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Sample records for airway exchange catheter

  1. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  2. Obstructed catheter connection pin discovered during intrathecal baclofen pump exchange.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan S; Christo, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of catheter obstruction due to complete narrowing of the lumen of a connecting pin, and catheter disconnection in a patient undergoing intrathecal Baclofen pump exchange. The patient underwent intrathecal baclofen pump implantation for treatment of lower extremity spasticity and hypertonia secondary to congenital tetraplegia. Intrathecal baclofen dose escalation occurred over the course of treatment (73 mo) from 80 to 708 mcg/d representing a 189% increase in dose. The pump had neared the manufacturer's recommended exchange interval; therefore, a pump exchange was scheduled to surgically replace the device. One week before surgery, the patient noted a distinct increase in his symptomatology and began enteral baclofen therapy. During the surgery, the pump catheter was noted to be disconnected from the pump. Upon further examination, the lumen of the connection pin positioned between the pump catheter and intrathecal catheter was completely obstructed. Postsurgically, the patient's intrathecal baclofen dose was substantially reduced from 708 to 527 mcg/d (25.6% reduction) to control hypotonicity and to reestablish an Ashworth score of 2. We discuss intrathecal baclofen therapy and a unique complication associated with a catheter connecting pin.

  3. Staphylococcus-Infected Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Is Over-the-Wire Exchange an Appropriate Management Option?

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, Jessica M.; Cohen, Raphael M.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Chittams, Jesse; Cooper, Emily T.; Trerotola, Scott O.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Over-the-wire exchange of tunneled dialysis catheters is the standard of care per K/DOQI guidelines for treating catheter-related bacteremia. However, Gram-positive bacteremia, specifically with staphylococcus species, may compromise over-the-wire exchange due to certain biological properties. This study addressed the effectiveness of over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters compared with non-staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters. Methods: Patients who received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to documented or suspected bacteremia were identified from a QA database. Study patients (n = 61) had positive cultures for Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or coagulase-negative staphylococcus not otherwise specified. Control patients (n = 35) received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to infection with any organism besides staphylococcus. Overall catheter survival and catheter survival among staphylococcal species were assessed. Results: There was no difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between study and control groups (P = 0.46). Median survival time was 96 days for study catheters and 51 days for controls; survival curves were closely superimposed. There also was no difference among the three staphylococcal groups in terms of catheter survival (P = 0.31). The median time until catheter removal was 143 days for SE, 67 days for CNS, and 88 days for SA-infected catheters. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters and those infected with other organisms.

  4. Do Not Burn Your Airway Bridge: A Technique to Safely Exchange a Tracheostomy Tube for a Tracheal Tube.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Miguel Alejandro; Truong, Dam-Thuy; Truong, Angela; Cata, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Tracheostomy is one of the most ancient and commonly performed surgical procedures. When tracheostomized patients require a subsequent intervention, it is usually necessary to exchange the tracheostomy tube for a tracheal tube, which can be dangerous. These potential complications may be overlooked or underestimated by the anesthesia providers. An inability to ventilate the patient and replace the tube after removal of a fresh tracheostomy tube can escalate rapidly to a life-threatening crisis. We present a case in which an airway exchange catheter was used to safely replace a tracheostomy tube with a tracheal tube in a patient with a fresh tracheostomy.

  5. Efficiency of airway heat and moisture exchangers in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Sessler, D I

    1990-10-01

    The efficiencies of airway heat and moisture exchanging filters in reducing respiratory water losses and increasing airway temperatures during general anesthesia were studied in five tracheally intubated patients given isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and oxygen anesthesia during controlled ventilation. Filters (Humid-Vent Filter, Humid-Vent 1, Pall Conserve, Siemens 150, and ThermoVent 600) were placed between the Y-piece of the anesthesia circle system and the endotracheal tube for 40 min each. Airway temperature, esophageal temperature, and water loss (determined by weighing expired water collected in CaSO4) were measured every 10 min. All of the filters reached near-maximum efficiency in reducing water losses within 10 min. The Humid-Vent Filter and Siemens 150 filters were most efficient, the Pall Conserve and ThermoVent 600 less efficient. Airway temperature rapidly increased 2 degrees-8 degrees C during each trial. The more efficient the filter in conserving water, the greater the airway temperature. The respiratory heat conserved by these filters represents 5.5%-7.2% of the estimated total metabolic heat production during anesthesia in adults.

  6. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected.

  7. Tunneled central venous catheter exchange: techniques to improve prevention of air embolism.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Umberto G; Torcia, Pierluca; Rigamonti, Paolo; Colombo, Francesca; Giordano, Antonino; Gallieni, Maurizio; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Malfunctioning tunneled hemodialysis central venous catheters (CVCs), because of thrombotic or infectious complications, are frequently exchanged. During the CVC exchanging procedure, there are several possible technical complications, as in first insertion, including air embolism. Prevention remains the key to the management of air embolism. Herein, we emphasize the technical tricks capable of reducing the risk of air embolism in long-term CVC exchange. In particular, adoption of a 5 to 10 degrees Trendelenburg position, direct puncture of the previous CVC venous lumen for guide-wire insertion, as opposed to guide-wire introduction after cutting the CVC, a light manual compression of the internal jugular vein venotomy site after catheter removal. The Valsalva maneuvre in collaborating patients, valved introducers, and correction of hypovolemia are also useful precautions. Principles of air embolism diagnosis and treatment are also outlined in the article.

  8. Probe exchange catheter used for angioplasty of total coronary artery occlusions.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Suwarganda, J S; van der Wieken, L R

    1990-04-01

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for total occlusions frequently fails, because the guidewire fails to pass the occlusion. With the use of the Probe exchange catheter (PEC), however, stiffness of the guidewire is increased and a higher pushability is obtained in order to manipulate the guidewire beyond the lesion. Once the guidewire has passed, the PEC is advanced and a non-over-the-wire dilatation catheter can be introduced through the PEC. This paper describes the technique in a representative case. The results of this technique in 19 consecutive patients with class III-IV/IV(NYHA) angina due to an occluded coronary artery are presented. In 16 patients the PEC reached the lesion (84%) and in all these patients the guidewire could pass the occlusion. A successful PTCA was performed in 14 patients (74%).

  9. Exchange of peripherally inserted central catheters is associated with an increased risk for bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Michael; Bedwell, Susan; Noori, Shahab

    2011-06-01

    It is not uncommon that the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) needs to be replaced either due to blockage or migration to a peripheral position. In such circumstances, there are two methods of PICC placement: new-site insertion and exchange by using the old PICC as a guide wire. Our objective was to investigate risk of infection associated with the exchange method. In this retrospective study, data on all PICC insertions in the neonatal intensive care unit in 2004 to 2008 were obtained. In the population who needed removal of existing PICC and insertion of a new one, we compared central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) within 1 week of insertion between the two insertion methods. Of 1148 PICC insertions reviewed, 164 (103 new-site and 61 exchange insertions) were performed after removal of a blocked/malpositioned PICC and therefore comprised the study population. The rate of CLABSI was higher in the exchange method (9.8% versus 1%, P < 0.007). After adjusting for the confounders, the odds for CLABSI within 7 days of PICC insertion was higher with the exchange method (odds ratio 25.2, 95% confidence interval: 2.17 to 292.98; P = 0.01). In infants, insertion of PICCs using the exchange method carries an increased risk of bloodstream infection.

  10. Evaluation of local gas exchange in a pulsating respiratory support catheter.

    PubMed

    Eash, Heide J; Frankowski, Brian J; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2005-01-01

    An intravenous respiratory support catheter, the next generation of artificial lungs, is being developed in our laboratory to potentially support acute respiratory failure or patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute exacerbations. A rapidly pulsating 25 ml balloon inside a bundle of hollow fiber membranes facilitates supplemental oxygenation and CO2 removal. In this study, we hypothesized that non-uniform gas exchange in different regions of this fiber bundle was present because of asymmetric balloon collapse and the interaction of longitudinal flow. Four quarter regions and two rings around the central balloon were selectively perfused to evaluate local gas exchange in a 3.18 cm test section using helium as the sweep gas. Quarter region CO2 exchange rates at 400 beats per minute were 156.8 +/- 0.8, 162.5 +/- 1.8, 157.2 +/- 0.2, and 196.6 +/- 0.8 ml/min/m2 (top, front, bottom, and back, respectively). The back section, adjacent to convex balloon collapse, had 17-20% higher exchange than the other sections caused by higher relative velocities past its stationary fibers. Inner and outer ring maximum pulsation gas exchange rates were 174.4 +/- 1.8 and 174.6 +/- 0.9 ml/min/m2, respectively, showing that fluid flow was equally distributed throughout the fiber bundle.

  11. Effect of impeller design and spacing on gas exchange in a percutaneous respiratory assist catheter.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, R Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J; Burgreen, Greg W; Federspiel, William J

    2014-12-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2 ) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2-5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m(2) (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5-10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2-13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange.

  12. Use of an Intravascular Heat Exchange Catheter and Intravenous Lipid Emulsion for Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest After Cyclobenzaprine Overdose.

    PubMed

    Westrol, Michael S; Awad, Nadia I; Bridgeman, Patrick J; Page, Erika; McCoy, Jonathan V; Jeges, Janos

    2015-09-01

    In this case report, a 22-year-old male developed severe hypothermia after an accidental overdose of cyclobenzaprine. During transport, the patient developed cardiac arrest. He received active rewarming measures, including pleural lavage, gastric lavage, an intravascular heat exchange catheter, and cardiopulmonary bypass. Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) was also administered. A discussion of cyclobenzaprine toxicity, hypothermia, ILE, and accidental hypothermic cardiac arrest follows.

  13. Does Guidewire Exchange Influence Infection Rate Related to Catheters Used for Vascular Access in Children on Chronic Hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina R; Battelino, Nina; Ponikvar, Rafael; Premru, Vladimir; Novljan, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) can either be inserted "de novo" or placed by guidewire exchange (GWE). From September 1998 to September 2015, 32 children (19 boys, 13 girls) were hemodialyzed in our unit by using a CVC. The mean age at CVC insertion was 12.6 ± 0.5 years. A total of 121 uncuffed catheters were placed, either "de novo" or by GWE in 64 (52.9%) and 57 (47.1%) cases, respectively. The most frequent cause for line revision was catheter dysfunction in 40/121 (33.1%) patients. The overall incidence of bacteremia was 1.5/1000 catheter-days. The incidence in newly inserted and GWE catheters was 1.4 and 1.7/1000 catheter-days, respectively. The difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.939). The infection rate correlated with patient age, and was higher in younger children (P = 0.006). GWE is an effective option of line revision, and did not influence the infection rate in our study.

  14. Total body and exchangeable potassium in chronic airways obstruction: a controversial area?

    PubMed Central

    Boddy, K; Davies, D L; Howie, A D; Madkour, M M; Mahaffy, M E; Pack, A I

    1978-01-01

    Potassium deficiency is an important complication in the treatment of heart disease. However, there is a serious dichotomy in the literature. Severe potassium depletion has been reported in this condition when exchangeable potassium was measured whereas normal levels or marginal depletion were found in measurements of total body potassium. To clarify this situation, simultaneous measurements of total body potassium by whole-body counting, and of exchangeable potassium by isotope dilution using 43K, were made in 10 male subjects with established airways obstruction. Sequential determinations showed that exchangeable potassium increased up to 68 hours after administration, and values obtained at only 24 hours would have been a substantial underestimate. In this group of subjects neither total body nor exchangeable potassium at 48 hours was significantly different from the expected normal value. PMID:417419

  15. Role of anion exchangers in Cl- and HCO3- secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dusik; Kim, Juyeon; Burghardt, Beáta; Best, Len; Steward, Martin C

    2014-07-15

    Despite the importance of airway surface liquid pH in the lung's defenses against infection, the mechanism of airway HCO3- secretion remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the contribution of apical and basolateral Cl-/HCO3- exchangers to Cl- and HCO3- transport in the Calu-3 cell line, derived from human airway submucosal glands. Changes in intracellular pH (pHi) were measured following substitution of Cl- with gluconate. Apical Cl- substitution led to an alkalinization in forskolin-stimulated cells, indicative of Cl-/HCO3- exchange. This was unaffected by the anion exchange inhibitor DIDS but inhibited by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172, suggesting that the HCO3- influx might occur via CFTR, rather than a solute carrier family 26 (SLC26) exchanger, as recently proposed. The anion selectivity of the recovery process more closely resembled that of CFTR than an SLC26 exchanger, and quantitative RT-PCR showed only low levels of SLC26 exchanger transcripts relative to CFTR and anion exchanger 2 (AE2). For pHi to rise to observed values (∼7.8) through HCO3- entry via CFTR, the apical membrane potential must reverse to at least +20 mV following Cl- substitution; this was confirmed by perforated-patch recordings. Substitution of basolateral Cl- evoked a DIDS-sensitive alkalinization, attributed to Cl-/HCO3- exchange via AE2. This appeared to be abolished in forskolin-stimulated cells but was unmasked by blocking apical efflux of HCO3- via CFTR. We conclude that Calu-3 cells secrete HCO3- predominantly via CFTR, and, contrary to previous reports, the basolateral anion exchanger AE2 remains active during stimulation, providing an important pathway for basolateral Cl- uptake.

  16. A new approach using high volume blood patch for prevention of post-dural puncture headache following intrathecal catheter pump exchange

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Susanne; Vielhaber, Stefan; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Abdulla, Walied

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an observational study, complications of intrathecal catheter pumps necessitating surgical exchange were analyzed. Also the use of a high-volume prophylactic epidural blood patch (EBP) during surgery for preventing post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) with a follow-up for 1 year is described. Materials and Methods: In 22 patients with refractory chronic pain of cancer/noncancer origin or severe spasticity, who were receiving intrathecal morphine including adjuvants or baclofen for symptom relief, catheter exchange with or without pump was performed. In patients with documented symptoms of PDPH following initial intrathecal catheter implantation, a prophylactic EBP with a high blood volume was used for PDPH prevention during surgery. Catheters were replaced using 40 mL EBP before entering dural space at a speed of 5mL/min into the epidural space. Patients were asked to quantify pain experience and functional ability. Results: From a sample of 72 patients admitted for catheter exchange with or without pump, 22 patients (33%) (12 male, 10 female) had a history of PDPH following initial implantation. Diagnostic and therapeutic measures occurring with malfunction of intrathecal catheter pump systems were described. Twenty-one patients were successfully treated with prophylactic EBP, while one patient could not be properly evaluated because of intracranial bleeding as the underlying disease. Conclusions: A new approach using a high-volume prophylactic EBP for preventing PDPH following catheter exchange is presented. The efficacy and safety of this technique for 1 year follow-up have been evaluated and was found to be safe and potentially effective. PMID:26157652

  17. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  18. AGONIST-MEDIATED AIRWAY CHALLENGE: CARDIOPULMONARY INTERACTIONS MODULATE GAS EXCHANGE AND RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    To better understand the early phase response (0-60 minutes) to airway challenge, we examined cardiopulmonary reactions during ovalbumin (OVA), histamine, and methacholine aerosol challenge tests in guinea pigs. Propranolol and 100% O2 were used to modify the reacti...

  19. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    measurement was made a heat and moisture exchanger was added to the experimental group. Three more measurements were recorded at 10, 30 and 60 minutes after...system was insufficient, but the addition of a heat and moisture exchanger provided adequate humidification of the inspired gases. In the experimental ...of these patients had a heat and moisture exchanger incorporated in the ventilator Heat and Moisture Exchangers 16 circuit (the experimental group

  20. Catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie A

    2009-06-01

    Tunneled, cuffed, double-lumen catheters are commonly used for long-term venous access in hemodialysis patients. Complications of these catheters, including catheter-related infection, are a major cause of morbidity and resource utilization in the hemodialysis population. Treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections includes the use of antibiotics and evaluation of the need for catheter removal or exchange. Measures to prevent catheter-related infections include use of an aseptic technique and antiseptic cleaning solution, elimination of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, topical exit site application of antibiotics, use of antibiotic lock solutions, and use of catheters and cuffs coated or impregnated with antimicrobial or antiseptic agents. This review article will provide an update on the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of catheter-related infections in the hemodialysis population.

  1. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    was added to the experimental group. Three more measurements were recorded at 10, 30 and 60 minutes after the insertion of the heat and moisture...heat and moisture exchanger provided adequate humidification of the inspired gases. In the experimental group, there was no difference in...exchanger incorporated in the ventilator Heat and Moisture Exchangers 16 circuit (the experimental group) and 10 did not (the control group

  2. OXIDATIVE STRESS ACTIVATES ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 2 AND AP-1 IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anion exchange protein 2 (AE2) is a membrane-bound protein that mediates chloride-bicarbonate exchange. In addition to regulating intracellular pH and cell volume, AE2 exports superoxide (O.) to the extracellular matrix in an HCO-dependent process. Given this ability to export O....

  3. Modification of a Braided Support Catheter into a Rapid Exchange System for Navigation of a Distal Protection Device through Significant Vascular Tortuosity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Durst, Christopher R.; Evans, Avery J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cerebral embolic protection devices (EPD) reduce the rate of periprocedural thromboembolic complications and are currently used in all carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedures. However, tortuous vascular anatomy of the internal carotid artery (ICA) may prevent navigation of distal EPDs, thereby leading to inadequate cerebral protection. We present a case in which significant tortuosity of the ICA distal to the stenotic lesion precluded navigation of currently available distal EPDs. During a CAS procedure, significant vascular tortuosity of the distal cervical ICA was noted which prevented navigation of currently available distal EPDs due to catheter kinking. In order to overcome this anatomic barrier, a novel rapid exchange catheter system (RECS) was created using a modified DAC 038 braided catheter through which a distal EPD and microguidewire were placed. This newly devised RECS allowed navigation of the distal EPD past the tortuous ICA bend and successful completion of the CAS procedure without periprocedural complications. We demonstrate that modification of currently available devices can, in select cases, effectively address cases of significant vascular tortuosity which limit the use of conventional distal EPDs. PMID:25496675

  4. Prevention and management of hemodialysis catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Venkat; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2012-12-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are associated with blood stream infections, and catheter use continues to be high among incident and prevalent patients on maintenance HD. Migration of micro-organism along the external surface of the catheter is probably the most common route of infection, followed by the endoluminal route of contamination. Almost all HD catheters have biofilm formation on their surfaces and this serves as a good reservoir for micro-organisms. These active but protected microorganisms have been implicated in local and systemic infections associated with HD catheters. Good personal hygiene, exit-site care with topical antibiotics and antibiotic lock solution in the dialysis catheter reduce the incidence of catheter infection. In selected subgroup of patients, HD catheter is promptly removed after the diagnosis of blood stream infection. However, catheter guidewire exchange is an acceptable alternate strategy in some patients. The most important goal should be to increase the rate of incident arteriovenous fistula use in the HD population.

  5. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  6. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  7. Catheter Embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotum that may be a cause of infertility. Catheter embolization may be used alone or combined ... in patients with diabetes or other pre-existing kidney disease. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  8. Urinary catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  9. Basolateral chloride loading by the anion exchanger type 2: role in fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junwei; Shan, Jiajie; Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Evagelidis, Alexandra; Alper, Seth L; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion exchanger type 2 (AE2 or SLC4A2) is an electroneutral Cl−/HCO3− exchanger expressed at the basolateral membrane of many epithelia. It is thought to participate in fluid secretion by airway epithelia. However, the role of AE2 in fluid secretion remains uncertain, due to the lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors, and because it is electrically silent and therefore does not contribute directly to short-circuit current (Isc). We have studied the role of AE2 in Cl− and fluid secretion by the airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. After confirming expression of its mRNA and protein, a knock-down cell line called AE2-KD was generated by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference in which AE2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced ≥90%. Suppressing AE2 increased the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by ∼70% without affecting the levels of NKCC1 (Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter) or NBCe1 (Na+–nHCO3− cotransporter). cAMP agonists stimulated fluid secretion by parental Calu-3 and scrambled shRNA cells >6.5-fold. In AE2-KD cells this response was reduced by ∼70%, and the secreted fluid exhibited elevated pH and [HCO3−] as compared with the control lines. Unstimulated equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) was elevated in AE2-KD cells, but the incremental response to forskolin was unaffected. The modest bumetanide-induced reductions in both Ieq and fluid secretion were more pronounced in AE2-KD cells. Basolateral Cl−/HCO3− exchange measured by basolateral pH-stat in cells with permeabilized apical membranes was abolished in AE2-KD monolayers, and the intracellular alkalinization resulting from basolateral Cl− removal was reduced by ∼80% in AE2-KD cells. These results identify AE2 as a major pathway for basolateral Cl− loading during cAMP-stimulated secretion of Cl− and fluid by Calu-3 cells, and help explain the large bumetanide-insensitive component of fluid secretion reported previously in airway

  10. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  11. Comparison of the GlideScope and the McGrath method using vascular forceps and a tube exchanger in cases of simulated difficult airway intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Hang; Jeon, Woo Jae; Choe, Gyu Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background A "difficult airway" can be simulated with an extrication collar, which restricts cervical motion and mouth opening. The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of the GlideScope and the McGrath in difficult airway simulation. Methods Patients were randomized using computer-generated numbers and were placed into the GlideScope group or the McGrath group. The total intubation time was defined as the time measured from when the anesthesiologist picks up the device to the time at which three successive end-tidal CO2 values are acquired after intubation. Results There was no significant difference in total intubation time between the two groups (73.0 ± 25.3 sec vs. 72.3 ± 20.9 sec, P = 0.92). The success rates of the first intubation attempt did not differ between the two groups (82.8% vs. 83.3%, P = 0.95). Conclusions Our results suggest that there are no significant differences in the intubations with GlideScope and McGrath using vascular forceps and tube exchangers in difficult intubation scenarios. PMID:27066203

  12. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2% and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6% and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6% and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation.

  13. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  14. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  15. Management of catheter-related infection.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Jean-Luc; Eggimann, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    Nosocomial infections related to the development of catheter-related infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among critically ill hospitalized patients. Despite important preventive efforts, these infections remain a daily concern for most clinicians. Significant improvements in the knowledge of their pathophysiology and diagnosis allow us to treat them more efficiently. Current practices, such as guidewire exchange of catheters suspected to be the source of clinical sepsis, are supported by indirect evidence only. Infected catheters should systematically be removed, but some of them may be salved by combining systemic and antibiotic-lock treatment. After reviewing some specific therapeutic aspects, we suggest a practical approach to manage catheter-related infections.

  16. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  17. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  18. Tracheal gas insufflation: catheter effectiveness determined by expiratory flush volume.

    PubMed

    Ravenscraft, S A; Shapiro, R S; Nahum, A; Burke, W C; Adams, A B; Nakos, G; Marini, J J

    1996-06-01

    Used adjunctively during mechanical ventilation, tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) improves CO2 elimination, principally by decreasing effective anatomic dead space. Continuing lung deflation at end- expiration raises the end-expiratory C02 concentration within the proximal airway, and could theoretically reduce the efficiency of a given catheter flow. To test this possibility, we designed a series of experiments that examined the influence of TGI delivery patterns on the efficiency of CO2 elimination. Using a gating device, catheter flow was delivered selectively during desired portions of expiration. Paralyzed, ventilated dogs were studied at short and extended inspiratory time fractions (TI/TT) with inspiratory tidal volume and ventilator frequency held constant. The expiratory flush volume, not the pattern of gas delivery, determined the observed decline in PaCO2, provided that the end-expiratory period was included in the catheter flush period. Despite continuing end-expiratory lung deflation (extended TI/TT), catheter effectiveness remained the same at matched expiratory flush volumes. To determine if enhanced distal mixing at the higher catheter flows required during the extended TI/TT (to match expiratory flush volume) masked a decrease in efficiency, we repeated the experiment with a tip-inverted catheter. We again found that matched catheter delivered expiratory volumes were similarly effective. With or without ongoing lung deflation, the volume of gas flushed during the expiratory period determined the effectiveness of TGI, provided that inspired minute ventilation remains unchanged and end-expiration is included in the catheter flush period.

  19. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  4. Effects of thoracic squeezing on airway secretion removal in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Yousefnia-Darzi, Farkhondeh; Hasavari, Farideh; Khaleghdoost, Tahereh; Kazemnezhad-Leyli, Ehsan; Khalili, Malahat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of secretions in the airways of patients with an endotracheal tube and mechanical ventilation will have serious consequences. One of the most common methods of airway clearance is endotracheal suctioning. In order to facilitate discharge of airway secretion resulting in promotion of gas exchange, chest physiotherapy techniques can be used at the time of expiration before suction. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial with a cross-over design, 50 mechanically ventilated patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) were randomly divided into two groups of thoracic squeezing. In each patient, two interventions of endotracheal suctioning were conducted, one with and the other without thoracic squeezing during exhalation, with a 3 h gap between the two interventions and an elapse of three respiratory cycles between the number of compressions. Sputum secreted was collected in a container connected to a suction catheter and weighed. Data were recorded in data gathering forms and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (Wilcoxon and independent t-test, Chi-square) in SPSS version 16. Results: Findings showed that the mean weight of the suction secretions removed from airway without thoracic squeezing was 1.35 g and that of suction secretions removed by thoracic squeezing was 1.94 g. Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference regarding the rate of secretion between the two techniques (P = 0.003). Conclusions: According to the study findings, endotracheal suction with thoracic squeezing on expiration helps airway secretion discharge more than suction alone in patients on mechanical ventilators and can be used as an effective method. PMID:27186214

  5. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. April 2011. ... MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ...

  6. [The bladder catheter].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, D M

    1996-09-01

    The benefit of the transurethral catheter to protect or measure renal function is well accepted. Urethral stricture and infection of the lower urinary tract as the complications should lead to a cautious use of catheters. A careful placement, the choice of the best material and a correct management help to avoid complications. Alternatives are discussed.

  7. A newly developed tool for intra-tracheal temperature and humidity assessment in laryngectomized individuals: the Airway Climate Explorer (ACE).

    PubMed

    Zuur, J K; Muller, S H; de Jongh, F H C; van der Horst, M J; Shehata, M; van Leeuwen, J; Sinaasappel, M; Hilgers, F J M

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a postlaryngectomy airway climate explorer (ACE) for assessment of intratracheal temperature and humidity and of influence of heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs). Engineering goals were within-device condensation prevention and fast response time characteristics. The ACE consists of a small diameter, heated air-sampling catheter connected to a heated sensor house, containing a humidity sensor. Air is sucked through the catheter by a controlled-flow pump. Validation was performed in a climate chamber using a calibrated reference sensor and in a two-flow system. Additionally, the analyser was tested in vivo. Over the clinically relevant range of humidity values (5-42 mg H2O/l air) the sensor output highly correlates with the reference sensor readings (R2 > 0.99). The 1-1/e response times are all <0.5 s. A first in vivo pilot measurement was successful. The newly developed, verified, fast-responding ACE is suitable for postlaryngectomy airway climate assessment.

  8. A newly developed tool for intra-tracheal temperature and humidity assessment in laryngectomized individuals: the Airway Climate Explorer (ACE)

    PubMed Central

    Zuur, J. K.; Muller, S. H.; de Jongh, F. H. C.; van der Horst, M. J.; Shehata, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Sinaasappel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a postlaryngectomy airway climate explorer (ACE) for assessment of intratracheal temperature and humidity and of influence of heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs). Engineering goals were within-device condensation prevention and fast response time characteristics. The ACE consists of a small diameter, heated air-sampling catheter connected to a heated sensor house, containing a humidity sensor. Air is sucked through the catheter by a controlled-flow pump. Validation was performed in a climate chamber using a calibrated reference sensor and in a two-flow system. Additionally, the analyser was tested in vivo. Over the clinically relevant range of humidity values (5–42 mg H2O/l air) the sensor output highly correlates with the reference sensor readings (R2 > 0.99). The 1–1/e response times are all <0.5 s. A first in vivo pilot measurement was successful. The newly developed, verified, fast-responding ACE is suitable for postlaryngectomy airway climate assessment. PMID:17629761

  9. The Phillips airway.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P; Wilkinson, D J

    2012-07-01

    The Phillips airway was developed by George Ramsay Phillips. There is no known original description of the airway and the earliest known reference to it is from 1919. The airway and its modifications are described.

  10. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  11. Endoluminal dilatation for embedded hemodialysis catheters: A case-control study of factors associated with embedding and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Hari; Ryan, Stephen Edward; Graham, Janet; Sood, Manish M.; Hadziomerovic, Adnan; Clark, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background With the increasing frequency of tunneled hemodialysis catheter use there is a parallel increase in the need for removal and/or exchange. A small but significant minority of catheters become embedded or ‘stuck’ and cannot be removed by traditional means. Management of embedded catheters involves cutting the catheter, burying the retained fragment with a subsequent increased risk of infections and thrombosis. Endoluminal dilatation may provide a potential safe and effective technique for removing embedded catheters, however, to date, there is a paucity of data. Objectives 1) To determine factors associated with catheters becoming embedded and 2) to determine outcomes associated with endoluminal dilatation Methods All patients with endoluminal dilatation for embedded catheters at our institution since Jan. 2010 were included. Patients who had an embedded catheter were matched 1:3 with patients with uncomplicated catheter removal. Baseline patient and catheter characteristics were compared. Outcomes included procedural success and procedure-related infection. Logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with embedded catheters. Results We matched 15 cases of embedded tunneled catheters with 45 controls. Among patients with embedded catheters, there were no complications with endoluminal dilatation. Factors independently associated with embedded catheters included catheter dwell time (> 2 years) and history of central venous stenosis. Conclusion Embedded catheters can be successfully managed by endoluminal dilatation with minimal complications and factors associated with embedding include dwell times > 2 years and/or with a history of central venous stenosis. PMID:28346468

  12. [Management of intravascular catheters for prevention of perioperative cross infections].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Ohara, Eiko; Nakamura, Akishige; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Manabe, Tadao

    2004-11-01

    Bloodstream infection derived from an intravascular catheter occupies an important position among the various types of nosocomial infection. It is therefore necessary to establish a system for preventing catheter infection not only as measures for each separate infection, but also for the entire hospital. Catheter infections are mainly caused by contamination of the connecting part of a transfusion line during the infusion of drug solution as well as by contamination of the part of the catheter inserted. Consequently, the greatest possible care should be taken in the preparation of aseptic transfusion and the prevention of contamination when connecting a transfusion line. In particular, there are problems with three-way stopcocks, management of hubs, frequency of transfusion line exchange, fat emulsion injection method, and blood preparation. It is most important to consider effective nutritional management methods that do not require the insertion of a central venous catheter.

  13. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  14. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  15. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin care part of your daily routine. Avoid physical activity for a week or two after your catheter is placed in your bladder. Cleaning Your Skin You will need these supplies for cleaning your ...

  16. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  17. Peritoneal catheters and related infections.

    PubMed

    Thodis, Elias; Passadakis, Ploumis; Lyrantzopooulos, Nikolaos; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Catheter related infectious complications (exit-site infections, tunnel infections, and peritonitis) remain the major reasons for technique failure during the three decades since, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment has been first established. Despite improvements in catheter's survival rates, catheter related complications result in an increase in the cumulative patients' morbidity and often leading to the catheter removal. The ideal catheter provides reliable and rapid dialysate flow rates without leaks or infections. Among several types, the double-cuff straight Tenckhoff catheter, developed in 1968, is still the most widely used, although its use is decreasing in favour of swanneck catheters. Although there are only few well-designed trials comparing catheters and catheters related infectious complications, controlling for all other important variables, no difference in these complications among the main types of catheters was seen. The single cuff catheters have been associated with a shorter survival rate and time to the first peritonitis episode than the double-cuff catheters. Also exit-site infections were found to be more frequent and significantly more resistant to treatment with single-cuff compared to double-cuff ones. Finally, better results have been reported with the latest developed presternal peritoneal dialysis catheter both regarding survival rates and exit-site infection and peritonitis rates. Recently a renewed interest in continuous flow peritoneal dialysis stimulated inventions of imaginative, double-lumen catheters since a suitable peritoneal access is a sine qua non condition for the development of this new technique of peritoneal dialysis.

  18. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms.

  19. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  20. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... support for only a very short period of time. Alternative Names Needle cricothyrotomy Images Emergency airway puncture Cricoid cartilage Emergency airway puncture - series References Hebert RB, Bose S, Mace SE. Cricothyrotomy and ...

  1. Upper airway biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper airway Images Upper airway test Bronchoscopy Throat anatomy References Yung RC, Boss EF. Tracheobronchial endoscopy. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  2. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  3. Catheter-associated UTI

    MedlinePlus

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  4. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... area around your catheter every day with mild soap and water. Gently pat it dry. Showers are fine. Ask your providers about bathtubs, swimming pools, and hot tubs. DO NOT use creams, powders, or sprays near the site. Apply bandages around ...

  5. Jet ventilation for surgical interventions in the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Biro, Peter

    2010-09-01

    The clinical applications of jet ventilation (JV) in ear, nose, and throat surgery can be best understood by the characteristics that distinguish this form of ventilation from conventional positive pressure ventilation. By definition, JV is based on the application of gas portions under high pressure through an unblocked catheter into the airway, which is open to the ambient air. Beneficial opportunities arise in JV, which otherwise are not available in regular ventilation.

  6. [Rotational stability of angiography catheters].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Weber, M

    1992-10-01

    Rotatory stability is a parameter that reflects the ability of a catheter to transmit a rotation applied at the outer end to the catheter tip for the purpose of selective probing. A method for measuring the rotatory stability is described, and the results of rotatory stability measurements of 70 different commercially available catheters are reported. There is an almost linear correlation between the rotatory stability and the difference between the respective fourth power of the external and internal diameter or, approximately, to the fourth power of the external diameter for catheters without wire reinforcement. With the same cross-sectional dimensions, the rotatory stability of teflon, polyethylene, and nylon catheters has an approximate ratio of 1:2:4. Wire reinforcement increases rotatory stability by an average factor of about 3. For catheters of calibers 5 F and 6 F, a correlation between the rotatory stability and the weight of the reinforcing wire mesh is apparent.

  7. A Case of Pulmonary Interstitial Emphysema Treated by Percutaneous Catheter Insertion in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changsin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Eun, Ho Seon; Park, Min Soo; Park, Kook In; Namgung, Ran; Lee, Sungsoo; Yoon, Choon Sik

    2016-01-01

    The pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE) is a life-threatening illness in premature infants with mechanical ventilation. While most are managed conservatively, decompression would be necessary. Here, we report the first case of PIE treated by percutaneous catheter insertion in an extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infant in Korea. The patient, born with 660 g in 23+2 weeks of gestation, showed PIE in left lower lung on postnatal day 12. Percutaneous catheter insertion was performed on postnatal day 25. The size of PIE decreased, but didn't disappear completely. On postnatal day 42, we exchanged catheter and inserted additional catheter in pleural space. However, sudden desaturation and pneumothorax occurred on postnatal day 44. We changed catheter in pleural space, and pneumothorax and PIE improved. Finally, we successfully removed catheters, and weaned patient out. As in our case, percutaneous catheter insertion would be a useful option for ELBW infants with PIE. PMID:27593885

  8. Utility of Percutaneous Intervention in the Management of Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, John F.; Shilling, Alfred T.; Schenk, Worthington G.; Bissonette, Eric A.; Stadtlander, Kevin S.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; Leung, Daniel A.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2003-02-15

    A variety of interventional techniques have been developed to restore function to dysfunctional tunneled hemodialysis catheters (THC). The relative efficacies of these techniques were evaluated retrospectively to determine which therapy might be most beneficial. The records of malfunctioning THCs referred to interventional radiology between November 1995 and December 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Dysfunctional THCs were studied using DSA images obtained while injecting contrast through the lumens of the THCs. The interventions performed were categorized into 1 of 5 groups:no treatment or conservative measures such as vigorous flushing;advancing a guidewire through the THC to reposition the catheter tip or to dislodge a small thrombus; catheter exchange over a guidewire; fibrin stripping of the THC using a loop snare; or prolonged (4 or more hr) direct thrombolytic infusion. A Cox Proportional Hazards model was developed to compare the rate of failure among the procedures. There were 340 THC studies. The catheters were managed as follows: 93 patients received conservative management only, 15 had a guidewire advanced through the catheter, 147 underwent catheter exchange, 62 were treated with a fibrin stripping procedure, and 23 received athrombolytic infusion. Estimated 30-day patency rates for THCs were 38.2% for conservative management, 30.9% for guidewire manipulation of catheter tip, 53.6% for catheter exchange, 76.1% for fibrin stripping, and 69.8% for thrombolytic infusion. Differences among the treatments were observed (p < 0.01) and pairwise comparisons were made among the treatment groups. Failure rates were significantly higher in the catheter exchange(p <0.01) and guidewire manipulation at catheter tip (p <0.01) groups when compared with the fibrin stripping group. The catheter exchange and guidewire manipulation groups also experienced higher rates of failure when compared with the thrombolytic infusion group, although the differences were not

  9. Thick airway surface liquid volume and weak mucin expression in pendrin-deficient human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Yoo, Jee Eun; Namkung, Wan; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Kim, Kyubo; Kang, Joo Wan; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger whose mutations are known to cause hearing loss. However, recent data support the linkage between pendrin expression and airway diseases, such as asthma. To evaluate the role of pendrin in the regulation of the airway surface liquid (ASL) volume and mucin expression, we investigated the function and expression of pendrin and ion channels and anion exchangers. Human nasal epithelial cells were cultured from 16 deaf patients carrying pendrin mutations (DFNB4) and 17 controls. The cells were treated with IL-13 to induce mucus hypersecretion. Airway surface liquid thickness was measured and real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed targeting various transporters and MUC5AC. Anion exchanger activity was measured using a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Periodic acid-Schiff staining was performed on the cultured cells and inferior turbinate tissues. The ASL layer of the nasal epithelia from DFNB4 subjects was thicker than the controls, and the difference became more prominent following IL-13 stimulation. There was no difference in anion exchange activity after IL-13 treatment in the cells from DFNB4 patients, while it increased in the controls. Goblet cell metaplasia induced by IL-13 treatment seen in the controls was not observed in the DFNB4 cells. Furthermore, the periodic acid-Schiff staining-positive area was lesser in the inferior turbinate tissues from DFNB4 patients that those from controls. Pendrin plays a critical role in ASL volume regulation and mucin expression as pendrin-deficient airway epithelial cells are refractory to stimulation with IL-13. Specific blockers targeting pendrin in the airways may therefore have therapeutic potential in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26243215

  10. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes.

  11. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  12. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging in the evaluation of airway dynamics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Kelly, Vanessa J.; Applegate, Matthew B.; Chee, Chunmin; Tan, Khay M.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Winkler, Tilo; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease resulting in periodic attacks of coughing and wheezing due to temporarily constricted and clogged airways. The pathophysiology of asthma and the process of airway narrowing are not completely understood. Appropriate in vivo imaging modality with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to dynamically assess the behavior of airways is missing. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables real-time evaluation of the airways during dynamic and static breathing maneuvers. Our aim was to visualize the structure and function of airways in healthy and Methacholine (MCh) challenged lung. Sheep (n=3) were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and imaged with OCT in 4 dependent and 4 independent airways both pre- and post-MCh administration. The OCT system employed a 2.4 Fr (0.8 mm diameter) catheter and acquired circumferential cross-sectional images in excess of 100 frames per second during dynamic tidal breathing, 20 second static breath-holds at end-inspiration and expiration pressure, and in a response to a single deep inhalation. Markedly different airway behavior was found in dependent versus non-dependent airway segments before and after MCh injection. OCT is a non-ionizing light-based imaging modality, which may provide valuable insight into the complex dynamic behavior of airway structure and function in the normal and asthmatic lung.

  13. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  14. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection.

  15. [Temporary vascular access for extra-renal detoxification: utilization of tunneled silicone double-lumen catheters by the percutaneous route].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Chazot, C; Vanel, T

    1994-01-01

    Femoral or subclavian central venous catheters are commonly used for temporary vascular access in haemodialysis. We used 36 tunnelized siliconed double lumen catheter (Quinton Permcath or Hickman Bard), most of them in right internal jugular percutaneously. Indication for this catheter were acute or chronic renal failure, plasma exchange, rescue of arterio venous fistula or peritoneal dialysis. Insertion incidents were minors (local haematoma), mean functional time was 51 days. Catheters were changed in 5 cases of infection, 3 cases of obstruction and in 2 accidental remove. Insertion facility, low morbidity, potentially long time use, high blood flow rate with low recirculation argue for this expensive material.

  16. Transcriptional Regionalization of the Fruit Fly’s Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Muhammad N.; Hoffmann, Julia; El-Kholy, Samar; Kallsen, Kimberley; Wagner, Christina; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although airway epithelia are primarily devoted to gas exchange, they have to fulfil a number of different tasks including organ maintenance and the epithelial immune response to fight airborne pathogens. These different tasks are at least partially accomplished by specialized cell types in the epithelium. In addition, a proximal to distal gradient mirroring the transition from airflow conduction to real gas exchange, is also operative. We analysed the airway system of larval Drosophila melanogaster with respect to region-specific expression in the proximal to distal axis. The larval airway system is made of epithelial cells only. We found differential expression between major trunks of the airways and more distal ones comprising primary, secondary and terminal ones. A more detailed analysis was performed using DNA-microarray analysis to identify cohorts of genes that are either predominantly expressed in the dorsal trunks or in the primary/secondary/terminal branches of the airways. Among these differentially expressed genes are especially those involved in signal transduction. Wnt-signalling associated genes for example are predominantly found in secondary/terminal airways. In addition, some G-protein coupled receptors are differentially expressed between both regions of the airways, exemplified by those activated by octopamine or tyramine, the invertebrate counterparts of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Whereas the OAMB is predominantly found in terminal airway regions, the oct3βR has higher expression levels in dorsal trunks. In addition, we observed a significant association of both, genes predominantly expressed in dorsal trunks or in primary to terminal branches branches with those regulated by hypoxia. Taken together, this observed differential expression is indicative for a proximal to distal transcriptional regionalization presumably reflecting functional differences in these parts of the fly’s airway system. PMID:25020150

  17. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  18. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  19. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  20. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. Image-Guided Interventions . ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  1. Comparison of cuffed tunneled hemodialysis catheter survival.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, M A; Dwight, C A; Callen, L J; Bispham, B Z; Spiegel, D M

    2001-03-01

    Despite efforts to have hemodialysis patients begin renal replacement therapy with a mature arteriovenous shunt, many patients begin dialysis with a cuffed tunneled catheter as their access. An increasing number of differently designed tunneled hemodialysis catheters have become available in the last decade. The primary aim of this study is to compare catheter survival for Hickman (Bard, Salt Lake City, UT) and Opti-flow (Bard) catheters. The 16-month experience with 182 catheters, totaling 13,861 catheter-days, is reported. The probability of Hickman catheter failure at 30, 60, and 90 days was 29%, 49%, and 67%. The probability of Opti-flow catheter failure was significantly less at 10%, 24%, and 38% for the same times, respectively (P: < 0.05 for all time points). The difference in catheter failure rates was caused by a greater malfunction rate of Hickman catheters; the two catheters had similar infection rates. We conclude that survival of Opti-flow catheters was significantly better than that of Hickman catheters from 30 to 90 days, which is a clinically relevant period when patients are waiting for maturation of a permanent access or replacement of a failed access. Since the conclusion of our study, we documented 10 episodes of Opti-flow catheter malfunction within 4 months secondary to hairline fracture of the arterial hub. The Opti-flow catheter was recalled and is now available with retooled hubs.

  2. Complications of Transfemoral Removal of Percutaneous Transfemorally Implanted Port-Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yahiro, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Naoyuki Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2006-10-15

    Our purpose is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the withdrawal procedure of percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter systems. Thirty-seven patients (17.7%) underwent the withdrawal procedure of this port-catheter system among 209 patients. The reasons for withdrawal were as follows: termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy (n = 7), obstruction of hepatic artery (n = 5), port infection (n = 4), catheter infection (n = 4), catheter obstruction (n = 4), lower-limb palsy and pain (n = 2), exposure of the port due to skin defect (n = 2), patient's desire (n = 2), side effect of chemotherapy (n = 1), no effectiveness of chemotherapy (n = 1), hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1), duodenum perforation by the catheter (n = 1), intermittent claudication due to severe stenosis of right common iliac artery (n = 1), dissection of common hepatic artery (n = 1), and broken catheter (n = 1). In thirty-four of the 37 cases, the port-catheter system was successfully withdrawn without any complications. Clinical success rate was 91.9%. Complications occurred in three cases (8.1%), which were a pseudoaneurysm, thromboembolism of the right common iliac artery, and continuous bleeding from the subcutaneous pocket where the port system was placed for 1 month. In 15 cases, correction of the catheter tip or exchange for dislocation of the tip had to be done without withdrawal. It is not rare to withdraw port-catheter systems in cases of infection or hematoma around the system. Although withdrawal of a percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter system is a relatively safe procedure, the port-catheter system should not be removed unless absolutely indicated.

  3. Retrieval of the Protection Filter with a Soft Coaxial Catheter After Carotid Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas E.; Holtmannspoetter, Markus; Mueller-Schunk, Stefanie

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to shorten and simplify the procedure of filter retrieval after carotid stenting with cerebral protecting devices. We propose a retrieval method with a soft-tip guiding catheter, which eliminates the step of balloon exchange and introduction of a retriever catheter for the protection filter. The technique was successfully used in our last 60 consecutive patients. One transient deficit occurred. In conclusion, retrieval of the filter with a soft coaxial catheter after carotid stenting is a feasible and safe method and may simplify cerebrovascular protection during stenting.

  4. European and Asian guidelines on management and prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Tenke, Peter; Kovacs, Bela; Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Tambyah, Paul A; Naber, Kurt G

    2008-02-01

    catheter is draining properly (C). A minority of patients can be managed with the use of the non-return (flip) valve catheter, avoiding the closed drainage bag. Such patients may exchange the convenience of on-demand drainage with an increased risk of infection. Patients with urethral catheters in place for 10 years or more should be screened annually for bladder cancer (C). Clinicians should always consider alternatives to indwelling urethral catheters that are less prone to causing symptomatic infection. In appropriate patients, suprapubic catheters, condom drainage systems and intermittent catheterisation are each preferable to indwelling urethral catheterisation (B).

  5. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  6. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  7. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  8. Patterns of recruitment and injury in a heterogeneous airway network model

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Peter S.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2015-01-01

    In respiratory distress, lung airways become flooded with liquid and may collapse due to surface-tension forces acting on air–liquid interfaces, inhibiting gas exchange. This paper proposes a mathematical multiscale model for the mechanical ventilation of a network of occluded airways, where air is forced into the network at a fixed tidal volume, allowing investigation of optimal recruitment strategies. The temporal response is derived from mechanistic models of individual airway reopening, incorporating feedback on the airway pressure due to recruitment. The model accounts for stochastic variability in airway diameter and stiffness across and between generations. For weak heterogeneity, the network is completely ventilated via one or more avalanches of recruitment (with airways recruited in quick succession), each characterized by a transient decrease in the airway pressure; avalanches become more erratic for airways that are initially more flooded. However, the time taken for complete ventilation of the network increases significantly as the network becomes more heterogeneous, leading to increased stresses on airway walls. The model predicts that the most peripheral airways are most at risk of ventilation-induced damage. A positive-end-expiratory pressure reduces the total recruitment time but at the cost of larger stresses exerted on airway walls. PMID:26423440

  9. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  10. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  11. Safeguards May Be Reducing Serious Catheter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include using sterile gloves, covering catheters with antimicrobial dressings and checking catheters daily for signs of movement or infection. Many hospitals have also added extra training, equipment and supplies. For this study, Nuckols and her colleagues analyzed ...

  12. Upper airway radiographs in infants with upper airway insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, S L; Davis, S L; Gunn, T R

    1994-01-01

    Upper airway measurements in nine infants considered to be at risk of upper airway insufficiency, six of whom presented after an apnoeic episode, were compared with measurements taken in two age groups of healthy infants. Paired, inspiratory and expiratory, lateral upper airway radiographs were obtained while the infants were awake and breathing quietly. The radiographs of all nine infants demonstrated narrowing in the oropharyngeal portion of the airway during inspiration and in six infants there was ballooning of the upper airway during expiration. Seven of the nine infants subsequently experienced recurrent apnoeic episodes which required vigorous stimulation to restore breathing. Experience suggests that respiratory phase timed radiographs are a useful adjunct to the evaluation of infants who are suspected of having upper airway dysfunction. They provide information regarding both the dimensions and compliance of the upper airway as well as the site of any restriction. Images PMID:8048825

  13. Selection of empiric therapy in patients with catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2002-05-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRI) are frequent and manifest in a wide range of clinical situations. A rational approach is necessary for the adequate management of these infections. Whenever a CRI is suspected, two main questions have to be addressed: whether to remove the catheter and whether to initiate empiric antimicrobial treatment. As the clinical diagnosis of CRI has a low specificity, the catheter should be removed only in circumstances such as severe or ongoing sepsis, persistent bacteremia, pulmonary or peripheral embolization, endocarditis, signs of tunnel infection, when the catheters or when the CRI is caused by fungi, Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa are easy to replace among others. Exchanging the catheter through a guidewire is a frequent practice but is not recommended by some authors. Empiric antimicrobial treatment should be administered in any of the following situations: when the catheter is not removed, in the case of central venous or surgically implanted catheters and prosthetic implants, in the presence of severe sepsis, neutropenia or other immunodepressed status, suppurative phlebitis, embolization and acute endocarditis. Empriic antimicrobial treatment should include a glycopeptide (vancomycin or teicoplanin) as staphylococci are the most frequent cause of CRI. Adding an antipseudomonal agent, such as amikacin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, or a carbapenem (depending on the local antimicrobial susceptibility data or antibiotic policy) is necessary in cases of neutropenia, burn patients, severe sepsis, or suspicion of contaminated infusate. Empiric treatment against Candida is not initially necessary in most cases. Empiric treatment should be replaced by specific therapy whenever possible.

  14. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; MacRae, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections, exit-site infections, and tunnel infections are common complications related to hemodialysis central venous catheter use. The various definitions of catheter-related infections are reviewed, and various preventive strategies are discussed. Treatment options, for both empiric and definitive infections, including antibiotic locks and systemic antibiotics, are reviewed. PMID:28270921

  15. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  16. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter is...

  18. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-10-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG.

  19. Effectiveness of different central venous catheters for catheter-related infections: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Huang, T; Jing, J; Jin, J; Wang, P; Yang, M; Cui, W; Zheng, Y; Shen, H

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of various catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection and to evaluate whether specific catheters are superior to others for reducing catheter-related infections. We identified randomised, controlled trials that compared different types of central venous catheter (CVC), evaluating catheter-related infections in a systematic search of articles published from January 1996 to November 2009 via Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Network meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison method using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation was used to combine direct within-trial, between-treatment comparisons with indirect trial evidence. Forty-eight clinical trials (12 828 CVCs) investigating 10 intervention catheters contributed to the analyses. For prevention of CVC colonisation, adjusted silver iontophoretic catheters (odds ratio: 0.58; 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.95), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine catheters (0.49; 0.36-0.64), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine blue plus catheters (0.37; 0.17-0.69), minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.28; 0.17-0.43) and miconazole-rifampicin catheters (0.11; 0.02-0.33) were associated with a significantly lower rate of catheter colonisation compared with standard catheters. For prevention of CRBSI, adjusted heparin-bonded catheters (0.20; 0.06-0.44) and minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.18; 0.08-0.34) were associated with a significantly lower rate of CRBSI with standard catheters. Rifampicin-based impregnated catheters seem to be better for prevention of catheter-related infection compared with the other catheters.

  20. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  1. Catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Gahlot, Rupam; Nigam, Chaitanya; Kumar, Vikas; Yadav, Ghanshyam; Anupurba, Shampa

    2014-01-01

    Central-venous-catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Consequences depend on associated organisms, underlying pre-morbid conditions, timeliness, and appropriateness of the treatment/interventions received. We have summarized risk factors, pathogenesis, etiology, diagnosis, and management of CRBSI in this review. PMID:25024944

  2. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... flushing Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/17/2016 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  3. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  4. Use of the GuideLiner catheter for aspiration thrombectomy in a patient with ST-elevation myocardial infarction with a large intracoronary thrombus.

    PubMed

    Numasawa, Yohei; Motoda, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kuno, Toshiki; Kodaira, Masaki; Fujisawa, Taishi

    2016-04-01

    We report a 67-year-old man with ST-elevation myocardial infarction with a large intracoronary thrombus who was successfully treated with percutaneous thrombectomy using the GuideLiner catheter. This catheter is designed for the "Mother and Child" technique with a rapid exchange system and it has a larger internal diameter than conventional aspiration devices. When aspiration thrombectomy using a conventional aspiration catheter is not feasible or fails, use of the GuideLiner catheter for aspiration of thrombus is a reasonable alternative for primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  5. Repositioning a displaced tracheostomy tube with an Aintree intubation catheter mounted on a fibre-optic bronchoscope.

    PubMed

    Rajendram, R; McGuire, N

    2006-10-01

    Although tracheostomy tube displacement is uncommon, the management is often difficult and the associated mortality is high. It is important to ensure that the airway is secure and then either replace or reposition the tracheostomy tube. This case report describes the use of an Aintree intubation catheter (C-CAE-19.0-56-AIC, William Cook Europe, Denmark) mounted on an intubating fibre-optic bronchoscope (11302BD1, Karl Storz Endoskope, Germany) to reposition a partially displaced tracheostomy tube.

  6. Untangling of knotted urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Andrew J; Todd, Alistair

    2007-04-01

    Intravesical catheter knotting during micturating cystourethrography is a rare but recognized complication of the procedure. We were able to untangle a knot utilizing a fluoroscopically guided vascular guidewire. Following this success, a small study was performed using a model. Various types of guidewires and techniques were tested for different diameters of knots in order to predict the likelihood of success in this type of situation.

  7. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies.

  8. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  9. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  10. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, J W

    2001-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection acquired in both hospitals and nursing homes and is usually associated with catheterization. This infection would be even more common but for the use of the closed catheter system. Most modifications have not improved on the closed catheter itself. Even with meticulous care, this system will not prevent bacteriuria. After bacteriuria develops, the ability to limit its complications is minimal. Once a catheter is put in place, the clinician must keep two concepts in mind: keep the catheter system closed in order to postpone the onset of bacteriuria, and remove the catheter as soon as possible. If the catheter can be removed before bacteriuria develops, postponement becomes prevention.

  11. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  12. A mechanical design principle for tissue structure and function in the airway tree.

    PubMed

    LaPrad, Adam S; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    With every breath, the dynamically changing mechanical pressures must work in unison with the cells and soft tissue structures of the lung to permit air to efficiently traverse the airway tree and undergo gas exchange in the alveoli. The influence of mechanics on cell and tissue function is becoming apparent, raising the question: how does the airway tree co-exist within its mechanical environment to maintain normal cell function throughout its branching structure of diminishing dimensions? We introduce a new mechanical design principle for the conducting airway tree in which mechanotransduction at the level of cells is driven to orchestrate airway wall structural changes that can best maintain a preferred mechanical microenvironment. To support this principle, we report in vitro radius-transmural pressure relations for a range of airway radii obtained from healthy bovine lungs and model the data using a strain energy function together with a thick-walled cylinder description. From this framework, we estimate circumferential stresses and incremental Young's moduli throughout the airway tree. Our results indicate that the conducting airways consistently operate within a preferred mechanical homeostatic state, termed mechanical homeostasis, that is characterized by a narrow range of circumferential stresses and Young's moduli. This mechanical homeostatic state is maintained for all airways throughout the tree via airway wall dimensional and mechanical relationships. As a consequence, cells within the airway walls throughout the airway tree experience similar oscillatory strains during breathing that are much smaller than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of how the maintenance of mechanical homeostasis, while facilitating healthy tissue-level alterations necessary for maturation, may lead to airway wall structural changes capable of chronic asthma.

  13. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  14. Thrombolytic therapy for central venous catheter occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters have improved the quality of care for patients with chronic illnesses, but are complicated by obstructions which can result in delay of treatment or catheter removal. Design and Methods This paper reviews thrombolytic treatment for catheter obstruction. Literature from Medline searches using the terms “central venous catheter”, “central venous access device” OR “central venous line” associated with the terms “obstruction”, “occlusion” OR “thrombolytic” was reviewed. Efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, central venous catheter clearance rates and time to clearance were assessed. Results Alteplase, one of the current therapies, clears 52% of obstructed catheters within 30 min with 86% overall clearance (after 2 doses, when necessary). However, newer medications may have higher efficacy or shorter time to clearance. Reteplase cleared 67–74% within 30–40 min and 95% of catheters overall. Occlusions were resolved in 70 and 83% of patients with one and 2 doses of tenecteplase, respectively. Recombinant urokinase cleared 60% of catheters at 30 min and 73% overall. Alfimeprase demonstrated rapid catheter clearance with resolution in 40% of subjects within 5 min, 60% within 30 min, and 80% within 2 h. Additionally, urokinase prophylaxis decreased the incidence of catheter occlusions from 16–68% in the control group to 4–23% in the treatment group; in some studies, rates of catheter infections were also decreased in the urokinase group. Conclusions Thrombolytic agents successfully clear central venous catheter occlusions in most cases. Newer agents may act more rapidly and effectively than currently utilized therapies, but randomized studies with direct comparisons of these agents are needed to determine optimal management for catheter obstruction. PMID:22180420

  15. Erroneous laboratory values obtained from central catheters.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J B; Messina, M

    1991-01-01

    Serious analytic errors in potassium measurements have been identified in blood specimens obtained from newly inserted central catheters. Erroneous elevated readings have been related to interactions of chemistry analyzer electrodes and substances fixed to external and intraluminal walls of the central catheter. Anecdotal summaries of this phenomenon are presented to enable the nurse to recognize potential problems when sampling blood from central catheters. Studies were performed to determine the amount of flush necessary to clear the catheter of interfering residue. To eliminate this potentially hazardous occurrence, recommended flush volumes, nursing implications, and actions are described.

  16. Housestaff Knowledge Related to Urinary Catheter Utilization and Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Paras, Molly L.; Shenoy, Erica S.; Hsu, Heather E.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Hooper, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite published catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention guidelines, inappropriate catheter use is common. We surveyed housestaff about their knowledge of CAUTIs at a teaching hospital and found the majority is aware of prevention guidelines; however, their application to clinical scenarios and catheter practices fall short of national goals. PMID:26278269

  17. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration

    PubMed Central

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. Methods: This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. Conclusion: The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance. PMID:25097505

  18. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to help prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections if I have a catheter? • Always clean your hands before and after doing catheter care. • Always keep your urine bag below the level ...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  4. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  5. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  6. Recurrent airway obstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction is a widely recognised airway disorder, characterised by hypersensitivity-mediated neutrophilic airway inflammation and lower airway obstruction in a subpopulation of horses when exposed to suboptimal environments high in airborne organic dust. Over the past decade, numerous studies have further advanced our understanding of different aspects of the disease. These include clarification of the important inhaled airborne agents responsible for disease induction, improving our understanding of the underlying genetic basis of disease susceptibility and unveiling the fundamental immunological mechanisms leading to establishment of the classic disease phenotype. This review, as well as giving a clinical overview of recurrent airway obstruction, summarises much of the work in these areas that have culminated in a more thorough understanding of this debilitating disease.

  7. The airway microbiome and disease.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Yadava, Koshika; Nicod, Laurent P

    2013-08-01

    Although traditionally thought to be sterile, accumulating evidence now supports the concept that our airways harbor a microbiome. Thus far, studies have focused upon characterizing the bacterial constituents of the airway microbiome in both healthy and diseased lungs, but what perhaps provides the greatest impetus for the exploration of the airway microbiome is that different bacterial phyla appear to dominate diseased as compared with healthy lungs. As yet, there is very limited evidence supporting a functional role for the airway microbiome, but continued research in this direction is likely to provide such evidence, particularly considering the progress that has been made in understanding host-microbe mutualism in the intestinal tract. In this review, we highlight the major advances that have been made discovering and describing the airway microbiome, discuss the experimental evidence that supports a functional role for the microbiome in health and disease, and propose how this emerging field is going to impact clinical practice.

  8. Airway and ventilation management during repair of a large acquired tracheoesophageal fistula: the novel use of a readily available tool.

    PubMed

    Malik, Asif M; Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Durgham, Nasser; Stockmann, Paul T; Belenky, Walter M; Zestos, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Acquired tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a life-threatening disorder of the airway that requires early diagnosis and treatment. The case of an infant who had delayed development of a TEF following endoscopic removal of a disc battery lodged in the midesophagus is reported. A repeat bronchoscopy, performed for respiratory distress 4 days later, showed a large defect in the posterior wall of the distal trachea, including the carina. A Foley catheter was used for airway management in the repair of the acquired TEF.

  9. Successful retrieval of an irretrievable jugular tesio catheter using a fogarty arterial embolectomy catheter.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Gutiérrez-Diez, Francisco; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier; Expósito, Víctor; Nistal, Juan Francisco; Rodríquez-Entem, Felipe; Olalla, Juan José; López-Rodríguez, Javier; González-Santos, José María

    2014-05-01

    Long life expectancy and wide development of therapies have increased the number of patients under artificial treatment for lost kidney function or dialysis. Different options for vascular access are suitable for receiving this therapy. The use of tunneled catheters has consequently increased complications related to its use. A difficult retrieval of catheters caused by a hard fibrin sheath along its trajectory is a common drawback. Herein, we report a woman with suspicion of hemodialysis catheter infection and an irretrievable Tesio catheter. A novel technique using a Fogarty arterial catheter allowed a successful retrieval and avoided an aggressive management.

  10. Robust pigtail catheter tip detection in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    The pigtail catheter is a type of catheter inserted into the human body during interventional surgeries such as the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The catheter is characterized by a tightly curled end in order to remain attached to a valve pocket during the intervention, and it is used to inject contrast agent for the visualization of the vessel in fluoroscopy. Image-based detection of this catheter is used during TAVI, in order to overlay a model of the aorta and enhance visibility during the surgery. Due to the different possible projection angles in fluoroscopy, the pigtail tip can appear in a variety of different shapes spanning from pure circular to ellipsoid or even line. Furthermore, the appearance of the catheter tip is radically altered when the contrast agent is injected during the intervention or when it is occluded by other devices. All these factors make the robust real-time detection and tracking of the pigtail catheter a challenging task. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a new tree-structured, hierarchical detection scheme, based on a shape categorization of the pigtail catheter tip, and a combination of novel Haar features. The proposed framework demonstrates improved detection performance, through a validation on a data set consisting of 272 sequences with more than 20,000 images. The detection framework presented in this paper is not limited to pigtail catheter detection, but it can also be applied successfully to any other shape-varying object with similar characteristics.

  11. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  12. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  13. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  14. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  15. Haemodialysis catheters in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Huriaux, Laetitia; Costille, Paul; Quintard, Hervé; Journois, Didier; Kellum, John A; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2016-11-29

    Ten to 15% of critically ill patients need renal replacement therapy (RRT) for severe acute kidney injury. The dialysis catheter is critical for RRT quality and efficiency. Catheters have several properties that must be optimized to promote RRT success. The distal tip has to be located in a high blood flow location, which means central venous territory. Therefore, catheters are mostly inserted into the right internal jugular vein or in femoral veins. External diameter should vary from 12 to 16 Fr in order to ensure adequate blood flow inside the catheter. Lumen shapes are theoretically designed to limit thrombotic risk with low turbulences and frictional forces against the internal wall. With low aspiration pressure, distal tip shape has to deliver sufficient blood flow, while limiting recirculation rate. Catheter material should be biocompatible. Despite in vitro data, no strong evidence supports the use of coated catheters in the ICU in order to reduce infectious risk. Antibiotic "lock" solutions are not routinely recommended. Ultrasound guidance for catheterization significantly decreases mechanical complications. Clinicians should select the optimal catheter according to patient body habitus, catheter intrinsic properties and RRT modality to be used.

  16. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter.

  17. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  18. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  19. Prevention of central venous catheter bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Walz, J Matthias; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Heard, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    The majority of nosocomial bloodstream infections in critically ill patients originate from an infected central venous catheter (CVC). Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) cause significant morbidity and mortality and increase the cost of care. The most frequent causative organisms for CRBSI are coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNSs), Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, and Candida species. The path to infection frequently includes migration of skin organisms at the insertion site into the cutaneous catheter tract, resulting in microbial colonization of the catheter tip and formation of biofilm. Evidence-based strategies for the prevention of CRBSI include behavioral and educational interventions, effective skin antisepsis coupled with maximum barrier precautions, the use of antiseptic dressings, and the use of antiseptic or antibiotic impregnated catheters. Achieving and maintaining very low rates of CRBSI requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the entire health care team, the use of novel technologies in patients with the highest risk of CRBSI, and frequent reeducation of staff.

  20. Catheter-related urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2005-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are used frequently in older populations. For either short- or long-term catheters, the infection rate is about 5% per day. Escherichia coli remains the most common infecting organism, but a wide variety of other organisms may be isolated, including yeast species. Bacteria tend to show increased resistance because of the repeated antimicrobial courses. Urinary tract infection (UTI) usually follows formation of biofilm on both the internal and external catheter surface. The biofilm protects organisms from both antimicrobials and the host immune response. Morbidity from UTI with short-term catheter use is limited if appropriate catheter care is practised. In patients with long-term catheters, fever from a urinary source is common with a frequency varying from 1 per 100 to 1 per 1000 catheter days. Long-term care facility residents with chronic indwelling catheters have a much greater risk for bacteraemia and other urinary complications than residents without catheters. Asymptomatic catheter-acquired UTI should not be treated with antimicrobials. Antimicrobial treatment does not decrease symptomatic episodes but will lead to emergence of more resistant organisms. For treatment of symptomatic infection, many antimicrobials are effective. Wherever possible, antimicrobial selection should be delayed until culture results are available. Whether to administer initial treatment by an oral or parenteral route is determined by clinical presentation. If empirical therapy is required, antimicrobial selection is based on variables such as route of administration, anticipated infecting organism and susceptibility, and patient tolerance. Renal function, concomitant medications, local formulary and cost may also be considered in selection of the antimicrobial agent. The duration of therapy is usually 10-14 days, but patients who respond promptly and in whom the catheter must remain in situ may be treated with a shorter 7-day course to reduce

  1. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  2. Intraluminal fluorescence spectroscopy catheter with ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yang; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marcu, Laura

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intraluminal investigation of arterial vessel composition under intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. A prototype 1.8-mm (5.4 Fr) catheter combining a side-viewing optical fiber (SVOF) and an IVUS catheter was constructed and tested with in vitro vessel phantoms. The prototype catheter can locate a fluorophore in the phantom vessel wall, steer the SVOF in place, perform blood flushing under flow conditions, and acquire high-quality TRFS data using 337-nm wavelength excitation. The catheter steering capability used for the coregistration of the IVUS image plane and the SVOF beam produce a guiding precision to an arterial phantom wall site location of 0.53+/-0.16 mm. This new intravascular multimodal catheter enables the potential for in vivo arterial plaque composition identification using TRFS.

  3. Evaluation of an intravenous catheter for use in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gulick, B A; Meagher, D M

    1981-02-01

    A commercially available polyvinyl chloride intravenous catheter was studied in 9 horses for 3 to 10 days to evaluate the catheter's suitability for use in the horse, to develop a new insertion technique, and to establish a protocol for catheter care. Seven of the animals were clinically normal horses receiving parenteral nutrition; one was a horse with hypocalcemia receiving frequent intravenous injections of calcium gluconate, and one was a clinically normal horse receiving no infusions. The catheter dressings were changed every 48 hours, and an aspirate from the catheter and the catheter tip was cultured at the time of catheter removal. One catheter became infected following a break in the protocol. It was concluded that the polyvinyl catheter is suitable for use in the horse and that the proposed protocol for catheter insertion and maintenance may reduce the likelihood of complications such as catheter sepsis, thrombophlebitis, and embolism.

  4. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  5. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  6. Induction of periodic breathing during sleep causes upper airway obstruction in humans.

    PubMed

    Onal, E; Burrows, D L; Hart, R H; Lopata, M

    1986-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that occlusive apneas result from sleep-induced periodic breathing in association with some degree of upper airway compromise, periodic breathing was induced during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep by administering hypoxic gas mixtures with and without applied external inspiratory resistance (9 cmH2O X l-1 X s) in five normal male volunteers. In addition to standard polysomnography for sleep staging and respiratory pattern monitoring, esophageal pressure, tidal volume (VT), and airflow were measured via an esophageal catheter and pneumotachograph, respectively, with the latter attached to a tight-fitting face mask, allowing calculation of total pulmonary system resistance (Rp). During stage I/II NREM sleep minimal period breathing was evident in two of the subjects; however, in four subjects during hypoxia and/or relief from hypoxia, with and without added resistance, pronounced periodic breathing developed with waxing and waning of VT, sometimes with apneic phases. Resistive loading without hypoxia did not cause periodicity. At the nadir of periodic changes in VT, Rp was usually at its highest and there was a significant linear relationship between Rp and 1/VT, indicating the development of obstructive hypopneas. In one subject without added resistance and in the same subject and in another during resistive loading, upper airway obstruction at the nadir of the periodic fluctuations in VT was observed. We conclude that periodic breathing resulting in periodic diminution of upper airway muscle activity is associated with increased upper airway resistance that predisposes upper airways to collapse.

  7. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  8. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljohi, Alanood Ahmed; Hassan, Hanan Elkefafy; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common device-related healthcare-acquired infection. CAUTI can be severe and lead to bacteremia, significant morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, and high antibiotic consumption. Patients and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the CAUTI-reducing efficacy of noble metal alloy catheters in sixty patients (thirty per group) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the King Fahad Hospital in Saudi Arabia. The study was a single-blinded, randomized, single-centered, prospective investigation that included patients using urinary catheters for 3 days. Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006). When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005). In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100%) for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24). No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use. PMID:28057985

  9. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  10. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  11. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  12. Candida spp. airway colonization: A potential risk factor for Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhu, Song; Yan, Dongxing; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ruilan; Zou, Jian; Yan, Jingdong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to identify potential risk factors for Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and evaluate the association between Candida spp. airway colonization and A. baumannii VAP. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were on mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥48 hours were divided into the following groups: patients with and without Candida spp. airway colonization; colonized patients receiving antifungal treatment or not; patients with A. baumannii VAP and those without VAP. Logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to identify factors independently associated with A. baumannii VAP. Among 618 eligible patients, 264 (43%) had Candida spp. airway colonization and 114 (18%) developed A. baumannii VAP. Along with MV for ≥7 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 8.9, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 4.9-15.8) and presence of a central venous catheter (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9), Candida spp. airway colonization (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.3) was identified as an independent risk factor for A. baumannii VAP. Patients with Candida spp. airway colonization were more likely to develop A. baumannii VAP than non-colonized patients (23% vs 15%, P=.01 and 34% vs. 15%, P<.001 in propensity score-matched subgroups). Administration of antifungal agents was not associated with A. baumannii VAP (29% vs. 21%, P=.153) but with higher in-hospital mortality (53% vs. 39%, P=.037). Candida spp. airway colonization (43%) and A. baumannii VAP (18%) were common in ICU patients who were on mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. Candida spp. airway colonization was an independent risk factor for subsequent A. baumannii VAP.

  13. Catheter-related complications of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, J N

    1996-06-01

    Although the management of CVC-related infection appears complex and at times the literature seems to be contradictory, simple guidelines can direct the clinician in a stepwise fashion. Knowledge of the pathogenesis of each organism and the immune status of the host is crucial to decide whether catheter removal or retention is indicated. For example, in general, GNB bacteremia does not immediately prompt catheter removal in a neutropenic patient but does in a nonneutropenic host because of the gastrointestinal source of the former and a primary catheter source in the latter. In summary, as more CVCs are inserted in patients undergoing chemotherapeutic, antimicrobial, transfusional, and nutritional supportive care, novel approaches to prevention and treatment of the associated infectious complications inherent with such devices are needed. A multifaceted approach from impregnated catheters to local catheter-site antisepsis was reviewed. We may find, however, that as simple handwashing between patients is crucial to infection control, so too is a trained catheter-care team using total barrier precautions and ensuring proper local catheter maintenance critical to preventing CVC-related infections.

  14. Principles of tunneled cuffed catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Tunneled cuffed catheters provide reliable and instant long-term intravenous access for a large variety of therapeutic purposes, including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and apheresis. The most frequent application is for patients with renal failure as an access device for hemodialysis. In this capacity, the rate of catheter use has remained stable in the United States, despite the promotion of arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous grafts. The latter 2 procedures achieve superior longevity and much higher cost-efficiency. Tunneled catheters, however, serve as bridging devices during maturation of newly placed arteriovenous fistulas or as the final option in patients in whom fistulas and grafts have failed. High-quality vascular access is a hallmark of interventional radiology, and its significance for patient care and for our specialty cannot be overestimated. Familiarity with basic concepts of the device and procedural techniques are crucial to achieve successful long-term venous access. The following article demonstrates key concepts of tunneled venous catheter placement by means of dialysis, inasmuch as dialysis catheters represent the most commonly placed tunneled central venous catheters. The principles of placement and techniques utilized, however, are applicable to devices that are used for chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition, such as the Hickman, Broviac, Groshong, or tunneled peripherally inserted central catheters.

  15. [Multifunctional testing of PTCA balloon catheters].

    PubMed

    Kraft, M; Schmitz, H; Schulte, R; Boenick, U

    2000-06-01

    New in vitro measuring methods for balloon catheters used for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and their verification in a complex test device are presented. This system can mimic all relevant application situations. The central element of the test device is a coronary vessel model matching the physiological situation in terms of geometrical structure and frictional properties. Reactive force sensors are used to measure the application-relevant forces exerted by the catheter on the model vessel walls and accessories, such as guide wire and guiding catheter. To generate a kink-free advancement of the catheter and permit measurement of the active forces, an alternating drive unit has been specially developed. The testing and application of the newly developed methods revealed statistically significant differences between various types of catheter. The test device closes a gap between complex but subjective clinical tests, and individual objective, but application-removed in vitro test setups for PTCA catheters. While the initial prototype had shortcomings with regard to the reproducibility of measurements, successor systems developed for industrial use are now in production. The properties of these measuring systems developed for the benefit of manufacturer and reprocessor of PTCA catheters are discussed.

  16. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  17. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  18. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  19. Use of the 4F Roesch Inferior Mesenteric Catheter in Embolization Procedures in the Pelvis: A Review of 300 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kroencke, Thomas J. Kluner, Claudia; Hamm, Bernd; Gauruder-Burmester, Annett

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of a 4F Roesch inferior mesenteric (RIM) catheter for pelvic embolization procedures. Between October 2000 and January 2006, 364 patients (357 female, 7 male; age: 23-67 years) underwent embolization of various pathologies [uterine fibroids (n = 324), pure adenomyosis of the uterus (n = 19), postpartum hemorrhage (n =1), traumatic or postoperative hemorrhage (n = 9), bleeding related to cervical cancer (n =7), AV malformation of the uterus (n = 2) and high-flow priapism (n = 2)] at a single institution. In all cases, bilateral catheterization was primarily attempted with the use of a 4F hook-shaped braided endhole catheter (Roesch-Inferior-Mesenteric, RIM-Catheter, Cordis, Miami, FL). Frequency of initial failure to catheterize the vascular territory of interest and carry out the embolization were recorded and the types of difficulty encountered were noted. Catherization of the main stem of the vessel territory of interest with the use of a unilateral femoral approach and the 4F RIM catherer was successful in 334/364 (91.8%) the embolization cases. Bilateral catheterization of the internal iliac arteries using a single common femoral artery access and the 4F RIM catheter was achieved in 322/364 (88.5%) patients. In 12/364 (3.3%) patients, a contralateral puncture was performed and the same 4F catheter was used. In 28/364 (7.7%) cases the 4F RIM catheter was exchanged for a catheter with a cobra-shaped or sidewinder configuration. The 4F RIM catheter is a simple and valuable alternative to catheters and techniques commonly employed for pelvic artery embolization.

  20. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  5. Early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tripepi-Bova, Kathleen A; Sun, Zhiyuan; Mason, David; Albert, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidurals resulted in urinary retention (>500 mL by bladder scanner). Patients were given up to 8 hours to void before further intervention. Of 61 patients, only 4 (6.6%) required urinary catheter reinsertion due to urinary retention. Early removal of urinary catheters after thoracic surgery in patients with thoracic epidurals was safe, with minimal urinary retention.

  6. Randomized comparison of popliteal-sciatic perineural catheter tip migration and dislocation in a cadaver model using two catheter designs

    PubMed Central

    Steffel, Lauren; Howard, Steven K.; Borg, Lindsay; Leng, Jody C.; Kim, T. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background New catheter-over-needle (CON) technology for continuous peripheral nerve blockade has emerged, but its effect on the risk of perineural catheter tip dislocation is unknown. Less flexible catheters may be more likely to migrate away from the nerve with simulated patient movement. In the present study, we evaluated catheter tip migration between CON catheters and traditional catheter-through-needle (CTN) catheters during ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane (SAX-IP) insertion. Methods We evaluated the migration of popliteal-sciatic catheters in a prone, unembalmed male cadaver. Thirty catheter placement trials were divided randomly into two groups based on the catheter type: CON or CTN. A single anesthesiology resident placed the catheters by SAX-IP insertion, and the catheters were then examined by ultrasound before and after ipsilateral knee range of motion (ROM) exercises (0°–130° flexion). A blinded expert regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after the ROM exercises. The primary outcome was the change in distance from the catheter tip to the center of the nerve (cm) between before and after the ROM exercises. Results The change in the tip-to-nerve distance (median [10th–90th percentile]) was 0.06 (−0.16 to 0.23) cm for the CTN catheter and 0.00 (−0.12 to 0.69) for the CON catheter (P = 0.663). However, there was a statistically significant increase in dislocation out of the nerve compartment for the CON catheter (4/15; 0/15 for CTN) (P = 0.043). Conclusions Although the use of different catheter designs had no effect on the change in the measured migration distance of popliteal-sciatic catheters, 27% of the CON catheters were dislocated out of the nerve compartment. These results may influence the choice of catheter design when using SAX-IP perineural catheter insertion. PMID:28184270

  7. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  8. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  9. Measurement of pleural pressure with oesophageal catheter-tip micromanometer in anaesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Chartrand, D A; Jodoin, C; Couture, J

    1991-05-01

    In spontaneously breathing anaesthetized subjects, we studied a new technique for the measurement of changes in pleural pressure. Seven ASA physical status I patients undergoing general anaesthesia (enflurane 1-2 MAC, nitrous oxide 50%, and oxygen) for minor orthopaedic surgery were studied in the supine position. Changes in oesophageal pressure (delta Pes) were measured by means of a catheter-tip pressure transducer. This micromanometer was positioned according to an occlusion test where delta Pes were compared with the changes in airway opening pressure (delta Pao). Optimizing the signal/noise ratio, we observed a linear relationship between delta Pes and delta Pao. In each patient, the delta Pes/delta Pao relationship was highly reproducible. Using the linear regression analysis to characterize the delta Pes/delta Pao relationship, we have developed a different approach for the positioning of oesophageal catheter. After statistical analysis of the observed delta Pes/delta Pao relationship, a "calibration" factor can be used in order to correct the observed slope of the delta Pes/delta Pao relationship to its theoretical value. We conclude that an oesophageal catheter-tip micromanometer can be used in anaesthetized supine patients to measure changes in pleural pressure.

  10. Management and visualization of a kinked epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Fileli, A; Pyrgos, P

    2010-01-01

    A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 29-year-old woman for labor analgesia. The catheter failed to provide adequate analgesia. Moreover, after labor, it proved difficult to be removed. After computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance impedance (MRI) examination the course of the catheter was visible, the entrapped catheter was dislodged intact, revealing a kinking near its distal tip. Kinking of an epidural catheter leading to entrapment is an unusual complication of epidural catheterization. PMID:21311644

  11. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-04

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it.

  12. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infections: what works other than impregnated or coated catheters?

    PubMed

    Mermel, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and excess hospital cost. Data from prospective, randomized trials demonstrate that the risk of these infections can be minimized by simple interventions. Changing the behaviour of healthcare workers who insert and care for intravascular catheters is imperative. Creating a culture of patient safety and assuring easy access to the products necessary to maintain strict asepsis during catheter insertion, dressing changes, and when manipulating catheter hubs, will enhance adherence to optimal practice and will reduce the risk posed to the millions of patients in need of such devices.

  13. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  14. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  15. Emergence of matched airway and vascular trees from fractal rules.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb W

    2011-04-01

    The bronchial, arterial, and venous trees of the lung are complex interwoven structures. Their geometries are created during fetal development through common processes of branching morphogenesis. Insights from fractal geometry suggest that these extensively arborizing trees may be created through simple recursive rules. Mathematical models of Turing have demonstrated how only a few proteins could interact to direct this branching morphogenesis. Development of the airway and vascular trees could, therefore, be considered an example of emergent behavior as complex structures are created from the interaction of only a few processes. However, unlike inanimate emergent structures, the geometries of the airway and vascular trees are highly stereotyped. This review will integrate the concepts of emergence, fractals, and evolution to demonstrate how the complex branching geometries of the airway and vascular trees are ideally suited for gas exchange in the lung. The review will also speculate on how the heterogeneity of blood flow and ventilation created by the vascular and airway trees is overcome through their coordinated construction during fetal development.

  16. In vivo size and shape measurement of the human upper airway using endoscopic longrange optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Julian J.; Leigh, Matthew S.; Walton, Ian D.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Schwer, Stefan; Sampson, David D.; Hillman, David R.; Eastwood, Peter R.

    2003-07-01

    We describe a long-range optical coherence tomography system for size and shape measurement of large hollow organs in the human body. The system employs a frequency-domain optical delay line of a configuration that enables the combination of high-speed operation with long scan range. We compare the achievable maximum delay of several delay line configurations, and identify the configurations with the greatest delay range. We demonstrate the use of one such long-range delay line in a catheter-based optical coherence tomography system and present profiles of the human upper airway and esophagus in vivo with a radial scan range of 26 millimeters. Such quantitative upper airway profiling should prove valuable in investigating the pathophysiology of airway collapse during sleep (obstructive sleep apnea).

  17. Designing a catheter skills training programme.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Karen Logan describes how a team of continence advisers designed and implemented a training programme that allows local nurses to meet the national occupational standards and competencies in catheterisation and catheter care.

  18. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  19. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... several weeks. A bloodstream infection can occur when bacteria or other germs travel down a “central line” and enter the blood. If you develop a catheter-associated blood- stream infection you may become ill with fevers and ...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. Airway management in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Dörges, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Securing and monitoring the airway are among the key requirements of appropriate therapy in emergency patients. Failures to secure the airways can drastically increase morbidity and mortality of patients within a very short time. Therefore, the entire range of measures needed to secure the airway in an emergency, without intermediate ventilation and oxygenation, is limited to 30-40 seconds. Endotracheal intubation is often called the 'gold standard' for airway management in an emergency, but multiple failed intubation attempts do not result in maintaining oxygenation; instead, they endanger the patient by prolonging hypoxia and causing additional trauma to the upper airways. Thus, knowledge and availability of alternative procedures are also essential in every emergency setting. Given the great variety of techniques available, it is important to establish a well-planned, methodical protocol within the framework of an algorithm. This not only facilitates the preparation of equipment and the training of personnel, it also ensures efficient decision-making under time pressure. Most anaesthesia-related deaths are due to hypoxaemia when difficulty in securing the airway is encountered, especially in obstetrics during induction of anaesthesia for caesarean delivery. The most commonly occurring adverse respiratory events are failure to intubate, failure to recognize oesophageal intubation, and failure to ventilate. Thus, it is essential that every anaesthesiologist working on the labour and delivery ward is comfortable with the algorithm for the management of failed intubation. The algorithm for emergency airway management describing the sequence of various procedures has to be adapted to internal standards and to techniques that are available.

  6. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  7. Catheter-directed interventions for pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Charles, Hearns W.; Maldonado, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), a potentially life-threatening entity, can be treated medically, surgically, and percutaneously. In patients with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), anticoagulation alone may be insufficient to restore cardiac function. Because of the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical embolectomy, clinical interest in catheter-directed interventions (CDI) has resurged. We describe specific catheter-directed techniques and the evidence supporting percutaneous treatments. PMID:28123985

  8. Evaluation of antiseptic-impregnated central venous catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Sheng, W H; Ko, W J; Wang, J T; Chang, S C; Hsueh, P R; Luh, K T

    2000-09-01

    Central venous catheterization represents a significant medical advancement, particularly in the treatment of critical ill. However, there is a high risk of central venous catheters-related infection. A novel antiseptic central venous catheter, made of polyurethane and impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine, was developed to reduce the risk of catheters-related infection. In this study, we did a randomized clinical study to determine the efficacy by using antiseptic catheters for the prevention of central venous catheters-related infection in the intensive care units. A total of 204 patients with 235 central venous catheters were studied at the surgical intensive care units at National Taiwan University Hospital between November 1998 and June 1999. Participants received either a standard triple-lumen polyurethane catheter or an antiseptic catheter (Arrow International, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA). Both were indistinguishable from each other. Compared to standard polyurethane catheters, antiseptic catheters were less likely to be colonized by microorganisms when they were cultured at the removal (8.0 versus 20.0 colonized catheters per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.34 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.74]; p<0.01). There was no significant differences between both groups in catheter-related infections (0.9 versus 4.9 infections per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.17 [95% CI, 0.03 to 1.15]; p = 0.07). Gram-positive cocci and fungi were more likely to colonize in the standard polyurethane catheters (p = 0.06 and 0.04, compared to antiseptic catheters respectively). Two of our cases in the control group died directly due to catheter-related candidemia. No adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity or leukopenia were found in the antiseptic catheter group. Our study showed that central venous catheters with antiseptic coating were safe and had less risk of colonization of bacteria and fungi than standard catheters in the critically ill patients.

  9. Republication: All India Difficult Airway Association 2016 Guidelines for Tracheal Intubation in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Kundra, Pankaj; Garg, Rakesh; Ramkumar, Venkateswaran; Patwa, Apeksh; Shah, Amit; Raveendra, Ubaradka S.; Shetty, Sumalatha Radhakrishna; Doctor, Jeson Rajan; Pawar, Dilip K.; Ramesh, Singaravelu; Das, Sabyasachi; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often lifesaving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with under evaluation of the airway and suboptimal response to preoxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA) proposes a stepwise plan for safe management of the airway in critically ill patients. These guidelines have been developed based on available evidence; Wherever, robust evidence was lacking, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the (AIDAA) and Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for preoxygenation provides adequate oxygen stores during TI for patients with respiratory pathology. Nasal insufflation of oxygen at 15 L/min can increase the duration of apnea before hypoxemia sets in. High flow nasal cannula oxygenation at 60–70 L/min may also increase safety during intubation of critically ill patients. Stable hemodynamics and gas exchange must be maintained during rapid sequence induction. It is necessary to implement an intubation protocol during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful.

  10. MR-trackable intramyocardial injection catheter.

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, P V; Kraitchman, D L; Izbudak, I; Hofmann, L V; Amado, L C; Fritzges, D; Young, R; Pittenger, M; Bulte, J W M; Atalar, E

    2004-06-01

    There is growing interest in delivering cellular agents to infarcted myocardium to prevent postinfarction left ventricular remodeling. MRI can be effectively used to differentiate infarcted from healthy myocardium. MR-guided delivery of cellular agents/therapeutics is appealing because the therapeutics can be precisely targeted to the desired location within the infarct. In this study, a steerable intramyocardial injection catheter that can be actively tracked under MRI was developed and tested. The components of the catheter were arranged to form a loopless RF antenna receiver coil that enabled active tracking. Feasibility studies were performed in canine and porcine myocardial infarction models. Myocardial delayed-enhancement (MDE) imaging identified the infarcted myocardium, and real-time MRI was used to guide left ventricular catheterization from a carotid artery approach. The distal 35 cm of the catheter was seen under MRI with a bright signal at the distal tip of the catheter. The catheter was steered into position, the distal tip was apposed against the infarct, the needle was advanced, and a bolus of MR contrast agent and tissue marker dye was injected intramyocardially, as confirmed by imaging and postmortem histology. A pilot study involving intramyocardial delivery of magnetically labeled stem cells demonstrated the utility of the active injection catheter system.

  11. Comparison of a Balloon Guide Catheter and a Non-Balloon Guide Catheter for Mechanical Thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Aglaé; Buerke, Boris; Stracke, Christian P; Berkemeyer, Shoma; Mosimann, Pascal J; Schwindt, Wolfram; Alcázar, Pedro; Cnyrim, Christian; Niederstadt, Thomas; Chapot, René; Heindel, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with the use of a stent retriever in acute ischemic stroke, performed by using a balloon guide catheter or non-balloon guide catheter. Materials and Methods In accordance with the institutional review board approval obtained at the two participating institutions, retrospective analysis was performed in 183 consecutive patients treated between 2013 and 2014 for occlusions in the middle cerebral artery or carotid terminus by using a stent retriever with a balloon guide catheter (n = 102) at one center and a non-balloon guide catheter (n = 81) at the other center. Data on procedure duration, number of passes, angiographic findings, type of stent retriever used, and expertise of the operators were collected. Successful recanalization was defined as grade 3 or 2b modified Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia recanalization accomplished in up to three passes. Univariate and multivariate subgroup analyses were conducted to control for the confounding variables of prior thrombolysis, location of occlusion, and operator expertise. Results Successful recanalization with the balloon guide catheter was achieved in 89.2% of thrombectomies (91 of 102) versus 67.9% (55 of 81) achieved with the non-balloon guide catheter (P = .0004). The one-pass thrombectomy rate with the balloon guide catheter was significantly higher than for that with the non-balloon guide catheter (63.7% [65 of 102] vs 35.8% [29 of 81], respectively; P = .001). The procedure duration was significantly shorter by using the balloon guide catheter than the non-balloon guide catheter (median, 20.5 minutes vs 41.0 minutes, respectively; P < .0001). Conclusion The effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers in acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation in terms of angiographic results and procedure duration was improved when performed in combination with the balloon guide catheter. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  12. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  13. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Rancourt, Raymond C. Veress, Livia A. Ahmad, Aftab Hendry-Hofer, Tara B. Rioux, Jacqueline S. Garlick, Rhonda B. White, Carl W.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  15. [Appropriate and inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters].

    PubMed

    Janzen, Jolien; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2012-01-01

    Many hospitalized patients receive a urinary catheter during their stay. In 21-54% of patients, however, there is no appropriate indication for this. The most significant complication caused by the use of urinary catheters is the development of a urinary tract infection (UTI), one of the most common nosocomial infections. In 71-80% of hospital acquired UTIs a urinary catheter is present. The duration of the presence of a catheter is the major risk factor for catheter-associated UTI. Reducing the number of inappropriate catheterisations is an effective way of preventing catheter-related UTIs. Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters can be reduced by maintaining strict guidelines on justifiable indications for inserting a urinary catheter, verifying daily whether the indication still applies, and by timely removal of the catheter when it is not or no longer needed.

  16. Antibiotic lock for treatment of tunneled hemodialysis catheter bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among catheter-dependent hemodialysis patients. Microorganism biofilm matrix formation in the catheter is the pathogenic process of this entity. Administration of systemic antibiotics and removal of the offending catheter is the most logical treatment. This article discusses an alternative option, instillation of an antibiotic-lock solution into the lumen of the catheter plus systemic antibiotic therapy. Recent studies suggest that this strategy could treat the infection and salvage the catheter, thus avoiding the need for further interventional procedures including but not limited to the removal of the catheter, placement of a temporary catheter, and finally placement of a new permanent catheter. The implementation of this effective approach will reduce morbidity and possibly reduce the cost and interventions associated with it.

  17. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated.

  18. Practical approach to catheter-related bloodstream infections in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBIs) are a common problem in paediatrics. Sterile insertion and proper care of the catheter is likely more important than the type of catheter in determining the rate of CRBIs. The accuracy of the diagnosis of CRBIs can be improved by comparing the time to positivity or the concentration of organisms in blood drawn through the catheter with blood drawn from other sites, or by changing the catheter over a guidewire and culturing the removed catheter. When a CRBI is suspected, the catheter should be removed if it is no longer required, the child is hemodynamically unstable, there are metastatic foci of infection, the infecting organism is Candida or a mycobacterium, or there is a tunnel infection. The necessity for catheter removal is controversial if the infecting organism is Staphylococcus aureus or a Gram-negative organism. In most other situations, the catheter only needs to be removed if bacteremia persists despite appropriate antibiotic use. PMID:19668658

  19. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways.

  20. Uptake of drugs by catheters: the influence of the drug molecule on sorption by polyurethane catheters.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Davies, M C; Melia, C D; Denyer, S P; Derrick, M R

    1996-08-01

    The sorption of drugs by indwelling intravenous catheters may have clinical consequences both by alteration of the dose received by the patient and by physically affecting the catheter materials themselves which may lead to changes in mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Studies of drug sorption to new catheter materials are therefore important. Pellethane, a polyurethane increasingly used in vascular access catheters, is as yet little studied in terms of its capacity for drug sorption. In this work a range of drugs known to be sorbed by PVC infusion sets were studied with respect to their sorption by Pellethane catheters. Standard lengths of catheter were incubated with solutions of drugs and samples of the solution were taken at intervals, assayed spectrophotometrically and compared with control solutions incubated without catheter. Losses from solution of up to 93% were found after 24 h. A series of highly sorbing and clinically relevant drugs was identified and their uptake was studied until equilibrium had been reached. A correlation was evident between the octanol/water partition coefficient and the fraction of drug taken up from solution at equilibrium, with the more hydrophobic drugs being taken up to a greater extent by the catheter.

  1. Percutaneous biliary drainage catheter insertion in patients with extensive hepatic metastatic tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Langman, Eun L.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Morse, Michael A.; Burbridge, Rebecca A.; Smith, Tony P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic disease of the liver can have hyperbilirubinemia due to a number of reasons, including biliary obstruction. The purpose of this study was to analyze patient outcomes after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) catheter insertion in patients with extensive hepatic metastatic tumor burden. Methods Out of 746 PBD insertions, 44 patients (24 males, 20 females, mean age 57.4 years, range, 34–80 years) had metastatic malignancy with a hepatic tumor burden of greater than 20% parenchymal volume based on pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laboratory data before and after PBD insertion were compared. Survival and outcomes analysis performed. A subanalysis was performed on patients with CT-demonstrated catheter traversal of tumoral tissue. Results A PBD catheter was successfully inserted in all patients. The mean serum bilirubin level decreased significantly from 10.9±6.4 mg/dL immediately prior to PBD insertion to 7.1±5.6 mg/dL (P<0.001) within one month post PBD insertion. Four patients (11%) demonstrated normalization of bilirubin levels to less than 1.6 mg/dL. Of the 14 patients with a post-procedure CT or MRI, the PBD catheter traversed a tumor in 11 (79%). One of these patients required a transfusion after the procedure and one had recurrent catheter exchanges due to pericatheter leakage. The 30-day overall survival was 41% with a median survival of 19 days. The percentage decrease in serum bilirubin after PBD insertion and pre-procedure international normalized ratio (INR) were correlated with improved survival (OR =3.7, P=0.010 and OR =4.9, P=0.028 respectively). The PBD-associated major complication rate was 16%. Conclusions In patients with hyperbilirubinemia and extensive hepatic metastatic disease burden, survival was dismal after PBD catheter insertion. Serum bilirubin level normalization occurred rarely. PMID:28078111

  2. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Eric; Garcia, Salvador; Miguel, Robin; Segura, Francisco J; Ipe, Tina S; Leveque, Christopher

    2016-08-10

    Therapeutic and donor apheresis requires adequate vascular access to achieve inlet flow rates of ∼50-100 mL/min. While central dialysis-type venous catheters can usually provide such access, their use includes several associated risks. Some of these risks can be avoided or diminished if adequate peripheral venous access can be established. Some patients have adequate peripheral veins for apheresis that cannot be readily identified visually or by palpation. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access would benefit such patients and would lead to placement of fewer central venous catheters. The technique of ultrasound-guided peripheral access for apheresis has been in use at Houston Methodist Hospital since 2012. We performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis at Houston Methodist Hospital from July 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015, to assess its benefit. During this time, we performed 831 procedures on 186 patients, including 787 therapeutic plasma exchanges, three red blood cell exchanges, 41 peripheral stem cell collections. Ultrasound-guided vascular access was used for 68 procedures (8% of all procedures), including 62 therapeutic plasma exchanges, 4 peripheral stem cell collections, and 2 red blood cell changes. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral access prevented the placement of central venous catheters in 37 (20%) patients, demonstrating its utility in a busy transfusion service.

  3. Elective use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and high-flow nasal oxygen for resection of subtotal malignant distal airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Fung, Rkf; Stellios, J; Bannon, P G; Ananda, A; Forrest, P

    2017-01-01

    We describe the use of peripheral veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) and high-flow nasal oxygen as procedural support in a patient undergoing debulking of a malignant tumour of the lower airway. Due to the significant risk of complete airway obstruction upon induction of anaesthesia, ECMO was established while the patient was awake, and was maintained without systemic anticoagulation to minimise the risk of intraoperative bleeding. This case illustrates that ECMO support with high-flow nasal oxygen can be considered as part of the algorithm for airway management during surgery for subtotal lower airway obstruction, as it may be the only viable option for maintaining adequate gas exchange.

  4. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Skolimowski, M.; Weiss Nielsen, M.; Abeille, F.; Skafte-Pedersen, P.; Sabourin, D.; Fercher, A.; Papkovsky, D.; Molin, S.; Taboryski, R.; Sternberg, C.; Dufva, M.; Geschke, O.; Emnéus, J.

    2012-01-01

    A modular microfluidic airways model system that can simulate the changes in oxygen tension in different compartments of the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was designed, developed, and tested. The fully reconfigurable system composed of modules with different functionalities: multichannel peristaltic pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we have mimicked the bacterial reinoculation of the aerobic compartments (lower respiratory tract) from the anaerobic compartments (cystic fibrosis sinuses) following an antibiotic treatment. This effect is hypothesised as the one on the main reasons for recurrent lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23908680

  5. Quantitative upper airway endoscopy with swept-source anatomical optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wijesundara, Kushal; Zdanski, Carlton; Kimbell, Julia; Price, Hillel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive imaging of upper airway obstructions in children and adults is needed to improve clinical decision-making. Toward this goal, we demonstrate an anatomical optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system delivered via a small-bore, flexible endoscope to quantify the upper airway lumen geometry. Helical scans were obtained from a proximally-scanned fiber-optic catheter of 820 μm outer diameter and >2 mm focal length. Coupled with a long coherence length wavelength-swept light source, the system exhibited an SNR roll-off of < 10 dB over a 10 mm range. Operating at 10 rotations/s, the average accuracy of segmented cross-sectional areas was found to be −1.4 ± 1.0%. To demonstrate the capability of this system, aOCT was performed on a pediatric airway phantom and on ex vivo swine trachea. The ability for quantitative endoscopy afforded by this system can aid in diagnosis, medical and surgical decision making, and predictive modeling of upper airway obstructive disorders. PMID:24688814

  6. The Effect of Lung Stretch during Sleep on Airway Mechanics in Overweight and Obese Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Campana, L.M.; Malhotra, A.; Suki, B.; Hess, L.; Israel, E.; Smales, E.; DeYoung, P.; Owens, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Both obesity and sleep reduce lung volume and limit deep breaths, possibly contributing to asthma. We hypothesize that increasing lung volume dynamically during sleep would reduce airway resistance in asthma. Asthma (n=10) and control (n=10) subjects were studied during sleep at baseline and with increased lung volume via bi-level positive airway pressure (BPAP). Using forced oscillations, respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) were measured during sleep and Rrs was partitioned to upper and lower airway resistance (Rup, Rlow) using an epiglottic pressure catheter. Rrs and Rup increased with sleep (p<0.01) and Xrs was decreased in REM (p=0.02) as compared to wake. Rrs, Rup, and Rlow, were larger (p<0.01) and Xrs was decreased (p<0.02) in asthma. On BPAP, Rrs and Rup were decreased (p<0.001) and Xrs increased (p<0.01), but Rlow was unchanged. High Rup was observed in asthma, which reduced with BPAP. We conclude that the upper airway is a major component of Rrs and larger lung volume changes may be required to alter Rlow. PMID:23041446

  7. Bradycardia during Transradial Cardiac Catheterization due to Catheter Manipulation: Resolved by Catheter Removal

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vishesh; Stys, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To report the resolution of bradycardia encountered during transradial cardiac catheterization through the catheter pullback technique in two cases. Case Report. A 62-year-old male and an 81-year-old male underwent coronary angiogram to evaluate for coronary artery disease and as a result of positive stress test, respectively. Upon engagement of the FL 3.5 catheter into the ascending aorta through the transradial approach, the first case developed bradycardia with a heart rate of 39 beats per minute. The second case developed profound bradycardia with a heart rate of 25 beats per minute upon insertion of the 5 Fr FL 3.5 catheter near the right brachiocephalic trunk through the right radial access. Conclusion. Bradycardia can be subsided by removal of the catheter during catheter manipulation in patients undergoing transradial coronary angiogram if there is a suspicion of excessive stretching of aortic arch receptors and/or carotid sinus receptors. PMID:28348915

  8. Analysis of venous access for therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Grishaber, J E; Cunningham, M C; Rohret, P A; Strauss, R G

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed our 2-year experience with venous access for 363 therapeutic plasma exchanges in 46 patients with neurological disease, including acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (N = 20), myasthenia gravis (N = 17), and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (N = 9). Twenty-three patients (50%) completed the planned course of therapy using only peripheral venous access, and 28 central venous catheters were placed in the remaining 23 patients. Patients utilizing central venous access did not undergo a greater number of procedures, but they were more likely to have acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (P < 0.02) or to be hospitalized in a medical intensive care unit (P < 0.01). Three types of central catheters were used, and although our experience was predominantly with 1 type, differences were noted. Only 3% of procedures (3 of 96) done with a Quinton-Mahurkar catheter were associated with a catheter failure, compared to 27% (4 of 15, P < 0.01) with a Hickman catheter and 67% (2 of 3) with a triple-lumen catheter. Life-threatening complications occurred with 3 of 28 (11%) central catheters. To optimize the success of therapeutic plasma exchange using central access, it is critical that hemapheresis personnel advise each patient's primary physician regarding the type of central venous catheter required. Currently, we recommend use of a Quinton-Mahurkar or other dual-lumen hemodialysis catheter.

  9. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Strategies with Bubble Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Not All Bubbling Is the Same: The Seattle Positive Airway Pressure System.

    PubMed

    Welty, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Premature neonates are predisposed to complications, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is associated with long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences. Noninvasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been recommended strongly by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, CPAP implementation has shown at least a 50% failure rate. Enhancing nasal CPAP effectiveness may decrease the need for mechanical ventilation and reduce the incidence of BPD. Bubble nasal CPAP is better than nasal CPAP using mechanical devices and the bubbling provides air exchange in distal respiratory units. The Seattle PAP system reduces parameters that assess work of breathing.

  10. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  11. Comments to Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Lien, Wan-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal ultrasound can be an alternative diagnostic tool in airway management, besides traditional confirmatory methods such as capnography and auscultation. The standard image is a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with a reverberation artifact posteriorly (comet-tail artifact). If the second A-M interface appears, which we call a "double-tract sign," esophageal intubation is considered.

  12. Experience of robotic catheter ablation in humans using a novel remotely steerable catheter sheath

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel T.; Goldenberg, Alex S.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter has been developed to enable precise manipulation and stable positioning of any eight French (Fr) or smaller electrophysiological catheter within the heart for the purposes of mapping and ablation. Objective To report our initial experience using this system for remotely performing catheter ablation in humans. Methods Consecutive patients attending for routine ablation were recruited. Various conventional diagnostic catheters were inserted through the left femoral vein in preparation for treating an accessory pathway (n = 1), atrial flutter (n = 2) and atrial fibrillation (n = 7). The steerable guide catheter was inserted into the right femoral vein through which various irrigated and non-irrigated tip ablation catheters were used. Conventional endpoints of loss of pathway conduction, bidirectional cavotricuspid isthmus block and four pulmonary vein isolation were used to determine acute procedural success. Results Ten patients underwent remote catheter ablation using conventional and/or 3D non-fluoroscopic mapping technologies. All procedural endpoints were achieved using the robotic control system without manual manipulation of the ablation catheter. There was no major complication. A radiation dosimeter positioned next to the operator 2.7 m away from the X-ray source showed negligible exposure despite a mean cumulative dose area product of 7,281.4 cGycm2 for all ten ablation procedures. Conclusions Safe and clinically effective remote navigation of ablation catheters can be achieved using a novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter in a variety of arrhythmias. The system is compatible with current mapping and ablation technologies Remote navigation substantially reduces radiation exposure to the operator. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10840-007-9184-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  13. Midline catheters: the middle ground of intravenous therapy administration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N Richard

    2004-01-01

    Evangelical Community Hospital at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, is a small community hospital with 110 beds. This organization sought a device to bridge between the short peripheral catheter and the peripherally inserted central catheter. The midline catheter provided an answer to this dilemma. However, a literature search for midline catheters yielded only four published articles, and only one of these was related to outcomes. The drugs used and the type of patients treated at Evangelical Community Hospital provided a challenge for the infusion therapist. This article examines the management of the patients who fell into a midlength of stay, and for whom both the short peripheral catheter and the peripherally inserted central catheter were inappropriate.

  14. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or ‘linogram’ technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. PMID:17932667

  15. Clinical review: Biphasic positive airway pressure and airway pressure release ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on mechanical ventilation strategies that allow unsupported spontaneous breathing activity in any phase of the ventilatory cycle. By allowing patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome to breathe spontaneously, one can expect improvements in gas exchange and systemic blood flow, based on findings from both experimental and clinical trials. In addition, by increasing end-expiratory lung volume, as occurs when using biphasic positive airway pressure or airway pressure release ventilation, recruitment of collapsed or consolidated lung is likely to occur, especially in juxtadiaphragmatic lung legions. Traditional approaches to mechanical ventilatory support of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome require adaptation of the patient to the mechanical ventilator using heavy sedation and even muscle relaxation. Recent investigations have questioned the utility of sedation, muscle paralysis and mechanical control of ventilation. Furthermore, evidence exists that lowering sedation levels will decrease the duration of mechanical ventilatory support, length of stay in the intensive care unit, and overall costs of hospitalization. Based on currently available data, we suggest considering the use of techniques of mechanical ventilatory support that maintain, rather than suppress, spontaneous ventilatory effort, especially in patients with severe pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:15566621

  16. Intravenous catheter for intracorporeal plasma filtration.

    PubMed

    Handley, Harold H; Gorsuch, Rey; Levin, Nathan W; Ronco, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Future advances in dialysis of end-stage renal disease patients may include improvements in therapeutic continuity and patient mobility. Continuous renal replacement therapies could lead to self-contained, mobile and potentially wearable dialysis units. We investigated an experimental, intravenous slow-continuous plasma separation system (IPSS) as a precursor to direct intravenous hemofiltration. An intracorporeal catheter employs asymmetric hollow fibers to separate blood cells from plasma in vivo. The fibers possess a sieving coefficient of 0.7 microm and remove 99.99% of all platelets. In vivo, catheters sustain an average plasma separation flow rate of 3 ml/min over 22 h, sufficient to remove 2 net liters of water from pigs through an extracorporeal hemofilter. Used catheter fibers are relatively free of protein deposition or clots in situ. In vitro studies suggest that human catheters may perform at 3-4 times the rate of porcine catheters. IPSS is proposed for acute fluid removal in CHF patients refractory to diuretics.

  17. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  18. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  19. Hibernation and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Milsom, William K; Jackson, Donald C

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation in endotherms and ectotherms is characterized by an energy-conserving metabolic depression due to low body temperatures and poorly understood temperature-independent mechanisms. Rates of gas exchange are correspondly reduced. In hibernating mammals, ventilation falls even more than metabolic rate leading to a relative respiratory acidosis that may contribute to metabolic depression. Breathing in some mammals becomes episodic and in some small mammals significant apneic gas exchange may occur by passive diffusion via airways or skin. In ectothermic vertebrates, extrapulmonary gas exchange predominates and in reptiles and amphibians hibernating underwater accounts for all gas exchange. In aerated water diffusive exchange permits amphibians and many species of turtles to remain fully aerobic, but hypoxic conditions can challenge many of these animals. Oxygen uptake into blood in both endotherms and ectotherms is enhanced by increased affinity of hemoglobin for O₂ at low temperature. Regulation of gas exchange in hibernating mammals is predominately linked to CO₂/pH, and in episodic breathers, control is principally directed at the duration of the apneic period. Control in submerged hibernating ectotherms is poorly understood, although skin-diffusing capacity may increase under hypoxic conditions. In aerated water blood pH of frogs and turtles either adheres to alphastat regulation (pH ∼8.0) or may even exhibit respiratory alkalosis. Arousal in hibernating mammals leads to restoration of euthermic temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange and occurs periodically even as ambient temperatures remain low, whereas body temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange of hibernating ectotherms are tightly linked to ambient temperature.

  20. The Lung Microbiome and Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated relationships between the composition of the airway microbiota (mixed-species communities of microbes that exist in the respiratory tract) and critical features of immune response and pulmonary function. These studies provide evidence that airway inflammatory status and capacity for repair are coassociated with specific taxonomic features of the airway microbiome. Although directionality has yet to be established, the fact that microbes are known drivers of inflammation and tissue damage suggests that in the context of chronic inflammatory airway disease, the composition and, more importantly, the function, of the pulmonary microbiome represent critical factors in defining airway disease outcomes.

  1. Airway nerves: in vitro electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alyson

    2002-06-01

    Recording the activity of single airway sensory fibres or neuronal cell bodies in vitro has allowed detailed characterisation of fibre types and membrane properties. Fibre types can be identified by their conduction velocities and further studied by the application of drugs to their receptive field. C-fibres are sensitive to mechanical stimuli and a range of irritant chemicals (bradykinin, capsaicin, low pH, platelet-activating factor), whereas Adelta-fibres are relatively insensitive to chemical stimuli and appear to correlate to the rapidly adapting receptors identified in airways in vivo. Their site of origin also differs: upper airway C-fibres arise predominantly from the jugular ganglion and Adelta-fibres from the jugular and nodose ganglia. Intracellular recording from cell bodies in the ganglia has revealed a calcium-dependent potassium current common to many putative C-fibre cell bodies. This slow after hyperpolarisation current may be inhibited by stimuli that excite and sensitise C-fibres - this could be an important mechanism underlying the sensitisation of C-fibres in airway irritability.

  2. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments.

  3. [Silastic catheters: pinpointing the end tip of the catheter by means of electrocardiographic monitoring].

    PubMed

    Giraldo Lozano, L; Barjau Capdevila, M

    1997-10-01

    The placement of catheters with a silastic center has been a common procedure in neonatal intensive care units for several years. Nonetheless, this procedure, like many others, bears its risks and complications if not properly carried out. The majority of complications, which are described in medical journals, include arrhythmias, myocardiac perforations, thrombosis, hemorrhage in the pleura, etc., and these are related with the catheter and its possible movement inside the blood vessel where it was originally inserted. The usual exploratory procedure to pinpoint the end tip of the catheter has been an ordinary x-ray, but often this x-ray does not allow one to see precisely where the catheter tip is located. This problem is caused by the tiny catheter calibre which does not allow for all the necessary contrast; because of this, it is frequently necessary to administer a radiopaque contrasting sub-stance and then repeat the x-ray in order to ensure that the catheter tip is located exactly where it should be. By means of electrocardiographic monitoring, a three-pronged key with an electrode and a 5.85% sodium chloride solution, it is possible to pinpoint the end tip of the catheter without resorting to an x-ray nor administering a contrasting solution.

  4. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidity in CF. We used a novel, mini-Ussing chamber system to investigate the properties of HCO3− transport in native porcine small airways (∼ 1 mm φ). We assayed HCO3− transport across small airway epithelia as reflected by the transepithelial voltage, conductance, and equivalent short-circuit current with bilateral 25-mM HCO3− plus 125-mM NaGlu Ringer’s solution in the presence of luminal amiloride (10 μM). Under these conditions, because no major transportable anions other than HCO3− were present, we took the equivalent short-circuit current to be a direct measure of active HCO3− secretion. Applying selective agonists and inhibitors, we show constitutive HCO3− secretion in small airways, which can be stimulated significantly by β-adrenergic– (cAMP) and purinergic (Ca2+) -mediated agonists, independently. These results indicate that two separate components for HCO3− secretion, likely via CFTR- and calcium-activated chloride channel–dependent processes, are physiologically regulated for likely roles in mucus clearance and antimicrobial innate defenses of small airways. PMID:24224935

  5. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed.

  6. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  7. Lesion-specific laser catheters for angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy-Chutorian, Douglas

    1992-08-01

    Since no one laser catheter can treat all types of disease, a new family of `lesion-specific' devices was evaluated with a holmium laser source. Three-hundred-thirty-one patients (avg. 60 years) with symptomatic coronary disease were studied. Average lesion length was 1.2 cm. A 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, or 2.0 mm, tapered-tip or non-tapered, multifiber catheter (Eclipse, Palo Alto, Calif.) was advanced over the wire while emitting 250 - 600 mj/pulse at 5 Hz. Mean percent stenosis decreased from 89% to 57% after lasing with a mean of 140 pulses. Complications were infrequent. Overall procedural success was 95%. The conclusion is that specialized laser catheters delivering holmium laser energy are capable of reducing the severity of coronary stenoses including balloon angioplasty failures and bypass graft failures. Follow up studies are in progress to assess long term efficacy.

  8. Ambulatory setting for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance ensuring entry into the abdominal cavity and avoiding the risk of epigastric artery injury under direct ultrasound visualization was recently published. This study demonstrated that the technique was minimally invasive and allowed for accurate assessment of entry into the abdominal cavity and avoidance of vascular injury. In the current analysis, we report the impact of this technique on hospital stay during a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion. Twenty-six PD catheters have been placed on an outpatient basis using this technique. All catheter insertions were successful. Patients were discharge on the same day of the procedure. There were no procedure-related complication or related to short hospital stay. An ambulatory setting allows for a short hospital stay without compromising patient care. This brief paper explains in detail the pre, peri and postoperative period and follow-up.

  9. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  10. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  15. Intravascular magnetic resonance imaging using a loopless catheter antenna.

    PubMed

    Ocali, O; Atalar, E

    1997-01-01

    Recently, intravascular catheter probes have been developed to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for MR imaging of blood vessels. Miniaturization of these catheter probes without degrading their performances is very critical in imaging small vessels such as coronary arteries. Catheter coils have a loop incorporated in their structure and have limitations in physical dimensions and electromagnetic properties. The use of a loopless intravascular catheter antenna is proposed to overcome these problems. The catheter antenna is essentially a dipole, which makes a very thin diameter possible, and its electronic circuitry can be placed outside the blood vessels without performance degradation. The theoretical foundation for the design and operation of the catheter antenna is presented. Several catheter antennae, as small as 1.5 French, were constructed and tested on phantoms and rabbits with great success. The catheter antenna has a simple structure and is easy to design, implement, and operate.

  16. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  17. Hemodialysis catheter-associated central venous stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and interventional treatment of central vein stenosis (CVS) that may result from central vein catheter (CVC) placement. The precise mechanism of CVC-associated CVS remains largely undefined, though anatomic considerations appear to play a prominent pathologic role. The impact of CVC-associated CVS on arteriovenous fistula outcomes is reviewed. The percutaneous treatment of CVS, observation, angioplasty, or angioplasty with stent placement is reviewed, along with potential surgical treatment options. As the treatment outcomes of CVC-associated CVS have been disappointing, catheter avoidance remains the best strategy.

  18. Magnetic Resonance-guided Active Catheter Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Several advantages of MR imaging compared with other imaging modalities have provided the rationale for increased attention to MR-guided interventions, including its excellent soft tissue contrast, its capability to show both anatomic and functional information, and no use of ionizing radiation. An important aspect of MR-guided intervention is to provide visualization and navigation of interventional devices relative to the surrounding tissues. This article focuses on the methods for MR-guided active tracking in catheter-based interventions. Practical issues about implementation of active catheter tracking in a clinical setting are discussed and several current application examples are highlighted.

  19. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  20. Prevention of indwelling catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    2011-03-01

    The use of indwelling urethral catheters has become a common aspect of patient care, but they can be a source of infection. Nurses can help to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections by using aseptic technique on insertion, following best practice in ongoing care and promptly removing catheters. The urinary catheter assessment and monitoring form (UCAM) is used at the Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, to remind staff of best practice and promote their early removal.

  1. Echinocandin and ethanol lock therapy treatment of fungal catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Kevin P; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A; Berquist, William E

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol lock therapy has been implemented to prevent infections of central venous catheters as well as to treat infections. Fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections are historically more difficult to treat and have required removal of central venous catheters. We report the largest case series to date, successfully treating 5 of 7 fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections with ethanol lock therapy and systemic echinocandin administration.

  2. Intermittent back pain after central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Rosa, U W; Foreman, M; Willsie-Ediger, S

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of inadvertent azygos placement of a central venous catheter. The patient experienced ill-defined back pain associated with total parenteral nutrition infusion. The catheter malposition remained unrecognized and resulted in extensive diagnostic work-up. Symptoms resolved after the catheter was withdrawn.

  3. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  5. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  6. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  7. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  8. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  9. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  11. Serendipitous detection of an errant central venous catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Romdall, K.; Griep, R.

    1985-09-01

    The inappropriate placement of a patient's central venous catheter in the pleural space by the serendipitous injection of Tc-99m labeled red blood cells through the catheter during a GI bleeding study was discovered. Position and patency of central venous lines can be incidentally evaluated by using existing central venous catheters for administration of radiopharmaceuticals during radionuclide imaging studies.

  12. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  15. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  16. Advances in Positive Airway Pressure Treatment Modalities for Hypoventilation Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Dan; Shetty, Safal; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Rationale Positive airway pressure therapy for hypoventilation syndromes can significantly improve health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), healthcare costs, and even mortality. The sleep-disordered breathing in such individuals are quite complex and require sophisticated devices with algorithms that are designed to accurately detect and effectively treat respiratory events that includes hypoventilation, upper airway obstruction, lower airway obstruction, central apneas and central hypopneas and reduce the work of breathing while maintaining breathing comfort. Objectives The therapeutic physiological rationale for the various advanced PAP modalities and the details about the principles of operation and technology implementation are provided here. Conclusions The physiological rationale for advanced PAP modalities is sound considering the complexity of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with hypoventilation syndromes. Although such devices are increasingly used in clinical practice, the supporting clinical evidence – specifically comparative-effectiveness studies in real-life conditions -- needs to be performed. Moreover, there is much opportunity for further refining these devices that include the ability of the device to reliably monitor gas-exchange, sleep-wakefulness state, and for reducing variability in device efficacy due to provider-selected device-settings. PMID:25346650

  17. Generation of Pig Airways using Rules Developed from the Measurements of Physical Airways

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md Khurshidul; Mansy, Hansen A.

    2017-01-01

    Background A method for generating bronchial tree would be helpful when constructing models of the tree for benchtop experiments as well as for numerical modeling of flow or sound propagation in the airways. Early studies documented the geometric details of the human airways that were used to develop methods for generating human airway tree. However, methods for generating animal airway tree are scarcer. Earlier studies suggested that the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. Hence, using algorithms for the human airways may not be accurate in generating models of animal airway geometry. Objective The objective of this study is to develop an algorithm for generating pig airway tree based on the geometric details extracted from the physical measurements. Methods In the current study, measured values of branch diameters, lengths and bifurcation angles and rotation of bifurcating planes were used to develop an algorithm that is capable of generating a realistic pig airway tree. Results The generation relations between parent and daughter branches were found to follow certain trends. The diameters and the length of different branches were dependent on airway generations while the bifurcation angles were primarily dependent on bifurcation plane rotations. These relations were sufficient to develop rules for generating a model of the pig large airways. Conclusion The results suggested that the airway tree generated from the algorithm can provide an approximate geometric model of pig airways for computational and benchtop studies. PMID:28255517

  18. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  19. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Intravenous Nurses Society.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Intravenous Nurses Society (INS) recognizes the need for uniform terminology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to encourage standardization for indications, care, and maintenance strategies for these devices. It also recognizes the need for recommendations regarding the choice, use, management, and discontinuation of PICCs to promote positive patient outcomes and enhance patient comfort, safety, and satisfaction.

  20. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  1. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  7. Left ventricular volumetric conductance catheter for rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Takaki, M; Yamaguchi, H; Tachibana, H; Suga, H

    1996-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) volume (V) is an essential parameter for assessment of the cardiac pump function. Measurement of LVV in situ by a conductance catheter method has been widely used in dogs and humans but not yet in small experimental animals such as rats. We instituted a miniaturized six-electrode conductance catheter (3-F) for rat LVV measurement and its signal processing apparatus. We compared stroke volumes (SVs) simultaneously measured with this conductance catheter introduced into the LV through the apex and an electromagnetic flow probe placed on the ascending aorta during gradual decreases in LVV by an inferior vena caval occlusion. A high and linear correlation (r = 0.982) was obtained between these differently measured by SVs pooled from six rats. In another group of three rats, LV pressure was simultaneously measured with a 3-F catheter-tip micromanometer introduced into the LV through the apex. We obtained the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume (P-V) relationship (Emax) by a gradual ascending aortic occlusion. After administration of propranolol, Emax obviously decreased with no change in volume intercept of the P-V relationship. The conductance volumetry proved to be useful in rats.

  8. Recent trends in airway management

    PubMed Central

    Karlik, Joelle; Aziz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal intubation remains a life-saving procedure that is typically not difficult for experienced providers in routine conditions. Unfortunately, difficult intubation remains challenging to predict and intubation conditions may make the event life threatening. Recent technological advances aim to further improve the ease, speed, safety, and success of intubation but have not been fully investigated. Video laryngoscopy, though proven effective in the difficult airway, may result in different intubation success rates in various settings and in different providers’ hands. The rescue surgical airway remains a rarely used but critical skill, and research continues to investigate optimal techniques. This review highlights some of the new thoughts and research on these important topics. PMID:28299194

  9. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  10. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion.

  11. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  12. Automated Lobe-Based Airway Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M.; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L.; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  13. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  14. Initial Experience and Feasibility of the New Low-Profile Stingray Catheter as Part of the Antegrade Dissection and Re-Entry Revascularization Strategy for Coronary Chronic Total Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Maeremans, Joren; Palmers, Pieter-Jan; Dens, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 77 • Male, 57 • Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Coronary chronic total occlusion Symptoms: Angina pectoris Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous coronary intervention of coronary chronic total occlusions Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: During antegrade dissection re-entry (ADR) of chronic total occlusions (CTO), the first-generation Stingray catheter requires the use of large-bore guides (sheathless 7.5 Fr or 8 Fr), which increases the risk for access site-related complications and compromises radial approaches. Smaller guiding sizes necessitate long guidewires (e.g., 300 cm) or guidewire extensions for catheter advancement or removal. However, friction between guides and the Stingray catheter can result in unstable guidewire position or unintentional removal. Furthermore, failure to deliver the catheter at the distal re-entry zone is a common problem. To overcome issues of deliverability and reduce the need for pre-dilatations, with its inherent risk of creating subintimal hematomas, the Stingray low-profile (LP) balloon catheter was developed. Case Report: We describe 3 cases of successful application of the novel Stingray LP catheter during ADR. In all cases, 7 Fr guiding catheters were successfully used in combination with the device. The lower profile facilitated a good exchange and delivery of the device, without the need for balloon pre-dilatations in 2 cases. This resulted in a limited subintimal plane, enabling a smooth puncture into the true lumen. One case presented with extreme levels of calcification and tortuosity, resulting in a high degree of friction, despite the lower catheter profile. No in-hospital coronary or access site-related complications occurred. Conclusions: This case report illustrates the feasibility of the Stingray LP catheter for the treatment of CTOs via the ADR technique. The lower profile of the catheter potentially increases the deliverability

  15. Initial Experience and Feasibility of the New Low-Profile Stingray Catheter as Part of the Antegrade Dissection and Re-Entry Revascularization Strategy for Coronary Chronic Total Occlusions.

    PubMed

    Maeremans, Joren; Palmers, Pieter-Jan; Dens, Joseph

    2017-01-31

    BACKGROUND During antegrade dissection re-entry (ADR) of chronic total occlusions (CTO), the first-generation Stingray catheter requires the use of large-bore guides (sheathless 7.5 Fr or 8 Fr), which increases the risk for access site-related complications and compromises radial approaches. Smaller guiding sizes necessitate long guidewires (e.g., 300 cm) or guidewire extensions for catheter advancement or removal. However, friction between guides and the Stingray catheter can result in unstable guidewire position or unintentional removal. Furthermore, failure to deliver the catheter at the distal re-entry zone is a common problem. To overcome issues of deliverability and reduce the need for pre-dilatations, with its inherent risk of creating subintimal hematomas, the Stingray low-profile (LP) balloon catheter was developed. CASE REPORT We describe 3 cases of successful application of the novel Stingray LP catheter during ADR. In all cases, 7 Fr guiding catheters were successfully used in combination with the device. The lower profile facilitated a good exchange and delivery of the device, without the need for balloon pre-dilatations in 2 cases. This resulted in a limited subintimal plane, enabling a smooth puncture into the true lumen. One case presented with extreme levels of calcification and tortuosity, resulting in a high degree of friction, despite the lower catheter profile. No in-hospital coronary or access site-related complications occurred. CONCLUSIONS This case report illustrates the feasibility of the Stingray LP catheter for the treatment of CTOs via the ADR technique. The lower profile of the catheter potentially increases the deliverability, safety, and exchangeability of the device.

  16. Validation of the Accuracy and Reliability of Culturing Intravascular Catheter Segments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    catheters located in central veins of adult surgical and medical intensive care patients were cultured. Any type of central venous catheter was accepted for...20 to 92 years). All catheters were central venous catheters, including 76 triple lumen catheters, 60 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters, 54 Cordis...RT, Kruse JA, Thill-Baharozian MC, Carlson RW. Triple-vs. Single-Lumen Central Venous Catheters: A prospective study in a critically ill population

  17. A three-microphone acoustic reflection technique using transmitted acoustic waves in the airway.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yuki; Huang, Jyongsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Kato, Ryo; Higashino, Mari; Shinomiya, Shohei; Kitadate, Shoko; Takahara, Yutaka; Yamaya, Atsuyo; Saito, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kojima, Koji; Oikawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Ken; Tsuchihara, Katsuma; Iguchi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Mizuno, Shiro; Osanai, Kazuhiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2013-10-15

    The acoustic reflection technique noninvasively measures airway cross-sectional area vs. distance functions and uses a wave tube with a constant cross-sectional area to separate incidental and reflected waves introduced into the mouth or nostril. The accuracy of estimated cross-sectional areas gets worse in the deeper distances due to the nature of marching algorithms, i.e., errors of the estimated areas in the closer distances accumulate to those in the further distances. Here we present a new technique of acoustic reflection from measuring transmitted acoustic waves in the airway with three microphones and without employing a wave tube. Using miniaturized microphones mounted on a catheter, we estimated reflection coefficients among the microphones and separated incidental and reflected waves. A model study showed that the estimated cross-sectional area vs. distance function was coincident with the conventional two-microphone method, and it did not change with altered cross-sectional areas at the microphone position, although the estimated cross-sectional areas are relative values to that at the microphone position. The pharyngeal cross-sectional areas including retropalatal and retroglossal regions and the closing site during sleep was visualized in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The method can be applicable to larger or smaller bronchi to evaluate the airspace and function in these localized airways.

  18. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells.

  19. Catheter-related infections: diagnosis and intravascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Burillo, A; Muñoz, P

    2001-11-01

    The diagnosis of catheter-related infections relies on the presence of clinical manifestations of infection and the evidence of colonization of the catheter tip by bacteria, mycobacteria or fungi. The reference method to confirm the latter requires the withdrawal of the catheter for culturing, which frequently turns out to be inconvenient, unnecessary and costly. New methods try to avoid these inconveniences and to assess the presence of tip colonization without withdrawal. One of these methods uses quantitative blood cultures with a jump (> or = 5) in colony counts between blood obtained from the catheter lumen and simultaneously from a peripheral vein. It has a high sensitivity (>80%) and specificity (94%-100%) but is cumbersome and requires both an easy backflow of blood in the catheter and the existence of bacteremia. Cytocentrifugation and acridine orange staining of blood withdrawn from an infected catheter lumen has a sensitivity and a specificity of over 90% for the diagnosis of tip colonization. "Superficial cultures" consist in the semiquantitative culture of the hub, of the skin surrounding the catheter entrance and of the first (1 cm) subcutaneous portion of the catheter after swabbing. Sensitivity of this method is >90% and specificity is >80%, and positive and negative predictive values for catheters (considering together those with and without clinical data of infection) are 66% and 97%, respectively. Endoluminal brushing has turned out to be an impractical and unreliable procedure, at least in our experience. New methods based on the speed of bacterial growth to detectable levels of microorganisms in conventional blood cultures are a new and interesting way of assessing catheter-related infections. Besides, as use of antimicrobial-coated catheters becomes more prevalent, the existing definitions of catheter colonization and catheter-related infection may need to be modified, because such coatings may lead to false-negative culture results. Many

  20. Validation of catheter semiquantitative culture technique for nonstaphylococcal organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, D P; Garcia, A; Kelly, J W; Longfield, R N; Harrison, L

    1996-01-01

    The catheter semiquantitative culture roll tip technique has been validated as a discriminator between non-catheter-related bacteremias and catheter-related bacteremias (CRBs) caused by Staphylococcus species. However, this technique has not been specifically validated when used for the evaluation of catheters infected with organisms other than staphylococci. We reviewed catheters that had been submitted for semiquantitative roll tip culture as well as hospital records to determine clinical correlates of infection. Local infection and CRB were defined by standard criteria. Catheter-related sepsis (CRS) was defined as fever, leukocytosis, or hypotension which resolved with catheter removal, without another source of infection. For 195 catheters from 93 patients, gram-negative rods and enterococci were present on 36, fungi were on 25, Corynebacterium species were on 5, Bacillus species were on 3, Staphylococcus species were on 79, and 41 demonstrated no growth. Of 21 episodes of CRB or CRS due to nonstaphylococcal organisms, only 1 (questionable) episode was due to a catheter with < 15 CFU (P < 0.05). Eleven of these 21 episodes of CRB or CRS were due to gram-negative rods and enterococci, of which only the questionable episode was due to a catheter with < 15 CFU. Nine of these 21 episodes of CRB or CRS were due to fungi, none of which were associated with a catheter with < 15 CFU. The data for Staphylococcus species recapitulated published data (none of 21 CRB or CRS episodes were associated with catheters with < 15 CFU) and validated this retrospective technique. The data presented in this study validate the use of the semiquantitative culture technique for the evaluation of catheter-related infections caused by organisms other than staphylococci. PMID:8789025

  1. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  2. Urgent peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis catheter dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, there is a steady incident rate of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who require renal replacement therapy. Of these patients, approximately one-third have an "unplanned" or "urgent" start to dialysis. This can be a very challenging situation where patients have either not had adequate time for education and decision making regarding dialysis modality and appropriate dialysis access, or a decision was made and plans were altered due to unforeseen circumstances. Despite such unplanned starts, clinicians must still consider the patient's ESKD "life-plan", which includes the best initial dialysis modality and access to suit the patient's individual goals and their medical, social, logistic, and facility circumstances. This paper will discuss the considerations of peritoneal dialysis and a peritoneal dialysis catheter access and hemodialysis and central venous catheter access in patients who require an urgent start to dialysis.

  3. Monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Labonte, S.; Blais, A.; Legault, S.R.; Ali, H.O.; Roy, L.

    1996-10-01

    The authors study the characteristics of various monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation of the endocardium. The investigation is done with a computer model based on the finite-element method in the frequency domain. Three monopole geometries are considered: open-tip, dielectric-tip, and metal-tip. Calculations are made for the magnetic field, the reflection coefficient and the power deposition pattern of the antennas immersed in normal saline. The theoretical results are compared with measurements performed on prototypes and good agreement is obtained. The antenna characteristics suggest that the metal-tip monopole best fulfills the requirements of catheter ablation. The computer model is then used to compare metal-tip monopoles of different dimensions and to determine design trade-offs.

  4. Baclofen pump catheter leakage after migration of the abdominal catheter in a pediatric patient with spasticity.

    PubMed

    Dastgir, Amer; Ranalli, Nathan J; MacGregor, Theresa L; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-09-01

    The authors report an unusual case of intrathecal baclofen withdrawal due to the perforation and subsequent leakage of a baclofen pump catheter in a patient with spastic cerebral palsy. A 15-year-old boy underwent an uncomplicated placement of an intrathecal baclofen pump for the treatment of spasticity due to cerebral palsy. After excellent control of symptoms for 3 years, the patient presented to the emergency department with increasing tremors following a refill of his baclofen pump. Initial evaluation consisted of radiographs of the pump and catheter, which appeared normal, and a successful aspiration of CSF from the pump's side port. A CT dye study revealed a portion of the catheter directly overlying the refill port and extravasation of radiopaque dye into the subfascial pocket anterior to the pump. During subsequent revision surgery, a small puncture hole in the catheter was seen to be leaking the drug. The likely cause of the puncture was an inadvertent perforation of the catheter by a needle during the refilling of the pump. This case report highlights a unique complication in a patient with an intrathecal baclofen pump. Physicians caring for these patients should be aware of this rare yet potential complication in patients presenting with baclofen withdrawal symptoms.

  5. Soft robotic concepts in catheter design: an on-demand fouling-release urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Levering, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; López, Gabriel P

    2014-10-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation is used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters are constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches.

  6. Incidence of phlebitis associated with the use of peripheral IV catheter and following catheter removal

    PubMed Central

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; Peixoto, Cibelle Grassmann; May, Tássia Amanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and its association with risk factors when using peripheral IV catheters (PIC) and following their removal - (post-infusion phlebitis) in hospitalized adults. Method: a cohort study of 171 patients using PIC, totaling 361 punctures. Sociodemographic variables and variables associated with the catheter were collected. Descriptive and analytical statistical analyses were performed. Results: average patient age was 56.96 and 51.5% of the sample population was male. The incidence of phlebitis was 1.25% while using PIC, and 1.38% post-infusion. The incidence of phlebitis while using PIC was associated with the length of time the catheter remained in place, whereas post-infusion phlebitis was associated with puncture in the forearm. Ceftriaxone, Clarithromycin and Oxacillin are associated with post-infusion phlebitis. Conclusions: this study made it possible to investigate the association between risk factors and phlebitis during catheter use and following its removal. The frequency of post-infusion phlebitis was larger than the incidence of phlebitis with the catheter in place, with Phlebitis Grade III and II being the most frequently found in each of these situations, respectively. Aspects related to post-infusion phlebitis can be explained, given the limited number of studies addressing this theme from this perspective. PMID:27508916

  7. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  8. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  9. a Subminiature Scintillation Detector for Catheter Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafè, R.; Montani, L.; Burgio, N.; Iurlaro, G.; Santagata, A.; Ciavola, C.; Alonge, G.

    2006-04-01

    The feasibility of a subminiature scintillation detector to be inserted in a catheter for lesion localization in nuclear medicine SPECT has been studied. Measurements on a simple laboratory setup have been performed and compared with Monte Carlo results. Further simulations, at 30keV and 140keV, concerning a configuration reproducing severe clinical conditions have shown poor lesion detectability. Several factors affecting the response have to be investigated to improve the capability of lesion localization characterizing such detector.

  10. Mechanisms of inflammation-mediated airway smooth muscle plasticity and airways remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Amrani, Yassine

    2003-09-16

    Recent evidence points to progressive structural change in the airway wall, driven by chronic local inflammation, as a fundamental component for development of irreversible airway hyperresponsiveness. Acute and chronic inflammation is orchestrated by cytokines from recruited inflammatory cells, airway myofibroblasts and myocytes. Airway myocytes exhibit functional plasticity in their capacity for contraction, proliferation, and synthesis of matrix protein and cytokines. This confers a principal role in driving different components of the airway remodeling process, and mediating constrictor hyperresponsiveness. Functional plasticity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by an array of environmental cues, including cytokines, which mediate their effects through receptors and a number of intracellular signaling pathways. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured airway myocytes, few have identified how intracellular signaling pathways modulate or induce these cellular responses. This review summarizes current understanding of these concepts and presents a model for the effects of inflammatory mediators on functional plasticity of ASM in asthma.

  11. Modeling structure-function interdependence of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Ewald R

    2008-01-01

    Modeling functional processes, such as gas exchange, that occur deep in the lung far from where one can directly observe, depends on knowledge about the precise and quantitative design of the structure of the gas exchanger. This is the case as well for the actual arrangement of alveoli and blood capillaries at the gas exchange surface as for the disposition of gas exchange units with respect to the airway and vascular trees. The serial arrangement of alveoli and their perfusion as parallel units have important consequences for gas exchange.

  12. Catheter-Related Mortality among ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  13. Flow Structure Associated with Hemodialysis Catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jason

    2005-11-01

    Insertion of a hemodialysis catheter into the superior vena cava (SVC) gives rise to complex flow patterns, which arise from the simultaneous injection and extraction of blood through different holes (ports) of the catheter. Techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed in a scaled-up water facility. This approach allows characterization of both the instantaneous and time-averaged flow structure due to generic classes of side hole geometries. The trajectory of the injection jet is related to the ratio of the initial jet velocity to the mainstream velocity through the SVC, and to the type of distortion of the jet cross-section. Furthermore, the mean and fluctuating velocity and vorticity fields are determined. Significant turbulent stresses develop rapidly in the injection jet, which can impinge upon the wall of the simulated SVC. Immediately downstream of the injection hole, a recirculation cell of low velocity exists adjacent to the catheter surface. These and other representations of the flow structure are first evaluated for a steady throughflow, then for the case of a pulsatile waveform in the SVC, which matches that of a normal adult.

  14. The All India Difficult Airway Association 2016 guidelines for tracheal intubation in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Kundra, Pankaj; Garg, Rakesh; Ramkumar, Venkateswaran; Patwa, Apeksh; Shah, Amit; Raveendra, Ubaradka S; Shetty, Sumalatha Radhakrishna; Doctor, Jeson Rajan; Pawar, Dilip K; Ramesh, Singaravelu; Das, Sabyasachi; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often life-saving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with a suboptimal evaluation of the airway and limited oxygen reserves despite adequate pre-oxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA) proposes a stepwise plan for safe management of the airway in critically ill patients. These guidelines have been developed based on available evidence; wherever robust evidence was lacking, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the AIDAA and the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation during pre-oxygenation improves oxygen stores in patients with respiratory pathology. Nasal insufflation of oxygen at 15 L/min can increase the duration of apnoea before the occurrence of hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygenation at 60–70 L/min may also increase safety during TI in critically ill patients. Stable haemodynamics and gas exchange must be maintained during rapid sequence induction. It is necessary to implement an intubation protocol during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful. PMID:28003694

  15. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  16. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  17. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  18. Upper airway resistance: species-related differences.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, N; Reinhold, P

    2010-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, upper airway resistance deserves a particular attention in equines athletes and brachycephalic dogs. Due to the anatomical peculiarities of the upper airway and/or pathological conditions, significant alterations of performance and/or well being might occur in horses and dogs. Physiological specificities and pathological changes of the lower respiratory tract deserve a major attention in other species.

  19. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  20. Comparison between qualitative and semiquantitative catheter-tip cultures: laboratory diagnosis of catheter-related infection in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Camila; de Lourdes RS Cunha, Maria; Lyra, João C; Bentlin, Maria R; Batalha, Jackson EN; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Rugolo, Lígia MSS

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated semiquantitative and qualitative catheter-culture methods for diagnosis of catheter-related infection (CRI) in newborns. Catheter tips from newborns admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the University Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP were included in the study. Catheter cultures were performed with both semiquantitative and qualitative techniques. For CRI diagnosis, microorganisms isolated from catheter cultures and from peripheral blood cultures were identified and submitted to agent susceptibility test. The gold standard was the certain CRI diagnosis when same microorganism (specie and profile of susceptibility to agents) was isolated from both catheter tips and peripheral blood culture. A total of 85 catheters from 63 newborns were included in the study. The semiquantitative culture method, despite presenting lower sensitivity (90%), showed higher specificity (71%) when compared to 100% of sensitivity and 60% of specificity in the qualitative method. The identification of the microorganisms obtained from the catheter cultures showed a prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) species. The specie Staphylococcus epidermidis (77.5%) was the prevalent in the catheters with positive semiquantitative cultures. Among 11 episodes with CRI diagnosis, 8 (72.7%) were associated with CNS species, of which 6 were S. epidermidis. Two episodes of CRI by S. aureus and one by Candida parapsilosis were also detected. The semiquantitative catheter-culture method showed advantages for CRI diagnosis in newborns when compared to the conservative qualitative method. PMID:24031213

  1. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  2. Relationship between airway narrowing, patchy ventilation and lung mechanics in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Tgavalekos, N T; Musch, G; Harris, R S; Vidal Melo, M F; Winkler, T; Schroeder, T; Callahan, R; Lutchen, K R; Venegas, J G

    2007-06-01

    Bronchoconstriction in asthma results in patchy ventilation forming ventilation defects (VDefs). Patchy ventilation is clinically important because it affects obstructive symptoms and impairs both gas exchange and the distribution of inhaled medications. The current study combined functional imaging, oscillatory mechanics and theoretical modelling to test whether the degrees of constriction of airways feeding those units outside VDefs were related to the extent of VDefs in bronchoconstricted asthmatic subjects. Positron emission tomography was used to quantify the regional distribution of ventilation and oscillatory mechanics were measured in asthmatic subjects before and after bronchoconstriction. For each subject, ventilation data was mapped into an anatomically based lung model that was used to evaluate whether airway constriction patterns, consistent with the imaging data, were capable of matching the measured changes in airflow obstruction. The degree and heterogeneity of constriction of the airways feeding alveolar units outside VDefs was similar among the subjects studied despite large inter-subject variability in airflow obstruction and the extent of the ventilation defects. Analysis of the data amongst the subjects showed an inverse relationship between the reduction in mean airway conductance, measured in the breathing frequency range during bronchoconstriction, and the fraction of lung involved in ventilation defects. The current data supports the concept that patchy ventilation is an expression of the integrated system and not just the sum of independent responses of individual airways.

  3. Endoscopic high-resolution auto fluorescence imaging and optical coherence tomography of airways in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony; Hohert, Geoffrey; Schwartz, Carley; Shaipanich, Tawimas; Ritchie, Alexander J.; Zhang, Wei; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Lane, Pierre M.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present multimodal imaging of peripheral airways in vivo using an endoscopic imaging system capable of co-registered optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging (OCT-AFI). This system employs a 0.9 mm diameter double-clad fiber optic-based catheter for endoscopic imaging of small peripheral airways. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can visualize detailed airway morphology in the lung periphery and autofluorescence imaging (AFI) can visualize fluorescent tissue components such as collagen and elastin, improving the detection of airway lesions. Results from in vivo imaging of 40 patients indicate that OCT and AFI offer complementary information that may increase the ability to identify pulmonary nodules in the lung periphery and improve the safety of biopsy collection by identifying large blood vessels. AFI can rapidly visualize in vivo vascular networks using fast scanning parameters resulting in vascular-sensitive imaging with less breathing/cardiac motion artifacts compared to Doppler OCT imaging. By providing complementary information about structure and function of tissue, OCT-AFI may improve site selection during biopsy collection in the lung periphery.

  4. Value of Superficial Cultures for Prediction of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in Long-Term Catheters: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures taken from the skin and from the hubs of short-term central venous catheters can help us to predict catheter-related bloodstream infections (C-RBSIs). The value of these cultures for such predictions has not been assessed in long-term catheters. Our objective was to assess the value of superficial cultures for the prediction of C-RBSI among patients with long-term catheters. Over a 2-year period, we prospectively obtained cultures from the skin overlying reservoir ports (group A) and from the skin insertion site and hubs of all tunneled catheters (group B). This routine was performed by vascular and interventional radiologists immediately before catheter removal (irrespective of the reason for withdrawal). Swabs were processed semiquantitatively. Catheter tips from both groups were cultured using Maki's semiquantitative technique and sonication. We also performed cultures of the reservoir ports at different sites. C-RBSI was defined as the isolation of the same species of microorganism(s) both in the colonized catheter and in at least 1 peripheral blood culture. We included 372 catheters (group A, 223; group B, 149) during the study period. The catheter colonization rate was 23.4% (87/372), and 28 patients had C-RBSI. Validity index values for the capacity of surface cultures to predict C-RBSI in groups A and B were, respectively, as follows: sensitivity, 23.5% and 45.5%; specificity, 59.7% and 63.0%; positive predictive value, 4.6% and 8.9%; and negative predictive value, 90.4% and 93.5%. Superficial cultures of patients with long-term catheters could help us to rule out the catheter as the portal of entry of bloodstream infections. Superficial cultures (from skin and hubs) proved to be a useful conservative diagnostic tool for ruling out C-RBSI among patients with long-term tunneled catheters and totally implantable venous access ports. PMID:23850957

  5. The critical airway in adults: The facts

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm on the indications and timing for a surgical airway in emergency as such cannot be drawn due to the multiplicity of variables and the inapplicability in the context of life-threatening critical emergency, where human brain elaborates decisions better in cluster rather than in binary fashion. In particular, in emergency or urgent scenarios, there is no clear or established consensus as to specifically who should receive a tracheostomy as a life-saving procedure; and more importantly, when. The two classical indications for emergency tracheostomy (laryngeal injury and failure to secure airway with endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy) are too generic and encompass a broad spectrum of possibilities. In literature, specific indications for emergency tracheostomy are scattered and are biased, partially comprehensive, not clearly described or not homogeneously gathered. The review highlights the indications and timing for an emergency surgical airway and gives recommendations on which surgical airway method to use in critical airway. PMID:22787346

  6. Investigation of catheter curvature and genetic algorithms in conductance catheter optimization.

    PubMed

    Thaijiam, C; Gale, T J

    2007-01-01

    Catheter curvature affects accuracy of intra-ventricular blood volume measurement when using conductance catheter techniques, especially with irregular geometries, such as in the right ventricle. To investigate this effect, we present results from using different curved catheter configurations and different numbers of electrodes in a simple Finite Element model. It was found that there is an apparent increase in accuracy with curvature, due to greater linearity in the field in the region of the measurement electrodes, which are located farther from the source electrodes as curvature increases. Also, optimization using Genetic Algorithms is presented as a method to find the optimal distribution of measurement electrodes. We plan to extend these results to develop improved electrode configurations for using in blood volume measurement in the right ventricle.

  7. [Biodegradable catheters and urinary stents. When?

    PubMed

    Soria, F; Morcillo, E; López de Alda, A; Pastor, T; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-10-01

    One of the main wishes in the field of urinary catheters and stents is to arm them with biodegradable characteristics because we consider a failure of these devices the need for retrieval, the forgotten catheter syndrome as well as the adverse effects permanent devices cause after fulfilling their aim. The efforts focused in new designs, coatings and biomaterials aim to increase the biocompatibility of theses internal devices. Lately, there have been correct advances to answer the main challenges regarding biodegradable ureteral devices. Thus, modulation of the rate of degradation has been achieved thanks to new biomaterials and the use of copolymers that enable to choose the time of permanence as it is programmed with conventional double J catheters. Biocompatibility has improved with the use of new polymers that adapt better to the urine. Finally, one of the main problems is elimination of degraded fragments and experimentally it has be demonstrated that new designs elicit controlled degradation, from distal to proximal; using stranding and combination of copolymers degradation may be caused by dilution, reducing fragmentation to the last stages of life of the prosthesis. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that biodegradable catheters potentially may cause less urinary tract infection, less encrustation and predictably they will diminish catheter morbidity, since their degradation process reduces adverse effects. Regarding the development of biodegradable urethral stents, it is necessary to find biomaterials that enable maintaining their biomechanical properties in the long term, keeping open the urethral lumen both in patients with BPH and urethral stenosis. Modulation of the time of degradation of the prosthesis has been achieved, but the appearance of urothelial hyperplasia is still a constant in the initial phases after implantation. The development of drug eluting stents, anti-proliferative or anti-inflammatory, as well as biodegradable stents biocoated is a

  8. Blocked urinary catheters: can they be better managed?

    PubMed

    Gibney, Linda E

    2016-08-11

    This article discusses one of the problems associated with urinary catheterisation. It focuses on catheter blockage and explains the effects of this on patients and the health service and aims to guide nurses in their management of this complex issue. The length of time a catheter remains functional is unique to the individual and imperative to good catheter care. Coupled with this the cause of the blockage needs to be identified before a treatment plan can be formulated. Encrustation is identified as a major problem and the reliability of using the pH value of urine to monitor is discussed. Adequate fluid intake is essential for catheter management and the benefits of citrate drinks are highlighted. The treatment regime of catheter maintenance solution is examined and while this may be an option for some patients the suggestion of proactive catheter changes would appear to be the most appropriate.

  9. [Infection associated with hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis catheters].

    PubMed

    Fariñas, María Carmen; García-Palomo, José Daniel; Gutiérrez-Cuadra, Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Catheter-related infections in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease. Staphylococcus aureus in HD patients and S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in PD patients are the most common causative organisms isolated. Currently, the diagnostic tests with highest yield in suspected catheter-related infection in HD patients have not been established, and tests used for central venous catheters (CVC) in general are applied. Management of the infected HD catheter and the use of antimicrobial therapy are similar to the measures used for other CVCs, with some specific recommendations. Peritonitis is the most severe complication in PD patients. Improving hygiene conditions in catheter insertion, treatment of S. aureus nasal carriers, regular treatment of the catheter's exit site, and antibiotic lock therapy have been associated with a reduction of infectious episodes in HD and PD patients.

  10. Practical Aspects of Nontunneled and Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Edward; Kappel, Joanne; MacRae, Jennifer; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Nontunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) are typically used when vascular access is required for urgent renal replacement therapy. The preferred site for NTHC insertion in acute kidney injury is the right internal jugular vein followed by the femoral vein. When aided by real-time ultrasound, mechanical complications related to NTHC insertion are significantly reduced. The preferred site for tunneled hemodialysis catheters placement is the right internal jugular vein followed by the left internal jugular vein. Ideally, the catheter should be inserted on the opposite side of a maturing or planned fistula/graft. Several dual-lumen, large-diameter catheters are available with multiple catheter tip designs, but no one catheter has shown significant superior performance. PMID:28270920

  11. Practical Aspects of Nontunneled and Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edward; Kappel, Joanne; MacRae, Jennifer; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Nontunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) are typically used when vascular access is required for urgent renal replacement therapy. The preferred site for NTHC insertion in acute kidney injury is the right internal jugular vein followed by the femoral vein. When aided by real-time ultrasound, mechanical complications related to NTHC insertion are significantly reduced. The preferred site for tunneled hemodialysis catheters placement is the right internal jugular vein followed by the left internal jugular vein. Ideally, the catheter should be inserted on the opposite side of a maturing or planned fistula/graft. Several dual-lumen, large-diameter catheters are available with multiple catheter tip designs, but no one catheter has shown significant superior performance.

  12. Evaluation of two coated catheters in intermittent self-catheterization.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, G; Clovis, S

    Intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) has addressed the problems of mechanical or functional urological voiding since the 1970s. Patient quality of life is enhanced by the increased independence and security offered by ISC (Lapides et al, 1972). A randomized, comparative crossover study was undertaken in two centres to evaluate the performance of SpeediCath (Coloplast) and Lofric (Astra Tech) catheters. A total of 27 subjects were recruited, all of whom had been performing ISC more than twice a day for longer than 3 months with a coated catheter. Each catheter was used for 1 week to assess catheter performance and acceptability. There were no significant differences recorded for the performance of each catheter. However, SpeediCath demonstrated favourable statistical significance in relation to ease of use, speed of use, and the concept of water as an integral part of the packaging of the catheter.

  13. Central venous catheter placement: where is the tip?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M

    2012-09-01

    The insertion of central venous catheters is a common bedside procedure performed in intensive care units. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old man who underwent insertion of a central venous catheter in the internal jugular vein without perceived complications. Postprocedural radiographs showed rostral migration of the catheter, and computed tomography performed coincidentally showed cannulation of the jugular bulb at the level of the jugular foramen. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document migration of a central venous catheter from the internal jugular vein into the dural sinuses, as confirmed by computed tomography. The case highlights the importance of acquiring postprocedural radiographs for all insertions of central venous catheters to confirm catheter placement.

  14. Conceptual Design and Procedure for an Autonomous Intramyocardial Injection Catheter.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weyland; Law, Peter

    2016-12-07

    This article discusses existing catheter systems and proposes a conceptual design and procedure for an autonomous cellinjection catheter for the purpose of transferring committed myogenic or undifferentiated stem cells into the infarct boundary zones of the left ventricle. Operation of existing catheters used for cell delivery is far from optimal. Commercial injection catheters available are hand-held devices operated manually by means of tip deflection and torque capabilities. Interventionists require a hefty learning curve and often encounter difficulties in catheter stabilization and infarct detection, resulting in lengthy operation times and non-precise injections. We examined current technologies and proposed a design incorporating robotic positional control, feedback signals, and an adaptable operational sequence to overcome these problems. The design provides the basis for the construction of a robotic catheter that is able to autonomously assist the physician in transferring myogenic cells to the left ventricle infarct boundary zones.

  15. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  16. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  17. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required.

  18. Pulmonary effects of expiratory-assisted small-lumen ventilation during upper airway obstruction in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, A; Garcia-Bardon, A; Kamuf, J; Thomas, R; Liu, T; Schad, A; Duenges, B; David, M; Hartmann, E K

    2015-10-01

    Novel devices for small-lumen ventilation may enable effective inspiration and expiratory ventilation assistance despite airway obstruction. In this study, we investigated a porcine model of complete upper airway obstruction. After ethical approval, we randomly assigned 13 anaesthetised pigs either to small-lumen ventilation following airway obstruction (n = 8) for 30 min, or to volume-controlled ventilation (sham setting, n = 5). Small-lumen ventilation enabled adequate gas exchange over 30 min. One animal died as a result of a tension pneumothorax in this setting. Redistribution of ventilation from dorsal to central compartments and significant impairment of the distribution of ventilation/perfusion occurred. Histopathology demonstrated considerable lung injury, predominantly through differences in the dorsal dependent lung regions. Small-lumen ventilation maintained adequate gas exchange in a porcine airway obstruction model. The use of this technique for 30 min by inexperienced clinicians was associated with considerable end-expiratory collapse leading to lung injury, and may also carry the risk of severe injury.

  19. Automatic Reconstruction of Catheters in CT Based Bracytherapy Treatment Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    backward of the current slice (+ and – z direction in the DICOM definition8) and (d) catheter loop option. E. Description of parameters 1.In...and +z direction according to the DICOM definition8. The backward searching algorithm is given below. Input data: PC - center of the catheter...prostate, breast, cervix, brain, chest, scapula, skin, neck and glioblastoma implants, and one phantom implant with three looped plastic catheters

  20. Endoluminal dilation technique to remove "stuck" tunneled hemodialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Stephen E; Hadziomerovic, Adnan; Aquino, Jose; Cunningham, Ian; O'Kelly, Kevin; Rasuli, Pasteur

    2012-08-01

    Most tunneled catheters can be easily removed after the retention cuff is dissected. Occasionally, these catheters can become resistant to removal even after application of potentially hazardous forceful traction. In addition, an infected catheter may cause life-threatening septicemia. Several methods have been described for their extraction, some of which may be available only in tertiary-care facilities. The present report describes the successful extraction of five such "stuck" catheters by using a recently described technique of endoluminal dilation. The technique appears safe and straightforward and can be performed in any interventional suite while allowing preservation of venous access.

  1. Multifunctional Catheters Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre T.; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A family of 3 multifunctional intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology (EP) mapping catheters has been in development to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac EP procedures. The catheter tip on the first device includes a 7.5 MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. The second device is a forward-looking catheter with a 24-element 14 MHz phased array. Both of these catheters operate on a commercial imaging system with standard software. Multiple EP mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the arrays for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images and used for unique integration with EP mapping technologies. To help establish the catheters’ ability for integration with EP interventional procedures, tests were performed in vivo in a porcine animal model to demonstrate both useful intracardiac echocardiographic (ICE) visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheters also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. The companion paper of this work discusses the catheter design of the side-looking catheter with special attention to acoustic lens design. The third device in development is a 10 MHz forward-looking ring array that is to be mounted at the distal tip of a 9F catheter to permit use of the available catheter lumen for adjunctive therapy tools. PMID:18986948

  2. Latex anaphylaxis caused by a Swan-Ganz catheter.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Kiyoshi; Watai, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Masami; Mitsui, Chihiro; Fukutomi, Yuma; Tanimoto, Hidenori; Kawaura, Noriyuki; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman visited the division of cardiovascular disease in our hospital. She underwent a cardiac catheter examination, and a Swan-Ganz catheter was inserted. Several minutes later, she developed anaphylactic shock. She had no past history of latex allergy, but did have a banana allergy. Skin prick tests showed a positive reaction to an extract of latex gloves and an extract of the balloon of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Anaphylactic shock caused by the latex balloon of a Swan-Ganz catheter was diagnosed. It is necessary to pay attention to not only latex allergy but also fruit allergies with a cross-reactivity to latex.

  3. [Incidence and risk factors for infections from hemodialysis catheters].

    PubMed

    Jean, G

    2001-01-01

    We report here a revue of hemodialysis catheter-related infections data published since 1985. The reported prevalence of bacteremia is 1 to 20% of catheters, and incidence is 0.72 to 9/1000 catheter-days. Local infection is reported in 6 to 63% of catheters and in 1 to 5/1000 catheter-days. Tunneled catheters and implantables chambers reported less infection rate. The most severe complication is endocarditis (4% rate). Death occurs in 8 to 20% of cases. Reported microbial data show that Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is responsible for most infections ahead of non-aureus Staphylococcus. SA skin colonisation is a risk factor for catheter colonisation and the first step of infection. On the other hand, the host immunity impairment in hemodialysis patients seems a significant risk factor. Iron overload, specially after blood transfusions, older age, diabetes mellitus, low serum albumin level, previous history of bacteremia and immunosuppressive treatment have been frequently involved. Other catheter-related factors are time of use, absence of tunnel and use for parenteral nutrition. Nurses plans, dressing type and frequency, nurses work experience are also important. In spite of recent progress in risk factor understanding, hemodialysis-related infection remains frequent. Multicentre studies are necessary to better evaluated care protocols and new catheter material.

  4. Glutathione redox regulates airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoko; Hisada, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Yasuo; Ono, Akihiro; Murata, Yukie; Hamuro, Junji; Mori, Masatomo; Dobashi, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer. We have shown that glutathione redox status, which is the balance between intracellular reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, in antigen-presenting cells (APC) regulates the helper T cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance due to the production of IL-12. Bronchial asthma is a typical Th2 disease. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines are characteristic of asthma and trigger off an inflammation. Accordingly, we studied the effects of the intracellular glutathione redox status on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergen-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We used gamma-Glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, to elevate the intracellular GSH level and GSH/GSSG ratio of mice. In vitro, gamma-GCE pretreatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced IL-12(p70) production induced by LPS. In the mouse asthma model, intraperitoneal injection of gamma-GCE elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio of lung tissue and reduced AHR. gamma-GCE reduced levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and the chemokines eotaxin and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas it enhanced the production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma. Histologically, gamma-GCE suppressed eosinophils infiltration. Interestingly, we also found that gamma-GCE directly inhibited chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis without affecting eotaxin receptor chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) expressions. Taken together, these findings suggest that changing glutathione redox balance, increase in GSH level, and the GSH/GSSG ratio by gamma-GCE, ameliorate bronchial asthma by altering the Th1/Th2 imbalance through IL-12 production from APC and suppressing chemokine production and eosinophil migration itself.

  5. Assessment of dimensions and image quality of coronary contrast catheters from cineangiograms.

    PubMed

    Reiber, J H; Kooijman, C J; den Boer, A; Serruys, P W

    1985-01-01

    In the quantitative assessment of coronary arterial dimensions from coronary cineangiograms, the contrast catheter is usually used as a scaling device, requiring the definition of the catheter contours by semi- or fully automated contour detection procedures. The image quality of the x-ray radiated catheter is dependent on the catheter material, concentration of the contrast agent in the catheter, and kilovoltage of the x-ray source. The effects of these variables on the image quality and accuracy of the size-measurement of the filmed catheters were studied for four different catheter materials: woven dacron (wd), polyvinylchloride (pv), polyurethane (pu), and nylon. The following parameters were studied: measured size, image contrast, and average brightness gradient along the edges of the displayed catheters. The average differences of the angiographically measured size with the true size for the wd, pv, pu, and nylon catheters were +0.2, -3.2, -3.5, and +9.8%, respectively. The image contrast at various fillings of the catheters was roughly identical for the wd, pv, and pu catheters, and significantly lower for the nylon catheter. Image gradient was highest for the wd catheter, followed by the pv and pu catheters, and lowest for the nylon catheter. From these data it may be concluded that the woven dacron catheter is most suitable for quantitative coronary angiographic studies. The polyvinylchloride and polyurethane catheters perform about equally well but slightly less than the woven dacron catheter. The nylon catheter should not be used for such quantitative studies.

  6. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  7. Airway adequacy, head posture, and craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Solow, B; Siersbaek-Nielsen, S; Greve, E

    1984-09-01

    Previous studies of different samples have demonstrated associations between craniocervical angulation and craniofacial morphology, between airway obstruction by adenoids and craniofacial morphology, and between airway obstruction and craniocervical angulation. A hypothesis to account for the different sets of associations was suggested by Solow and Kreiborg in 1977. In the present study, the three sets of associations were examined in a single group of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction. Cephalometric radiographs taken in the natural head position and rhinomanometric recordings were obtained from twenty-four children 7 to 9 years of age. Correlations were calculated between twenty-seven morphologic, eight postural, and two airway variables. A large craniocervical angle was, on the average, seen in connection with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, and a large mandibular inclination. Obstructed nasopharyngeal airways (defined as a small pm-ad 2 radiographic distance and a large nasal respiratory resistance, NRR, determined rhinomanometrically) were, on the average, seen in connection with a large craniocervical angle and with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, a large mandibular inclination, and retroclination of the upper incisors. The observed correlations were in agreement with the predicted pattern of associations between craniofacial morphology, craniocervical angulation, and airway resistance, thus suggesting the simultaneous presence of such associations in the sample of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction.

  8. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  9. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter.

  10. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  11. Correlation of Airway Hyper-responsiveness with Obstructive with Spirometric Indices and FEV1 90% Predicted

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    carbon monoxide], gas exchange evaluation, and measurement of muscle strength or exercise testing.1 There is a lack of evidence supporting this...FEV1 (108% of predicted) along with upper-airway obstruction based on the midexpiratory to inspiratory flow ratio.16 Subsequent studies of acromeg... muscle function and control of breathing in patients with acromegaly. Eur Respir J 1997;10(5):977-982. 19. Armour J, Donnelly PM, Bye PTP. The large

  12. Improved method for the detection of catheter colonization and catheter-related bacteremia in newborns.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rabadán, P; Pérez-García, F; Zamora Flores, E; Nisa, E S; Guembe, M; Bouza, E

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is mandatory for hospital infection control. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are widely used in intensive care units, but studies about procedures for detection of colonization are scarce in neonates. We sequentially processed 372 PICCs by 2 methods, first by the standard roll-plate (RP) technique and then by rubbing catheters on a blood agar plate after being longitudinally split (LS). With both techniques, we detected 133 colonized PICCs. Ninety-four events of CRBSI were diagnosed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of CRBSI were 58.5%, 92.8%, 73.3%, and 86.9%, respectively, for RP technique and 96.8%, 88.5%, 74.0%, and 98.8%, respectively, for LS technique. The LS technique increased the proportion of detected CRBSI by 38.3%. Neonatal PICC tips should be cultured after cutting them open. This technique is simple and sensitive to detect catheter colonization and also to diagnose CRBSI.

  13. Myeloid sarcoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary collection of blasts of the myeloid series that partially or totally effaces the architecture of the tissue in which it is found. These tumors have been described in many sites of the body, but the skin, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, bone, soft tissue, and testes are most common. They can arise in a patient following the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, but they may also be precursors of leukemia and should be considered diagnostic for acute myeloid leukemia. The differential diagnosis of this neoplasm includes malignant lymphoma, with which it is often mistaken, leading to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. We present the case of an 84-year-old African American man with a history of renal disease secondary to hypertension and coronary artery disease without any prior history of malignancies who presented with airway obstruction. He was diagnosed with a myeloid sarcoma of the mediastinum compressing his trachea.

  14. The Development and Application of Airway Devices in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangdong; Ma, Wuhua; Liu, Renyu; Yao, Shanglong

    2017-01-01

    Airway management is one of the most important tasks for anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists are experts in airway management and have made tremendous contribution to the development of the airway devices. Chinese anesthesiologists have made significant contribution in introducing advanced airway management and developing innovative techniques and devices for airway management in China. This article overviews the development and application of airway devices in China as well as the dedication and contribution of Chinese experts in the development of novel airway devices. With the development of science and technology accompanied by the advanced knowledge in airway management, more effective and safe artificial airways will be developed for clinical practice. The authors believe that Chinese experts will continue their outstanding contribution to the development of innovative airway devices, systems and knowledge. PMID:28191485

  15. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  16. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Fluid and electrolyte transport by cultured human airway epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J J; Welsh, M J

    1993-01-01

    An understanding of the fluid and electrolyte transport properties of any epithelium requires knowledge of the direction, rate, and regulation of fluid transport and the composition of the fluid. Although human airway epithelial likely play a key role in controlling the quantity and composition of the respiratory tract fluid, evidence for such a role is not available. To obtain such knowledge, we measured fluid and electrolyte transport by cultured human nasal epithelia. Under basal conditions we found that epithelia absorbed Na+ and fluid; both processes were inhibited by addition of amiloride to the mucosal surface. These data suggest that active Na+ absorption is responsible for fluid absorption. Interestingly, Na+ absorption was not accompanied by the net absorption of Cl-; some other anion accompanied Na+. The combination of cAMP agonists and mucosal amiloride stimulated the secretion of NaCl-rich fluid. But surprisingly, the response to cAMP agonists in the absence of amiloride showed substantial intersubject variability: cAMP stimulated fluid secretion across some epithelia, for others, cAMP stimulated fluid absorption. The explanation for the differences in response is uncertain, but we speculate that the magnitude of apical membrane Na+ conductance may modulate the direction of fluid transport in response to cAMP. We also found that airway epithelial secrete H+ and absorb K+ under basal conditions; both processes were inhibited by cAMP agonists. Because the H+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, SCH 28080, inhibited K+ absorption, an apical membrane H+/K(+)-ATPase may be at least partly responsible for K+ and H+ transport. However, H+/K+ exchange could not entirely account for the luminal acidification. The finding that cAMP agonists inhibited luminal acidification may be explained by the recent finding that cAMP increases apical HCO3- conductance. These results provide new insights into how the intact airway epithelium may modify the composition of the respiratory

  18. Innovations in Balloon Catheter Technology in Rhinology.

    PubMed

    D'Anza, Brian; Sindwani, Raj; Woodard, Troy D

    2017-03-31

    Since being introduced more than 10 years ago, balloon catheter technology (BCT) has undergone several generations of innovations. From construction to utilization, there has been a myriad of advancements in balloon technology. The ergonomics of the balloon dilation systems have improved with a focus on limiting the extra assembly. "Hybrid" BCT procedures have shown promise in mucosal preservation, including treating isolated complex frontal disease. Multiple randomized clinical trials report improved long-term outcomes in stand-alone BCT, including in-office use. The ever-expanding technological innovations ensure BCT will be a key component in the armamentarium of the modern sinus surgeon.

  19. Antifungal catheter lock therapy for the management of a persistent Candida albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Paul DiMondi, V; Townsend, Mary L; Johnson, Melissa; Durkin, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Antifungal catheter lock therapy (AfLT) with liposomal amphotericin B has been used in the treatment of pediatric central line infections caused by Candida species; however, reports describing the use of liposomal amphotericin B lock therapy in the adult hemodialysis patient population are lacking. Management of central line-associated candidemia with systemic therapy alone is often challenging due to the propensity of Candida species to form biofilms on foreign bodies. We describe a 64-year-old woman who was receiving hemodialysis 3 times/week and was hospitalized with persistent fungemia. Despite receiving intravenous micafungin, she had multiple positive blood cultures for Candida albicans, which finally cleared after 7 days. Her double-lumen catheter was considered the most likely nidus of infection. Although catheter removal would have been preferred, this was not possible given her vasculopathy, history of multiple bloodstream infections, and lack of other available sites for vascular access. Catheter exchange was performed, and liposomal amphotericin B AfLT was administered in combination with intravenous micafungin for a total of 6 days. During this time, the patient experienced no discernible adverse effects secondary to AfLT. At discharge, AfLT was discontinued, and intravenous micafungin was changed to oral fluconazole. After 6 months of treatment, the patient remained culture negative and maintained her dialysis access. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of liposomal amphotericin B catheter lock therapy used to manage a persistent C. albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis. AfLT is a novel concept for treating catheter-associated fungal infections. Liposomal amphotericin B was chosen based on its favorable in vitro activity against Candida species biofilms in catheter lock environments. We identified several barriers to implementing AfLT, and these issues may prohibit the use of AfLT. This case report

  20. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections: improving post-insertion catheter care.

    PubMed

    Shapey, I M; Foster, M A; Whitehouse, T; Jumaa, P; Bion, J F

    2009-02-01

    Patients with central venous catheters (CVCs) are at increased risk of bloodstream infections and sepsis-related death. CVC-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are costly and account for a significant proportion of hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this audit was to assess current practice and staff knowledge of CVC post-insertion care and therefore identify aspects of CVC care with potential for improvement. We conducted a prospective audit over 28 consecutive days at a university teaching hospital investigating current practice of CVC post-insertion care in wards with high CVC usage. A multiple choice questionnaire on best practice of CVC insertion and care was distributed among clinical staff. Rates of breaches in catheter care and CRBSIs were calculated and statistical significance assumed when P<0.05. Data was recorded from 151 CVCs in 106 patients giving a total of 721 catheter days. In all, 323 breaches in care were identified giving a failure rate of 44.8%, with significant differences between intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU wards (P<0.001). Dressings (not intact) and caps and taps (incorrectly placed) were identified as the major lapses in CVC care with 158 and 156 breaches per 1000 catheter days, respectively. During the study period four CRBSIs were identified, producing a CRBSI rate of 5.5 per 1000 catheter days (95% confidence interval: 0.12-10.97). There are several opportunities to improve CVC post-insertion care. Future interventions to improve reliability of care should focus on implementing best practice rather than further education.

  1. Local blockade of epithelial PDL-1 in the airways enhances T cell function and viral clearance during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    McNally, Beth; Ye, Fang; Willette, Meredith; Flaño, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    In order to maintain the gas exchange function of the lung following influenza virus infection, a delicate orchestration of positive and negative regulatory pathways must be maintained to attain viral eradication while minimizing local inflammation. The programmed death receptor 1 ligand/programmed death receptor 1 (PDL-1/PD-1) pathway plays an important immunoregulatory role, particularly in the context of T cell function. Here, we have shown that influenza virus infection of primary airway epithelial cells strongly enhances PDL-1 expression and does so in an alpha interferon receptor (IFNAR) signaling-dependent manner. PD-1 is expressed primarily on effector T cells in the lung, compared to effector memory and central memory cells, and shortly after influenza virus infection, an increased number of PD-1(+) T cells are recruited to the airways. Using in vitro cocultures of airway epithelial cells and T cells and in vivo models of influenza virus infection, we have demonstrated that blockade of airway epithelial PDL-1 improves CD8 T cell function, defined by increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzyme B and expression of CD107ab. Furthermore, PDL-1 blockade in the airways served to accelerate influenza virus clearance and enhance infection recovery. Our findings suggest that local manipulation of the PDL-1/PD-1 axis in the airways may represent a therapeutic alternative during acute influenza virus infection.

  2. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  3. A magnetic-resonance-imaging-compatible remote catheter navigation system.

    PubMed

    Tavallaei, Mohammad Ali; Thakur, Yogesh; Haider, Syed; Drangova, Maria

    2013-04-01

    A remote catheter navigation system compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed to facilitate MRI-guided catheterization procedures. The interventionalist's conventional motions (axial motion and rotation) on an input catheter - acting as the master - are measured by a pair of optical encoders, and a custom embedded system relays the motions to a pair of ultrasonic motors. The ultrasonic motors drive the patient catheter (slave) within the MRI scanner, replicating the motion of the input catheter. The performance of the remote catheter navigation system was evaluated in terms of accuracy and delay of motion replication outside and within the bore of the magnet. While inside the scanner bore, motion accuracy was characterized during the acquisition of frequently used imaging sequences, including real-time gradient echo. The effect of the catheter navigation system on image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was also evaluated. The results show that the master-slave system has a maximum time delay of 41 ± 21 ms in replicating motion; an absolute value error of 2 ± 2° was measured for radial catheter motion replication over 360° and 1.0 ± 0.8 mm in axial catheter motion replication over 100 mm of travel. The worst-case SNR drop was observed to be 2.5%.

  4. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hajnour, Mohamed S.; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications. PMID:28217071

  5. Device for Catheter Placement of External Ventricular Drain

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Jae-Min; Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2016-01-01

    To introduce a new device for catheter placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This device was composed of three portions, T-shaped main body, rectangular pillar having a central hole to insert a catheter and an arm pointing the tragus. The main body has a role to direct a ventricular catheter toward the right or left inner canthus and has a shallow longitudinal opening to connect the rectangular pillar. The arm pointing the tragus is controlled by back and forth movement and turn of the pillar attached to the main body. Between April 2012 and December 2014, 57 emergency EVDs were performed in 52 patients using this device in the operating room. Catheter tip located in the frontal horn in 52 (91.2%), 3rd ventricle in 2 (3.5%) and in the wall of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle in 3 EVDs (5.2%). Small hemorrhage along to catheter tract occurred in 1 EVD. CSF was well drained through the all EVD catheters. The accuracy of the catheter position and direction using this device were 91% and 100%, respectively. This device for EVD guides to provide an accurate position of catheter tip safely and easily. PMID:27226870

  6. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  9. Diagnosis of intra vascular catheter-related infection.

    PubMed

    Cicalini, S; Palmieri, F; Noto, P; Boumis, E; Petrosillo, N

    2002-01-01

    The use of central vascular catheters (CVC) is associated with a substantial number of complications, amongst which infections predominate. A diagnosis of CVC-related infection usually requires catheter removal for culture. Semiquantitative (roll-plate method) and quantitative methods (flush, vortex, centrifugation or sonication methods) are the most reliable diagnostic methodologies requiring catheter removal, because of their greater specificity. The roll-plate method is the simplest and most commonly used technique. This method only samples the external surface of the catheter, and is particularly indicated for recently inserted catheters in which extraluminal colonisation is the primary mechanism of infection. Luminal culture techniques, such as the quantitative methods, may be more relevant for catheters that have been in place for a long period of time. However, in up to 85% of removed CVC the culture is negative, and other diagnostic techniques that do not require catheter removal have been proposed, including paired quantitative blood cultures, endoluminal brushing, and differential time to positivity (DTP) of paired blood cultures. DTP, that compares the time to positivity for qualitative cultures of blood samples simultaneously drawn from the CVC and a peripheral vein, appears to be the most reliable in the routine clinical practice since many hospitals use automatic devices for qualitative blood culture positivity detection. More recently catheter-sparing direct diagnostic methods, which include Gram stain and acridin-orange leucocyte cytospin (AOLC) test, appeared to be especially useful because of the rapidity of results and the ability to distinguish different microorganisms, allowing early targeted antimicrobial therapy.

  10. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Feneley, Roger C L; Hopley, Ian B; Wells, Peter N T

    2015-01-01

    For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0-2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users.

  11. Migration of Indwelling Central Venous Catheter and Fatal Hydrothorax

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Shagufta; Murtaza, Ghulam; Hanif, Muhammad Zubair; Morabito, Antonino; Khalil, Basem

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheter complications can be related to insertion, indwelling, or extraction. Most of the times, immediate complications are anticipated and managed; whereas, delayed complications can go unnoticed. In the case discussed here, migration and dislodgement of catheter tip resulted in delayed hydrothorax and sudden death of a 9-month-old female infant. PMID:25755966

  12. Central venous access for haemodialysis using the Hickman catheter.

    PubMed

    Cappello, M; De Pauw, L; Bastin, G; Prospert, F; Delcour, C; Thaysse, C; Dhaene, M; Vanherweghem, J L; Kinnaert, P

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and seven Hickman catheters for haemodialysis were inserted in 90 end-stage chronic renal failure patients, and were used for 1-448 days (median 45 days). Sixty-nine per cent of the patients were treated without any problem for 1-165 days (median 34 days). Clinically evident complications occurred in 44 catheters inserted in 28 patients, and included outflow obstruction (16.8% of the catheters) and thrombosis (13.1% of the catheters). However, many episodes of clotting or insufficient flow could be corrected by simple manoeuvres. Other less frequent complications were recorded: sepsis, mainly in patients with increased risk factors (4.1% of the catheters), laceration of the catheter (3.7%) and occasional cases of jugular-vein phlebitis, transient palsy of a vocal cord, haematoma of the wound, and bleeding of the cutaneous orifice. No clinical sign of subclavian or innominate-vein thrombosis was observed. Nevertheless, a prospective study conducted in 50 asymptomatic patients demonstrated a 12% rate of anomalies of the venous system, although two-thirds of these alterations were mild and had no consequence. When the present series is compared to the results obtained with currently available percutaneous haemodialysis catheters, it is concluded that the Hickman catheter is a safe, comfortable and efficient vascular access device.

  13. Balloon catheter dilatation and thrombectomy for acute aortoiliac occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Archie, Joseph P.

    1981-01-01

    A case of acute distal aortic thrombosis in an elderly high-risk patient was successfully managed with intraoperative thrombectomy and balloon catheter dilatation of the common iliac arteries. Balloon catheter dilatation may be indicated prior to bypass grafting in high-risk patients with acute aortoiliac thrombosis. PMID:15216181

  14. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Feneley, Roger C. L.; Hopley, Ian B.; Wells, Peter N. T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0–2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  15. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  16. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  17. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery.

  18. Therapeutic bronchoscopic interventions for malignant airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dalar, Levent; Özdemir, Cengiz; Abul, Yasin; Karasulu, Levent; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Akbaş, Ayşegül; Altın, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no definitive consensus about the factors affecting the choice of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of malignant airway obstruction. The present study defines the choice of the interventional bronchoscopic modality and analyzes the factors influencing survival in patients with malignant central airway obstruction. Totally, over 7 years, 802 interventional rigid bronchoscopic procedures were applied in 547 patients having malignant airway obstruction. There was a significant association between the type of stent and the site of the lesion in the present study. Patients with tracheal involvement and/or involvement of the main bronchi had the worst prognosis. The sites of the lesion and endobronchial treatment modality were independent predictors of survival in the present study. The selection of different types of airway stents can be considered on the base of site of the lesion. Survival can be estimated based on the site of the lesion and endobronchial brochoscopic modality used. PMID:27281104

  19. New tools in diagnosing catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Blot, F; Nitenberg, G; Brun-Buisson, C

    2000-07-01

    Clinical criteria alone are insufficient to allow a diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related sepsis (CRS). A definite diagnosis of CRS usually requires removal of the catheter for quantitative catheter tip culture. However, only about 15-25% of central venous catheters (CVC) removed because infection is suspected actually prove to be infected, and the diagnosis is always retrospective. Other diagnostic tests, such as differential quantitative blood cultures from samples taken simultaneously from the catheter and a peripheral vein, have been proposed to avoid unjustified removal of the catheter and the potential risks associated with the placement of a new catheter at a new site: a central-to-peripheral blood culture colony count ratio of 5:1 to 10:1 is considered indicative of CRS. Despite its high specificity, the latter diagnostic technique is not routinely used in clinical practice because of its complexity and cost. The measurement of the differential time to positivity between hub blood (taken from the catheter port) and peripheral blood cultures might be a reliable tool facilitating the diagnosis of CRS in situ. In an in vitro study, we found a strong relationship between the inoculum size of various microorganisms and the time to positivity of cultures. When the times to positivity of cultures of blood taken simultaneously from central and peripheral veins in patients with and without CRS were examined, we found that earlier positivity of central vs peripheral vein blood cultures was highly correlated with CRS. Using a cut-off value of +120 min, the "differential time to positivity" of the paired blood samples, defined as time to positivity of the peripheral blood minus that of the hub blood culture, had 91% specificity and 94% sensitivity for the diagnosis of CRS. This method may be coupled with other techniques that have high negative predictive value, such as skin cultures at the catheter exit site. This diagnostic test can be proposed for routine

  20. The stuck central venous catheter: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Neeti; Choudhury, Minati; Kiran, Usha; Chowdhury, Ujjwal

    2008-10-01

    The placement of central venous catheter (CVC) through internal jugular vein is not free from potential hazards. We report two cases of triple lumen central venous catheter, placed into right internal jugular vein, which got entrapped in patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement. The entrapment of catheter went unnoticed until the time of removal. Subsequent investigations, mechanism of entrapment, prevention, and removal is described. To conclude, we encountered an unusual cause of stuck central venous catheter, in the left atrial suture line. Removal of central venous catheter requires utmost care, and should never be done by forceful traction in the postoperative cardiac surgical patients, as it may lead to disruption of suture lines or rupture of vessels.

  1. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  2. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  3. The male experience of ISC with a silicone catheter.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) has become more common and should be considered the method of choice for draining retained urine. The realisation for male patients that they require catheterisation can be associated with a significant physical and psychological burden (Shaw and Logan, 2013). This article describes a UK multi-centre patient satisfaction survey evaluating the features of a male ISC silicone catheter. The survey was aimed at determining patient preferences and perceptions of learning ISC with the intermittent catheter to evaluate if a silicone catheter is acceptable and user friendly. This information is intended to be used to expand the knowledge base around catheter selection and help guide nurses who offer a choice of catheters when teaching ISC to patients.

  4. The Utilization of Long Nylon Catheters for Prolonged Intravenous Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ronald B.; Wilkinson, R. H.; Bayliss, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    A study of 300 patients receiving intravenous therapy showed that 90 had associated phlebitis. Because of this high rate of complications, the use of long plastic catheters, with the tip located in a large central vessel, was investigated. One hundred and one catheters were inserted into the basilic vein through a cut-down. The patients were divided into four groups: infusions lasting one to seven days, eight to 14 days, 15 to 28 days and 29 days or longer. The most common complication was obstruction of the catheter with clotted blood. In four patients the catheters had to be removed because of phlebitis; two were pulled out by the patients themselves. Infection was not observed. Two factors probably contributed to the successful infusions: the composition of the plastic catheters (nylon) and the location of the tip in a large central vessel. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:6017172

  5. Catheter tracking with phase information in a magnetic resonance scanner.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevan J T; Scott, Greig C; Wright, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a new active technique for accurately determining both the position and orientation of the tip of a catheter during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided percutaneous cardiovascular procedures. The technique utilizes phase information introduced into the MR signal from a small receive coil located on the distal tip of the catheter. Phase patterns around a small receive coil are rich in information that is directly related to position and orientation. This information can be collected over a large spherical volume with a diameter several times that of the receive coil. The high degree of redundancy yields the potential for an accurate and robust method of catheter tracking. A tracking algorithm is presented that performs catheter tip localization using phase images acquired in two orthogonal planes without any a priori knowledge of catheter position. Associated experimentation demonstrating feasibility is also presented.

  6. Intra-bronchial migration of peritoneal catheter of lumboperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Yanagi, Masakazu; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Background: A rare case of intra-bronchial migration of peritoneal catheter of lumboperitoneal (LP) shunt was treated under the bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic observation. Case Description: A 71-year-old man, who underwent LP shunt installation due to idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus a year before, presented with history of high fever and sputum production. Roentgenography and computed tomography of the chest revealed migration of distal end of the peritoneal catheter into the left main bronchus. Migrated catheter was gently extracted through the abdominal wound incision under the bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic observation. Contrast material infused into the catheter did not spread into the pleural cavity. The patient was free of the symptoms within 2 postoperative weeks. Moreover, he underwent the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt surgery 1-month later. Conclusion: This is the first case of the migration of peritoneal catheter of LP shunt into the main bronchus. PMID:26962468

  7. Temperature measurement within myocardium during in vitro RF catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Vorperian, V R; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Woo, E J; Webster, J G

    2000-11-01

    While most commercial ablation units and research systems can provide catheter tip temperature during ablation, they do not provide information about the temperature change inside the myocardium, which determines the lesion size. We present the details of a flow simulation and temperature measurement system, which allows the monitoring of the temperature change inside the myocardium during in vitro radio frequency (RF) cardiac catheter ablation at different blood flow rates to which the catheter site may be exposed. We set up a circulation system that simulated different blood flow rates of 0 to 5 L/min at 37 degrees C. We continuously measured the temperature at the catheter tip using the built-in thermistor and inside the myocardium using a three-thermocouple probe. The system provides a means for further study of the temperature inside myocardium during RF catheter ablation under different flow conditions and at different penetration depths.

  8. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  9. An Effective Technique for Enhancing an Intrauterine Catheter Fetal Electrocardiogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Steven L.; Holls, William M.

    2003-12-01

    Physician can obtain fetal heart rate, electrophysiological information, and uterine contraction activity for determining fetal status from an intrauterine catheters electrocardiogram with the maternal electrocardiogram canceled. In addition, the intrauterine catheter would allow physicians to acquire fetal status with one non-invasive to the fetus biosensor as compared to invasive to the fetus scalp electrode and intrauterine pressure catheter used currently. A real-time maternal electrocardiogram cancellation technique of the intrauterine catheters electrocardiogram will be discussed along with an analysis for the methods effectiveness with synthesized and clinical data. The positive results from an original detailed subjective and objective analysis of synthesized and clinical data clearly indicate that the maternal electrocardiogram cancellation method was found to be effective. The resulting intrauterine catheters electrocardiogram from effectively canceling the maternal electrocardiogram could be used for determining fetal heart rate, fetal electrocardiogram electrophysiological information, and uterine contraction activity.

  10. Taste Receptors in Upper Airway Immunity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ryan M; Lee, Robert J; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors are well known for their role in communicating information from the tongue to the brain about nutritional value or potential toxicity of ingested substances. More recently, it has been shown that taste receptors are expressed in other locations throughout the body, including the airway, gastrointestinal tract, brain and pancreas. The roles of some 'extraoral' taste receptors are largely unknown, but emerging research suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are capable of sensing bacteria and modulating innate immunity. This chapter focuses on the role of bitter and sweet taste receptors in human airway innate immunity and their clinical relevance to rhinosinusitis. The bitter taste receptor T2R38 expressed in sinonasal cilia detects bitter bacterial quorum-sensing molecules and activates a nitric oxide-dependent innate immune response; moreover, there are polymorphisms in T2R38 that underlie susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Bitter and sweet receptors in sinonasal solitary chemosensory cells control secretion of antimicrobial peptides in the upper airway and may have a profound impact on airway infections in patients with CRS and diabetes. Future research on taste receptors in the airway has enormous potential to expand our understanding of host-pathogen immune interactions and provide novel therapeutic targets.

  11. Sensory nerves in lung and airways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Yu, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves innervating the lung and airways play an important role in regulating various cardiopulmonary functions and maintaining homeostasis under both healthy and disease conditions. Their activities conducted by both vagal and sympathetic afferents are also responsible for eliciting important defense reflexes that protect the lung and body from potential health-hazardous effects of airborne particulates and chemical irritants. This article reviews the morphology, transduction properties, reflex functions, and respiratory sensations of these receptors, focusing primarily on recent findings derived from using new technologies such as neural immunochemistry, isolated airway-nerve preparation, cultured airway neurons, patch-clamp electrophysiology, transgenic mice, and other cellular and molecular approaches. Studies of the signal transduction of mechanosensitive afferents have revealed a new concept of sensory unit and cellular mechanism of activation, and identified additional types of sensory receptors in the lung. Chemosensitive properties of these lung afferents are further characterized by the expression of specific ligand-gated ion channels on nerve terminals, ganglion origin, and responses to the action of various inflammatory cells, mediators, and cytokines during acute and chronic airway inflammation and injuries. Increasing interest and extensive investigations have been focused on uncovering the mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity of these airway afferents, and their role in the manifestation of various symptoms under pathophysiological conditions. Several important and challenging questions regarding these sensory nerves are discussed. Searching for these answers will be a critical step in developing the translational research and effective treatments of airway diseases.

  12. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  13. Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Airway Responsiveness in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effect of inhaled NO2 on the inherent responsiveness of the airways to challenge by bronchoconstricting agents have had mixed results. In general, existing meta-analyses show statistically significant effects of NO2 on the airway responsiveness of individuals with asthma. However, no meta-analysis has provided a comprehensive assessment of clinical relevance of changes in airway responsiveness, the potential for methodological biases in the original papers, and the distribution of responses. This paper provides analyses showing that a statistically significant fraction, 70% of individuals with asthma exposed to NO2 at rest, experience increases in airway responsiveness following 30-minute exposures to NO2 in the range of 200 to 300 ppb and following 60-minute exposures to 100 ppb. The distribution of changes in airway responsiveness is log-normally distributed with a median change of 0.75 (provocative dose following NO2 divided by provocative dose following filtered air exposure) and geometric standard deviation of 1.88. About a quarter of the exposed individuals experience a clinically relevant reduction in their provocative dose due to NO2 relative to air exposure. The fraction experiencing an increase in responsiveness was statistically significant and robust to exclusion of individual studies. Results showed minimal change in airway responsiveness for individuals exposed to NO2 during exercise. A variety of fa

  14. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  15. In vitro evaluation of the impact of silver coating on Escherichia coli adherence to urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Adam T; Brisson, Brigitte A; Singh, Ameet; Weese, J Scott

    2015-05-01

    A silver-coated urinary catheter was compared to a non-silver-coated urinary catheter for the ability to reduce adherence of 6 isolates of Escherichia coli. Catheters were incubated with E. coli strains for 0, 24, 48, and 72 h. Broth was sampled at all time points to determine CFU/mL. Catheters were subjected to sonication to determine adhered bacteria at all time points, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to semi-quantitatively assess biofilm formation. Silver-coated catheters had significantly less adhered bacteria than non-silver-coated catheters at times 24, 48, and 72 h. Subjectively, silver-coated urinary catheters had less biofilm formation than non-silver-coated urinary catheters as assessed by SEM. Silver coating of catheters was associated with reduced adherence of E. coli in an in vitro evaluation. Testing of catheters in dogs in vivo is required to determine if there is a reduction in catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

  16. Evaluation of a humidified nasal high-flow oxygen system, using oxygraphy, capnography and measurement of upper airway pressures.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, J E; Williams, A B; Gerard, C; Hockey, H

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the performance of a humidified nasal high-flow system (Optiflow, Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) by measuring delivered FiO, and airway pressures. Oxygraphy, capnography and measurement of airway pressures were performed through a hypopharyngeal catheter in healthy volunteers receiving Optiflow humidified nasal high flow therapy at rest and with exercise. The study was conducted in a non-clinical experimental setting. Ten healthy volunteers completed the study after giving informed written consent. Participants received a delivered oxygen fraction of 0.60 with gas flow rates of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 l/minute in random order FiO2, F(E)O2, F(E)CO2 and airway pressures were measured. Calculation of FiO2 from F(E)O2 and F(E)CO2 was later performed. Calculated FiO2 approached 0.60 as gas flow rates increased above 30 l/minute during nose breathing at rest. High peak inspiratory flow rates with exercise were associated with increased air entrainment. Hypopharyngeal pressure increased with increasing delivered gas flow rate. At 50 l/minute the system delivered a mean airway pressure of up to 7.1 cm H20. We believe that the high gas flow rates delivered by this system enable an accurate inspired oxygen fraction to be delivered. The positive mean airway pressure created by the high flow increases the efficacy of this system and may serve as a bridge to formal positive pressure systems.

  17. Slowly Adapting Sensory Units Have More Receptors in Large Airways than in Small Airways in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Song, Nana; Guardiola, Juan; Roman, Jesse; Yu, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na+/K+-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi) vs. small (bronchioles <500 μm in diameter) airways in the rabbit. We found that even though the sensory structure was bigger in large airways than in small airways (3340 ± 223 vs. 1168 ± 103 μm2; P < 0.0001), there was no difference in receptor sizes (349 ± 14 vs. 326 ± 16 μm2; > 0.05). However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.6 ± 0.3; P < 0.0001). Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities. PMID:28018231

  18. Slowly Adapting Sensory Units Have More Receptors in Large Airways than in Small Airways in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Nana; Guardiola, Juan; Roman, Jesse; Yu, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi) vs. small (bronchioles <500 μm in diameter) airways in the rabbit. We found that even though the sensory structure was bigger in large airways than in small airways (3340 ± 223 vs. 1168 ± 103 μm(2); P < 0.0001), there was no difference in receptor sizes (349 ± 14 vs. 326 ± 16 μm(2); > 0.05). However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.6 ± 0.3; P < 0.0001). Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities.

  19. Comparison of Heparin-Coated and Conventional Split-Tip Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W. I. Jacobs, David; Charles, Hearns W.; Kovacs, Sandor; Aquino, Theresa; Erinjeri, Joseph; Benstein, Judith A.

    2009-07-15

    Catheter coatings have the potential to decrease infection and thrombosis in patients with chronic dialysis catheters. We report our midterm experience with a heparin-coated dialysis catheter. This retrospective, case-control study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 88 tunneled dialysis catheters were inserted over a 13-month period via the internal jugular vein. Thirty-eight uncoated split-tip catheters and 50 heparin-coated catheters were inserted. Primary catheter patency was compared between the two groups using the log rank test, with infection and/or thrombosis considered as catheter failures. Dialysis parameters during the first and last dialysis sessions, including pump speed, actual blood flow, and arterial port pressures, were compared using unpaired t-tests. Primary patency of the uncoated catheters was 86.0 {+-} 6.5% at 30 days and 76.1 {+-} 8.9% at 90 days. Primary patency of heparin-coated catheters was 92.0 {+-} 6.2% at 30 days and 81.6 {+-} 8.0% at 90 days (p = 0.87, log rank test). Infection requiring catheter removal occurred in four patients with uncoated catheters and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.23). Catheter thrombosis requiring catheter replacement or thrombolysis occurred in one patient with an uncoated catheter and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.9). No differences in catheter function during hemodialysis were seen between the two groups. In conclusion, the heparin-coated catheter did not show a significantly longer patency compared to the uncoated catheter. The flow characteristics of this device were comparable to those of the conventional uncoated catheter. A demonstrable benefit of the heparin-coated catheter in randomized trials is needed before a recommendation for routine implementation can be made.

  20. Comparison of heparin-coated and conventional split-tip hemodialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy W I; Jacobs, David; Charles, Hearns W; Kovacs, Sandor; Aquino, Theresa; Erinjeri, Joseph; Benstein, Judith A

    2009-07-01

    Catheter coatings have the potential to decrease infection and thrombosis in patients with chronic dialysis catheters. We report our midterm experience with a heparin-coated dialysis catheter. This retrospective, case-control study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 88 tunneled dialysis catheters were inserted over a 13-month period via the internal jugular vein. Thirty-eight uncoated split-tip catheters and 50 heparin-coated catheters were inserted. Primary catheter patency was compared between the two groups using the log rank test, with infection and/or thrombosis considered as catheter failures. Dialysis parameters during the first and last dialysis sessions, including pump speed, actual blood flow, and arterial port pressures, were compared using unpaired t-tests. Primary patency of the uncoated catheters was 86.0 +/- 6.5% at 30 days and 76.1 +/- 8.9% at 90 days. Primary patency of heparin-coated catheters was 92.0 +/- 6.2% at 30 days and 81.6 +/- 8.0% at 90 days (p = 0.87, log rank test). Infection requiring catheter removal occurred in four patients with uncoated catheters and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.23). Catheter thrombosis requiring catheter replacement or thrombolysis occurred in one patient with an uncoated catheter and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.9). No differences in catheter function during hemodialysis were seen between the two groups. In conclusion, the heparin-coated catheter did not show a significantly longer patency compared to the uncoated catheter. The flow characteristics of this device were comparable to those of the conventional uncoated catheter. A demonstrable benefit of the heparin-coated catheter in randomized trials is needed before a recommendation for routine implementation can be made.

  1. Promotion of airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and alleviation of airway ischemia by deferoxamine nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wen; Sung, Yon K.; Sun, Wenchao; Hsu, Joe L.; Manickam, Sathish; Wagh, Dhananjay; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Semenza, Gregg L.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Airway tissue ischemia and hypoxia in human lung transplantation is a consequence of the sacrifice of the bronchial circulation during the surgical procedure and is a major risk factor for the development of airway anastomotic complications. Augmented expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α promotes microvascular repair and alleviates allograft ischemia and hypoxia. Deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) is an FDA-approved iron chelator which has been shown to upregulate cellular HIF-1α. Here, we developed a nanoparticle formulation of DFO that can be topically applied to airway transplants at the time of surgery. In a mouse orthotopic tracheal transplant (OTT) model, the DFO nanoparticle was highly effective in enhancing airway microvascular perfusion following transplantation through the production of the angiogenic factors, placental growth factor (PLGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1. The endothelial cells in DFO treated airways displayed higher levels of p-eNOS and Ki67, less apoptosis, and decreased production of perivascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to vehicle-treated airways. In summary, a DFO formulation topically-applied at the time of surgery successfully augmented airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and the repair of alloimmune-injured microvasculature. This approach may be an effective topical transplant-conditioning therapy for preventing airway complications following clinical lung transplantation. PMID:24161166

  2. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  3. Two-dimensional airway analysis using probabilistic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Park, Sang Cheol; Pu, Jiantao; Sciurba, Frank C.; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-03-01

    Although 3-D airway tree segmentation permits analysis of airway tree paths of practical lengths and facilitates visual inspection, our group developed and tested an automated computer scheme that was operated on individual 2-D CT images to detect airway sections and measure their morphometry and/or dimensions. The algorithm computes a set of airway features including airway lumen area (Ai), airway cross-sectional area (Aw), the ratio (Ra) of Ai to Aw, and the airway wall thickness (Tw) for each detected airway section depicted on the CT image slice. Thus, this 2-D based algorithm does not depend on the accuracy of 3-D airway tree segmentation and does not require that CT examination encompasses the entire lung or reconstructs contiguous images. However, one disadvantage of the 2-D image based schemes is the lack of the ability to identify the airway generation (Gb) of the detected airway section. In this study, we developed and tested a new approach that uses 2-D airway features to assign a generation number to an airway. We developed and tested two probabilistic neural networks (PNN) based on different sets of airway features computed by our 2-D based scheme. The PNNs were trained and tested on 12 lung CT examinations (8 training and 4 testing). The accuracy for the PNN that utilized Ai and Ra for identifying the generation of airway sections varies from 55.4% - 100%. The overall accuracy of the PNN for all detected airway sections that are spread over all generations is 76.7%. Interestingly, adding wall thickness feature (Tw) to PNN did not improve identification accuracy. This preliminary study demonstrates that a set of 2-D airway features may be used to identify the generation number of an airway with reasonable accuracy.

  4. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  5. Central venous catheters in neonates: from simple monolumen to port catheter.

    PubMed

    Caruselli, Marco; Carboni, Laura; Franco, Federica; Torino, Giovanni; Camilletti, Gianfranco; Piattellini, Gianmarco; Giretti, Roberto; Pagni, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) represents an important step in the management of the surgical, onco-hematology and critically ill patients. CVCs in neonates, like in adult patients, are mainly used to infuse hyperosmolar solutions, to take blood samples and for hemodynamic monitoring. The need for CVCs is higher in neonates than in adults. Poor peripheral access and the high demand for IV access and blood samples are already valuable indications for a CVC.

  6. Airway surface liquid homeostasis in cystic fibrosis: pathophysiology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Haq, Iram J; Gray, Michael A; Garnett, James P; Ward, Christopher; Brodlie, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease characterised by recurrent respiratory infections, inflammation and lung damage. The volume and composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) are important in maintaining ciliary function, mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial properties of the airway. In CF, these homeostatic mechanisms are impaired, leading to a dehydrated and acidic ASL. ASL volume depletion in CF is secondary to defective anion transport by the abnormal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Abnormal CFTR mediated bicarbonate transport creates an unfavourable, acidic environment, which impairs antimicrobial function and alters mucus properties and clearance. These disease mechanisms create a disordered airway milieu, consisting of thick mucopurulent secretions and chronic bacterial infection. In addition to CFTR, there are additional ion channels and transporters in the apical airway epithelium that play a role in maintaining ASL homeostasis. These include the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the solute carrier 26A (SLC26A) family of anion exchangers, and calcium-activated chloride channels. In this review we discuss how the ASL is abnormal in CF and how targeting these alternative channels and transporters could provide an attractive therapeutic strategy to correct the underlying ASL abnormalities evident in CF.

  7. Airway constrictor response to cotton bract extracts in the absence of endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M G; Wall, J H; Schachter, E N

    1986-01-01

    Crude and purified aqueous extracts of cotton bracts shown to cause airway constriction in naive subjects were assayed for endotoxin content. Pulmonary function measured by flow changes on partial expiratory flow volume curves was used to assess airway responses to the bract extracts after their inhalation by a panel of volunteers. These responses are similar to the acute responses experienced by cotton textile workers. Crude aqueous extracts from various bracts harvested before and after senescence of the cotton plant displayed endotoxin concentrations ranging widely from 0.086 to 50 micrograms/ml. No correlation was found between these differences in endotoxin content and the severity of the airway constrictor response. Purifying the bract extract by a series of procedures that included precipitation of polymeric material by addition of methanol and chromatography on an anion exchange column of DEAE-Sephacel resulted in the elimination of almost all the endotoxin. The partially purified extract contained less than 1 ng/ml of endotoxin. The panel of volunteers responded to this purified bract extract, however, with a decrease in pulmonary function which was more than 60% of that seen with the crude extract of bracts. It is concluded that aqueous extracts of cotton bract contain an agent(s) other than endotoxin that causes acute airway constriction in people. PMID:3964570

  8. Outcomes of Extracorporeal Life Support During Surgery for the Critical Airway Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Hee; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Yeong Dae; I, Hoseok; Cho, Jeong Su; Ahn, Hyo Yeong; Lee, Jonggeun; Kim, Do Hyung; Son, Bong Soo

    Anesthetic management of critical airway stenosis is often very challenging. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may provide adequate respiratory support when conventional approaches fail. We report our experience of ECMO support for critical airway surgery. Between April 2012 and March 2015, nine patients underwent ECMO-supported airway operation. The reason for surgery was tracheal stenosis in nine patients, and tracheomalacia, tracheal tumor, and external tracheal compression by mediastinal mass in one patient each. Resection and end-to-end anastomosis was performed in four patients; the remainder underwent diverse procedures, including tracheoplasty, tracheal ballooning, tracheostomy, and debulking of mediastinal mass. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was sufficient for gas exchange during surgery and six patients were successfully weaned off intraoperatively. The median time on ECMO was 2.42 hours (range: 14.43-216 hours). No ECMO-related complications occurred. The median intensive care unit stay, median hospital stay, and mean follow-up period were 2 days (range: 1-61 days), 33 days (range: 9-303 days), and 17.1 ± 10.8 months, respectively. The rate of freedom from reintervention was 71.4%; the mean survival rates over 1 and 2 years were 76.2% and 63.5%, respectively. Our experience indicates that ECMO is a feasible and safe method for critical airway surgery.

  9. Airway pressure with chest compressions versus Heimlich manoeuvre in recently dead adults with complete airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Langhelle, A; Sunde, K; Wik, L; Steen, P A

    2000-04-01

    In a previous case report a standard chest compression successfully removed a foreign body from the airway after the Heimlich manoeuvre had failed. Based on this case, standard chest compressions and Heimlich manoeuvres were performed by emergency physicians on 12 unselected cadavers with a simulated complete airway obstruction in a randomised crossover design. The mean peak airway pressure was significantly lower with abdominal thrusts compared to chest compressions, 26.4+/-19.8 cmH(2)O versus 40.8+/-16.4 cmH(2)O, respectively (P=0.005, 95% confidence interval for the mean difference 5.3-23.4 cmH(2)O). Standard chest compressions therefore have the potential of being more effective than the Heimlich manoeuvre for the management of complete airway obstruction by a foreign body in an unconscious patient. Removal of the Heimlich manoeuvre from the resuscitation algorithm for unconscious patients with suspected airway obstruction will also simplify training.

  10. Protecting short-term intravascular ear catheters in healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Orchard, Rekha N; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Hamilton, Donald L

    2012-01-20

    Researchers may place a catheter in the ear vessel of a rabbit for a short period of time in order to collect repeated blood samples without extensive restraint of the animal. Maintaining such a catheter in a healthy rabbit can be challenging, as the animal may scratch at the ear, removing the catheter or forming a large hematoma that might impede blood sampling. The authors developed a technique for protecting the indwelling catheter by cutting a section of moleskin to the same shape as the ear and gluing it to the surface of the ear and the catheter. They applied this technique to collect multiple blood samples during 12-h periods from nine rabbits in a pharmacokinetics study. Catheters remained patent in five rabbits for 12 h, in two rabbits for 8 h, in one rabbit for 6 h and in one rabbit for 4 h. This technique allowed for collection of repeated blood samples and prevented the rabbits from interfering with the catheter while allowing them to move freely during the sampling period.

  11. Nephrologists Hate the Dialysis Catheters: A Systemic Review of Dialysis Catheter Associated Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kavita

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old Egyptian female with end stage renal disease, one month after start of hemodialysis via an internal jugular catheter, presented with fever and shortness of breath. She developed desquamating vesiculobullous lesions, widespread on her body. She was in profound septic shock and broad spectrum antibiotics were started with appropriate fluid replenishment. An echocardiogram revealed bulky leaflets of the mitral valve with a highly mobile vegetation about 2.3 cm long attached to the anterior leaflet. CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed bilateral pleural effusions in the chest, with triangular opacities in the lungs suggestive of infarcts. There was splenomegaly with triangular hypodensities consistent with splenic infarcts. Blood cultures repeatedly grew Candida albicans. Despite parenteral antifungal therapy, the patient deteriorated over the course of 5 days. She died due to a subsequent cardiac arrest. Systemic review of literature revealed that the rate of infection varies amongst the various types of accesses, and it is well documented that AV fistulas have a much less rate of infection in comparison to temporary catheters. All dialysis units should strive to make a multidisciplinary effort to have a referral process early on, for access creation, and to avoid catheters associated morbidity.

  12. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM.

  13. Is the pulmonary artery catheter useful?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Nitsun, Martin; Vender, Jeffery S

    2005-03-01

    In the United States more than 1.5 million pulmonary artery catheters (PACs) are inserted each year. Of these, approximately 55% are placed in high-risk surgical and trauma patients. Most clinicians believe that PAC use is beneficial in guiding therapy and may improve outcome. Despite these beliefs and hundreds of published articles related to PACs, appropriate use and impact on outcome remain unclear. A review of the current literature reveals conflicting data and significant flaws in most study designs. Inadequate sample size, lack of randomization, lack of standardization of therapies to PAC data, and deficiencies in user knowledge all significantly limit interpretation of clinical trials. Despite these deficiencies and the need for better-designed investigations, it is the opinion of the authors that access to hemodynamic data provided by the PAC, coupled with accurate interpretation of the data, may lead to reduced perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  14. Catheter ablation of fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, B; Jaishankar, S; Rao, Hygriv B; Narasimhan, C

    2008-08-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an idiopathic VT with right bundle branch block morphology and left-axis deviation occuring predominantly in young males. Fascicular tachycardia has been classified into three subtypes namely, left posterior fascicular VT, left anterior fascicular VT and upper septal fascicular VT. The mechanism of this tachycardia is believed to be localized reentry close to the fascicle of the left bundle branch. The reentrant circuit is composed of a verapamil sensitive zone, activated antegradely during tachycardia and the fast conduction Purkinje fibers activated retrogradely during tachycardia recorded as the pre Purkinje and the Purkinje potentials respectively. Catheter ablation is the preferred choice of therapy in patients with fascicular VT. Ablation is carried out during tachycardia, using conventional mapping techniques in majority of the patients, while three dimensional mapping and sinus rhythm ablation is reserved for patients with nonmappable tachycardia.

  15. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  16. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  17. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  18. Antibiofilm surface functionalization of catheters by magnesium fluoride nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lellouche, Jonathan; Friedman, Alexandra; Lahmi, Roxanne; Gedanken, Aharon; Banin, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to colonize catheters is a major cause of infection. In the current study, catheters were surface-modified with MgF2 nanoparticles (NPs) using a sonochemical synthesis protocol described previously. The one-step synthesis and coating procedure yielded a homogenous MgF2 NP layer on both the inside and outside of the catheter, as analyzed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The coating thickness varied from approximately 750 nm to 1000 nm on the inner walls and from approximately 450 nm to approximately 580 nm for the outer wall. The coating consisted of spherical MgF2 NPs with an average diameter of approximately 25 nm. These MgF2 NP-modified catheters were investigated for their ability to restrict bacterial biofilm formation. Two bacterial strains most commonly associated with catheter infections, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, were cultured in tryptic soy broth, artificial urine and human plasma on the modified catheters. The MgF2 NP-coated catheters were able to significantly reduce bacterial colonization for a period of 1 week compared to the uncoated control. Finally, the potential cytotoxicity of MgF2 NPs was also evaluated using human and mammalian cell lines and no significant reduction in the mitochondrial metabolism was observed. Taken together, our results indicate that the surface modification of catheters with MgF2 NPs can be effective in preventing bacterial colonization and can provide catheters with long-lasting self-sterilizing properties. PMID:22419866

  19. Designing and testing of backflow-free catheters.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, O; Ivanchenko, V

    2011-06-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a drug delivery technique used to target specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS) for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer while bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The application of CED is limited by low volumetric flow rate infusions in order to prevent the possibility of backflow. Consequently, a small convective flow produces poor drug distribution inside the treatment region, which can render CED treatment ineffective. Novel catheter designs and CED protocols are needed in order to improve the drug distribution inside the treatment region and prevent backflow. In order to develop novel backflow-free catheter designs, the impact of the micro-fluid injection into deformable porous media was investigated experimentally as well as numerically. Fluid injection into the porous media has a considerable effect on local transport properties such as porosity and hydraulic conductivity because of the local media deformation. These phenomena not only alter the bulk flow velocity distribution of the micro-fluid flow due to the changing porosity, but significantly modify the flow direction, and even the volumetric flow distribution, due to induced local hydraulic conductivity anisotropy. These findings help us to design backflow-free catheters with safe volumetric flow rates up to 10 μl/min. A first catheter design reduces porous media deformation in order to improve catheter performance and control an agent volumetric distribution. A second design prevents the backflow by reducing the porosity and hydraulic conductivity along a catheter's shaft. A third synergistic catheter design is a combination of two previous designs. Novel channel-inducing and dual-action catheters, as well as a synergistic catheter, were successfully tested without the occurrence of backflow and are recommended for future animal experiments.

  20. Percutaneous catheter drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Adams, D B; Harvey, T S; Anderson, M C

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts represent a complication of severe pancreatic inflammatory disease. Although operative drainage is the cornerstone of therapy for pseudocysts, we have undertaken percutaneous catheter drainage in a selected group of 28 patients over a six-year period (1982-88). This represents 42 per cent of pseudocyst patients managed by the senior author and 1.7 per cent of admissions for pancreatitis at the Medical University Hospitals during that period of time. There were 26 men and two women with an age range of 26-66 years (mean = 42.1). Twenty-six patients had alcohol abuse as the cause of pancreatitis; two were due to surgical trauma. Nondilated pancreatic ducts were demonstrated in 25 patients. Six had pancreatic ascites associated with pseudocysts. Four had previous operative drainage (2 internal and 2 external drainage procedures). Five patients received octreotide acetate, a synthetic peptide which mimics the action of somatostatin, in an attempt to aid closure of external fistulas. The mean length of catheter drainage was 48 days (range 7-210 days). Eight (29%) patients developed procedure-related complications (1 pneumothorax, 1 sheared guidewire, six drain tract infections). There was no mortality. Successful resolution of pseudocysts was achieved in 26 patients (93%). Two patients subsequently had elective caudal pancreaticojejunostomy (CPJ), and one lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) to drain obstructed pancreatic ducts. One patient has required repeat external drainage. Percutaneous external drainage is successful in pseudocyst eradication. When underlying pancreatic pathology remains uncorrected, elective surgical decompression of obstructed, dilated ducts may be necessary.

  1. Percutaneous Untying of a Knot in a Retained Swan-Ganz Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Waqar A.; Sinha, Sankar; Rowlands, Peter

    2000-03-15

    A patient was referred to us with a tightly knotted Swan-Ganz catheter. The catheter could not be removed by conventional simple methods. We describe a minimally invasive means of removal of the catheter using an Amplatz gooseneck snare and an angioplasty balloon. This allowed the catheter to be removed without trauma.

  2. Retrograde catheterization of the urinary bladder in healthy male goats by use of angiographic catheters.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Emily J; Streeter, Robert N; Simpson, Katharine M; Taylor, Jared D

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify and evaluate 3 types of angiographic catheters for retrograde urinary bladder catheterization in healthy male goats. ANIMALS 12 sexually intact yearling Alpine-cross bucks. PROCEDURES Three 5F angiographic catheters of the same length (100 cm) and diameter (0.17 cm) but differing in curvature at the tip were labeled A (straight tip), B (tip bent in 1 place), and C (tip bent in 2 places). During a single anesthetic episode, attempts were made to blindly pass each catheter into the urinary bladder of each goat. Order of catheters used was randomized, and the veterinarian passing the catheter was blinded as to catheter identity. The total number of attempts at catheter passage and the total number of successful attempts were recorded. RESULTS Catheter A was unsuccessfully passed in all 12 goats, catheter B was successfully passed in 8 goats, and catheter C was successfully passed in 4 goats. The success rate for catheter B was significantly greater than that for catheter A; however, no significant difference was identified between catheters B and C or catheters A and C. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE 2 angiographic catheters were identified that could be successfully, blindly advanced in a retrograde direction into the urinary bladder of healthy sexually intact male goats. Such catheters may be useful for determining urethral patency, emptying the urinary bladder, and instilling chemolysing agents in goats with clinical obstructive urolithiasis.

  3. Ion beam sputter-etched ventricular catheter for hydrocephalus shunt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid shunt in the form of a ventricular catheter for controlling the condition of hydrocephalus by relieving the excessive cerebrospinal fluid pressure is described. A method for fabrication of the catheter and shunting the cerebral fluid from the cerebral ventricles to other areas of the body is also considered. Shunt flow failure occurs if the ventricle collapse due to improper valve function causing overdrainage. The ventricular catheter comprises a multiplicity of inlet microtubules. Each microtubule has both a large openings at its inlet end and a multiplicity of microscopic openings along its lateral surfaces.

  4. Structure of the jet from a generic catheter tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2006-10-01

    A generic feature of a wide variety of central venous catheters, which are typically located within the superior vena cava (SVC), is a jet from a side hole of the catheter tip. Particle image velocimetry is employed in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, in order to characterize the structure of the jet as a function of dimensionless hole diameter and jet velocity ratio. Quantitative patterns in the radial and crossflow planes of the catheter-SVC system define the jet evolution. It has distinctive features, relative to the classical jet in a crossflow, which issues from a small opening in a planar surface into a region of large extent.

  5. Pericardial effusion associated with an appropriately placed umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, A; Cook, V; Dunn, M

    2007-05-01

    Central venous catheterization is widely used in neonatal intensive care units to support tiny preterm babies. Pericardial effusion (PCE) and cardiac tamponade are uncommon but potentially fatal complications of percutaneous, umbilical and surgically placed central venous catheters related to intracardiac position or migration. This report describes a case of PCE arising from fluid infused via umbilical venous catheter. The case study highlights two important aspects: one, occurrence of PCE in a baby with satisfactory position of the umbilical catheter, and second, the life-saving application of basic echocardiography by bedside caregivers for the diagnosis and treatment of this critical condition.

  6. [Use of peripheral catheters: too much to learn].

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Josep A

    2013-03-01

    Frequently incident complications due to the use of peripheral catheters are considered not relevant. However, recently multiple observational studies have demonstrated its role causing nosocomial bacteraemia. Guidelines about prevention of catheter-related infection are focused in central lines instead of peripheral ones. This approach causes an important lack of knowledge about the best manner to manipulate peripheral lines. Risk factors related to the development of a peripheral phlebitis, its clinical relevance and doubts related to prevention are presented and discussed in this article. The main objective is to alert about the importance of peripheral catheters in the prevention of nosocomial infection.

  7. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for Evaluating Catheter Related FDG Avidity

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Kenneth L.; Berman, Claudia G.; Montilla-Soler, Jaime L.

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old female with a history of metastatic left arm melanoma presented for F(18) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) which showed a moderately FDG avid focus at her port catheter tip near the cavoatrial junction. Although catheter tip related FDG avidity has previously been suggested to be bland thrombus or infection, melanoma can metastasize to unusual locations including the superior vena cava. In addition, the patient had an elevated risk of anticoagulation due to a history of hemorrhagic brain metastases. Therefore, confirmatory cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was obtained and findings were consistent with bland catheter-related thrombus. PMID:27867676

  8. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  9. Color Doppler Imaging of Cardiac Catheters Using Vibrating Motors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kalyan E.; Light, Edward D.; Rivera, Danny J.; Kisslo, Joseph A.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    We attached a miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip which were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. We imaged the catheter tip within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner, and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case though results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner. PMID:19514134

  10. [ARS mingendi cum instrumentis, probes: candelette, minugie, catheters].

    PubMed

    Serarcangeli, C; Rispoli, G

    2001-01-01

    The Museum of History of Medicine of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" has a rich collection of probes and metal catheters, some of which in surgical kits. Tracing the history of catheters, the authors follow the technical evolution in the field of urology techniques, also highlighting the intelligent craft of artisans, surgeons, barbers - and the industrial effort to ameliorate techniques. The use and the crafting of these instruments are to be related to new knowledge in the fields of urethral, vesical and prostatic occlusion. Italian contribution of the field is stressed, highlighting the original experience of Michele Troja, who invented and diffused metal catheters covered in caouthouc.

  11. Epidural catheter design: history, innovations, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Roulhac D; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2014-07-01

    Epidural catheters have evolved during the past several decades, as clinicians and manufacturers have sought to influence the quality of analgesia and anesthesia and reduce the incidence of catheter-related complications. This evolution has allowed a transformation from single-shot to continuous-infusion techniques and resulted in easier passage into the epidural space, more extensive medication distribution, and ultimately, improved patient satisfaction. Particular catheter features, including the materials used, tip design, and orifice number and arrangement, have been associated with specific outcomes and provide direction for future development.

  12. Preparation of the patient and the airway for awake intubation

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Venkateswaran

    2011-01-01

    Awake intubation is usually performed electively in the presence of a difficult airway. A detailed airway examination is time-consuming and often not feasible in an emergency. A simple 1-2-3 rule for airway examination allows one to identify potential airway difficulty within a minute. A more detailed airway examination can give a better idea about the exact nature of difficulty and the course of action to be taken to overcome it. When faced with an anticipated difficult airway, the anaesthesiologist needs to consider securing the airway in an awake state without the use of anaesthetic agents or muscle relaxants. As this can be highly discomforting to the patient, time and effort must be spent to prepare such patients both psychologically and pharmacologically for awake intubation. Psychological preparation is best initiated by an anaesthesiologist who explains the procedure in simple language. Sedative medications can be titrated to achieve patient comfort without compromising airway patency. Additional pharmacological preparation includes anaesthetising the airway through topical application of local anaesthetics and appropriate nerve blocks. When faced with a difficult airway, one should call for the difficult airway cart as well as for help from colleagues who have interest and expertise in airway management. Preoxygenation and monitoring during awake intubation is important. Anxious patients with a difficult airway may need to be intubated under general anaesthesia without muscle relaxants. Proper psychological and pharmacological preparation of the patient by an empathetic anaesthesiologist can go a long way in making awake intubation acceptable for all concerned. PMID:22174458

  13. Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol; Saint, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection remains one of the most common healthcare-associated infections in the intensive care unit and predominantly occurs in patients with indwelling urinary catheters. Duration of catheterization is the most important risk factor for developing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). General strategies for preventing CAUTI include measures such as adherence to hand hygiene. Targeted strategies for preventing CAUTI include limiting the use and duration of urinary catheters, using aseptic technique for catheter insertion, and adhering to proper catheter care. Anti-infective catheters may be considered in some settings. Successful implementation of these measures has decreased urinary catheter use and CAUTI.

  14. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Hussell, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations) are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition.

  15. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  16. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  17. Lung Volume and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Heinzer, Raphael C.; Stanchina, Michael L.; Malhotra, Atul; Fogel, Robert B.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Jordan, Amy S.; Schory, Karen; White, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lung volume during wakefulness influences upper airway size and resistance, particularly in patients with sleep apnea. We sought to determine the influence of lung volume on the level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to prevent flow limitation during non-REM sleep in subjects with sleep apnea. Seventeen subjects (apnea–hypopnea index, 42.6 ± 6.2 [SEM]) were studied during stable non-REM sleep in a rigid head-out shell equipped with a positive/negative pressure attachment for manipulation of extrathoracic pressure. An epiglottic pressure catheter plus a mask/pneumotachometer were used to assess flow limitation. When lung volume was increased by 1,035 ± 22 ml, the CPAP level could be decreased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.7 cm H2O (p < 0.001) without flow limitation. The decreased CPAP at the same negative extrathoracic pressure yielded a final lung volume increase of 421 ± 36 ml above the initial value. Conversely, when lung volume was reduced by 732 ± 74 ml (n = 8), the CPAP level had to be increased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 17.1 ± 1.0 cm H2O (p < 0.001) to prevent flow limitation, with a final lung volume decrease of 567 ± 78 ml. These results demonstrate that relatively small changes in lung volume have an important effect on the upper airway in subjects with sleep apnea during non-REM sleep. PMID:15817803

  18. Test of the Starling resistor model in the human upper airway during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Genta, Pedro R.; Owens, Robert L.; Edwards, Bradley A.; Sands, Scott A.; Loring, Stephen H.; White, David P.; Jackson, Andrew C.; Pedersen, Ole F.; Butler, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The human pharyngeal airway during sleep is conventionally modeled as a Starling resistor. However, inspiratory flow often decreases with increasing effort (negative effort dependence, NED) rather than remaining fixed as predicted by the Starling resistor model. In this study, we tested a major prediction of the Starling resistor model—that the resistance of the airway upstream from the site of collapse remains fixed during flow limitation. During flow limitation in 24 patients with sleep apnea, resistance at several points along the pharyngeal airway was measured using a pressure catheter with multiple sensors. Resistance between the nose and the site of collapse (the upstream segment) was measured before and after the onset of flow limitation to determine whether the upstream dimensions remained fixed (as predicted by the Starling resistor model) or narrowed (a violation of the Starling resistor model). The upstream resistance from early to mid inspiration increased considerably during flow limitation (by 35 ± 41 cmH2O·liter−1·s−1, P < 0.001). However, there was a wide range of variability between patients, and the increase in upstream resistance was strongly correlated with the amount of NED (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, patients with little NED exhibited little upstream narrowing (consistent with the Starling model), and patients with large NED exhibited large upstream narrowing (inconsistent with the Starling model). These findings support the idea that there is not a single model of pharyngeal collapse, but rather that different mechanisms may dominate in different patients. These differences could potentially be exploited for treatment selection. PMID:25324514

  19. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  20. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  1. Host-microbe interactions in distal airways: relevance to chronic airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Martin, Clémence; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Lepage, Patricia; Andréjak, Claire; de Blic, Jacques; Bourdin, Arnaud; Brouard, Jacques; Chanez, Pascal; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Deslée, Gaetan; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; Touqui, Lhousseine; Dusser, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This article is the summary of a workshop, which took place in November 2013, on the roles of microorganisms in chronic respiratory diseases. Until recently, it was assumed that lower airways were sterile in healthy individuals. However, it has long been acknowledged that microorganisms could be identified in distal airway secretions from patients with various respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other chronic airway diseases (e.g. post-transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans). These microorganisms were sometimes considered as infectious agents that triggered host immune responses and contributed to disease onset and/or progression; alternatively, microorganisms were often considered as colonisers, which were considered unlikely to play roles in disease pathophysiology. These concepts were developed at a time when the identification of microorganisms relied on culture-based methods. Importantly, the majority of microorganisms cannot be cultured using conventional methods, and the use of novel culture-independent methods that rely on the identification of microorganism genomes has revealed that healthy distal airways display a complex flora called the airway microbiota. The present article reviews some aspects of current literature on host-microbe (mostly bacteria and viruses) interactions in healthy and diseased airways, with a special focus on distal airways.

  2. Thoracic epidural catheter in the management of a child with an anterior mediastinal mass: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Loran M; Mossad, Emad B

    2006-02-01

    We describe a case of an anterior mediastinal mass compressing the right main bronchus that required a biopsy through a thoracotomy incision. The anesthetic management of these patients is associated with several risks and challenges, including potential airway compression and cardiovascular collapse. Inhalation induction and maintenance of spontaneous respiration is recommended to preserve normal transpulmonary pressure gradient and improve flow through conducting airways. We placed a thoracic epidural catheter under general anesthesia as the main analgesic technique in order to maintain spontaneous breathing. The use of regional anesthesia, especially continuous epidurals in pediatric cardiothoracic anesthesia have many theoretical advantages including attenuation of the neuroendocrine response, facilitation of rapid extubation and improved ventilatory mechanics secondary to decreased narcotic requirements. The absolute risk of nerve injury and epidural hematoma for this procedure is unknown and hard to define in this patient population. We reviewed multiple studies and case reports addressing its safety and reported side effects. Finally, we emphasize that a thoracic epidural anesthesia is a reasonable choice that can be applied carefully in special situations even for children under general anesthesia.

  3. MicroRNA in United Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin-Hao; Callejas-Díaz, Borja; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of united airway diseases (UAD) has received increasing attention in recent years. Sustained and increased inflammation is a common feature of UAD, which is inevitably accompanied with marked gene modification and tight gene regulation. However, gene regulation in the common inflammatory processes in UAD remains unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA), a novel regulator of gene expression, has been considered to be involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although there are an increasing number of studies of miRNAs in inflammatory upper and lower airway diseases, few miRNAs have been identified that directly link the upper and lower airways. In this article, therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies available in order to improve the understanding of the roles of miRNAs in the interaction and pathogenesis of UAD. PMID:27187364

  4. Electrical stimulation of upper airway musculature.

    PubMed

    Smith, P L; Eisele, D W; Podszus, T; Penzel, T; Grote, L; Peter, J H; Schwartz, A R

    1996-12-01

    Investigators have postulated that pharyngeal collapse during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be alleviated by stimulating the genioglossus. The effect of electrical stimulation (ES) of the genioglossus on pharyngeal patency was examined in an isolated feline upper airway preparation and in apneic humans during sleep. We found that stimulation of the genioglossus (n = 8) and of the hypoglossal nerve (n = 1) increased maximum airflow through the isolated feline upper airway in humans during sleep. Additional findings in the isolated feline upper airway suggest that such increases in airflow were due to decreases in pharyngeal collapsibility. The evidence suggests that improvements in airflow dynamics with electrical stimulation are due to selective recruitment of the genioglossus, rather than due to nonspecific activation of the pharyngeal musculature or arousal from sleep. The implications of these results for future therapy with ES are discussed.

  5. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  6. Anatomical Consideration in Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takumi; Kay, G Neal

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are ventricular tachycardias (VTs) or premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with a mechanism that is not related to myocardial scar. The sites of successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VA origins have been progressively elucidated and include both the endocardium and, less commonly, the epicardium. Idiopathic VAs usually originate from specific anatomical structures such as the ventricular outflow tracts, aortic root, atrioventricular (AV) annuli, papillary muscles, Purkinje network and so on, and exhibit characteristic electrocardiograms based on their anatomical background. Catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs is usually safe and highly successful, but can sometimes be challenging because of the anatomical obstacles such as the coronary arteries, epicardial fat pads, intramural and epicardial origins, AV conduction system and so on. Therefore, understanding the relevant anatomy is important to achieve a safe and successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. This review describes the anatomical consideration in the catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs.

  7. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis.

  8. Thermal and hydrodynamic modelling of active catheters for interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice; Royon, Laurent; Blanc, Raphaël; Szewczyk, Jérome

    2011-07-01

    Interventional radiologists desire to improve their operating tools such as catheters. Active catheters in which the tip is moved using shape memory alloy actuators activated using the Joule effect present a promising approach for easier navigation in the small vessels. However, the increase in temperature caused by this Joule effect must be controlled in order to prevent damage to blood cells and tissues. This paper is devoted to the simulation and experimental validation of a fluid-thermal model of an active catheter prototype. Comparisons between computer-predicted and experimentally measured temperatures are presented for both experiments in air and water at 37°C. Good agreement between the computational and experimental results is found, demonstrating the validity of the developed computer model. These comparisons enable us to highlight some important issues in the modelling process and to determine the optimal current for the activation of the catheter.

  9. Sonographically guided placement of intravenous catheters in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Pinkernelle, Jens; Raschzok, Nathanael; Teichgräber, Ulf K M

    2009-07-01

    Many procedures in minipigs require establishment of reliable deep venous access with a large-bore catheter. In animal experiments, such catheters are typically implanted surgically. In clinical settings, however, ultrasound imaging is routinely used to facilitate safe, minimally invasive puncture of deep vessels. The authors describe a technique for using ultrasound guidance to puncture and cannulate the minipig femoral vein. They carried out the procedure in six minipigs for the purpose of injecting contrast agents for subsequent imaging scans. The procedure was ultimately successful in all pigs, took 10 min on average and resulted in no physiological complications. In one minipig, however, a 10-cm-long catheter became dislodged from the femoral vein; use of a longer (25-cm-long) catheter was optimal for establishing reliable intravenous access.

  10. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented. PMID:26203277

  11. Catheters: instrumental advancements in biomedical applications of optical fibers.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Carlos J; Moreira, Leonardo M; Lyon, Juliana P; Villaverde, Antonio B; Pacheco, Marcos T T

    2009-07-01

    This review is focused on the advancements in biomedical engineering regarding the elaboration of new prototypes of optical fiber catheters to be applied in spectroscopic analysis, such as Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Our group has contributed to the development of new prototypes with interesting properties, such as side-viewing signal excitation and collection, distal tip with bending control, and Raman scattering minimization from the optical fiber. In addition, several groups have contributed to other new catheter-improving properties of this spectroscopic device. However, a relatively small number of studies has been published in the literature, due to industrial interest in this interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary area. To our knowledge, no review that has focused on the applications of catheters to several modes of spectroscopy has been published. In this work we revised this topic, analyzing the advancements and limitations of the recent biomedical catheters.

  12. Guidelines for the management of intravascular catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mermel, L A; Farr, B M; Sherertz, R J; Raad, I I; O'Grady, N; Harris, J S; Craven, D E

    2001-01-01

    These guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American College of Critical Care Medicine (for the Society of Critical Care Medicine), and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America contain recommendations for the management of adults and children with, and diagnosis of infections related to, peripheral and nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), pulmonary artery catheters, tunneled central catheters, and implantable devices. The guidelines, written for clinicians, contain IDSA evidence-based recommendations for assessment of the quality and strength of the data. Recommendations are presented according to the type of catheter, the infecting organism, and the associated complications. Intravascular catheter-related infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, aerobic gram-negative bacilli, and Candida albicans most commonly cause catheter-related bloodstream infection. Management of catheter-related infection varies according to the type of catheter involved. After appropriate cultures of blood and catheter samples are done, empirical i.v. antimicrobial therapy should be initiated on the basis of clinical clues, the severity of the patient's acute illness, underlying disease, and the potential pathogen(s) involved. In most cases of nontunneled CVC-related bacteremia and fungemia, the CVC should be removed. For management of bacteremia and fungemia from a tunneled catheter or implantable device, such as a port, the decision to remove the catheter or device should be based on the severity of the patient's illness, documentation that the vascular-access device is infected, assessment of the specific pathogen involved, and presence of complications, such as endocarditis, septic thrombosis, tunnel infection, or metastatic seeding. When a catheter-related infection is documented and a specific pathogen is identified, systemic antimicrobial

  13. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented.

  14. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype.

  15. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  16. Loss of catheter locking solution caused by fluid density.

    PubMed

    Polaschegg, Hans-Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    The avoidance of clotting in catheter lumina between treatments usually entails locking with an anticoagulant solution such as heparin. In a previous work, it was shown that approximately 20% of locking solution flows from the catheter during instillation of the lock equal in volume to the lumen volume. Furthermore, the locking solution may spill into the blood stream under the influence of gravity. This work investigates the influence of density and viscosity of the locking solution on the volume and speed of locking solution loss from the catheter lumen. A large fraction of the catheter locking solution spills under the influence of gravity if the locking solution's density is higher than the fluid it spills to (blood). Locking solution lost is replaced by blood. Viscosity delays this process, but at 90 minutes after injection, the loss is completed even when highly viscous lock solutions are used. Slow administration of the lock has negligible influence upon the dynamics of the loss.

  17. Anatomical Consideration in Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Kay, G Neal

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are ventricular tachycardias (VTs) or premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with a mechanism that is not related to myocardial scar. The sites of successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VA origins have been progressively elucidated and include both the endocardium and, less commonly, the epicardium. Idiopathic VAs usually originate from specific anatomical structures such as the ventricular outflow tracts, aortic root, atrioventricular (AV) annuli, papillary muscles, Purkinje network and so on, and exhibit characteristic electrocardiograms based on their anatomical background. Catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs is usually safe and highly successful, but can sometimes be challenging because of the anatomical obstacles such as the coronary arteries, epicardial fat pads, intramural and epicardial origins, AV conduction system and so on. Therefore, understanding the relevant anatomy is important to achieve a safe and successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. This review describes the anatomical consideration in the catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. PMID:28116086

  18. All India Difficult Airway Association 2016 guidelines for the management of unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in adults

    PubMed Central

    Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Shah, Amit; Kundra, Pankaj; Patwa, Apeksh; Ramkumar, Venkateswaran; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha; Raveendra, Ubaradka S; Shetty, Sumalatha Radhakrishna; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Doctor, Jeson Rajan; Pawar, Dilip K; Ramesh, Singaravelu; Das, Sabyasachi; Garg, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA) guidelines for management of the unanticipated difficult airway in adults provide a structured, stepwise approach to manage unanticipated difficulty during tracheal intubation in adults. They have been developed based on the available evidence; wherever robust evidence was lacking, or to suit the needs and situation in India, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the AIDAA and the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists. We recommend optimum pre-oxygenation and nasal insufflation of 15 L/min oxygen during apnoea in all patients, and calling for help if the initial attempt at intubation is unsuccessful. Transnasal humidified rapid insufflations of oxygen at 70 L/min (transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange) should be used when available. We recommend no more than three attempts at tracheal intubation and two attempts at supraglottic airway device (SAD) insertion if intubation fails, provided oxygen saturation remains ≥ 95%. Intubation should be confirmed by capnography. Blind tracheal intubation through the SAD is not recommended. If SAD insertion fails, one final attempt at mask ventilation should be tried after ensuring neuromuscular blockade using the optimal technique for mask ventilation. Failure to intubate the trachea as well as an inability to ventilate the lungs by face mask and SAD constitutes ‘complete ventilation failure’, and emergency cricothyroidotomy should be performed. Patient counselling, documentation and standard reporting of the airway difficulty using a ‘difficult airway alert form’ must be done. In addition, the AIDAA provides suggestions for the contents of a difficult airway cart. PMID:28003690

  19. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  20. Cold weather exercise and airway cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Malayer, Jerry R; Vandeventer, Lori; Royer, Christopher M; McKenzie, Erica C; Williamson, Katherine K

    2005-06-01

    Athletes who perform repeated exercise while breathing cold air have a high prevalence of asthmalike chronic airway disease, but the mechanism linking such activity to airway inflammation is unknown. We used a novel animal model (exercising horses) to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced chronic airway disease is caused by exposure of intrapulmonary airways to unconditioned air, resulting in the upregulation of cytokine expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from eight horses 5 h after submaximal exercise while they breathed room temperature or subfreezing air in a random crossover design. BALF total and differential nucleated cell counts were determined, and relative cytokine mRNA expression in BALF nucleated cells was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using primer and probe sequences specific for equine targets. There were no significant changes in total or differential cell concentrations between BALF recovered after warm and cold air exercise, although there was a strong trend toward increased concentrations of airway epithelial cells after cold air exercise (P = 0.0625). T(H)2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were preferentially upregulated after cold air exercise 12-, 9-, and 10-fold, respectively, compared with warm air exercise. Other cytokines (IL-2 and IL-6) were upregulated to a lesser extent (6- and 3-fold, respectively) or not at all (IL-1, IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha). These results suggest that cold weather exercise can lead to asthmalike airway disease through the local induction of cytokines typical of the T(H)2 phenotype.

  1. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  2. Benign Nodular Goiter Causing Upper Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Başoğlu, Mahmut; Öztürk, Gürkan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Yıldırgan, M. İlhan; Atamanalp, S. Selçuk; Celebi, Fehmi

    2009-01-01

    Objective Benign nodular goiter (BNG) can cause narrowing of the upper airway. In some rare cases, obstruction of the upper airway also occurs. The following paper reports our experiences with regard to BNG patients who experienced obstruction of the upper airway. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively investigated the records of 13 patients with acute airway obstruction due to BNG who were admitted to the General Surgery Department of Ataturk University Medical School between January 2000 and December 2007. Results Thirteen patients with airway obstruction secondary to BNG were hospitalized during this period. There were two males and 11 females, and the mean age was 58.5 years (range 37–74 years). For all patients, the primary symptom upon admission was defined as respiratory distress; all patients had varying degrees of respiratory distress upon admission. Three of the patients underwent emergent endotracheal intubation in the emergency room. A preoperative radiological evaluation was performed with thyroid ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT). There were retrosternal or substernal components of the BNG in nine patients. Twelve patients underwent operations, while one patient with mild respiratory distress elected not to be operated on. Ten patients underwent total thyroidectomies, while two patients underwent near-total thyroidectomies. One patient with retrosternal goiter also underwent a median sternotomy. Three patients received a tracheostomy after the operation. Suction drains were utilized in all operations. During the post-operative period, two patients suffered from voice impairment, and seven patients experienced hypocalcemia. Two patients died. Pathological examination of the thyroidectomy tissue revealed BNG in all cases. In addition, two patients had micropapillary carcinomas. Conclusion Although BNG causing upper airway obstruction is rare, it is an important clinical entity because of the need for emergent operation, the

  3. Preventing central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Charlotte

    2015-01-13

    Nurses should be able to apply evidence-based practice in a way that is appropriate for the individual patient. This article discusses one area, the incidence of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection in acute care, to examine the available evidence and identify ways in which this evidence can be applied to practice. Research indicates that implementing best practice at the time of insertion is a principal determinant in minimising the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection.

  4. Catheter steering using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Viviane; Gosselin, Frederick P; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A catheter is successfully bent and steered by applying magnetic gradients inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system (MRI). One to three soft ferromagnetic spheres are attached at the distal tip of the catheter with different spacing between the spheres. Depending on the interactions between the spheres, progressive or discontinuous/jumping displacement was observed for increasing magnetic load. This phenomenon is accurately predicted by a simple theoretical dipole interaction model.

  5. Laparoscopic removal of two dislocated ventriculoperitoneal catheters: case report.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, E; Pizzoni, C; Lospalluti, A; Gigante, N; Colamaria, A

    1999-06-01

    In a child two previously migrated abdominal catheters from ventriculoperitoneal shunts were removed from the abdominal cavity by use of laparoscopy. Avoiding the usually longitudinal laparatomy, two small incisions were necessary to insert the laparoscope (sub-umbilical incision) and grasping forceps (left iliac pit incision). Laparoscopy allowed for identification of a working ventriculoperitoneal shunt, that was correctly in place, and for removal of two old migrated catheters. The child was mobilized the same day and the post-operative course was uneventful.

  6. Catheter Migration of a Port-a-Cath System

    SciTech Connect

    Bruninx, Guy; Matte, Jean-Christophe; Wilder, Francoise van; Delcour, Christian

    1996-11-15

    A patient with axillary venous thrombosis caused by lymph node compression and the presence of a displaced catheter in the vascular lumen is presented. In this case, percutaneous interventional radiological procedures (balloon angioplasty and snare loop method) in conjunction with medical treatment were effective in limiting the post-thrombotic syndrome and restoring the proper positioning of the catheter, thereby saving the central venous access.

  7. Catheter-based transarterial therapies for hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Laroia, Sandeep T; Morales, Steven A; Laroia, Archana T

    2015-12-01

    As the prevalence of liver cancer increases, so does the demand for nonsurgical, minimally invasive alternatives to surgery, since many patients have tumors that cannot be surgically resected. Catheter-based hepatic arterial procedures may be an option in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer. The authors describe four catheter-based hepatic arterial procedures and outline the management of potential complications during the immediate postprocedural period.

  8. Epidural Catheter Migration in a Patient with Severe Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of appropriate neuraxial catheter positioning is typically a straightforward procedural undertaking. It can, however, lead to deception of even the most experienced clinician and occur despite the most meticulous attention to detail. Written and verbal consent were obtained from the patient to prepare, discuss, and publish this case report; we describe the occurrence of what we believe was the intraoperative migration of an epidural catheter in the setting of significant tissue changes resulting from a previous spinal fusion. PMID:28097025

  9. [The management of catheter related blood stream infection].

    PubMed

    Kurai, Hanako

    2012-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection causes severe complications and high mortality. CDC revised the guideline for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infection in 2011, and various anti-infection devices were introduced. However, the most important deterrents of infection are basic procedures such as hand-hygiene and maximal barrier precautions. I would like to describe the points involving early detection, and its medical treatment and prevention.

  10. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    PubMed

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  11. High-speed upper-airway imaging using full-range optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Loy, Anthony Chin; Wong, Brian J. F.; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-11-01

    Obstruction in the upper airway can often cause reductions in breathing or gas exchange efficiency and lead to rest disorders such as sleep apnea. Imaging diagnosis of the obstruction region has been accomplished using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However CT requires the use of ionizing radiation, and MRI typically requires sedation of the patient to prevent motion artifacts. Long-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images with high resolution and without the use of ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present work on the development of a long-range OCT endoscopic probe with 1.2 mm OD and 20 mm working distance used in conjunction with a modified Fourier domain swept source OCT system to acquire structural and anatomical datasets of the human airway. Imaging from the bottom of the larynx to the end of the nasal cavity is completed within 40 s.

  12. [Regional anesthesia of the airways in difficult tracheal intubation in a conscious patient with spontaneous respiration].

    PubMed

    Dziadz'ko, A M

    2002-01-01

    Clinical pattern of anesthesia, hemodynamic and gas exchange states were evaluated in 64 patients with congenital or acquired damage of maxillary-facial region due to tumor or trauma. 51 patients were intubated under locoregional anesthesia of the upper respiratory tract (superior laryngeal nerves, glossopharyngeal nerves, intratracheal anesthesia) by means of blind nasal or oral fiberoptic retrograde and by using laryngeal mask technique. In 12 cases fiberoptic device was used for intubation under local anesthesia by lidocaine solution. There was no airways obstruction in any case. Satisfactory anesthesia in oropharynx, larynx and trachea was reached in all cases, the most profound blockage of airways and lack of pharyngeal and laryngeal reflexes being in patients under locoregional anesthesia. So locoregional anesthesia can be used for awake intubation.

  13. Incidence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection after introduction of minocycline and rifampin antimicrobial-coated catheters in a pediatric burn population.

    PubMed

    Weber, Joan M; Sheridan, Robert L; Fagan, Shawn; Ryan, Colleen M; Pasternack, Mark S; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections suggest that antimicrobial-coated catheters can decrease the risk of developing catheter-related bloodstream infection in a variety of adult patient populations. There are limited data on their efficacy in the pediatric population, particularly among children with burn injuries. A study was conducted at Shriners Hospitals for Children®, Boston, to determine whether minocycline/rifampin (MR)-coated catheters could decrease the incidence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) in a pediatric burn population. A historical control group included all patients with double- or triple-lumen catheters inserted in the 18-month period from January 2006 to June 2007. The study group included all patients with MR antimicrobial double- or triple-lumen catheters inserted in the subsequent 18-month period, July 2007 to December 2008. Data collected included name, age, date of burn/injury, date of admission, percent TBSA area burn injury or other diagnosis, catheter site (subclavian, internal jugular, or femoral), method of insertion (new percutaneous stick or guidewire), type of catheter (double or triple lumen), date inserted, duration of catheter placement (days), and positive blood cultures recovered while the central venous catheter was in place. CABSI was defined using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection. There were a total of 66 patients with 252 catheters (1780 catheter days) in the control group and 75 patients with 263 catheters (1633 catheter days) in the study group. Age, percent burn injury, catheter site, and method of insertion were not statistically different between the two groups. The percentage of infected catheters and the rate of infection were significantly different for the two groups, with the MR antimicrobial catheters only half as likely to become infected. In

  14. Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EIEN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  15. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the ... share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory ...

  16. Cine CT technique for dynamic airway studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ell, S.R.; Jolles, H.; Keyes, W.D.; Galvin, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    The advent of cine CT scanning with its 50-msec data acquisition time promises a much wider range of dynamic CT studies. The authors describe a method for dynamic evaluation of the extrathoracic airway, which they believe has considerable potential application in nonfixed upper-airway disease, such as sleep apnea and stridor of unknown cause. Conventional CT is limited in such studies by long data acquisition time and can be used to study only prolonged maneuvers such as phonation. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction studies are limited by relatively high radiation dose and inability to image all wall motions simultaneously.

  17. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... provide an emergency airway during upper airway obstruction. (b) Classification. Class II...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  1. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  3. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  4. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  8. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  9. Misplaced central venous catheters: applied anatomy and practical management.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F; Bodenham, A

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year and misplacement occurs frequently. This review outlines the normal and abnormal anatomy of the central veins in relation to the placement of CVCs. An understanding of normal and variant anatomy enables identification of congenital and acquired abnormalities. Embryological variations such as a persistent left-sided superior vena cava are often diagnosed incidentally only after placement of a CVC, which is seen to take an abnormal course on X-ray. Acquired abnormalities such as stenosis or thrombosis of the central veins can be problematic and can present as a failure to pass a guidewire or catheter or complications after such attempts. Catheters can also be misplaced outside veins in a patient with otherwise normal anatomy with potentially disastrous consequences. We discuss the possible management options for these patients including the various imaging techniques used to verify correct or incorrect catheter placement and the limitations of each. If the course of a misplaced catheter can be correctly identified as not lying within a vulnerable structure then it can be safely removed. If the misplaced catheter is lying within or traversing large and incompressible arteries or veins, it should not be removed before consideration of what is likely to happen when it is removed. Advice and further imaging should be sought, typically in conjunction with interventional radiology or vascular surgery. With regard to misplaced CVCs, in the short term, a useful aide memoir is: 'if in doubt, don't take it out'.

  10. Electromagnetically tracked placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacolick, Laura; Patel, Neilesh; Tang, Jonathan; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program to utilize electromagnetic tracking guidance during insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters. Placement of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) line is a relatively simple, routine procedure in which a catheter is inserted into the veins of the lower arm and threaded up the arm to the vena cava to sit just above the heart. However, the procedure requires x-ray verification of the catheter position and is usually done under continuous fluoroscopic guidance. The computer program is designed to replace fluoroscopic guidance in this procedure and make PICC line placement a bedside procedure. This would greatly reduce the time and resources dedicated to this procedure. The physician first goes through a quick registration procedure to register the patient space with the computer screen coordinates. Once registration is completed, the program provides a continuous, real-time display of the position of the catheter tip overlaid on an x-ray image of the patient on an adjacent computer screen. Both the position and orientation of the catheter tip is shown. The display is very similar to that shown when using fluoroscopy.

  11. New materials and devices for preventing catheter-related infections

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Catheters are the leading source of bloodstream infections for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Comprehensive unit-based programs have proven to be effective in decreasing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs). ICU rates of CR-BSI higher than 2 per 1,000 catheter-days are no longer acceptable. The locally adapted list of preventive measures should include skin antisepsis with an alcoholic preparation, maximal barrier precautions, a strict catheter maintenance policy, and removal of unnecessary catheters. The development of new technologies capable of further decreasing the now low CR-BSI rate is a major challenge. Recently, new materials that decrease the risk of skin-to-vein bacterial migration, such as new antiseptic dressings, were extensively tested. Antimicrobial-coated catheters can prevent CR-BSI but have a theoretical risk of selecting resistant bacteria. An antimicrobial or antiseptic lock may prevent bacterial migration from the hub to the bloodstream. This review discusses the available knowledge about these new technologies. PMID:21906266

  12. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  13. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  14. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Dorota; Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material.

  15. Technical considerations in the use of external condom catheter systems.

    PubMed

    deHoll, J D; Williams, L A; Steers, W D; Rodeheaver, G T; Clark, M M; Edlich, R F

    1992-01-01

    Since the advent of rehabilitation engineering new advances have been made that have revolutionized condom catheter drainage systems (CCDS). An innovative CCDS has been designed that ensures unobstructed urine flow. Its condom catheter has several unique design features. It has a double row of convolutions near the catheter tip that prevent kinking and twisting so that the pathway remains open. The condom catheter features a unique inner flap that fits snugly on the glans to prevent backflow of urine on the shaft. This condom catheter is connected to a vented leg bag that eliminates the development of a partial vacuum in the connecting tube. This vacuum can create siphoning, which in turn interferes with urine flow into the leg bag. In addition, a new rechargeable battery-operated clipper has been developed that makes nick-free hair removal from the genitals exceptionally easy. This atraumatic hair removal eliminates the pubic hair that becomes trapped under the condom catheter. The clinical impact of these new advances in CCDS requires further investigation.

  16. Digital Subtraction MR Angiography Roadmapping for Magnetic Steerable Catheter Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Saeed, Maythem; Losey, Aaron D.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Lee; Arenson, Ronald L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a high temporal resolution MR imaging technique that could be employed with magnetically-assisted remote control (MARC) endovascular catheters. Materials and Methods A technique is proposed based on selective intra-arterial injections of dilute MR contrast at the beginning of a fluoroscopic MR angiography acquisition. The initial bolus of contrast is used to establish a vascular roadmap upon which MARC catheters can be tracked. The contrast to noise ratio of the achieved roadmap was assessed in phantoms and in a swine animal model. The ability of the technique to permit navigation of activated MARC catheters through arterial branch points was evaluated. Results The roadmapping mode proved effective in phantoms for tracking objects and achieved a contrast to noise ratio of 35.7 between the intra and extra-vascular space. In vivo, the intra-arterial enhancement strategy produced roadmaps with a contrast to noise ratio of 42.0. The artifact produced by MARC catheter activation provided signal enhancement patterns on the roadmap that experienced interventionalists could track through vascular structures. Conclusion A roadmapping approach with intra-arterial CE-MRA is introduced for navigating the MARC catheter. The technique mitigates the artifact produced by the MARC catheter, greatly limits the required SAR, permits regular roadmap updates due to the low contrast agent requirements, and proved effective in the in vivo setting. PMID:24797218

  17. Needle catheter duodenostomy: a technique for duodenal alimentation of birds.

    PubMed

    Goring, R L; Goldman, A; Kaufman, K J; Roberts, C; Quesenberry, K E; Kollias, G V

    1986-11-01

    A technique for duodenal alimentation (needle catheter duodenostomy) of birds was developed, using the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) as the experimental model. A needle catheter was inserted into the descending duodenum of 5 pigeons and was secured to the body wall and dorsum of each bird. A liquid diet was administered daily (in equal amounts of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hours) for 14 days without adverse effects. On day 15, the catheters were removed, and the birds immediately resumed normal consumption of a pigeon ration and water diet. Although 4 of the 5 birds had minor weight loss, dietary alterations probably could be used on an individual basis to alleviate this problem. After oral alimentation was resumed, the 5 birds exceeded their initial body weight within 7 days. Four weeks after catheter removal, positive-contrast radiographic evaluations indicated that the duodenum of each pigeon appeared normal. Needle catheter duodenostomy was a viable method of alimentation in the domestic pigeon. This technique should be applicable for other avian species requiring bypass of the upper gastrointestinal tract proximal to the region of catheter insertion in the duodenum.

  18. A retrospective study of palindrome symmetrical-tip catheters for chronic hemodialysis access in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chaoyang; Mao, Zhiguo; Zhang, Pan; Zhang, Yuqiang; Rong, Shu; Chen, Jing; Mei, Changlin

    2015-07-01

    Hemodialysis catheters remain necessary for long-term vascular access in patients for whom arteriovenous access may be problematic or impossible. Developments in catheter design have improved long-term catheter functionality, and reduced the rate of infection and complications associated with their use. This retrospective study of 284 cases of chronic catheterization in 271 patients treated between 2009 and 2011 using Tal Palindrome™ symmetrical-tip (N = 118) or Quinton™ Permcath™ step-tip (N = 166) hemodialysis catheters evaluates the efficacy and the safety of symmetrical-tip dialysis catheters for chronic hemodialysis, compared with a step-tip catheter. Measurements of catheter performance included mean catheter dwell time, incidence of low blood flow, and rates of infection and catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI). The symmetrical-tip catheter had a significantly longer mean dwell time compared with the step-tip catheter; 329.4 ± 38.1 versus 273.1 ± 25.4 d (p < 0.05). In addition, the rate of occurrence of low blood flow per 1000 catheter days was lower for the symmetrical-tip compared with the step-tip catheter; 1.13 versus 6.86 (p < 0.01). The symmetrical-tip catheter was also associated with a lower incidence of complications; the rates of infection (0.28 vs. 0.78; p < 0.01) and CRBSI (0.15 vs. 0.44; p < 0.01) were lower compared with those for step-tip catheters, and catheter removal occurred less often for the symmetrical-tip catheter (8% vs. 16%; p < 0.05). The symmetrical-tip hemodialysis catheter was associated with a longer mean dwell time, lower incidence of low blood flow, and lower infection rate compared with the step-tip catheter.

  19. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  20. Prehospital endotracheal tube airway or esophageal gastric tube airway: a critical comparison.

    PubMed

    Shea, S R; MacDonald, J R; Gruzinski, G

    1985-02-01

    This study compares two similar groups of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest with ventricular fibrillation (VF). In the survival study group of 296 patients, 148 patients received an endotracheal tube airway (ETA) and 148 patients received an esophageal gastric tube airway (EGTA), the improved version of the esophageal obturator airway (EOA). Survival rates, both short term (ETA = 35.8%, EGTA = 39.1%) and long term (ETA = 11.5%, EGTA = 16.2%), and neurological sequelae of survivors showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P greater than .05). In addition, we found that success and complication rates of intubation were similar. Training time was longer for the ETA. We conclude that both airways have a place in the prehospital setting.