Science.gov

Sample records for airway facilities maintenance

  1. Identification of Artificial Intelligence (AI) Applications for Maintenance, Monitoring, and Control of Airway Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Goernmeni AcceOn No. 3 . Rweponrs Catalog No. DOT/FAA/CT-TN92 / 4 , I 4. TiO Wid SuW te S. Report Dat Identification of Artificial Intelligence (AI) May...CONTENTS Page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ix 1. INTRODUCTION I 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Purpose 1 1.3 Scope 2 I.4 Organization 2 2. STUDY APPROACH 3 2. 1 Methodology... 3 2.2 Information Sources 4 3 . CURRENT FAA AF MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS 4 3 . 1 The AF Systems and Maintenance Operations Field Work Force 6 3 . 1. 1 AF

  2. Job Attitudes Toward the New Maintenance Concept of the Airway Facilities Service,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Sched. -.014 Facility -.137 Q47-Time on Rotating Sched. .086 Occupational Identification -.199 Q48-Productivity on Eve -Shifts -.018 Al’ Program .026 Q49...Productivity on Mid-Shifts -.011 Region -.118 Q53-Diff. Keep Awake in Eve . -.026 Supervisor/Nonsupervisor .236 Q55-Most Efficient Work Time .121 *Q7...165 Q68-Amt. of Sleep Aft. Eve -Shift -.147 *QiS-Sat. with Employment .241 A-State Anxiety .198 Q18-Sat. With Working Cond. .275 A-Trait Anxiety

  3. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and

  4. 340 Facility maintenance implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) has been developed for maintenance functions associated with the 340 Facility. This plan is developed from the guidelines presented by Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program (DOE 1994), Chapter II. The objective of this plan is to provide baseline information for establishing and identifying Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) conformance programs and policies applicable to implementation of DOE order 4330.4B guidelines. In addition, this maintenance plan identifies the actions necessary to develop a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program at the 340 Facility. Primary responsibility for the performance and oversight of maintenance activities at the 340 Facility resides with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Maintenance at the 340 Facility is performed by ICF-Kaiser Hanford (ICF-KH) South Programmatic Services crafts persons. This 340 Facility MIP provides interface requirements and responsibilities as they apply specifically to the 340 Facility. This document provides an implementation schedule which has been developed for items considered to be deficient or in need of improvement. The discussion sections, as applied to implementation at the 340 Facility, have been developed from a review of programs and practices utilizing the graded approach. Biennial review and additional reviews are conducted as significant programmatic and mission changes are made. This document is revised as necessary to maintain compliance with DOE requirements.

  5. NASA Critical Facilities Maintenance Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Critical Facilities Maintenance Assessment (CFMA) was first implemented by NASA following the March 2000 overtest of the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) spacecraft. A sine burst dynamic test using a 40 year old shaker failed. Mechanical binding/slippage of the slip table imparted 10 times the planned force to the test article. There was major structural damage to HESSI. The mechanical "health" of the shaker had not been assessed and tracked to assure the test equipment was in good working order. Similar incidents have occurred at NASA facilities due to inadequate maintenance (e.g., rainwater from a leaky roof contaminated an assembly facility that housed a spacecraft). The HESSI incident alerted NASA to the urgent need to identify inadequacies in ground facility readiness and maintenance practices. The consequences of failures of ground facilities that service these NASA systems are severe due to the high unit value of NASA products.

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) maintenance provisions

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was designed with maintainability as a primary parameter, and facilities and provisions were designed into the plant to accommodate the maintenance function. This paper describes the FFTF and its systems. Special maintenance equipment and facilities for performing maintenance on radioactive components are discussed. Maintenance provisions designed into the plant to enhance maintainability are also described.

  7. Maintenance Staffing Guidelines For Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, Alexandria, VA.

    The purpose of this publication is to provide a resource or guide for educational facilities in establishing or developing a maintenance trades organization that is sufficient to accomplish basic facilities maintenance functions. The guidelines are intended to suggest staffing levels for those routine facilities maintenance activities that are…

  8. Preventive Maintenance Guidelines for School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciha, John C.

    This five-part manual, intended to increase the integrity and support the longevity of school facilities, provides easy-to-use preventive maintenance (PM) system guidelines. Part 1 outlines the special considerations of school maintenance as compared to other facilities. Part 2 establishes the basic components of a PM program and provides Work…

  9. Reliability centered maintenance in astronomical infrastructure facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansorge, W. R.

    2006-06-01

    Hundreds of mirror segment, thousands of high precision actuators, highly complex mechanical, hydraulic, electrical and other technology subsystems, and highly sophisticated control systems: an ELT system consists of millions of individual parts and components, each of them may fail and lead to a partial or complete system breakdown. The traditional maintenance concepts characterized by predefined preventive maintenance activities and rigid schedules are not suitable for handling this large number of potential failures and malfunctions and the extreme maintenance workload. New maintenance strategies have to be found suitable to increase reliability while reducing the cost of needless maintenance services. The Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) methodology is already used extensively by airlines, and in industrial and marine facilities and even by scientific institutions like NASA. Its application increases the operational reliability while reducing the cost of unnecessary maintenance activities and is certainly also a solution for current and future ELT facilities. RCM is a concept of developing a maintenance scheme based on the reliability of the various components of a system by using "feedback loops between instrument / system performance monitoring and preventive/corrective maintenance cycles." Ideally RCM has to be designed within a system and should be located in the requirement definition, the preliminary and final design phases of new equipment and complicated systems. However, under certain conditions, an implementation of RCM into the maintenance management strategy of already existing astronomical infrastructure facilities is also possible. This presentation outlines the principles of the RCM methodology, explains the advantages, and highlights necessary changes in the observatory development, operation and maintenance philosophies. Presently, it is the right time to implement RCM into current and future ELT projects and to save up to 50% maintenance

  10. School Facilities Maintenance and Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials of the United States and Canada, Park Ridge, IL. Research Corp.

    This publication presents a series of field-proven school energy conservation, management, maintenance, and operations practices and ideas. Also included are the names, addresses, and phone numbers of individuals and organizations to contact for more detailed information. The brief summaries are grouped into six sections. "Planning and…

  11. Facility Maintenance. V-TECS Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles G.; And Others

    This facility maintenance guide is a compilation of duties, tasks, performance objectives, and performance guides that deals with the psychomotor aspect of an occupation. The guide addresses the three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. Each unit provides job-relevant tasks, standards of performance, source of standard,…

  12. 14 CFR 121.105 - Servicing and maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as are necessary for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of airplanes and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Servicing and maintenance facilities. 121... Operations § 121.105 Servicing and maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting domestic...

  13. 14 CFR 121.105 - Servicing and maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... as are necessary for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of airplanes and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Servicing and maintenance facilities. 121... Operations § 121.105 Servicing and maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting domestic...

  14. 14 CFR 121.105 - Servicing and maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... as are necessary for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of airplanes and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Servicing and maintenance facilities. 121... Operations § 121.105 Servicing and maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting domestic...

  15. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., supplies, and materials) are available for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123... Operations § 121.123 Servicing maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting...

  16. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., supplies, and materials) are available for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123... Operations § 121.123 Servicing maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting...

  17. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., supplies, and materials) are available for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123... Operations § 121.123 Servicing maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting...

  18. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., supplies, and materials) are available for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123... Operations § 121.123 Servicing maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting...

  19. Ground Software Maintenance Facility (GSMF) system manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derrig, D.; Griffith, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Ground Software Maintenance Facility (GSMF) is designed to support development and maintenance of spacelab ground support software. THE GSMF consists of a Perkin Elmer 3250 (Host computer) and a MITRA 125s (ATE computer), with appropriate interface devices and software to simulate the Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). This document is presented in three sections: (1) GSMF Overview; (2) Software Structure; and (3) Fault Isolation Capability. The overview contains information on hardware and software organization along with their corresponding block diagrams. The Software Structure section describes the modes of software structure including source files, link information, and database files. The Fault Isolation section describes the capabilities of the Ground Computer Interface Device, Perkin Elmer host, and MITRA ATE.

  20. Manned Mars mission health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioanni, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) requirements which enable/enhance manned Mars missions (MMMs) are addressed. It does not attempt to resolve any issues that may affect the feasibility of any given element in the HMF. Reference is made to current work being conducted in the design of the space station HMF. The HMF requirements are discussed within the context of two distinctly different scenarios: HMF as part of the Mars surface infrastructure, and HMF as part of the nine months translation from low Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Requirements for an HMF are provided, and a concept of HMF is shown.

  1. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  2. 24 CFR 242.57 - Maintenance of hospital facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maintenance of hospital facility... Requirements § 242.57 Maintenance of hospital facility. The mortgagor shall maintain the hospital's grounds... such repairs and maintenance as HUD considers necessary....

  3. 30 CFR 71.501 - Sanitary toilet facilities; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sanitary toilet facilities; maintenance. 71.501... COAL MINES Sanitary Toilet Facilities at Surface Worksites of Surface Coal Mines § 71.501 Sanitary toilet facilities; maintenance. Sanitary toilets provided in accordance with the provisions of §...

  4. Facilities Maintenance in the U.S. Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    organization tasked to administer the maintenance function (Public Works Department for the Navy and Marine Air Bases , Facilities Maintenance Office for...The Navy’s Facility Maintenance Management system is based on several wmaximaw or preceptus 3 1. Maintenance and Repairs (M&R) are less costly if...emergency call. 2. Enough money in never available to accomplish all the M&RI therefore, a consistent system of job priorities, based upon operational

  5. Alaska School Facilities Preventive Maintenance Handbook. 1997 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Tim; Crittenden, Edwin; Morgan, Michael

    The State of Alaska has issued preventive maintenance guidelines for educational facilities designed to prevent premature failure, or to maximize or extend the useful life of a facility and its components, including roofing inspections, repainting, and door hardware adjustments. The handbook examines preventive maintenance state legislation, and…

  6. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123 Section 121.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION..., supplies, and materials) are available for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance...

  7. Health maintenance facility system effectiveness testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Gosbee, John; Bueker, Richard; Kupra, Debra; Ruta, Mary

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Simulations Working Group conducted a series of medical simulations to evaluate the proposed Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) Preliminary Design Review (PDR) configuration. The goal of these simulations was to test the system effectiveness of the HMF PDR configurations. The objectives of the medical simulations are to (1) ensure fulfillment of requirements with this HMF design, (2) demonstrate the conformance of the system to human engineering design criteria, and (3) determine whether undesirable design or procedural features were introduced into the design. The simulations consisted of performing 6 different medical scenarios with the HMF mockup in the KRUG laboratory. The scenarios included representative medical procedures and used a broad spectrum of HMF equipment and supplies. Scripts were written and simulations performed by medical simulations working group members under observation from others. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, debriefings, and videotapes. Results were extracted and listed in the individual reports. Specific issues and recommendations from each simulation were compiled into the individual reports. General issues regarding the PDR design of the HMF are outlined in the summary report.

  8. A health maintenance facility for space station freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, R. D.; Doarn, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a health care facility to be built and used on an orbiting space station in low Earth orbit. This facility, called the health maintenance facility, is based on and modeled after isolated terrestrial medical facilities. It will provide a phased approach to health care for the crews of Space Station Freedom. This paper presents the capabilities of the health maintenance facility. As Freedom is constructed over the next decade there will be an increase in activities, both construction and scientific. The health maintenance facility will evolve with this process until it is a mature, complete, stand-alone health care facility that establishes a foundation to support interplanetary travel. As our experience in space continues to grow so will the commitment to providing health care.

  9. School Facilities Maintenance and Operations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    Often a community's largest single investment is in its physical plants, including public school buildings and grounds. An essential factor in efficient school district operation is a well-organized, responsive plant operations and maintenance division. Maintenance has generally been defined as those services, activities, and procedures concerned…

  10. APPLICATION OF LINEAR PROGRAMMING TO FACILITY MAINTENANCE PROBLEMS IN THE NAVY SHORE ESTABLISHMENT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LINEAR PROGRAMMING ), (*NAVAL SHORE FACILITIES, MAINTENANCE), (*MAINTENANCE, COSTS, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, MANPOWER, FEASIBILITY STUDIES, OPTIMIZATION, MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING.

  11. Modernizing a Preventive Maintenance Strategy for Facility and Infrastructure Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    lowest cost possible (Sheu & Krajewski , 1994). Under most circumstances though, infrastructure operability is directly related to the expenditure of... Krajewski , 1994). Although PM requires routine planning and analysis in order to ensure a consistent, optimal balance between resource expenditures and...adverse effects of breakdown and maximizing facility availability at minimum cost while operating within environmental constraints (Sheu & Krajewski

  12. Operation and Maintenance of Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Douglas D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment: (1) operators, training, and certification; (2) solutions to operating problems; (3) collection systems; (4) operations manuals; (5) wastewater treatment facility case histories; (5) land application; and (6) treatment of industrial wastes. A list of 36 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  15. 1. AERIAL VIEW, NAVAL INACTIVE SHIPS MAINTENANCE FACILITY, SINCLAIR ISLET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, NAVAL INACTIVE SHIPS MAINTENANCE FACILITY, SINCLAIR ISLET, BREMERTON, KITSAP COUNTY, WASHINGTON WITH EX-USS HORNET CVS-12, THREE MINECRAFT ALONGSIDE TO PORT. OTHER INACTIVE SHIPS IN BACKGROUND. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  16. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance...

  17. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance...

  18. Maintenance implementation plan for the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.A.

    1997-01-30

    This plan implements the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program (1994), at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FFTF is a research and test reactor located near Richland, Washington, and is operated under contract for the DOE by the B&W Hanford Company (BWHC). The intent of this Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is to describe the manner in which the activities of the maintenance function are executed and controlled at the FFTF and how this compares to the requirements of DOE 4330.4B. The MIP ii a living document that is updated through a Facility Maintenance Self- Assessment Program. During the continuing self-assessment program, any discrepancies found are resolved to meet DOE 4330.4B requirements and existing practices. The philosophy of maintenance management at the FFTF is also describe within this MIP. This MIP has been developed based on information obtained from various sources including the following: * A continuing self-assessment against the requirements of the Conduct of Maintenance Order * In-depth reviews conducted by the members of the task team that assembled this MIP * Inputs from routine audits and appraisals conducted at the facility The information from these sources is used to identify those areas in which improvements could be made in the manner in which the facility conducts maintenance activities. The action items identified in Rev. 1 of the MIP have been completed. The MIP is arranged in six sections. Section I is this Executive Summary. Section 2 describes the facility and its 0683 history. Section 3 describes the philosophy of the graded approach and how it is applied at FFTF. Section 3 also discusses the strategy and the basis for the prioritizing resources. Section 4 contains the detailed discussion of `the elements of DOE 4330.4B and their state of implementation. Section 5 is for waivers and requested deviations from the requirements of the order. Section 6 contains a copy of the Maintenance

  19. Risk-based maintenance of ethylene oxide production facilities.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faisal I; Haddara, Mahmoud R

    2004-05-20

    This paper discusses a methodology for the design of an optimum inspection and maintenance program. The methodology, called risk-based maintenance (RBM) is based on integrating a reliability approach and a risk assessment strategy to obtain an optimum maintenance schedule. First, the likely equipment failure scenarios are formulated. Out of many likely failure scenarios, the ones, which are most probable, are subjected to a detailed study. Detailed consequence analysis is done for the selected scenarios. Subsequently, these failure scenarios are subjected to a fault tree analysis to determine their probabilities. Finally, risk is computed by combining the results of the consequence and the probability analyses. The calculated risk is compared against known acceptable criteria. The frequencies of the maintenance tasks are obtained by minimizing the estimated risk. A case study involving an ethylene oxide production facility is presented. Out of the five most hazardous units considered, the pipeline used for the transportation of the ethylene is found to have the highest risk. Using available failure data and a lognormal reliability distribution function human health risk factors are calculated. Both societal risk factors and individual risk factors exceeded the acceptable risk criteria. To determine an optimal maintenance interval, a reverse fault tree analysis was used. The maintenance interval was determined such that the original high risk is brought down to an acceptable level. A sensitivity analysis is also undertaken to study the impact of changing the distribution of the reliability model as well as the error in the distribution parameters on the maintenance interval.

  20. Preventive Maintenance for Higher Education Facilities: A Planning & Budgeting Tool for Facilities Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This guide is designed to help higher education facilities managers, through the implementation of preventive maintenance (PM), to increase the life of facility systems and equipment, lower overall operating costs, and provide maximum responsiveness to the college/university community. Part One, "Selling the Need," is designed to address…

  1. Alternative Cask Maintenance Facility concepts, an update and reassessment

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, C.R.; Medley, L.B.; Williamson, A.; Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.

    1992-02-01

    The results of three trade-off studies of alternative concepts for performing cask maintenance for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System casks are presented. An earlier study resulted in a recommendation that a submerged pool concept for cask internal component removal be used in the design of a Cask Maintenance Facility. The first trade-off study resulted in confirming the previous recommendation that a submerged pool concept be used rather than an isolation cell; the basis for this continued recommendation is discussed. The second study provides an evaluation of the previously proposed facility for the capability of handling an increased quantity of OCRWM casks. This third study provides a preliminary concept for adding the capability to repaint the exterior cylindrical portions of casks.

  2. Alternative Cask Maintenance Facility concepts, an update and reassessment

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, C.R.; Medley, L.B.; Williamson, A.; Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    The results of three trade-off studies of alternative concepts for performing cask maintenance for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System casks are presented. An earlier study resulted in a recommendation that a submerged pool concept for cask internal component removal be used in the design of a Cask Maintenance Facility. The first trade-off study resulted in confirming the previous recommendation that a submerged pool concept be used rather than an isolation cell; the basis for this continued recommendation is discussed. The second study provides an evaluation of the previously proposed facility for the capability of handling an increased quantity of OCRWM casks. This third study provides a preliminary concept for adding the capability to repaint the exterior cylindrical portions of casks.

  3. 20 CFR 670.220 - Are we responsible for the protection and maintenance of center facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... maintenance of center facilities? 670.220 Section 670.220 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... and Protection and Maintenance of Facilities § 670.220 Are we responsible for the protection and maintenance of center facilities? (a) Yes, the Secretary establishes procedures for the protection...

  4. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.806 Section 170.806 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  5. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.806 Section 170.806 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  6. Force maintenance and myosin filament assembly regulated by Rho-kinase in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Deng, Linhong; Donovan, Graham M; Chin, Leslie Y M; Syyong, Harley T; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Christopher D; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Swyngedouw, Nicholas E; Banaem, Saleha M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction can be divided into two phases: the initial contraction determines the amount of developed force and the second phase determines how well the force is maintained. The initial phase is primarily due to activation of actomyosin interaction and is relatively well understood, whereas the second phase remains poorly understood. Force maintenance in the sustained phase can be disrupted by strains applied to the muscle; the strain causes actomyosin cross-bridges to detach and also the cytoskeletal structure to disassemble in a process known as fluidization, for which the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of airway smooth muscle to maintain force after the initial phase of contraction. Specifically, we examined the roles of Rho-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) in force maintenance. We found that for the same degree of initial force inhibition, Rho-kinase substantially reduced the muscle's ability to sustain force under static conditions, whereas inhibition of PKC had a minimal effect on sustaining force. Under oscillatory strain, Rho-kinase inhibition caused further decline in force, but again, PKC inhibition had a minimal effect. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibition led to a decrease in the myosin filament mass in the muscle cells, suggesting that one of the functions of Rho-kinase is to stabilize myosin filaments. The results also suggest that dissolution of myosin filaments may be one of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of fluidization. These findings can shed light on the mechanism underlying deep inspiration induced bronchodilation.

  7. Department of National Defence's use of thermography for facilities maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittson, John E.

    1990-03-01

    Since the late seventies DND through the Director General Works has been actively encouraging the use of thermography as an efficient and effective technique for supporting preventive maintenance quality assurance and energy conservation programs at Canadian Forces Bases (CFBs). This paper will provide an overview of DND''s experiences in the utilization of thermography for facilities maintenance applications. 1. HISTORICAL MILESTONES The following are milestones of DND''s use of thermography: a. Purchase of Infrared Equipment In 1976/77 DND purchased five AGA 750 Infrared Thermovision Systems which were distributed to commands. In 1980/81/82 six AGA liOs five AGA TPT8Os two AGA 782s and one AGA 720 were acquired. Finally DND also purchased seven AGEMA 870 systems during 1987/88. b. First and Second Interdepartaental Building Thermography Courses In 1978 and 1980 DND hosted two building thermography courses that were conducted by Public Works Canada. c. CE Thermographer Specialist Training Courses DND developed a training standard in 1983 for Construction Engineering (CE) Thermographer qualification which included all CE applications of thermography. The first annual inhouse training course was conducted at CFB Borden Ontario in 1984. These are now being conducted at the CFB Chilliwack Detachment in Vernon British Columbia. 2 . MARKETING FACILITIES MAINTENANCE IR Of paramount importance for successfully developing DND appreciation for thermography was providing familiarization training to CE staff at commands and bases. These threeday presentations emphasized motivational factors conducting thermographic surveys and utilizing infrared data of roofs electrical/mechanical systems heating plants steam distribution and building enclosures. These factors consisted mainly of the following objectives: a. preventive maintenance by locating deficiencies to be repaired b. quality assurance by verification of workmanship materials and design c. energy conservation by locating

  8. Does the Health Maintenance Facility Provide Speciality Capabilities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joey; Wurgler, James; Broadwell, Kim; Martin, William; Stiernberg, Charles M.; Bove, Alfred; Fromm, Rob; O'Neill, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) is capable of handling all minor illnesses, most moderate illnesses, and some major illnesses on board a space station. Its primary purpose should be to treat problems that are mission threatening, not life threatening. The HMF will have greater medical capabilities than those currently on Navy submarines. Much of the discussion in this document focuses on the possibilities of treating specific medical conditions on board a space station. The HMF will be limited to caring for critically ill patients for a few days, so a crew return vehicle will be important.

  9. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  11. Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1997-06-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam is used for holding and spawning adult fall chinook and coho salmon. Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and summer steelhead. The main goal of acclimation is to reduce stress from trucking prior to release and improve imprinting of juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. Juveniles are transported to the acclimation facilities primarily from Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries. This report details activities associated with operation and maintenance of the Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques, Thornhollow and Three Mile Dam facilities in 1996.

  12. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. 208.10 Section 208.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. (a) General. (1... responsible for the development and maintenance of, and directly in charge of, an organization responsible...

  13. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. 208.10 Section 208.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. (a) General. (1... responsible for the development and maintenance of, and directly in charge of, an organization responsible...

  14. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. 208.10 Section 208.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. (a) General. (1... responsible for the development and maintenance of, and directly in charge of, an organization responsible...

  15. Guideline to good practices for types of maintenance activities at DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Types of Maintenance at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information that may be used for the development and implementation of a properly balanced corrective, preventive and predictive maintenance program at DOE nuclear facilities. This document is intended to be an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 4. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they should use the information contained herein as a guide for developing maintenance programs that are applicable to their facility.

  16. Operation and Maintenance of Water Pollution Control Facilities: A WPCF White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presented are the recommendations of the Water Pollution Control Federation for operation and maintenance consideration during the planning design, construction, and operation of wastewater treatment facilities. (CS)

  17. 14 CFR 121.105 - Servicing and maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... spare parts, supplies, and materials) are available at such points along the certificate holder's route as are necessary for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of airplanes...

  18. 14 CFR 121.105 - Servicing and maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... spare parts, supplies, and materials) are available at such points along the certificate holder's route as are necessary for the proper servicing, maintenance, and preventive maintenance of airplanes...

  19. [Provision of building maintenance services in healthcare facilities].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Gláucia Maria; Quintão, Eliana Cardoso Vieira; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper was to evaluate the provision of building maintenance services in health units, by means of a descriptive, quantitative and cross-sectional study, considering the five types of facilities (Primary Health, Emergency, Specialty, Hospital and Mental Health Units). The research was approved by the Research Ethics Comittee of FHEMIG with the Terms of Agreement signed with the Unified Health System of Betim. Comparative analysis was conducted by checking the requirements of "Physical-Functional Structure Management" of the "Brazilian Hospital Accreditation Manual" of the National Accreditation Organization. Nonconformities were noted in the physical-functional management of the health centers, especially the primary health units. The assessment was important, considering that compliance with formal, technical and structural requirements, welfare activities, according to the service organization and appropriate to the profile and complexity, can collaborate to minimize the risks of users. To improve the quality of health care establishments, it is essential that managers, backed by "top management," prioritize financial, human and material resources in planning to ensure compliance with security requirements of users in buildings.

  20. Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    -one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease (Yersinia ruckeri) was detected in one fish. Cell culture assays for replicating viral agents on spawned fall chinook were negative. One hundred eighty-three spawned fall chinook females were sampled for BKD and all had ELISA readings between 0.00 and 0.099, indicating negative to low level positives. Two fall chinook mortalities were examined for BKD and both had OD{sub 405} readings of less than 0.099, indicating negative to very low levels of Rs antigen. Regularly scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment, and facilities was performed in 2002. Critical maintenance and repair was also performed by Umatilla Passage Facility Operation and Maintenance crews.

  1. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facility Maintenance Management System (TFMMS). 16. Performing pavement maintenance such as pot... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program A Appendix A to Subpart G Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt....

  2. Knowledge and stigma regarding methadone maintenance treatment among personnel of methadone maintenance treatment and non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction facilities in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shidlansik, Lia; Adelson, Miriam; Peles, Einat

    2017-01-01

    Stigma attached to methadone maintenance treatment is very common. The objective of the current article is to evaluate the presence of stigma and its relation to the extent of knowledge about methadone maintenance treatment. The authors conducted a survey among methadone maintenance treatment and non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction therapists from different treatment centers in Israel, including methadone maintenance treatment clinics (Ministry of Health) and non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction facilities (Ministry of Social Services), using an anonymous questionnaire about methadone maintenance treatment stigma and knowledge. There were 63 therapists from methadone maintenance treatment clinics (63%) and 46 therapists from the social services department (SSD) non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction facilities (9.2%) who responded. Methadone maintenance treatment versus social services department personnel were older (42.7 ± 12.8 versus 37.5 ± 8.2 years; p = 0.03), with fewer females (48 versus 75%; p = 0.006), and 50% were social workers compared to 100% social workers in the SSD group (p < 0.0005). Stigma score was lower among methadone maintenance treatment personnel compared to the social services department personnel (3 ± 2.5 versus 5.0 ± 3.5; p = 0.0001), while the knowledge score about methadone maintenance treatment was higher among the methadone maintenance treatment personnel (10.3 ± 2.9 versus 7.7 ± 2.8; p < 0.0005). The difference in both the stigma and knowledge scores remained significant after controlling for age, gender, and profession. There was a negative correlation between the stigma and knowledge scores among both the methadone maintenance treatment (R = -0.5, p < 0.0005) and the social services department personnel (R = -0.33, p = 0.03). These results revealed a significant correlation between the presence of stigma and the extent of education and knowledge about methadone maintenance treatment, with ignorance

  3. Students Speak With Angela Bauer, Facilities Operations and Maintenance Group Lead

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center Angela Bauer, Facilities Operations and Maintenance Group lead in the Mission Operations Directorate at Johnson Space Center, partic...

  4. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR... facility, ensure safety, and report future funding needs to the Secretary. BIA will develop the IRR TFMMS....

  5. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, J.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell was designed to perform interim examination and/or disassembly of experimental core components for final analysis elsewhere, as well as maintenance of sodium-wetted or neutron-activated internal reactor parts and plant support hardware. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell equipment developed and used for the first ten years of operation has been primarily devoted to the disassembly and examination of core component test assemblies. While no major reactor equipment has required remote repair or maintenance, the Interim Examina Examination and Maintenance Cell has served as the remote repair facility for its own in-cell equipment, and several innovative remote repairs have been accomplished. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell's demonstrated versatility has shown its capability to support a challenging future. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Improving Math Literacy for the Facilities Maintenance Industry: A Multimedia Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, John; Taylor, Don

    Texas State Technical College in Waco (TSTCW) entered into a partnership with ServiceMaster, one of the largest maintenance companies in the world, to develop a contextual-based videodisc curriculum for facility maintenance workers intended to increase math literacy. TSTCW developed a task analysis, a curriculum, and evaluation measures for the…

  7. Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Norm Stanley

    2011-02-01

    This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

  8. 14 CFR 147.37 - Maintenance of facilities, equipment, and material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... material. 147.37 Section 147.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 147.37 Maintenance of facilities, equipment, and material. (a) Each certificated...

  9. 14 CFR 147.37 - Maintenance of facilities, equipment, and material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... material. 147.37 Section 147.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 147.37 Maintenance of facilities, equipment, and material. (a) Each certificated...

  10. 14 CFR 147.37 - Maintenance of facilities, equipment, and material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... material. 147.37 Section 147.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 147.37 Maintenance of facilities, equipment, and material. (a) Each certificated...

  11. Analyses in support of risk-informed natural gas vehicle maintenance facility codes and standards :

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Blaylock, Myra L.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Horne, Douglas B.

    2014-03-01

    Safety standards development for maintenance facilities of liquid and compressed gas fueled large-scale vehicles is required to ensure proper facility design and operation envelopes. Standard development organizations are utilizing risk-informed concepts to develop natural gas vehicle (NGV) codes and standards so that maintenance facilities meet acceptable risk levels. The present report summarizes Phase I work for existing NGV repair facility code requirements and highlights inconsistencies that need quantitative analysis into their effectiveness. A Hazardous and Operability study was performed to identify key scenarios of interest. Finally, scenario analyses were performed using detailed simulations and modeling to estimate the overpressure hazards from HAZOP defined scenarios. The results from Phase I will be used to identify significant risk contributors at NGV maintenance facilities, and are expected to form the basis for follow-on quantitative risk analysis work to address specific code requirements and identify effective accident prevention and mitigation strategies.

  12. EBR-II facility for cleaning and maintenance of LMR components

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cleaning and maintenance of EBR-II sodium wetted components is accomplished in a separate hands-on maintenance facility known as the Sodium Components Maintenance Shop (SCMS). Sodium removal is mostly done using alcohol but steam or water is used. The SCMS has three alcohol cleaning systems: one for small nonradioactive components, one for small radioactive components, and one for large radioactive components. The SCMS also has a water-wash station for the removal of sodium with steam or water. An Alcohol Recovery Facility removes radioactive contaminants from the alcohol and reclaims the alcohol for reuse. Associated with the large components cleaning system is a major component handling system.

  13. Recommended Guidelines for Facilities, Equipment, Grounds, and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    Recommended minimum physical facility standards are listed in this set of guidelines drawn up in outline form for Iowa public schools. Included are standards for school sites, safety, playgrounds, physical condition of exterior as well as interior of buildings, various classroom types, guidance facilities, auditoriums, gymnasiums, instructional…

  14. 50 CFR 85.45 - Public access to facilities and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public access to facilities and... GRANT PROGRAM Conditions on Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.45 Public access to facilities and maintenance. All recreational vessels must have access to pumpout and dump stations funded under this grant...

  15. Developing Mobile- and BIM-Based Integrated Visual Facility Maintenance Management System

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Facility maintenance management (FMM) has become an important topic for research on the operation phase of the construction life cycle. Managing FMM effectively is extremely difficult owing to various factors and environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of 2D graphics when depicting maintenance service. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the maintenance service of facilities depicted in 3D object-oriented CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FMM using BIM technology. Using BIM technology, this study proposes a BIM-based facility maintenance management (BIMFMM) system for maintenance staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The BIMFMM system is then applied in selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FMM practice. Using the BIMFMM system, maintenance staff can access and review 3D BIM models for updating related maintenance records in a digital format. Moreover, this study presents a generic system architecture and its implementation. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFMM-like system can be an effective visual FMM tool. PMID:24227995

  16. Developing mobile- and BIM-based integrated visual facility maintenance management system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Facility maintenance management (FMM) has become an important topic for research on the operation phase of the construction life cycle. Managing FMM effectively is extremely difficult owing to various factors and environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of 2D graphics when depicting maintenance service. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the maintenance service of facilities depicted in 3D object-oriented CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FMM using BIM technology. Using BIM technology, this study proposes a BIM-based facility maintenance management (BIMFMM) system for maintenance staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The BIMFMM system is then applied in selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FMM practice. Using the BIMFMM system, maintenance staff can access and review 3D BIM models for updating related maintenance records in a digital format. Moreover, this study presents a generic system architecture and its implementation. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFMM-like system can be an effective visual FMM tool.

  17. Maintenance & Operations Solutions: Meeting the Challenge of Improving School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    This paper examines the impact current maintenance and operations (M&O) practices have on U.S. school performance and offers possible opportunities for improvement through the judicious use of technology and methodology. The paper also presents a regional comparative analysis of M&O costs across the country. A list of equipment and their…

  18. Using Decision Analysis to Select Facility Maintenance Management Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...Systems and Engineering Management Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air...increased (Garg & Deshmukh, 2006). According to Teicholz and Ikeda (1995), the support for technology -based maintenance systems began during the

  19. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  20. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... IRR transportation facilities? 170.808 Section 170.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA Road Maintenance Program funds cannot be used to improve roads or other IRR transportation facilities to a...

  1. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... IRR transportation facilities? 170.808 Section 170.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA Road Maintenance Program funds cannot be used to improve roads or other IRR transportation facilities to a...

  2. Federal Guidelines - Operation and Maintenance of Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document contains the federal guidelines for meeting the specific requirements of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972. These guidelines are also intended to assist in meeting the regulations for grant assisted facility construction and to provide information on the key elements to be included in the operation plans for…

  3. Asset Management: Roof Maintenance and Facility Energy Retrofits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Online]. Available : http://www.srpnet.com/ energy /biztips.aspx [43] Cranston Public Schools Network. (2012). Energy Conservation and Building...costs forced the USAF to begin aggressively searching for new energy conservation measures. Although, the USAF made significant gains in the...developing the right combination of energy efficiency conservation measures (ECMs) for certain facility types [25]. These facts documented the

  4. Preliminary survey report: evaluation of brake-drum-service controls at Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, J.W.

    1986-07-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio, was visited as part of a study of asbestos control during the maintenance and repair of vehicular brakes. The effectiveness of various control technologies designed to reduce asbestos exposure were evaluated.

  5. Master slave manipulator maintenance at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lethco, A.J.; Beasley, K.M.

    1991-12-31

    Equipment has been developed and tested to provide transport, installation, removal, decontamination, and repair for the master slave manipulators that are required for thirty-five discrete work locations in the 221-S Vitrification Building of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This specialized equipment provides a standardized scheme for work locations at different elevations with two types of manipulators.

  6. Master slave manipulator maintenance at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lethco, A.J.; Beasley, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    Equipment has been developed and tested to provide transport, installation, removal, decontamination, and repair for the master slave manipulators that are required for thirty-five discrete work locations in the 221-S Vitrification Building of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This specialized equipment provides a standardized scheme for work locations at different elevations with two types of manipulators.

  7. Optimal pricing policies for services with consideration of facility maintenance costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Ruey Huei; Lin, Yi-Fang

    2012-06-01

    For survival and success, pricing is an essential issue for service firms. This article deals with the pricing strategies for services with substantial facility maintenance costs. For this purpose, a mathematical framework that incorporates service demand and facility deterioration is proposed to address the problem. The facility and customers constitute a service system driven by Poisson arrivals and exponential service times. A service demand with increasing price elasticity and a facility lifetime with strictly increasing failure rate are also adopted in modelling. By examining the bidirectional relationship between customer demand and facility deterioration in the profit model, the pricing policies of the service are investigated. Then analytical conditions of customer demand and facility lifetime are derived to achieve a unique optimal pricing policy. The comparative statics properties of the optimal policy are also explored. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effects of parameter variations on the optimal pricing policy.

  8. Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1996-05-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservoir (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and coho salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla river releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries.

  9. Operation, Maintenance and Management of Wastewater Treatment Facilities: A Bibliography of Technical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Dottie

    This is an annotated bibliography of wastewater treatment manuals. Fourteen manuals are abstracted including: (1) A Planned Maintenance Management System for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants; (2) Anaerobic Sludge Digestion, Operations Manual; (3) Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities; (4) Estimating Laboratory Needs…

  10. Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Poderis, Reed J.; King, Rebecca A.

    2013-09-30

    This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or

  11. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  12. Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

  13. Environmental risk assessment for start-up of a new consolidated maintenance facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Wise, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    This paper summarizes a case study of a risk assessment for a consolidated maintenance facility (CMF). An interdisciplinary team was formed to identify and evaluate showstopper'' risks which could delay or prevent ontime, safe, and economical operation of a CMF and to recommend ways to mitigate the risks. The risk assessment was constrained by time, information, incomplete plans and facilities, and a concomitant major transition in manufacturing process, organization, and technology. Working within these constraints, the team integrated convergent findings into estimates of high, medium, and low risks based on the subjective likelihood of occurrence and predicted consequences of potential hazard events. The team also made risk-reduction recommendations for facility detail design and production start-up. The findings and recommendations reported in this study focus on risks related to environmental design and workstation ergonomics. Findings from the risk assessment effort should aid other constrained risk assessments and applied research on similar facilities.

  14. Optimum ADP Support for Financial Management of Marine Corps Facilities Maintenance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    fiscal y-ar fuel the growing BMAR. B. P&P PROCESING All projects ente ring the Facilities maintenance Department pass over the P&P Supervisor’s desk...Branch, NAV?-ACEN GCOM% (Code 1001) on 17 Harch 1983 36. NAVFACENGCOM Scoping Estimate User’s Guide, Interi.m Facilities .42 er .4iatn 37. Civil Engineer...Support office; BEST Base Engieering Sujport Technical Work n~tCE.fl’ -em WU-Sr -s C~ITTI, Port Hueneme, c a. 93040 *38. Civil Engin er Support Office

  15. A Medical Decision Support System for the Space Station Health Maintenance Facility

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, David V.; Gardner, Reed M.; Logan, James S.

    1988-01-01

    NASA is developing a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) to provide the equipment and supplies necessary to deliver medical care in the Space Station. An essential part of the Health Maintenance Facility is a computerized Medical Decision Support System (MDSS) that will enhance the ability of the medical officer (“paramedic” or “physician”) to maintain the crew's health, and to provide emergency medical care. The computer system has four major functions: 1) collect and integrate medical information into an electronic medical record from Space Station medical officers, HMF instrumentation, and exercise equipment; 2) provide an integrated medical record and medical reference information management system; 3) manage inventory for logistical support of supplies and secure pharmaceuticals; 4) supply audio and electronic mail communications between the medical officer and ground based flight surgeons. ImagesFigure 1

  16. Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    JANIN, L.F.

    2000-08-30

    This O&M Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design.

  17. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell - past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) interim examination and maintenance (IEM) cell was designed to perform interim examination and/or disassembly of experimental core components for final analysis elsewhere, as well as maintenance of sodium-wetted or neutron-activated internal reactor parts and plant support hardware. The first 10 yr of operation were mainly devoted to the disassembly and examination of core component test assemblies. While some maintenance was performed on reactor support equipment, such as the closed-loop ex-vessel machine (CLEM) sodium-wetted grapple, 90% of IEM cell availability has been devoted to core component tests. Some test assemblies originally considered for processing in the IEM cell have not been irradiated; others, not originally planned, have been designed, irradiated, and processed. While no major reactor equipment has required remote repair or maintenance, the IEM cell has served as the remote repair facility for its own in-cell equipment, and several innovative remote repairs have been accomplished and are described.

  18. Software solutions manage the definition, operation, maintenance and configuration control of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, D; Churby, A; Krieger, E; Maloy, D; White, K

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest laser composed of millions of individual parts brought together to form one massive assembly. Maintaining control of the physical definition, status and configuration of this structure is a monumental undertaking yet critical to the validity of the shot experiment data and the safe operation of the facility. The NIF business application suite of software provides the means to effectively manage the definition, build, operation, maintenance and configuration control of all components of the National Ignition Facility. State of the art Computer Aided Design software applications are used to generate a virtual model and assemblies. Engineering bills of material are controlled through the Enterprise Configuration Management System. This data structure is passed to the Enterprise Resource Planning system to create a manufacturing bill of material. Specific parts are serialized then tracked along their entire lifecycle providing visibility to the location and status of optical, target and diagnostic components that are key to assessing pre-shot machine readiness. Nearly forty thousand items requiring preventive, reactive and calibration maintenance are tracked through the System Maintenance & Reliability Tracking application to ensure proper operation. Radiological tracking applications ensure proper stewardship of radiological and hazardous materials and help provide a safe working environment for NIF personnel.

  19. Umatilla Basin Fish Facilities Operation & Maintenance : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Mike

    2008-12-30

    Westland Irrigation District, as contractor to Bonneville Power Administration, and West Extension Irrigation District, as subcontractor to Westland, provide labor, equipment, and material necessary for the operation, care, and maintenance of fish facilities on the Umatilla River. Westland Irrigation District is the contractor of record. Job sites that are covered: Three Mile Right, Three Mile Left, Three Mile Adult Spawning, WEID Sampling Facility, Maxwell Screen Site, Westland Screen Site/Ladder/Juvenile Sampling Facility, Feed Canal Ladder/Screen Site, Stanfield Ladder/Screen Site, Minthorn Holding Facility, Thornhollow Acclimation Site, Imeques Acclimation Site, Pendleton Acclimation Site, and South Fork Walla Walla Spawning Facility. O & M personnel coordinate with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel in performing tasks under this contract including scheduling of trap and haul, sampling, acclimation site maintenance, and other related activities as needed. The input from ODFW biologists Bill Duke and Ken Loffink, and CTUIR biologist Preston Bronson is indispensable to the success of the project, and is gratefully acknowledged. All tasks associated with the project were successfully completed during the fiscal year 2008 work period of October, 2007 through September, 2008. The project provides operations and maintenance throughout the year on five fish screen sites with a total of thirty-four rotating drum-screens, and four fish ladders in the Umatilla River Basin; additionally, periodic operations and maintenance is performed at holding, acclimation, and spawning sites in the Basin. Three people are employed full-time to perform these tasks. The FY08 budget for this project was $492,405 and actual expenditures were $490,267.01. Selected work activities and concerns: (1) Feed Dam Passage Improvement Project - A project to improve fish passage over the short term at the

  20. [STRATEGY OF USE AND MAINTENANCE OF CLINICAL HOSPITAL CENTER RIJEKA IN ACCORDANCE WITH KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR STRATEGIC HEALTHCARE FACILITIES MAINTENANCE].

    PubMed

    Sjekavica, Mariela; Haller, Herman; Cerić, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Building usage is the phase in the building life cycle that is most time-consuming, most functional, most significant due to building purpose and often systematically ignored. Maintenance is the set of activities that ensure the planned duration of facility exploitation phase in accordance with the requirements for quality maintenance of a large number of important building features as well as other elements immanent to the nature of facilities' life. The aim of the study is to show the analysis of the current state of organized, planned and comprehensive managerial approach in hospital utilization and maintenance in the Republic of Croatia, given on the case study of Clinical hospital center in Rijeka. The methodology used consists of relevant literature section of theory of facility utilization, maintenance and management in general, hospital buildings especially, display of practice on case study, and comparison of key performance indicators values obtained through interview with those that author Igal M. Shohet defined in his study by field surveys and statistical analyses. Despite many positive indicators of Clinical hospital center Rijeka maintenance, an additional research is needed in order to define a more complete national hospital maintenance strategy.

  1. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks

  2. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program: Facility Operations and Maintenance, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2003-03-01

    The Catherine Creek Acclimation Facility (CCAF) received 180,912 smolts from LFH. The size of the fish at delivery was 18.4 fish/lb. Volitional releases started 1 April 2002 with a total of 7,998 PIT-tagged fish (68,948 estimated total fish) migrating from the raceways during the volitional release period. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left between 1400 and 2200 hours. The size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 16.4 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 569 (0.3 %). No significant mortality related to disease was observed. The fish were fed a total of 1,968 lbs of food for the acclimation period. The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility in 2002 was 180,343. The Upper Grande Ronde Acclimation Facility (UGRAF) received 201,958 smolts from LFH. The size of the fish at delivery was 17.4 fish/lb. On 3 March 2002 the water inflow to raceway 4 froze in the early morning hours and the entire raceway was lost. Volitional releases started 1 April 2002 with a total of 682 PIT-tagged fish (68,200 estimated total fish) migrating from the raceways during the volitional release period. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left between 1500 and 2200 hours. The size of the fish left in the raceways just before the forced release was 18.3 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period not including raceway 4 was 402 (0.3 %). No significant mortality related to disease was observed. The fish were fed a total of 568 lbs of food for the acclimation period. The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility in 2002 was 151,444. Maintenance and repair activities were conducted at the acclimation facilities in 2002. Facility maintenance work consisted of snow removal, painting of building, installation of backup water supply system, construction of steps to intake area, improvements to raceway standpipes, removal of gravel from intake

  3. Hypergol Maintenance Facility Hazardous Waste South Staging Areas, SWMU 070 Corrective Measures Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ralinda R.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI) Year 10 Annual Report for implementation of corrective measures at the Hypergol Maintenance Facility (HMF) Hazardous Waste South Staging Areas at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The work is being performed by Tetra Tech, Inc., for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) NNK12CA15B, Task Order (TO) 07. Mr. Harry Plaza, P.E., of NASA's Environmental Assurance Branch is the Remediation Project Manager for John F. Kennedy Space Center. The Tetra Tech Program Manager is Mr. Mark Speranza, P.E., and the Tetra Tech Project Manager is Robert Simcik, P.E.

  4. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Facilities Maintenance Team (FMT) paint shop.

    SciTech Connect

    Klossner, Kristin Ann

    2003-05-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for Sandia National Laboratories/California Facilities Maintenance Team Paint Shop Operations in August and September 2002. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist Paint Shop personnel in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed and recommends options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Pollution Prevention staff will continue to work with the Paint Shop to implement the recommendations.

  5. An assessment of clinical chemical sensing technology for potential use in space station health maintenance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Health Maintenance Facility is currently under development for space station application which will provide capabilities equivalent to those found on Earth. This final report addresses the study of alternate means of diagnosis and evaluation of impaired tissue perfusion in a microgravity environment. Chemical data variables related to the dysfunction and the sensors required to measure these variables are reviewed. A technology survey outlines the ability of existing systems to meet these requirements. How the candidate sensing system was subjected to rigorous testing is explored to determine its suitability. Recommendations for follow-on activities are included that would make the commercial system more appropriate for space station applications.

  6. Shuttle Flight Operations Contract Generator Maintenance Facility Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Flight Operations Contract Generator Maintenance Facility (SFOC; SWMU 081; "the Site") of institutional controls that have been implemented at the Site1. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with the SFOC, an institutional land use control (LUC) is necessary to prevent human health exposure to antimony-affected groundwater at the Site. Controls will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  7. National Ignition Facility final optics assembly thermal effects of maintenance operations

    SciTech Connect

    Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world`s most powerful laser system, is being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study inertial fusion and high-energy-density science. This billion-dollar facility consists of 192 beams focusing 1.8 MJ on a fusion target. The Final Optics Assembly (FOA), the last mechanical apparatus before the target chamber, converts the light from an incoming frequency of 1 {omega} to ia target-ready 3 {omega}, and focuses the laser beam. The performance of the frequency conversion crystals is very sensitive to temperature changes; crystal temperature must be maintained within a 0.1 C of a nominal temperature prior to a laser shot. Maximizing system availability requires minimizing thermal recovery times after thermal disturbances occurring in both normal and maintenance operations. To guide the design, it is important to have estimates of those recovery times. This report presents Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) design calculations to evaluate thermal effects of maintenance operations.

  8. Guidance for the design and management of a maintenance plan to assure safety and improve the predictability of a DOE nuclear irradiation facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, R.S.; Kryter, R.C.; Shepard, R.L.; Smith, O.L.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Rowan, W.J.

    1994-10-01

    A program is recommended for planning the maintenance of DOE nuclear facilities that will help safety and enhance availability throughout a facility`s life cycle. While investigating the requirements for maintenance activities, a major difference was identified between the strategy suitable for a conventional power reactor and one for a research reactor facility: the latter should provide a high degree of predicted availability (referred to hereafter as ``predictability``) to its users, whereas the former should maximize total energy production. These differing operating goals necessitate different maintenance strategies. A strategy for scheduling research reactor facility operation and shutdown for maintenance must balance safety, reliability,and predicted availability. The approach developed here is based on three major elements: (1) a probabilistic risk analysis of the balance between assured reliability and predictability (presented in Appendix C), (2) an assessment of the safety and operational impact of maintenance activities applied to various components of the facility, and (3) a data base of historical and operational information on the performance and requirements for maintenance of various components. These factors are integrated into a set of guidelines for designing a new highly maintainable facility, for preparing flexible schedules for improved maintenance of existing facilities, and for anticipating the maintenance required to extend the life of an aging facility. Although tailored to research reactor facilities, the methodology has broader applicability and may therefore be used to improved the maintenance of power reactors, particularly in anticipation of peak load demands.

  9. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program; Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2006-01-01

    prompting an early release. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 49 (0.05 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 105,369. Maintenance and repair activities were conducted at the acclimation facilities in 2005. Facility maintenance work consisted of snow removal, installation of drainage lines, removal of gravel from intake area, installation of new gate at the CCAF, and complete overhaul of 2 travel trailers. The Catherine Creek Adult Capture Facility (CCACF) was put into operation on 11 February 2005. The first adult summer steelhead was captured on 4 March. A total of 190 adult summer steelhead were trapped and released from 4 March to 16 May 2005. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 8 April. The first adult spring Chinook salmon was captured at CCACF on 6 May 2005. A total of 226 spring Chinook salmon were trapped from 6 May to 8 July 2005. There were 56 adults and 4 jacks unmarked and 136 adult and 30 jack marked spring Chinook salmon trapped. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 10 June for the unmarked and marked fish. None of the captive broodstock returns were collected for broodstock. Broodstock was collected systematically over the entire return from 31 May to 6 July 2005. Ten of the 34 broodstock collected and transported from CCACF to LGH were unmarked fish trapped. About 18% of the naturally produced adult males and females trapped were taken to LGH for broodstock. One jack was collected for every 5 adult males that were taken to LGH. A total of 30 age 4 and 5 and 4 age 3 fish were transported to LGH for broodstock. The hatchery component of the broodstock was 66.7%. Five weekly spawning surveys were conducted below the weir on Catherine Creek beginning 30 June 2005. During these surveys no live or dead fish were observed. The trap was removed from Catherine Creek on 3 August 2005. Temperatures at the CCACF ranged from -0.1 C on 14 February to 23.7 C on 21 July. The hourly

  10. Evaluation of prototype air/fluid separator for Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Smith, Maureen; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype air/fluid separator suction apparatus proposed as a possible design for use with the Health Maintenance Facility aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF) was evaluated. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed for this purpose. The flights followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. A protocol was prepared to evaluate the prototype device in several regulator modes (or suction force), using three fluids of varying viscosity, and using either continuous or intermittent suction. It was felt that a matrixed approach would best approximate the range of utilization anticipated for medical suction on SSF. The protocols were performed in one-gravity in a lab setting to familiarize the team with procedures and techniques. Identical steps were performed aboard the KC-135 during parabolic flight.

  11. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  12. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  13. Breaking the Backlog Reduction Mold with FacMan: A Facilities Management Application for Maintenance Backlogs and Capital Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managan, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a facilities-management software program that helps managers better document and understand maintenance backlogs, improvements, and future cyclic renewal needs. Major software components are examined including a software tool that filters, groups, and ranks projects to help determine funding requests. (GR)

  14. Small-scale hydroelectric demonstration project: Reactivation of the Elk Rapids Hydroelectric Facility: Final operation and maintenance report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G.

    1987-03-01

    Information related to the reactivation of the Elk River Hydroelectric Power facility is reported. This report includes a history of the power plant, pertinent cost data, emergency action plans, inspections and testing, warranty work, operating problems, project data, monthly production data, and monthly operating and maintenance costs. 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. 9 CFR 71.4 - Maintenance of certain facilities and premises in a sanitary condition required; cleaning and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance of certain facilities and premises in a sanitary condition required; cleaning and disinfection, when required; animals classed as âexposed.â 71.4 Section 71.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  16. Guideline to good practices for maintenance history at DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Purpose of this guideline is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information for developing and implementing comprehensive, readily retrievable, information on item maintenance and critical parameters essential to effective maintenance planning, safe and reliable first-effort workmanship, trending, problem analysis, and knowledge-based management decisions. This document is an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 16, Maintenance History.

  17. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  18. Advanced technologies for maintenance of electrical systems and equipment at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Husler, R.O. ); Weir, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    An enhanced maintenance program is being established to characterize and monitor cables, components, and process response at the Savannah River Site, Defense Waste Processing Facility. This facility was designed and constructed to immobilize the radioactive waste currently stored in underground storage tanks and is expected to begin operation in 1993. The plant is initiating the program to baseline and monitor instrument and control (I C) and electrical equipment, remote process equipment, embedded instrument and control cables, and in-cell jumper cables used in the facility. This program is based on the electronic characterization and diagnostic (ECAD) system which was modified to include process response analysis and to meet rigid Department of Energy equipment requirements. The system consists of computer-automated, state-of-the-art electronics. The data that are gathered are stored in a computerized database for analysis, trending, and troubleshooting. It is anticipated that the data which are gathered and trended will aid in life extension for the facility.

  19. Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1989-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

  20. Operation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1988-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1987.

  1. Maintenance Business Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Discusses maintenance business plans, statements which provide accountability for facilities maintenance organizations' considerable budgets. Discusses the plan's components: statement of plan objectives, macro and detailed description of the facility assets, maintenance function descriptions, description of key performance indicators, milestone…

  2. 30 CFR 75.1600-2 - Communication facilities; working sections; installation and maintenance requirements; audible or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; installation and maintenance requirements; audible or visual alarms. 75.1600-2 Section 75.1600-2 Mineral... sections; installation and maintenance requirements; audible or visual alarms. (a) Telephones or equivalent... alarm, distinguishable from the surrounding noise level, or a visual alarm that can be seen by a...

  3. Investigating the Optimal Management Strategy for a Healthcare Facility Maintenance Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    hybrid outsourcing maintenance programs (see table 1). For simplicity, table 1 is broken into two categories: insurance based programs and non...Freeman, Berek and Perry, 2002). Cost Reduction. Historically, cost reduction has been a primary driver for outsourcing maintenance (Finchem, 1997

  4. FFTF/IEM (Fast Flux Test Facility/Interim Examination and Maintenance) cell fuel pin weighing system

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is used for remote dissassembly of irradiated fuel and materials experiments. For those fuel experiments where the FFTF tag-gas detection system has indicated a fuel pin cladding breach, a weighing system is used in identifying that fuel pin with a reduced weight due to the escape of gaseous and volatile fission products. A fuel pin weighing machine, originally purchased for use in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), was the basis for the IEM cell system. Design modifications to the original equipment were centered around adapting the machine to the differences between the two facilities and correcting deficiencies discovered during functional testing in the IEM cell mock-up.

  5. Characterization of stormwater at selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yards and section shed facilities in Ballentine, Conway, and North Charleston, South Carolina, 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Increased impervious surfaces (driveways, parking lots, and buildings) and human activities (residential, industrial, and commercial) have been linked to substantial changes in both the quality and quantity of stormwater on a watershed scale (Brabec and others, 2002; Pitt and Maestre, 2005). Small-scale storage and equipment repair facilities increase impervious surfaces that prevent infiltration of stormwater, and these facilities accommodate activities that can introduce trace metals, organic compounds, and other contaminants to the facility’s grounds. Thus, these small facilities may contribute pollutants to the environment during storm events (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1992). The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) operates section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State. Prior to this investigation, the SCDOT had no data to define the quality of stormwater leaving these facilities. To provide these data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the SCDOT, conducted an investigation to identify and quantify constituents that are transported in stormwater from two maintenance yards and a section shed in three different areas of South Carolina. The two maintenance yards, in North Charleston and Conway, S.C., were selected because they represent facilities where equipment and road maintenance materials are stored and complete equipment repair operations are conducted. The section shed, in Ballentine, S.C., was selected because it is a facility that stores equipment and road maintenance material. Characterization of the constituents that were transported in stormwater from these representative SCDOT maintenance facilities may be used by the SCDOT in the development of stormwater management plans for similar section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State to improve stormwater quality.

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, N.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

  7. 78 FR 72794 - Revisions to Auxiliary Installations, Replacement Facilities, and Siting and Maintenance Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... permitted to rely on section 2.55(a) to make other modifications to its storage facility, including adding... make a supplemental filing describing the auxiliary facilities while the application is pending. \\10... 2.55, in response to a request to increase operating pressures and make other changes to a...

  8. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: GENERAL MAIL AND VEHICLE MAINTENANCE FACILITY, UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE, BUFFALO, NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) summarized here was conducted at a U.S.Postal Service (USPS) Facility in Buffalo, NY. The PPOA documented and quantified waste generation at the General Mail Facility (GMF) where mail is processed, and at the Vehicle Maintena...

  9. Advanced technologies for maintenance of electrical systems and equipment at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Husler, R.O.; Weir, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    An enhanced maintenance program is being established to characterize and monitor cables, components, and process response at the Savannah River Site, Defense Waste Processing Facility. This facility was designed and constructed to immobilize the radioactive waste currently stored in underground storage tanks and is expected to begin operation in 1993. The plant is initiating the program to baseline and monitor instrument and control (I&C) and electrical equipment, remote process equipment, embedded instrument and control cables, and in-cell jumper cables used in the facility. This program is based on the electronic characterization and diagnostic (ECAD) system which was modified to include process response analysis and to meet rigid Department of Energy equipment requirements. The system consists of computer-automated, state-of-the-art electronics. The data that are gathered are stored in a computerized database for analysis, trending, and troubleshooting. It is anticipated that the data which are gathered and trended will aid in life extension for the facility.

  10. 25 CFR 170.803 - What facilities are eligible under the BIA Road Maintenance Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... facilities such as public roads, highway bridges, trails, and bus stations; and (4) Other transportation... as signs, traffic signals, pavement striping, trail markers, guardrails, etc.; (2) Highway bridges and drainage structures; (3) Airport runways and heliport pads, including runway lighting;...

  11. 33 CFR 127.401 - Maintenance: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Maintenance § 127.401 Maintenance: General. The...

  12. Facility and Component Inspection Technology Concepts: Potential Use in U.S. Army Maintenance Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    permit management at the facility level. Integration of ROOFER, SCALER , and PAINTER is being studied as part of the approach. An initial report...to the numerous individuals from the field who responded to written and telephone surveys conducted as part of this work. The review comments of Don...challenge. Effective management requires an understanding of the facilities inventory, the component parts and their interrelationships, and the impact

  13. Layaway Procedures for U.S. Army Facilities. Volume 2. Inspection and Maintenance and Repair Checklists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    EPDM ethylone-propylene.diene monomer EPRI Electrical Power Research Institute ETAC US. Force Environmental Technical Applications Center EUAC...inspections for ethylene-propylene-diene monomer ( EPDM ) single-ply roofs should be performed in accordance with the previously mentioned USACERL draft...Debris and Vegetation Improper Equipment Supports B13 "I? SINGLE-PLY EPDM - MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR NOTE: D = Deactivation Pfr - Preferred P - Periodic

  14. 76 FR 23690 - Version One Regional Reliability Standards for Facilities Design, Connections, and Maintenance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    .... System Operating Limits 25 3. Summary 33 B. PRC-004-WECC-1 34 1. WECC Transfer Path Table and WECC...-STD-001-1 with System Operating Limits in FAC-501-WECC-1. Currently, WECC determines transfer... catalog identify the facilities that make up each rated system path. Unlike a System Operating Limit,...

  15. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed F/A-22 Maintenance Facilities, Hill AFB, Utah

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Averaging Averaging risk for quotient for time for time for Exposure Exposure carcinogens , noncarcinogens, carcinogens , noncarcinogens, duration, frequency...Administration OU operable unit PCE perchloroethylene PEG potential exposure group PM10 particulate matter (less than 10 microns) ppm parts per...workers in the potential exposure group (PEG) of the proposed RCS facility will conduct x-ray operations, perform ultrasound eddy current testing

  16. Missile Facilities, LMG-25 Maintenance Career Ladder AFSCs 44530F, 44550F, and 44570F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    PERFORM FIRE WATER SYSTEM CHECKOUT PROCEDURES 31 • ;37 TRAINING ANALYSIS Occupational survey data are one of the many sources of information that can be...demonstrates, some tasks primarily involved maintaining facility systems such as fire water systems, cooling water systems, fire prevention and protection...DOMESTIC WATER SYSTEM COMPONENTS 100 G232 ISOLATE MALFUNCTIONS ON COOLING WATER SYSTEM COMPONENTS 100 G236 ISOLATE MALFUNCTIONS ON FIRE WATER SYSTEMS

  17. FFTF/IEM (Fast Flux Test Facility/Interim Examination and Maintenance) cell fuel pin removal equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a fuel pin removal device used for pin removal from irradiated fuel assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). After irradiation in the FFTF, selected fuel assemblies are remotely disassembled in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell. The remote disassembly, following sodium removal, consists of slitting and removing the duct and then removing the fuel pins one-at-a-time by sliding the pins from parallel attachment rails. All pins are removed from one rail before starting on the next. The new pin removal equipment has been used very successfully on the last three fuel experiments disassembled in the IEM cell, including one assembly containing residual sodium. Pin removal time has been cut in half, and this once tedious and time-consuming activity has been turned into an almost effortless evolution.

  18. An overview of the space medicine program and development of the Health Maintenance Facility for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam Lee

    1988-01-01

    Because the prolonged stay on board the Space Station will increase the risk of possible inflight medical problems from that on Skylab missions, the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) planned for the Space Station is much more sophisticated than the small clinics of the Skylab missions. The development of the HMF is directed by the consideration of three primary factors: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries and illnesses that may occur in flight. The major components of the HMF include the clinical laboratory, pharmacy, imaging system, critical-care system, patient-restraint system, data-management system, exercise system, surgical system, electrophysiologic-monitoring system, introvenous-fluid system, dental system, and hyperbaric-treatment-support system.

  19. Review of Maintenance and Repair Times for Components in Technological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2012-11-01

    This report is a compilation of some unique component repair time data and it also presents citations of more extensive reports where lists of repair times can be found. This collection of information should support analysts who seek to quantify maintainability and availability of high technology and nuclear energy production systems. While there are newer sources of repair time information, most, if not all, of the newer sources are proprietary and cannot be shared. This report offers data that, while older, is openly accessible and can serve as reasonable estimates of repair times, at least for initial studies. Some times were found for maintenance times in radiation environments, and some guidance for multiplicative factors to use to account for work in contamination areas.

  20. Maintenance and operation of the multispectral data collection and reproduction facilities of the Willow Run Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.; Stewart, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    The accomplishments in multispectral mapping during 1970 and (fiscal year) 1971 are presented. The mapping was done with the instrumented C-47 aircraft owned and operated by Willow Run Laboratories of The University of Michigan. Specific information for flight operations sponsored by NASA/MSC (Manned Spacecraft Center) in 1970 and fiscal year 1971 is presented, and a total listing of flights for 1968, 1969, 1970, and fiscal year 1971 is included in the appendices. The data-collection and reproduction facilities are described.

  1. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operations and Maintenance, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2005-02-01

    There were 2 acclimation periods at the Catherine Creek Acclimation Facility (CCAF) in 2004. During the early acclimation period, 92,475 smolts were delivered from Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on 8 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the captive broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.1 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 15 March 2004 and ended 22 March with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 1,475) of 8,785 fish leaving the raceways. This was 9.5% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left between 1200 and 2000 hours which was similar to the hourly temperature profile. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.1 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.5 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 62 (0.07 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the early period was 92,413. During the second acclimation period 70,977 smolts were delivered from LGH on 24 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.4 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 30 March 2004 and ended 12 April with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 3,632) of 49,147 fish leaving the raceways. This was 69.2% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left between 1200 and 2000 hours which was similar to the hourly temperature profile. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.4 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.9 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 18 (0.03 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation

  2. In-depth survey report: evaluation of brake drum service controls at United States Postal Service Vehicle Maintenance Facility, Louisville, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.C.; Sheehy, J.W.; O'Brien, D.M.; McGlothlin, J.D.; Todd, W.F.

    1987-12-01

    A control technology assessment of various methods to control worker exposure to asbestos during brake repair was reported for the Vehicle Maintenance Facility at the U.S. Post Office Building in Louisville, Kentucky. Results indicated that effective control of asbestos dust was achieved with the system used; one of 22 samples had a detectable level. Recommendations for better work practices were presented.

  3. Analysis of the University of Ibadan Carrying Capacities vis-à-vis Enrolment and Facilities' Maintenance: Implications on Administration and Curriculum Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atanda, Ademola

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which the University of Ibadan complies with carrying capacity standards as directed by the National Universities Commission (NUC) and the level of facility maintenance. A descriptive research design was adopted with three research questions. The population of study comprised undergraduate students and an…

  4. School Operations and Maintenance: Best Practices For Controlling Energy Costs. A Guidebook for K-12 School System Business Officers and Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Operations and maintenance (O&M) offers not only strategies for maintaining facilities, but also opportunities for reducing energy costs and increasing energy efficiency at existing schools, regardless of age. This Guidebook provides detailed and practical guidance on how K-12 school districts can plan and implement enhancements to their current…

  5. HT-9 duct cutting - IEM (Interim Examination and Maintenance) cell and mock-up testing experience at FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, P.W.; Greenwell, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes experience gained during remote cutting of the HT-9 alloy duct from an advanced fuel assembly in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Also described is a test program performed on mock-up equipment to develop successful cutting parameters.

  6. Rat maintenance in the Research Animal Holding Facility during the flight of Space Lab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, T.; Grindeland, R.; Kraft, L.; Ruder, M.; Vasques, M.

    1985-01-01

    To test the husbandry capabilities of the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) during space flight, 24 male rats were flown on Spacelab 3 for 7 days. Twelve large rats (400 g, LF), 5 of which had telemetry devices implanted (IF), and 12 small rats (200 g, SF) were housed in the RAHF. Examination 3 hr after landing (R + 3) revealed the rats to be free of injury, well nourished, and stained with urine. At R + 10 the rats were lethargic and atonic with hyperemia of the extremities and well groomed except for a middorsal area stained with urine and food. Both LF and SF rats showed weight gains comparable to their IG controls; IF rats grew less than controls. Food and water consumption were similar for flight and control groups. Plasma concentrations of total protein, sodium, albumin and creatinine did not differ between flight and control groups. LF and SF rats had elevated plasma glucose, and SF rats had increased blood urea nitrogen, potassium and glutamic pyruvic transaminase. These observations indicate that rats maintained in the RAHF were healthy, well nourished and experienced minimal stress; physiological changes in the rats can thus be attributed to the effects of space flight.

  7. In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

  8. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1992-06-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1991. Major repairs to one Minthorn pump were required and flood damage at Minthorn necessitated the replacement of rock and gravel around the pump house and steelhead brood holding area. Several modifications to the steelhead brood holding pond were also made to help reduce mortality. These changes appeared to be successful as evidenced by the reduced number of mortalities. Total prespawn mortality in 1990-91 was 10.4%. This compares to 20.0 to 39.0% for the previous three years at Minthorn. A total of 202 adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam from November, 1990 through April, 1991 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 410,356 eggs were taken from 64 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and initial rearing. The fish were then transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for further rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 347 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Threemile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:l spawning ratio, a total of 601,548 eggs were taken from 159 females. They were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing and later release into the Umatilla River. Acclimation of 100,505 spring chinook salmon and 42,610 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1991. At Minthorn, 152,974 coho and 79,672 fall chinook salmon were acclimated and released. In the fall, 81,144 spring chinook salmon

  9. Facilities Maintenance Demonstration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    formula for estimating reliability (Guilford, 1956, pp. 454-456). The formula and a summary of the results of the Kuder - Richardson estimating procedure...were selected and before the innovations were installed aboard the test ship. The reliability of Part A was estimated using the Kuder - Richardson ...are shown below: Kuder - Richardson Formula : ■■ ■ W\\ 2 _ - pq •4- where number of items in the test proportion (of subjects) passing an item 1-p

  10. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find…

  11. Maintenance Trades Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, Theodore J.

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, APPA published "Maintenance Staffing Guidelines for Educational Facilities," the first building maintenance trades staffing guideline designed to assist educational facilities professionals with their staffing needs. addresses how facilities professionals can determine the appropriate size and mix of their organization. Contents…

  12. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC`s Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  13. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  14. Industrial Processes to Reduce Generation of Hazardous Waste at DoD Facilities. Phase III Report. Appendix C. Workshop Manual Centralized Vehicle Wash Racks and Scheduled Maintenance Facilities, Fort Lewis, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    facility described above are centrallyo one settled, treated by an oil removal device, and subjected to intermittent sand filtration. The sludges from the...solids and grease and oil content. e. Solid Waste Disposal: (1) Special Wastes Developed: sludges from sedimentation chambers and periodic scrapings...to - collect the waste oil from vehicles and place it directly into a storage tank . To eliminate the need for detergents and maintenance cleaning, low

  15. Characterization of stormwater at selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yard and section shed facilities in Ballentine, Conway, and North Charleston, South Carolina, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    The South Carolina Department of Transportation operates section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a cooperative investigation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation to characterize water-quality constituents that are transported in stormwater from representative maintenance yard and section shed facilities in South Carolina. At a section shed in Ballentine, S.C., stormwater discharges to a retention pond outfall (Ballentine). At the Conway maintenance yard, stormwater in the southernmost section discharges to a pipe outfall (Conway1), and stormwater in the remaining area discharges to a grass-lined ditch (Conway2). At the North Charleston maintenance yard, stormwater discharges from the yard to Turkey Creek through a combination of pipes, ditches, and overland flow; therefore, samples were collected from the main channel of Turkey Creek at the upstream (North Charleston1) and downstream (North Charleston2) limits of the North Charleston maintenance yard facility. The storms sampled during this study had a wide range of rainfall amounts, durations, and intensities at each of the facilities and, therefore, were considered to be reasonably representative of the potential for contaminant transport. At all facilities, stormwater discharge was significantly correlated to rainfall amount and intensity. Event-mean unit-area stormwater discharge increased with increasing impervious surface at the Conway and North Charleston maintenance yards. The Ballentine facility with 79 percent impervious surface had a mean unit-area discharge similar to that of the North Charleston maintenance yard (62 percent impervious surface). That similarity may be attributed, in part, to the effects of the retention pond on the stormwater runoff at the Ballentine facility and to the greater rainfall intensities and amounts at the North Charleston facility. Stormwater samples from the facilities were analyzed for multiple

  16. The Phillips airway.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P; Wilkinson, D J

    2012-07-01

    The Phillips airway was developed by George Ramsay Phillips. There is no known original description of the airway and the earliest known reference to it is from 1919. The airway and its modifications are described.

  17. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  18. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... hole patching, crack sealing, chip sealing, surface rejuvenation, and thin overlays (less than 1...

  19. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... hole patching, crack sealing, chip sealing, surface rejuvenation, and thin overlays (less than 1...

  20. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... hole patching, crack sealing, chip sealing, surface rejuvenation, and thin overlays (less than 1...

  1. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... hole patching, crack sealing, chip sealing, surface rejuvenation, and thin overlays (less than 1...

  2. 20 CFR 638.306 - Protection and maintenance of contract center facilities owned or leased by Job Corps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities owned or leased by Job Corps. 638.306 Section 638.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT... facilities owned or leased by Job Corps. The Job Corps Director shall establish procedures for the...

  3. 20 CFR 638.306 - Protection and maintenance of contract center facilities owned or leased by Job Corps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... facilities owned or leased by Job Corps. 638.306 Section 638.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT... facilities owned or leased by Job Corps. The Job Corps Director shall establish procedures for the...

  4. 20 CFR 638.306 - Protection and maintenance of contract center facilities owned or leased by Job Corps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... facilities owned or leased by Job Corps. 638.306 Section 638.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT... facilities owned or leased by Job Corps. The Job Corps Director shall establish procedures for the...

  5. Evaluation of prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) pack for use by the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) Pack which was developed for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). This pack will enable the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) to have ready access to advanced life support supplies and equipment for time critical responses to any situation within the Space Station Freedom. The objectives are: (1) to evaluate the design of the pack; and (2) to collect comments for revision to the design of the pack. The in-flight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic test flight to simulate weightlessness are presented.

  6. 25 CFR 502.22 - Construction and maintenance of the gaming facility, and the operation of that gaming is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the operation of that gaming is conducted in a manner which adequately protects the environment and... protects the environment and the public health and safety. Construction and maintenance of the gaming... environment and the public health and safety means a tribe has identified and enforces laws,...

  7. 25 CFR 502.22 - Construction and maintenance of the gaming facility, and the operation of that gaming is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the operation of that gaming is conducted in a manner which adequately protects the environment and... protects the environment and the public health and safety. Construction and maintenance of the gaming... environment and the public health and safety means a tribe has identified and enforces laws,...

  8. 25 CFR 502.22 - Construction and maintenance of the gaming facility, and the operation of that gaming is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the operation of that gaming is conducted in a manner which adequately protects the environment and... protects the environment and the public health and safety. Construction and maintenance of the gaming... environment and the public health and safety means a tribe has identified and enforces laws,...

  9. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807... accomplished; (6) Forecasting short- and long-term budget needs; (7) Recommended programs and schedules for implementation within policy and budget constraints; (8) Tracking and reporting unmet needs; and (9) Ability...

  10. 9 CFR 71.4 - Maintenance of certain facilities and premises in a sanitary condition required; cleaning and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; cleaning and disinfection, when required; animals classed as “exposed.” (a) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys...) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys, and other facilities and premises which have contained interstate...

  11. 9 CFR 71.4 - Maintenance of certain facilities and premises in a sanitary condition required; cleaning and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; cleaning and disinfection, when required; animals classed as “exposed.” (a) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys...) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys, and other facilities and premises which have contained interstate...

  12. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program: Facility Operation and Maintenance and Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Boe, Stephen J.; Ogburn, Parker N.

    2003-03-01

    This is the second annual report of a multi-year project to operate adult collection and juvenile acclimation facilities on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River for Snake River spring chinook salmon. These two streams have historically supported populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries. Supplementation using conventional and captive broodstock techniques is being used to restore fisheries in these streams. Statement of Work Objectives for 2001: (1) Participate in implementation of the comprehensive multiyear operations plan for the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring chinook Supplementation Program (GRESCP). (2) Plan detailed GRESCP Monitoring and Evaluation for future years. (3) Ensure proper construction and trial operation of semi-permanent adult and juvenile facilities for use in 2001. (4) Plan for data collection needs for bull trout. (5) Ensure proper construction and trial operation of semi-permanent adult and juvenile facilities for use in 2001. (6) Collect summer steelhead. (7) Monitor adult endemic spring chinook salmon populations and collect broodstock. (8) Acclimate juvenile spring chinook salmon prior to release into the upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek. (9) Monitor adult population abundance and characteristics of Grande Ronde River spring chinook salmon populations. (10) Monitor condition, movement, and mortality of spring chinook salmon acclimated at remote facilities. (11) Participate in Monitoring & Evaluation of the captive brood component of the Program to document contribution to the Program. (12) Monitor water quality at facilities. (13) Document accomplishments and needs to permitters, comanagers, and funding agencies. (14) Communicate Project results to the scientific community.

  13. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms.

  14. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  15. 9 CFR 71.4 - Maintenance of certain facilities and premises in a sanitary condition required; cleaning and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; cleaning and disinfection, when required; animals classed as “exposed.” (a) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys... representative or an accredited veterinarian before such premises are again used for livestock or poultry. (b) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys, and other facilities and premises which have contained interstate...

  16. 9 CFR 71.4 - Maintenance of certain facilities and premises in a sanitary condition required; cleaning and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; cleaning and disinfection, when required; animals classed as “exposed.” (a) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys... representative or an accredited veterinarian before such premises are again used for livestock or poultry. (b) Yards, pens, chutes, alleys, and other facilities and premises which have contained interstate...

  17. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program: Facility Operation and Maintenance and Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Boe, Stephen J.; Lofy, Peter T.

    2003-03-01

    This is the third annual report of a multi-year project to operate adult collection and juvenile acclimation facilities on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River for Snake River spring chinook salmon. These two streams have historically supported populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries. Supplementation using conventional and captive broodstock techniques is being used to restore fisheries in these streams. Statement of Work Objectives for 2000: (1) Participate in implementation of the comprehensive multiyear operations plan for the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Supplementation Program (GRESCP). (2) Plan for recovery of endemic summer steelhead populations in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River. (3) Ensure proper construction and trial operation of semi-permanent adult and juvenile facilities for use in 2000. (4) Collect summer steelhead. (5) Collect adult endemic spring chinook salmon broodstock. (6) Acclimate juvenile spring chinook salmon prior to release into the upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek. (7) Document accomplishments and needs to permitters, comanagers, and funding agency. (8) Communicate project results to the scientific community. (9) Plan detailed GRESCP Monitoring and Evaluation for future years. (10) Monitor adult population abundance and characteristics of Grande Ronde River spring chinook salmon populations and incidentally-caught summer steelhead and bull trout. (11) Monitor condition, movement, and mortality of spring chinook salmon acclimated at remote facilities. (12) Monitor water quality at facilities. (13) Participate in Monitoring & Evaluation of the captive brood component of the Program to document contribution to the Program.

  18. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... support for only a very short period of time. Alternative Names Needle cricothyrotomy Images Emergency airway puncture Cricoid cartilage Emergency airway puncture - series References Hebert RB, Bose S, Mace SE. Cricothyrotomy and ...

  19. Upper airway biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper airway Images Upper airway test Bronchoscopy Throat anatomy References Yung RC, Boss EF. Tracheobronchial endoscopy. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  20. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  1. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  2. Design and maintenance considerations for pesticide and fertilizer containment systems used in lawn care and golf course facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hurto, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    The design of pesticide and fertilizer containment facilities for lawn and golf course operations are similar to those designs used for most pesticide handling operations. In lawn care operations, service vehicles are filled from a centralized facility and the diluted mixtures are transported to residential and commercial sites where mixtures are applied to turfgrass areas. Golf course operations involve fewer vehicles and the volume and frequency of spray operations performed are much lower compared to lawn care operations. Rarely are spray mixtures used in golf course operations transported off-site. A golf course operation will involve spray applications to 100 to 200 acres of plantings. Typically, the amount of spray activity conducted averages 3 to 5 days per month, whereas commercial lawn care companies may be providing applications to 10 to 200 acres daily. Because of the potential risk of cross contamination of spray equipment, operations associated with tree and shrub plantings should be segregated from those associated with herbicide and other materials considered toxic to ornamental plants.

  3. Data Sharing Report for the Quantification of Removable Activity in Various Surveillance and Maintenance Facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A.

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OR-EM) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Specifically, DOE OR-EM requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting potential removable radiological contamination that may be transferrable to future personal protective equipment (PPE) and contamination control materials—collectively referred to as PPE throughout the remainder of this report—used in certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Project facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Routine surveys in Bldgs. 3001, 3005, 3010, 3028, 3029, 3038, 3042, 3517, 4507, and 7500 continuously generate PPE. The waste is comprised of Tyvek coveralls, gloves, booties, Herculite, and other materials used to prevent worker exposure or the spread of contamination during routine maintenance and monitoring activities. This report describes the effort to collect and quantify removable activity that may be used by the ORNL S&M Project team to develop radiation instrumentation “screening criteria.” Material potentially containing removable activity was collected on smears, including both masselin large-area wipes (LAWs) and standard paper smears, and analyzed for site-related constituents (SRCs) in an analytical laboratory. The screening criteria, if approved, may be used to expedite waste disposition of relatively clean PPE. The ultimate objectives of this effort were to: 1) determine whether screening criteria can be developed for these facilities, and 2) provide process knowledge information for future site planners. The screening criteria, if calculated, must be formally approved by Federal Facility Agreement parties prior to use for

  4. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program: Facility Operation and Maintenance and Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Boe, Stephen J.; Lofy, Peter T.

    2002-11-01

    This is the second annual report of a multi-year, multi-agency project to restore spring chinook salmon populations in the Grande Ronde River Basin (Grande Ronde Endemic Chinook Salmon Program--GRESCP). The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operates adult collection and juvenile acclimation facilities on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River for Snake River spring chinook salmon. These two streams have historically supported populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries. Supplementation using conventional and captive broodstock techniques is being used to increase natural production and restore fisheries in these two streams. Statement of Work Objectives for 1999: (1) Participate in development and continued implementation of the comprehensive multi year operations plan for the Grande Ronde Endemic Supplementation Program. (2) Ensure proper construction and trial operation of semi-permanent adult and juvenile facilities for use in 2000. (3) Monitor adult endemic spring chinook salmon populations and collect broodstock. (4) Plan detailed Monitoring and Evaluation for future years. (5) Monitor population abundance and characteristics and local environmental factors that may influence abundance and run timing of Grande Ronde River spring chinook populations. (6) Participate in Monitoring and Evaluation of the captive brood component of the Program to assure this component is contributing to the Program. (7) Participate in data collection for incidentally-caught bull trout and summer steelhead and planning for recovery of summer steelhead populations. (8) Document accomplishments and needs to permitters, comanagers, and funding agencies. (9) Communicate project results to the scientific community.

  5. Fixing Maintenance Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes how one university's facility managers use Nextel communications technology in conjunction with a Famis Software maintenance management system to improve the productivity of its maintenance technicians. The system uses a wireless Internet connection to automate the flow of work order information to and from technicians. The key to these…

  6. Improving the safety of remote site emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wijesuriya, Julian; Brand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Airway management, particularly in non-theatre settings, is an area of anaesthesia and critical care associated with significant risk of morbidity & mortality, as highlighted during the 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists (NAP4). A survey of junior anaesthetists at our hospital highlighted a lack of confidence and perceived lack of safety in emergency airway management, especially in non-theatre settings. We developed and implemented a multifaceted airway package designed to improve the safety of remote site airway management. A Rapid Sequence Induction (RSI) checklist was developed; this was combined with new advanced airway equipment and drugs bags. Additionally, new carbon dioxide detector filters were procured in order to comply with NAP4 monitoring recommendations. The RSI checklists were placed in key locations throughout the hospital and the drugs and advanced airway equipment bags were centralised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It was agreed with the senior nursing staff that an appropriately trained ICU nurse would attend all emergency situations with new airway resources upon request. Departmental guidelines were updated to include details of the new resources and the on-call anaesthetist's responsibilities regarding checks and maintenance. Following our intervention trainees reported higher confidence levels regarding remote site emergency airway management. Nine trusts within the Northern Region were surveyed and we found large variations in the provision of remote site airway management resources. Complications in remote site airway management due lack of available appropriate drugs, equipment or trained staff are potentially life threatening and completely avoidable. Utilising the intervention package an anaesthetist would be able to safely plan and prepare for airway management in any setting. They would subsequently have the drugs, equipment, and trained assistance required to manage any difficulties or complications

  7. Stick with a School Maintenance Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's "Planning Guide for Maintaining School Facilities" states that a sound facilities maintenance plan serves as evidence that school facilities are, and will be, cared for appropriately. On the other hand, negligent facilities maintenance planning can cause real problems. Budget restraints and cuts in…

  8. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  9. 18. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL AREAS; LOOKING EAST - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  10. 17. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL AREAS; LOOKING WEST. - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  11. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the

  12. 33 CFR 106.255 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.255 Security systems and equipment maintenance....

  13. 33 CFR 106.255 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.255 Security systems and equipment maintenance....

  14. 33 CFR 106.255 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.255 Security systems and equipment maintenance....

  15. 33 CFR 106.255 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.255 Security systems and equipment maintenance....

  16. 33 CFR 106.255 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.255 Security systems and equipment maintenance....

  17. The Many Features of Stanford's Housing Maintenance Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Explains how Stanford University custom designed its own building maintenance and administration software package: the Housing Operations Maintenance Enterprise Resource (HOMER). Describes how HOMER relieved facility maintenance staff from some archaic systems, and its development and functionality. (GR)

  18. Transcriptional Regionalization of the Fruit Fly’s Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Muhammad N.; Hoffmann, Julia; El-Kholy, Samar; Kallsen, Kimberley; Wagner, Christina; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although airway epithelia are primarily devoted to gas exchange, they have to fulfil a number of different tasks including organ maintenance and the epithelial immune response to fight airborne pathogens. These different tasks are at least partially accomplished by specialized cell types in the epithelium. In addition, a proximal to distal gradient mirroring the transition from airflow conduction to real gas exchange, is also operative. We analysed the airway system of larval Drosophila melanogaster with respect to region-specific expression in the proximal to distal axis. The larval airway system is made of epithelial cells only. We found differential expression between major trunks of the airways and more distal ones comprising primary, secondary and terminal ones. A more detailed analysis was performed using DNA-microarray analysis to identify cohorts of genes that are either predominantly expressed in the dorsal trunks or in the primary/secondary/terminal branches of the airways. Among these differentially expressed genes are especially those involved in signal transduction. Wnt-signalling associated genes for example are predominantly found in secondary/terminal airways. In addition, some G-protein coupled receptors are differentially expressed between both regions of the airways, exemplified by those activated by octopamine or tyramine, the invertebrate counterparts of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Whereas the OAMB is predominantly found in terminal airway regions, the oct3βR has higher expression levels in dorsal trunks. In addition, we observed a significant association of both, genes predominantly expressed in dorsal trunks or in primary to terminal branches branches with those regulated by hypoxia. Taken together, this observed differential expression is indicative for a proximal to distal transcriptional regionalization presumably reflecting functional differences in these parts of the fly’s airway system. PMID:25020150

  19. 25 CFR 170.802 - How is road maintenance funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... program for the maintenance of IRR transportation facilities as defined in this part through annual... maintenance of IRR transportation facilities that they own or have agreed to maintain. (c) Tribal governments, at their discretion, may also provide for the maintenance of IRR transportation facilities....

  20. Landscaping With Maintenance in Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Examines school ground landscape design that enhances attractive of the school and provides for easier maintenance. Landscape design issues discussed include choice of grass, trees, and shrubs; irrigation; and safety and access. Other considerations for lessening maintenance problems for facility managers are also highlighted. (GR)

  1. Progenitor Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas J.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple distinct epithelial domains are found throughout the airway that are distinguishable by location, structure, function, and cell-type composition. Several progenitor cell populations in the proximal airway have been identified to reside in confined microenvironmental niches including the submucosal glands (SMGs), which are embedded in the tracheal connective tissue between the surface epithelium and cartilage, and basal cells that reside within the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Current research suggests that regulatory pathways that coordinate development of the proximal airway and establishment of progenitor cell niches may overlap with pathways that control progenitor cell responses during airway regeneration following injury. SMGs have been shown to harbor epithelial progenitor cells, and this niche is dysregulated in diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, mechanisms that regulate progenitor cell proliferation and maintenance within this glandular niche are not completely understood. Here we discuss glandular progenitor cells during development and regeneration of the proximal airway and compare properties of glandular progenitors to those of basal cell progenitors in the SAE. Further investigation into glandular progenitor cell control will provide a direction for interrogating therapeutic interventions to correct aberrant conditions affecting the SMGs in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. PMID:24818588

  2. Restoring airway epithelial barrier dysfunction: a new therapeutic challenge in allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Steelant, B; Seys, S F; Boeckxstaens, G; Akdis, C A; Ceuppens, J L; Hellings, P W

    2016-09-01

    An intact functional mucosal barrier is considered to be crucial for the maintenance of airway homeostasis as it protects the host immune system from exposure to allergens and noxious environmental triggers. Recent data provided evidence for the contribution of barrier dysfunction to the development of inflammatory diseases in the airways, skin and gut. A defective barrier has been documented in chronic rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it remains to be elucidated to what extent primary (genetic) versus secondary (inflammatory) mechanisms drive barrier dysfunction. The precise pathogenesis of barrier dysfunction in patients with chronic mucosal inflammation and its implications on tissue inflammation and systemic absorption of exogenous particles are only partly understood. Since epithelial barrier defects are linked with chronicity and severity of airway inflammation, restoring the barrier integrity may become a useful approach in the treatment of allergic diseases. We here provide a state-of-the-art review on epithelial barrier dysfunction in upper and lower airways as well as in the intestine and the skin and on how barrier dysfunction can be restored from a therapeutic perspective.

  3. Upper airway radiographs in infants with upper airway insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, S L; Davis, S L; Gunn, T R

    1994-01-01

    Upper airway measurements in nine infants considered to be at risk of upper airway insufficiency, six of whom presented after an apnoeic episode, were compared with measurements taken in two age groups of healthy infants. Paired, inspiratory and expiratory, lateral upper airway radiographs were obtained while the infants were awake and breathing quietly. The radiographs of all nine infants demonstrated narrowing in the oropharyngeal portion of the airway during inspiration and in six infants there was ballooning of the upper airway during expiration. Seven of the nine infants subsequently experienced recurrent apnoeic episodes which required vigorous stimulation to restore breathing. Experience suggests that respiratory phase timed radiographs are a useful adjunct to the evaluation of infants who are suspected of having upper airway dysfunction. They provide information regarding both the dimensions and compliance of the upper airway as well as the site of any restriction. Images PMID:8048825

  4. The Maintenance of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Systems and Indoor Air Quality in Schools: A Guide for School Facility Managers. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Arthur E.

    To help maintain good indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, guidance for the development and implementation of an effective program for maintenance and operation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are discussed. Frequently, a building's occupants will complain about IAQ when the temperature or humidity are at uncomfortable…

  5. Resting calcium influx in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Luis M; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ leak remains the most uncertain of the cellular Ca2+ regulation pathways. During passive Ca2+ influx in non-stimulated smooth muscle cells, basal activity of constitutive Ca2+ channels seems to be involved. In vascular smooth muscle, the 3 following Ca2+ entry pathways contribute to this phenomenon: (i) via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, (ii) receptor gated Ca2+ channels, and (iii) store operated Ca2+ channels, although, in airway smooth muscle it seems only 2 passive Ca2+ influx pathways are implicated, one sensitive to SKF 96365 (receptor gated Ca2+ channels) and the other to Ni2+ (store operated Ca2+ channels). Resting Ca2+ entry could provide a sufficient amount of Ca2+ and contribute to resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), maintenance of the resting membrane potential, myogenic tone, and sarcoplasmic reticulum-Ca2+ refilling. However, further research, especially in airway smooth muscle, is required to better explore the physiological role of this passive Ca2+ influx pathway as it could be involved in airway hyperresponsiveness.

  6. Maintenance Process Strategic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiulewicz-Kaczmarek, M.; Stachowiak, A.

    2016-08-01

    The performance and competitiveness of manufacturing companies is dependent on the availability, reliability and productivity of their production facilities. Low productivity, downtime, and poor machine performance is often linked to inadequate plant maintenance, which in turn can lead to reduced production levels, increasing costs, lost market opportunities, and lower profits. These pressures have given firms worldwide the motivation to explore and embrace proactive maintenance strategies over the traditional reactive firefighting methods. The traditional view of maintenance has shifted into one of an overall view that encompasses Overall Equipment Efficiency, Stakeholders Management and Life Cycle assessment. From practical point of view it requires changes in approach to maintenance represented by managers and changes in actions performed within maintenance area. Managers have to understand that maintenance is not only about repairs and conservations of machines and devices, but also actions striving for more efficient resources management and care for safety and health of employees. The purpose of the work is to present strategic analysis based on SWOT analysis to identify the opportunities and strengths of maintenance process, to benefit from them as much as possible, as well as to identify weaknesses and threats, so that they could be eliminated or minimized.

  7. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS)/TRICARE: Refills of Maintenance Medications Through Military Treatment Facility Pharmacies or National Mail Order Pharmacy Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-02

    This final rule implements section 702 (c) of the Carl Levin and Howard P. "Buck" McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 which states that beginning October 1, 2015, the pharmacy benefits program shall require eligible covered beneficiaries generally to refill non-generic prescription maintenance medications through military treatment facility pharmacies or the national mail-order pharmacy program. An interim final rule is in effect. Section 702(c) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 also terminates the TRICARE For Life Pilot Program on September 30, 2015. The TRICARE For Life Pilot Program described in section 716(f) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013, was a pilot program which began in March 2014 requiring TRICARE For Life beneficiaries to refill non-generic prescription maintenance medications through military treatment facility pharmacies or the national mail-order pharmacy program. TRICARE for Life beneficiaries are those enrolled in the Medicare wraparound coverage option of the TRICARE program. This rule includes procedures to assist beneficiaries in transferring covered prescriptions to the mail order pharmacy program.

  8. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS)/TRICARE: Refills of Maintenance Medications Through Military Treatment Facility Pharmacies or National Mail Order Pharmacy Program. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-06

    This interim final rule implements Section 702 (c) of the Carl Levin and Howard P. "Buck" McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 which states that beginning October 1, 2015, the pharmacy benefits program shall require eligible covered beneficiaries generally to refill non-generic prescription maintenance medications through military treatment facility pharmacies or the national mail-order pharmacy program. Section 702(c) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 also terminates the TRICARE For Life Pilot Program on September 30, 2015. The TRICARE For Life Pilot Program described in Section 716 (f) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013, was a pilot program which began in March 2014 requiring TRICARE For Life beneficiaries to refill non-generic prescription maintenance medications through military treatment facility pharmacies or the national mail-order pharmacy program. TRICARE for Life beneficiaries are those enrolled in the Medicare wraparound coverage option of the TRICARE program. This interim rule includes procedures to assist beneficiaries in transferring covered prescriptions to the mail order pharmacy program. This regulation is being issued as an interim final rule in order to comply with the express statutory intent that the program begin October 1, 2015. Public comments, however, are invited and will be considered for possible revisions to this rule for the second year of the program.

  9. Essentials of Airway Management, Oxygenation, and Ventilation: Part 1: Basic Equipment and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.; Rosenberg, Morton B.; Phero, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management (CRM) involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of US dental offices per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. Part 2 of this series will address advanced airway devices, including supraglottic airways and armamentarium for tracheal intubation and invasive airway procedures. PMID:24932982

  10. 77 FR 64444 - VOR Federal Airway V-595; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    .../DME facility which currently serves as an end point for the route. DATES: Comments must be received on... Portland, OR VOR/ DME, which serves as the northern endpoint of the route, is scheduled to be... Portland VOR/DME. VOR Federal airways are published in paragraph 6010, of FAA Order 7400.9W dated August...

  11. 49 CFR 260.39 - Maintenance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maintenance standards. 260.39 Section 260.39... REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT FINANCING PROGRAM Standards for Maintenance of Facilities Involved in the Project § 260.39 Maintenance standards. (a) When the proceeds of a direct loan or an obligation guaranteed...

  12. 33 CFR 127.401 - Maintenance: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintenance: General. 127.401 Section 127.401 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Maintenance § 127.401 Maintenance: General. The...

  13. Laboratory services series: a programmed maintenance system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuxbury, D.C.; Srite, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    The diverse facilities, operations and equipment at a major national research and development laboratory require a systematic, analytical approach to operating equipment maintenance. A computer-scheduled preventive maintenance program is described including program development, equipment identification, maintenance and inspection instructions, scheduling, personnel, and equipment history.

  14. 49 CFR 260.39 - Maintenance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance standards. 260.39 Section 260.39... REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT FINANCING PROGRAM Standards for Maintenance of Facilities Involved in the Project § 260.39 Maintenance standards. (a) When the proceeds of a direct loan or an obligation guaranteed...

  15. Utilization and outcomes of detoxification and maintenance treatment for opioid dependence in publicly-funded facilities in California, US: 1991-2012*

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Li, Libo; Evans, Elizabeth; Urada, Darren; Huang, David; Wood, Evan; Rawson, Richard; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2015-01-01

    Background California treats the largest population of opioid dependent individuals in the US and is among a small group of states that applies regulations for opioid treatment that are more stringent than existing federal regulations. We aim to characterize changes in patient characteristics and treatment utilization over time, and identify determinants of successful completion of detoxification and MMT retention in repeated attempts. Methods State-wide administrative data was obtained from California Outcome Measurement System during the period: January 1st, 1991 to March 31st, 2012. Short-term detoxification treatment and long-term maintenance treatment, primarily with methadone, was available to study participants. Mixed effects regression models were used to define determinants of successful completion of the detoxification treatment protocol (as classified by treatment staff) and duration of maintenance treatment. Results The study sample consisted of 237,709 unique individuals and 885,971 treatment episodes; 83.7% were detoxification treatment episodes in 1994, dropping to 40.5% in 2010. Among individuals accessing only detoxification, the adjusted odds of success declined with each successive attempt (vs. 1st attempt: 2nd: OR: 0.679; 95% CI (0.610, 0.755); 3rd: 0.557 (0.484, 0.641); 4th: 0.526 (0.445, 0.622); 5th: 0.407 (0.334, 0.497); ≥6th: 0.339 (0.288, 0.399). For those ever accessing maintenance treatment, later subsequent attempts were longer in duration, and those with two or more prior attempts at detoxification had marginally longer subsequent maintenance episodes (hazard ratio: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99). Finally, only 10.9% of all detoxification episodes were followed by admission into maintenance treatment within 14 days. Conclusions This study has revealed high rates of detoxification treatment for opioid dependence in California throughout the study period, and decreasing odds of success in repeated attempts at detoxification. PMID:25110333

  16. A mechanical design principle for tissue structure and function in the airway tree.

    PubMed

    LaPrad, Adam S; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    With every breath, the dynamically changing mechanical pressures must work in unison with the cells and soft tissue structures of the lung to permit air to efficiently traverse the airway tree and undergo gas exchange in the alveoli. The influence of mechanics on cell and tissue function is becoming apparent, raising the question: how does the airway tree co-exist within its mechanical environment to maintain normal cell function throughout its branching structure of diminishing dimensions? We introduce a new mechanical design principle for the conducting airway tree in which mechanotransduction at the level of cells is driven to orchestrate airway wall structural changes that can best maintain a preferred mechanical microenvironment. To support this principle, we report in vitro radius-transmural pressure relations for a range of airway radii obtained from healthy bovine lungs and model the data using a strain energy function together with a thick-walled cylinder description. From this framework, we estimate circumferential stresses and incremental Young's moduli throughout the airway tree. Our results indicate that the conducting airways consistently operate within a preferred mechanical homeostatic state, termed mechanical homeostasis, that is characterized by a narrow range of circumferential stresses and Young's moduli. This mechanical homeostatic state is maintained for all airways throughout the tree via airway wall dimensional and mechanical relationships. As a consequence, cells within the airway walls throughout the airway tree experience similar oscillatory strains during breathing that are much smaller than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of how the maintenance of mechanical homeostasis, while facilitating healthy tissue-level alterations necessary for maturation, may lead to airway wall structural changes capable of chronic asthma.

  17. Preventative Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliorino, James

    Boards of education must be convinced that spending money up front for preventive maintenance will, in the long run, save districts' tax dollars. A good program of preventive maintenance can minimize disruption of service; reduce repair costs, energy consumption, and overtime; improve labor productivity and system equipment reliability; handle…

  18. Software Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Glenn; Jobe, Holly

    Proper cleaning and storage of audiovisual aids is outlined in this brief guide. Materials and equipment needed for first line maintenance are listed, as well as maintenance procedures for records, audio and video tape, film, filmstrips, slides, realia, models, prints, graphics, maps, and overhead transparencies. A 15-item quiz on software…

  19. Feasibility of Vibration Analysis as a Preventive Maintenance Tool on Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Equipment in U.S. Air Force Medical Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-21

    equipment and as a way to diagnose and reduce machine inefficiencies, thus reducing operating cost and energy utilization. Properly aligned and balanced...facilities. Vibration monitoring allows precision alignment and balancing of machinery, which should result in decreased energy consumption. Energy...percent amperage decrease after balancing and aligning rotating equipment. The cost savings to a typical three-phase motor can be calculated as

  20. Airway management evolution - in a search for an ideal extraglottic airway device.

    PubMed

    Michálek, Pavel; Miller, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EADs) are commonly used equipment for airway maintenance during elective procedures under general anaesthesia. They may be used also in other indications such as conduit for tracheal intubation or rescue airway device in prehospital medicine. Current classifications of the EADs lack systematic approach and therefore classification according to the sealing sites and sealing mechanisms is suggested in this review article. Modern EADs are disposable, latex-free devices made of plastic materials most commonly from polyvinylchloride (PVC). The bowl of uncuffed sealers is manufactured from different materials such as thermoplastic elastomers or ethylene-vinyl-acetate co-polymer. EADs create various physical forces exerted on the adjacent tissues which may contribute to different sealing characteristic of particular device or to variable incidence of postoperative complications. Desired features of an ideal EAD involve easy insertion, high insertion success rate even by inexperienced users, protection against aspiration of gastric contents and low incidence of postoperative complications such as sore throat, hoarseness, cough or swallowing difficulties.

  1. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  2. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  3. Recurrent airway obstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction is a widely recognised airway disorder, characterised by hypersensitivity-mediated neutrophilic airway inflammation and lower airway obstruction in a subpopulation of horses when exposed to suboptimal environments high in airborne organic dust. Over the past decade, numerous studies have further advanced our understanding of different aspects of the disease. These include clarification of the important inhaled airborne agents responsible for disease induction, improving our understanding of the underlying genetic basis of disease susceptibility and unveiling the fundamental immunological mechanisms leading to establishment of the classic disease phenotype. This review, as well as giving a clinical overview of recurrent airway obstruction, summarises much of the work in these areas that have culminated in a more thorough understanding of this debilitating disease.

  4. The airway microbiome and disease.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Yadava, Koshika; Nicod, Laurent P

    2013-08-01

    Although traditionally thought to be sterile, accumulating evidence now supports the concept that our airways harbor a microbiome. Thus far, studies have focused upon characterizing the bacterial constituents of the airway microbiome in both healthy and diseased lungs, but what perhaps provides the greatest impetus for the exploration of the airway microbiome is that different bacterial phyla appear to dominate diseased as compared with healthy lungs. As yet, there is very limited evidence supporting a functional role for the airway microbiome, but continued research in this direction is likely to provide such evidence, particularly considering the progress that has been made in understanding host-microbe mutualism in the intestinal tract. In this review, we highlight the major advances that have been made discovering and describing the airway microbiome, discuss the experimental evidence that supports a functional role for the microbiome in health and disease, and propose how this emerging field is going to impact clinical practice.

  5. 14 CFR 171.115 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Facility (SDF) § 171.115 Maintenance and operations requirements. (a) The owner of the facility shall... procedures and the use of specialized test equipment. (b) The SDF must be designed and maintained so that the... within the facility that may adversely affect SDF operations. (2) Maintenance and operations...

  6. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  7. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  8. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  9. A pathogenic role for the integrin CD103 in experimental allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Fear, Vanessa S; Lai, Siew Ping; Zosky, Graeme R; Perks, Kara L; Gorman, Shelley; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe; Stumbles, Philip A; Strickland, Deborah H

    2016-11-01

    The integrin CD103 is the αE chain of integrin αEβ7 that is important in the maintenance of intraepithelial lymphocytes and recruitment of T cells and dendritic cells (DC) to mucosal surfaces. The role of CD103 in intestinal immune homeostasis has been well described, however, its role in allergic airway inflammation is less well understood. In this study, we used an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced, CD103-knockout (KO) BALB/c mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD) to investigate the role of CD103 in disease expression, CD4(+) T-cell activation and DC activation and function in airways and lymph nodes. We found reduced airways hyper-responsiveness and eosinophil recruitment to airways after aerosol challenge of CD103 KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice, although CD103 KO mice showed enhanced serum OVA-specific IgE levels. Following aerosol challenge, total numbers of effector and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell subsets were significantly increased in the airways of WT but not CD103 KO mice, as well as a lack of DC recruitment into the airways in the absence of CD103. While total airway DC numbers, and their in vivo allergen capture activity, were essentially normal in steady-state CD103 KO mice, migration of allergen-laden airway DC to draining lymph nodes was disrupted in the absence of CD103 at 24 h after aerosol challenge. These data support a role for CD103 in the pathogenesis of EAAD in BALB/c mice through local control of CD4(+) T cell and DC subset recruitment to, and migration from, the airway mucosa during induction of allergic inflammation.

  10. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  11. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  12. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  13. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  14. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults.

    PubMed

    Frerk, C; Mitchell, V S; McNarry, A F; Mendonca, C; Bhagrath, R; Patel, A; O'Sullivan, E P; Woodall, N M; Ahmad, I

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team.

  15. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  16. Computer-Assisted School Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2012-01-01

    At thousands of schools and universities, years of economic troubles have led to repeated budget cuts. The reductions typically fall disproportionately on maintenance departments, where cuts are viewed as less critical than those that directly affect classroom instruction. And so nearly every facility manager at an education institution faces a…

  17. Maintenance Sourcebook: A Caretaker's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeatts, G. Dewey; Stoverink, Al; Conry, Terry; Goulet, Nicole; Wilson, Joe; Ryan, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Discusses five areas of custodial maintenance caretaking in which facility managers need continual education: first aid and safety, hazardous materials, products and supplies, chemicals and their intended use, and cleaning procedures. Includes an annotated list of resources related to these areas. (EV)

  18. Asset Management and Facility Equipment Maintenance Nexus: Maintenance Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    WEEKS B2AS-MA 3 MONTHS ERDC/CERL TR-13-15 192 100 LUBRICATE AXLE COUPLERS 110 CLEAN ENGINE COOLING FINS 72 BSL-2355 6 MONTH JOH N DEERE GATOR...1469 MONTHLY GRINDER/ BUFFER MAINT. & INSP. B2AS-MA 1 MONTHS Next 7/9/12 Next Job BSL-13791 Use Target Start: y BSL-13791 MONTHLY GRINDER/ BUFFER MAl NT

  19. 14 CFR 171.273 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... beacon power, and modulation. (18) The following information concerning the ISMLS facility: (i) Facility... emission and frequencies of the ISMLS localizer, glide path, beacon markers, and associated compass... marker beacon radiation characteristics must be conducted in accordance with the maintenance...

  20. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  1. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  2. Periodontal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tan, A E S

    2009-09-01

    The main goal of periodontal therapy is to establish an oral environment compatible with periodontal health by the physical disruption of the plaque biofilm and adjunctive chemical means if required. Implicit in this objective is the ongoing requirement of detection and interception of new and recurrent disease, which continues at selected intervals for the life of the dentition after the initial ("active") phase of periodontal treatment. This concept of ongoing periodontal maintenance therapy has been embraced as the mandatory requirement for favourable periodontal outcomes based on institutional clinical trials and in practice-based studies in various parts of the world. This review examines the ramifications of periodontal maintenance therapy based upon a multi-level assessment of logistic issues and risk factors at three levels: (1) The patient level - treatment time; patient attendance compliance; and homecare measures, antiseptics/antibiotics and smoking. (2) The level of the individual tooth - tooth loss; and evaluation of success versus survival. (3) The level of each tooth surface ("site") - probing depth, loss of attachment and bleeding on probing; and changes in clinical attachment levels. In spite of the diversity of studies conducted, there is agreement on the efficacy of periodontal maintenance therapy when compared with studies on untreated populations and in treated cases that were not maintained.

  3. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  4. Airway management in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Dörges, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Securing and monitoring the airway are among the key requirements of appropriate therapy in emergency patients. Failures to secure the airways can drastically increase morbidity and mortality of patients within a very short time. Therefore, the entire range of measures needed to secure the airway in an emergency, without intermediate ventilation and oxygenation, is limited to 30-40 seconds. Endotracheal intubation is often called the 'gold standard' for airway management in an emergency, but multiple failed intubation attempts do not result in maintaining oxygenation; instead, they endanger the patient by prolonging hypoxia and causing additional trauma to the upper airways. Thus, knowledge and availability of alternative procedures are also essential in every emergency setting. Given the great variety of techniques available, it is important to establish a well-planned, methodical protocol within the framework of an algorithm. This not only facilitates the preparation of equipment and the training of personnel, it also ensures efficient decision-making under time pressure. Most anaesthesia-related deaths are due to hypoxaemia when difficulty in securing the airway is encountered, especially in obstetrics during induction of anaesthesia for caesarean delivery. The most commonly occurring adverse respiratory events are failure to intubate, failure to recognize oesophageal intubation, and failure to ventilate. Thus, it is essential that every anaesthesiologist working on the labour and delivery ward is comfortable with the algorithm for the management of failed intubation. The algorithm for emergency airway management describing the sequence of various procedures has to be adapted to internal standards and to techniques that are available.

  5. Mining Surveillance and Maintenance Dollars

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, R.

    2000-02-01

    Accelerating site cleanup to reduce facility risks to the workers, the public and the environment during a time of declining federal budgets represents a significant technical and economic challenge to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Offices and their respective contractors. A significant portion of a facility's recurring annual expenses are associated with routine, long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities. However, ongoing S&M activities do nothing to reduce risks and basically spend money that could be reallocated towards facility deactivation. This paper discusses the background around DOE efforts to reduce surveillance and maintenance costs, one approach used to perform cost reviews, lessons learned from field implementation and what assistance is available to assist DOE sites in performing these evaluations.

  6. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  8. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways.

  9. ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P. L.

    2007-06-25

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

  10. 49 CFR 193.2639 - Maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... at each LNG plant of the date and type of each maintenance activity performed on each component to meet the requirements of this part. For each LNG facility that is designed and constructed after March... records must be retained for as long as the LNG facility remains in service: (1) Each record or...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2639 - Maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... at each LNG plant of the date and type of each maintenance activity performed on each component to meet the requirements of this part. For each LNG facility that is designed and constructed after March... records must be retained for as long as the LNG facility remains in service: (1) Each record or...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2639 - Maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... at each LNG plant of the date and type of each maintenance activity performed on each component to meet the requirements of this part. For each LNG facility that is designed and constructed after March... records must be retained for as long as the LNG facility remains in service: (1) Each record or...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2639 - Maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... at each LNG plant of the date and type of each maintenance activity performed on each component to meet the requirements of this part. For each LNG facility that is designed and constructed after March... records must be retained for as long as the LNG facility remains in service: (1) Each record or...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2639 - Maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... at each LNG plant of the date and type of each maintenance activity performed on each component to meet the requirements of this part. For each LNG facility that is designed and constructed after March... records must be retained for as long as the LNG facility remains in service: (1) Each record or...

  15. Innovative Coatings Potentially Lower Facility Maintenance Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Through extensive testing at Stennis Space Center, Nanocepts Inc. of Lexington, Kentucky, received key validation of the effectiveness of its photocatalytic coatings. Now a NASA Dual Use Technology partner, the company s commercial coatings offer unique environmental and medical benefits, and their self-cleaning properties help limit grime buildup on buildings.

  16. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  17. Comments to Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Lien, Wan-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal ultrasound can be an alternative diagnostic tool in airway management, besides traditional confirmatory methods such as capnography and auscultation. The standard image is a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with a reverberation artifact posteriorly (comet-tail artifact). If the second A-M interface appears, which we call a "double-tract sign," esophageal intubation is considered.

  18. 40 CFR 63.1160 - Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommended maintenance at the recommended intervals on fresh solvent pumps, recirculating pumps, discharge... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance dates and maintenance... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1160 Compliance dates and maintenance...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1160 - Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Require the manufacturer's recommended maintenance at the recommended intervals on fresh solvent pumps... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance dates and maintenance... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1160 Compliance dates and maintenance...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1160 - Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Require the manufacturer's recommended maintenance at the recommended intervals on fresh solvent pumps... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates and maintenance... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1160 Compliance dates and maintenance...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1160 - Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommended maintenance at the recommended intervals on fresh solvent pumps, recirculating pumps, discharge... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance dates and maintenance... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1160 Compliance dates and maintenance...

  2. 36 CFR 212.4 - Construction and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction and maintenance... TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.4 Construction and maintenance. (a) Construction and maintenance work on forest transportation facilities with appropriated...

  3. The Lung Microbiome and Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated relationships between the composition of the airway microbiota (mixed-species communities of microbes that exist in the respiratory tract) and critical features of immune response and pulmonary function. These studies provide evidence that airway inflammatory status and capacity for repair are coassociated with specific taxonomic features of the airway microbiome. Although directionality has yet to be established, the fact that microbes are known drivers of inflammation and tissue damage suggests that in the context of chronic inflammatory airway disease, the composition and, more importantly, the function, of the pulmonary microbiome represent critical factors in defining airway disease outcomes.

  4. Airway nerves: in vitro electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alyson

    2002-06-01

    Recording the activity of single airway sensory fibres or neuronal cell bodies in vitro has allowed detailed characterisation of fibre types and membrane properties. Fibre types can be identified by their conduction velocities and further studied by the application of drugs to their receptive field. C-fibres are sensitive to mechanical stimuli and a range of irritant chemicals (bradykinin, capsaicin, low pH, platelet-activating factor), whereas Adelta-fibres are relatively insensitive to chemical stimuli and appear to correlate to the rapidly adapting receptors identified in airways in vivo. Their site of origin also differs: upper airway C-fibres arise predominantly from the jugular ganglion and Adelta-fibres from the jugular and nodose ganglia. Intracellular recording from cell bodies in the ganglia has revealed a calcium-dependent potassium current common to many putative C-fibre cell bodies. This slow after hyperpolarisation current may be inhibited by stimuli that excite and sensitise C-fibres - this could be an important mechanism underlying the sensitisation of C-fibres in airway irritability.

  5. The laryngeal mask airway in experimental pig anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wemyss-Holden, S A; Porter, K J; Baxter, P; Rudkin, G E; Maddern, G J

    1999-01-01

    The pig is used as a large animal model in many research projects. Standard practice for airway maintenance under general anaesthesia is using endotracheal (ET) intubation after intravenous induction to a near surgical plane. This is a technically demanding skill, requiring the assistance of an experienced technician. A technique is required which simplifies pig anaesthesia. This study examined the feasibility and potential advantages of using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in 10 pigs during laparotomy under spontaneous breathing anaesthesia. The results show that the LMA can be inserted rapidly, with minimal time for airway control by researchers relatively inexperienced in anaesthesia and is associated with few complications. By removing the need for intravenous induction, an entire step in the anaesthetic process is removed. The LMA designed for humans fits well in the pig hypopharynx; all pigs could be manually ventilated with no detectable gas leak. Although the pigs in this study were spontaneously breathing it is proposed that the LMA should be further investigated in studies of artificially ventilated pigs.

  6. Airway epithelial-derived factor relaxes pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Farah, Omar R; Li, Dongge; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The factors controlling the pulmonary vascular resistance under physiological conditions are poorly understood. We have previously reported on an apparent cross talk between the airway and adjacent pulmonary arterial bed where a factor likely derived from the bronchial epithelial cells reduced the magnitude of agonist-stimulated force in the vascular smooth muscle. The main purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether bronchial epithelial cells release a pulmonary arterial smooth muscle relaxant factor. Conditioned media from SPOC-1 or BEAS-2B, a rat- and a human-derived bronchial epithelial cell line, respectively, were utilized. This media significantly relaxed precontracted adult but not fetal pulmonary arterial muscle in an oxygen tension-dependent manner. This response was mediated via soluble guanylate cyclase, involving AKT/PI3-kinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media increased AKT phosphorylation in pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and reduced intracellular calcium change following ATP stimulation to a significantly greater extent than observed for bronchial SMC. The present data strongly support the evidence for bronchial epithelial cells releasing a stable and soluble factor capable of inducing pulmonary arterial SMC relaxation. We speculate that under physiological conditions, the maintenance of a low pulmonary vascular resistance, postnatally, is in part modulated by the airway epithelium.

  7. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments.

  8. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidity in CF. We used a novel, mini-Ussing chamber system to investigate the properties of HCO3− transport in native porcine small airways (∼ 1 mm φ). We assayed HCO3− transport across small airway epithelia as reflected by the transepithelial voltage, conductance, and equivalent short-circuit current with bilateral 25-mM HCO3− plus 125-mM NaGlu Ringer’s solution in the presence of luminal amiloride (10 μM). Under these conditions, because no major transportable anions other than HCO3− were present, we took the equivalent short-circuit current to be a direct measure of active HCO3− secretion. Applying selective agonists and inhibitors, we show constitutive HCO3− secretion in small airways, which can be stimulated significantly by β-adrenergic– (cAMP) and purinergic (Ca2+) -mediated agonists, independently. These results indicate that two separate components for HCO3− secretion, likely via CFTR- and calcium-activated chloride channel–dependent processes, are physiologically regulated for likely roles in mucus clearance and antimicrobial innate defenses of small airways. PMID:24224935

  9. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed.

  10. Low maintenance hydrocarbon soil & groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Seabolt, L.K. Jr.; Ryckman, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    This paper illustrates practical methods to control remedial system life cycle costs for pump and treat and biovent systems through the use of low maintenance treatment systems. Cost control factors will be illustrated through the presentation of three case histories: a groundwater free product recovery system at an Air Force P.O.L. (Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant) storage area, a free product recovery and bioventing system at a beverage fleet distribution facility, and a free product recovery and ventilation system at a publication facility.

  11. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  12. Double Shell Tank (DST) Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem Definition Report

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, E.A.

    2000-07-26

    The description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem presented in this document was developed to establish its boundaries. The DST Maintenance and Recovery Subsystem consists of new and existing equipment and facilities used to provide tank farm operators logistic support and problem resolution for the DST System during operations. This support will include evaluating equipment status, performing preventive and corrective maintenance, developing work packages, managing spares and consumables, supplying tooling, and training maintenance and operations personnel.

  13. Work control in separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    The topic addressed in this technical review is the development and implementation of a work control program in one of the chemical separations facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. This program will be used as a pilot for the Nuclear Materials Processing Division at the site. The SRS Work Control Pilot program is based on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practices and guidelines for the conduct of maintenance and complies with SRS quality assurance and DOE orders on maintenance management. The program follows a ten-step process for control of maintenance and maintenance-related activities in a chemical separations facility. The program took the existing maintenance planning and scheduling system and upgraded it to comply with all INPO work control and related guidelines for histories, post-maintenance testing and scheduling. The development process of adapting a nuclear-related- based plan to a batch/continuous chemical separations plant was a challenge. There were many opportunities to develop improvements in performance while being creative and realistic in applying reactor maintenance technology to chemical plant maintenance. This pilot program for work control in a nonreactor nuclear facility will provide valuable information for applying a controlled maintenance process to a multiphase chemical operating plant environment.

  14. Work control in separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.D.

    1990-12-31

    The topic addressed in this technical review is the development and implementation of a work control program in one of the chemical separations facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. This program will be used as a pilot for the Nuclear Materials Processing Division at the site. The SRS Work Control Pilot program is based on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practices and guidelines for the conduct of maintenance and complies with SRS quality assurance and DOE orders on maintenance management. The program follows a ten-step process for control of maintenance and maintenance-related activities in a chemical separations facility. The program took the existing maintenance planning and scheduling system and upgraded it to comply with all INPO work control and related guidelines for histories, post-maintenance testing and scheduling. The development process of adapting a nuclear-related- based plan to a batch/continuous chemical separations plant was a challenge. There were many opportunities to develop improvements in performance while being creative and realistic in applying reactor maintenance technology to chemical plant maintenance. This pilot program for work control in a nonreactor nuclear facility will provide valuable information for applying a controlled maintenance process to a multiphase chemical operating plant environment.

  15. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  16. Is I-gel airway a better option to endotracheal tube airway for sevoflurane-fentanyl anesthesia during cardiac surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Elgebaly, Ahmed Said; Eldabaa, Ahmed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anesthetists used lower doses of fentanyl, successfully with hemodynamic control by titrating volatile anesthetic agents or vasodilators for fast-tracking in cardiac surgery. Hypothesis: Lower total doses of anesthetics and fentanyl could be required with hemodynamic control by use of supraglottic devices than endotracheal tube (ETT) and helps in fast-tracking. Design: A prospective randomized observational clinical trial study. Aims: The authors compared the utility of I-gel airway with a conventional ETT during the induction and maintenance of anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients and Methods: A total of 49 adult patients underwent cardiac surgery were randomized into two groups according to the airway management: I-gel group (n = 23) and ETT group (n = 26). Doses of fentanyl and hemodynamic parameters (heart rate [HR], mean arterial pressure [MAP] central venous pressure [CVP], pulmonary artery pressure [PAP], and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure [PCWP]) were recorded preoperative, 5 min following tracheal intubation or I-gel airway insertion, after skin incision, after stenotomy, and after weaning off bypass. Results: None of the patients in the I-gel group required additional doses of fentanyl during the I-gel insertion, compared with 74% of the patients during laryngoscopy and endotracheal insertion in the ETT group, for an average total dose of 22.6 ± 0.6 μg/kg. The MAP and HR did not significantly differ from the baseline values at any point of measurement in either group. Furthermore, CVP, PAP, and PCWP measured during the procedure were significantly lower in I-gel group than ETT group. Extubation required more amount of time in ETT than I- gel group. Conclusion: The I-gel airway is well-tolerated by adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery, and requires lower total doses of anesthetics than endotracheal intubation with hemodynamic control and helps in fast-tracking. PMID:25886229

  17. Maintenance Management Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternloff, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Current trends in park maintenance are overviewed, including maintenance impact statements, avoidance of cost through efficient use and national resource conservation, horticultural accomplishments that influence maintenance management, and vandalism prevention. (CB)

  18. Generation of Pig Airways using Rules Developed from the Measurements of Physical Airways

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md Khurshidul; Mansy, Hansen A.

    2017-01-01

    Background A method for generating bronchial tree would be helpful when constructing models of the tree for benchtop experiments as well as for numerical modeling of flow or sound propagation in the airways. Early studies documented the geometric details of the human airways that were used to develop methods for generating human airway tree. However, methods for generating animal airway tree are scarcer. Earlier studies suggested that the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. Hence, using algorithms for the human airways may not be accurate in generating models of animal airway geometry. Objective The objective of this study is to develop an algorithm for generating pig airway tree based on the geometric details extracted from the physical measurements. Methods In the current study, measured values of branch diameters, lengths and bifurcation angles and rotation of bifurcating planes were used to develop an algorithm that is capable of generating a realistic pig airway tree. Results The generation relations between parent and daughter branches were found to follow certain trends. The diameters and the length of different branches were dependent on airway generations while the bifurcation angles were primarily dependent on bifurcation plane rotations. These relations were sufficient to develop rules for generating a model of the pig large airways. Conclusion The results suggested that the airway tree generated from the algorithm can provide an approximate geometric model of pig airways for computational and benchtop studies. PMID:28255517

  19. Recent trends in airway management

    PubMed Central

    Karlik, Joelle; Aziz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal intubation remains a life-saving procedure that is typically not difficult for experienced providers in routine conditions. Unfortunately, difficult intubation remains challenging to predict and intubation conditions may make the event life threatening. Recent technological advances aim to further improve the ease, speed, safety, and success of intubation but have not been fully investigated. Video laryngoscopy, though proven effective in the difficult airway, may result in different intubation success rates in various settings and in different providers’ hands. The rescue surgical airway remains a rarely used but critical skill, and research continues to investigate optimal techniques. This review highlights some of the new thoughts and research on these important topics. PMID:28299194

  20. Facilities of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The bricks-and-mortar infrastructure of community colleges has not nearly kept pace with increases in student enrollments. Not only are colleges bursting at the proverbial seams, but, according to the American Graduation Initiative, many two-year institutions "face large needs due to deferred maintenance or lack the modern facilities and…

  1. Facilities Data System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acridge, Charles W.; Ford, Tim M.

    The purposes of this manual are to set forth the scope and procedures for the maintenance and operation of the University of California facilities Data System (FDX) and to serve as a reference document for users of the system. FDX is an information system providing planning and management data about the existing physical plant. That is, it…

  2. Surveying School Facilities Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Harry J.; Dennell, James

    1990-01-01

    Ralston (Nebraska) Public School District's communitywide survey helped set school facilities priorities while keeping the district's finite resources firmly in mind. With an outline of maintenance costs for the next 10 years, the district can develop a strategic construction schedule. The board also has the option of financing projects through a…

  3. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion.

  4. State School Facility Programs Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of General Services, Sacramento. Office of Public School Construction.

    This overview examines California's various State Allocation Board's funding programs for the construction, modernization, and maintenance of local school facilities. Funding information is provided for each program as are explanations of the school facility program construction process and the lease purchase program. The organizational chart for…

  5. Automation tools for flexible aircraft maintenance.

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, William J.; Drotning, William D.; Watterberg, Peter A.; Loucks, Clifford S.; Kozlowski, David M.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 26546 at Sandia, during the period FY01 through FY03. The project team visited four DoD depots that support extensive aircraft maintenance in order to understand critical needs for automation, and to identify maintenance processes for potential automation or integration opportunities. From the visits, the team identified technology needs and application issues, as well as non-technical drivers that influence the application of automation in depot maintenance of aircraft. Software tools for automation facility design analysis were developed, improved, extended, and integrated to encompass greater breadth for eventual application as a generalized design tool. The design tools for automated path planning and path generation have been enhanced to incorporate those complex robot systems with redundant joint configurations, which are likely candidate designs for a complex aircraft maintenance facility. A prototype force-controlled actively compliant end-effector was designed and developed based on a parallel kinematic mechanism design. This device was developed for demonstration of surface finishing, one of many in-contact operations performed during aircraft maintenance. This end-effector tool was positioned along the workpiece by a robot manipulator, programmed for operation by the automated planning tools integrated for this project. Together, the hardware and software tools demonstrate many of the technologies required for flexible automation in a maintenance facility.

  6. NOX Modifiers—Just a Step Away from Application in the Therapy of Airway Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Wieczfinska, Joanna; Sokolowska, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes, which are widely expressed in different airway cell types, not only contribute to the maintenance of physiological processes in the airways but also participate in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic diseases. Therefore, the understanding of NOX isoform regulation, expression, and the manner of their potent inhibition might lead to effective therapeutic approaches. Recent Advances: The study of the role of NADPH oxidases family in airway physiology and pathophysiology should be considered as a work in progress. While key questions still remain unresolved, there is significant progress in terms of our understanding of NOX importance in airway diseases as well as a more efficient way of using NOX modifiers in human settings. Critical Issues: Agents that modify the activity of NADPH enzyme components would be considered useful tools in the treatment of various airway diseases. Nevertheless, profound knowledge of airway pathology, as well as the mechanisms of NOX regulation is needed to develop potent but safe NOX modifiers. Future Directions: Many compounds seem to be promising candidates for development into useful therapeutic agents, but their clinical potential is yet to be demonstrated. Further analysis of basic mechanisms in human settings, high-throughput compound scanning, clinical trials with new and existing molecules, and the development of new drug delivery approaches are the main directions of future studies on NOX modifiers. In this article, we discuss the current knowledge with regard to NOX isoform expression and regulation in airway inflammatory diseases as well as the aptitudes and therapeutic potential of NOX modifiers. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 428–445. PMID:24383678

  7. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults†

    PubMed Central

    Frerk, C.; Mitchell, V. S.; McNarry, A. F.; Mendonca, C.; Bhagrath, R.; Patel, A.; O'Sullivan, E. P.; Woodall, N. M.; Ahmad, I.

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  8. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  9. Automated Lobe-Based Airway Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M.; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L.; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  10. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  11. Concomitant responses of upper airway stabilizing muscles to transcranial magnetic stimulation in normal men.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric; Wang, Wei; Mélot, Christian; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Upper airway stabilizing muscles play a crucial role in the maintenance of upper airway patency. Transcranial magnetic stimulation allows the investigation of the corticomotor activation process for respiratory muscles. This technique has also been used to evaluate the genioglossus corticomotor response. The aims of this study were to characterize the response of different upper airway stabilizing muscles to focal cortical stimulation of the genioglossus. Alae nasi, genioglossus, levator palatini, palatoglossus and diaphragm motor-evoked potential responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded during expiration, tidal inspiration and deep inspiration in nine normal awake subjects. A concomitant response of the four studied upper airway muscles was observed in the majority of cortical stimuli. The response of these muscles was independent of the diaphragmatic one that was only occasionally observed. Significant positive relationships were found between alae nasi, levator palatini and palatoglossus motor-evoked potential latencies and amplitudes and the corresponding values of the genioglossus. We conclude that transcranial magnetic stimulation applied in the genioglossus area induces a concomitant motor response of upper airway stabilizing muscles with consistent changes in their motor responses during inspiratory manoeuvres.

  12. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  13. Advanced servomanipulator remote maintenance demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.L.; Bradley, E.C.

    1989-03-01

    The advanced servomanipulator (ASM) is a dual-arm, force-reflecting, master/slave servomanipulator that was designed for remote maintenance applications and is digitally controlled. The ASM is installed in the Maintenance Systems Test Area (MSTA) of the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The unique aspect of ASM is that the slave arms were designed to be remotely maintainable, using a similar remote manipulator system, to maximize availability and minimize downtime. This test report describes the results of the maintenance testing conducted on ASM. Demonstration of the ability to maintain ASM remotely is an important precursor to the ultimate application of ASM in a totally remote facility. The approach taken in the design of ASM was for the manipulator slave arms to be composed of modules capable of being removed and replaced by another manipulator system of similar capabilities. The ASM incorporates gear and torque tube drives with drive couplings that facilitate remote maintenance. Although the use of special fixtures is normally discouraged for remote maintenance, special fixtures were required for this demonstration due to the complex nature of the slave arms. This test was performed to demonstrate that the ASM slave arms could be completely disassembled and reassembled remotely. Maintenance of ASM was successfully demonstrated using the M-2 servomanipulator and special fixtures. The entire disassembly process took about 4 h, and the assembly took about 3 1/2 h. Although there were some problems, in general, the arm modules were adequately designed for remote removal and replacement. Recommendations, which are documented in this report, have been made for improvements. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  15. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  16. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  17. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  18. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  19. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  20. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  1. Mechanisms of inflammation-mediated airway smooth muscle plasticity and airways remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Amrani, Yassine

    2003-09-16

    Recent evidence points to progressive structural change in the airway wall, driven by chronic local inflammation, as a fundamental component for development of irreversible airway hyperresponsiveness. Acute and chronic inflammation is orchestrated by cytokines from recruited inflammatory cells, airway myofibroblasts and myocytes. Airway myocytes exhibit functional plasticity in their capacity for contraction, proliferation, and synthesis of matrix protein and cytokines. This confers a principal role in driving different components of the airway remodeling process, and mediating constrictor hyperresponsiveness. Functional plasticity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by an array of environmental cues, including cytokines, which mediate their effects through receptors and a number of intracellular signaling pathways. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured airway myocytes, few have identified how intracellular signaling pathways modulate or induce these cellular responses. This review summarizes current understanding of these concepts and presents a model for the effects of inflammatory mediators on functional plasticity of ASM in asthma.

  2. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  4. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  5. Upper airway resistance: species-related differences.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, N; Reinhold, P

    2010-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, upper airway resistance deserves a particular attention in equines athletes and brachycephalic dogs. Due to the anatomical peculiarities of the upper airway and/or pathological conditions, significant alterations of performance and/or well being might occur in horses and dogs. Physiological specificities and pathological changes of the lower respiratory tract deserve a major attention in other species.

  6. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  7. Kalispell Maintenance Headquarters Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-01-01

    The facilities needed to maintain and repair Bonneville Power Administration (BPA's) electrical equipment in northwest Montana are currently in two locations: A maintenance headquarters at the Kalispell Substation, and a temporary leased facility south of Kalispell. The present situation is not efficient. There is not enough space to accommodate the equipment needed at each site, and coordination and communication between the two sites is difficult. Also, two sites means duplication of equipment and facilities. BPA needs a single, centralized facility that would efficiently accommodate all the area's maintenance activities and equipment. BPA proposes to build a maintenance headquarters facility consisting of 2 to 4 single-story buildings totaling about 35,000 square feet (office spaces and workshop areas); an open-ended vehicle storage building (carport style); a fenced-in storage year; a storage building for flammables, herbicides, and hazardous wastes; and a parking lot. The facility would require developing about 6 to 10 acres of land. Two sites are being considered for the proposed project (see the attached map for locations). This report is the environmental assessment of the two options.

  8. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  9. New Trends in Facility Asset Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Explains new, positive trends in facility asset management that encompasses greater acceptance and involvement of facility managers in the financial planning process, greater awareness of the need for maintenance, and facility administrators taking a greater role with business officers. The new climate for alternative renewal financing proposals…

  10. MEDEMAS -Medical Device Management and Maintenance System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Ülkü Balcı; Dogan, Mehmet Ugur; Ülgen, Yekta; Özkan, Mehmed

    In the proposed study, a medical device maintenance management system (MEDEMAS) is designed and implemented which provides a data pool of medical devices, the maintenance protocols and other required information for these devices. The system also contains complete repair and maintenance history of a specific device. MEDEMAS creates optimal maintenance schedule for devices and enables the service technician to carry out and report maintenance/repair processes via remote access. Thus predicted future failures are possible to prevent or minimize. Maintenance and repair is essential for patient safety and proper functioning of the medical devices, as it prevents performance decrease of the devices, deterioration of the equipment, and detrimental effects on the health of a patient, the user or other interacting people. The study aims to make the maintenance process more accurate, more efficient, faster and easier to manage and organize; and much less confusing. The accumulated history of medical devices and maintenance personnel helps efficient facility planning.

  11. The critical airway in adults: The facts

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm on the indications and timing for a surgical airway in emergency as such cannot be drawn due to the multiplicity of variables and the inapplicability in the context of life-threatening critical emergency, where human brain elaborates decisions better in cluster rather than in binary fashion. In particular, in emergency or urgent scenarios, there is no clear or established consensus as to specifically who should receive a tracheostomy as a life-saving procedure; and more importantly, when. The two classical indications for emergency tracheostomy (laryngeal injury and failure to secure airway with endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy) are too generic and encompass a broad spectrum of possibilities. In literature, specific indications for emergency tracheostomy are scattered and are biased, partially comprehensive, not clearly described or not homogeneously gathered. The review highlights the indications and timing for an emergency surgical airway and gives recommendations on which surgical airway method to use in critical airway. PMID:22787346

  12. Establishing maintenance performance indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, B.

    1994-10-01

    Maintenance Performance Indicators (PI) specify where the maintenance department is and which direction it is going allowing for a quick and accurate assessment of the performance of the Maintenance Management Program (MMP). Establishing PI`s for the maintenance department will allow a measure of productivity and a means of feedback for methods improvement. Effective performance of the maintenance department directly effects plant profitability. Improvements in the quality and productivity of the maintenance work force will significantly reduce maintenance costs. The level of performance attained by the maintenance work force is usually guessed at. Guessing will not identify areas needing improvement or help to initiate a corrective action. Maintenance PI`s are required for maintenance departments whose goal is to control maintenance costs while increasing productivity. The application of basic statistical methods will allow a maintenance department to know where they are and which direction they are going. The data presented in this paper is a representation of indicators used in industry as well as developed indicators to establish a complete maintenance performance indicator program. The methodology used in developing this program can be used as a way to manage a cost effective maintenance management program.

  13. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  14. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  15. 43. Launch Control Equipment Room, generator and maintenance mannequin. Lyon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Launch Control Equipment Room, generator and maintenance mannequin. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  16. Method and computer program product for maintenance and modernization backlogging

    DOEpatents

    Mattimore, Bernard G; Reynolds, Paul E; Farrell, Jill M

    2013-02-19

    According to one embodiment, a computer program product for determining future facility conditions includes a computer readable medium having computer readable program code stored therein. The computer readable program code includes computer readable program code for calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, for calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and for calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. In another embodiment, a computer-implemented method for calculating future facility conditions includes calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. Other embodiments are also presented.

  17. Public-Private Partnerships for Depot-Level Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    reviews public - private partnerships for depot-level maintenance and leases of DoD depot-level facilities. The Services have used a number of authorities to establish these public-private statutory and regulatory authorities.

  18. Looking Northeast at Southwest End of Maintenance Shop with Milling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northeast at Southwest End of Maintenance Shop with Milling Machines, Hoist, Electrical Boxes in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  19. 21 CFR 211.58 - Maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maintenance. 211.58 Section 211.58 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and Facilities §...

  20. Davis PV plant operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This operation and maintenance manual contains the information necessary to run the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) test facility in Davis, California. References to more specific information available in drawings, data sheets, files, or vendor manuals are included. The PVUSA is a national cooperative research and demonstration program formed in 1987 to assess the potential of utility scale photovoltaic systems.

  1. Glutathione redox regulates airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoko; Hisada, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Yasuo; Ono, Akihiro; Murata, Yukie; Hamuro, Junji; Mori, Masatomo; Dobashi, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer. We have shown that glutathione redox status, which is the balance between intracellular reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, in antigen-presenting cells (APC) regulates the helper T cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance due to the production of IL-12. Bronchial asthma is a typical Th2 disease. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines are characteristic of asthma and trigger off an inflammation. Accordingly, we studied the effects of the intracellular glutathione redox status on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergen-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We used gamma-Glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, to elevate the intracellular GSH level and GSH/GSSG ratio of mice. In vitro, gamma-GCE pretreatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced IL-12(p70) production induced by LPS. In the mouse asthma model, intraperitoneal injection of gamma-GCE elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio of lung tissue and reduced AHR. gamma-GCE reduced levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and the chemokines eotaxin and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas it enhanced the production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma. Histologically, gamma-GCE suppressed eosinophils infiltration. Interestingly, we also found that gamma-GCE directly inhibited chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis without affecting eotaxin receptor chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) expressions. Taken together, these findings suggest that changing glutathione redox balance, increase in GSH level, and the GSH/GSSG ratio by gamma-GCE, ameliorate bronchial asthma by altering the Th1/Th2 imbalance through IL-12 production from APC and suppressing chemokine production and eosinophil migration itself.

  2. Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) Design Guide. Army Reserve Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    compressed air piping system for maintenance bay service tools , typically the air compressor is located in the mechanical room. Other maintenance building...Including Change 3, 1 February 2010 FOREWORD The Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) system is prescribed by MIL-STD 3007 and provides...Engineering Command (NAVFAC), and Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency (AFCESA) are responsible for administration of the UFC system . Defense agencies

  3. 33 CFR 146.15 - Maintenance of emergency equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of emergency equipment. 146.15 Section 146.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.15 Maintenance...

  4. 29 CFR 1917.111 - Maintenance and load limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maintenance and load limits. 1917.111 Section 1917.111..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.111 Maintenance and load limits... maintained. (b) Maximum safe load limits, in pounds per square foot (kilograms per square meter), of...

  5. 29 CFR 1917.111 - Maintenance and load limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maintenance and load limits. 1917.111 Section 1917.111..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.111 Maintenance and load limits... maintained. (b) Maximum safe load limits, in pounds per square foot (kilograms per square meter), of...

  6. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  7. Airway adequacy, head posture, and craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Solow, B; Siersbaek-Nielsen, S; Greve, E

    1984-09-01

    Previous studies of different samples have demonstrated associations between craniocervical angulation and craniofacial morphology, between airway obstruction by adenoids and craniofacial morphology, and between airway obstruction and craniocervical angulation. A hypothesis to account for the different sets of associations was suggested by Solow and Kreiborg in 1977. In the present study, the three sets of associations were examined in a single group of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction. Cephalometric radiographs taken in the natural head position and rhinomanometric recordings were obtained from twenty-four children 7 to 9 years of age. Correlations were calculated between twenty-seven morphologic, eight postural, and two airway variables. A large craniocervical angle was, on the average, seen in connection with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, and a large mandibular inclination. Obstructed nasopharyngeal airways (defined as a small pm-ad 2 radiographic distance and a large nasal respiratory resistance, NRR, determined rhinomanometrically) were, on the average, seen in connection with a large craniocervical angle and with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, a large mandibular inclination, and retroclination of the upper incisors. The observed correlations were in agreement with the predicted pattern of associations between craniofacial morphology, craniocervical angulation, and airway resistance, thus suggesting the simultaneous presence of such associations in the sample of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction.

  8. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  9. 1. GENERAL VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE EMAD FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE E-MAD FACILITY AND THE SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL SETTING. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  10. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  11. Microform Reader Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Hal W.; Michaels, George H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes experiences in organizing a program of microform reader and reader/printer maintenance at Texas A & M's Sterling C. Evans Library and offers guidelines for regular machine maintenance and repair. Guidelines discussed relate to maintenance philosophy, general machine cleaning, troubleshooting, service contracts, supplies,…

  12. Asphalt in Pavement Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    Maintenance methods that can be used equally well in all regions of the country have been developed for the use of asphalt in pavement maintenance. Specific information covering methods, equipment and terminology that applies to the use of asphalt in the maintenance of all types of pavement structures, including shoulders, is provided. In many…

  13. Light Vehicle Preventive Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to instruct students in the performance of preventive maintenance on motor vehicles. Instructional materials are presented in three chapters as follows: (1) Major Maintenance Areas (maintenance system, tires, batteries, cooling systems, and vehicle lubrication; (2)…

  14. Defer Maintenance, Invite Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, William W.

    1977-01-01

    An AGB- and NACUBO-sponsored survey showed that "wish lists" are accumulating overdue major maintenance projects because energy costs are consuming physical plant budgets. Problem areas are discussed: budget "guesstimation," preventive maintenance, deferred maintenance inventory, the APPA accounting format, resource allocation,…

  15. Maintenance Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    maintenance opera- tions. d. Available national maintenance management system (MMS) software be utilized to develop the planning, organizing...portland cement concrete pavements to level and realign faulted areas between slabs or craks within the slab by grinding the high side. MAINTENANCE ITEM

  16. Myeloid sarcoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary collection of blasts of the myeloid series that partially or totally effaces the architecture of the tissue in which it is found. These tumors have been described in many sites of the body, but the skin, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, bone, soft tissue, and testes are most common. They can arise in a patient following the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, but they may also be precursors of leukemia and should be considered diagnostic for acute myeloid leukemia. The differential diagnosis of this neoplasm includes malignant lymphoma, with which it is often mistaken, leading to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. We present the case of an 84-year-old African American man with a history of renal disease secondary to hypertension and coronary artery disease without any prior history of malignancies who presented with airway obstruction. He was diagnosed with a myeloid sarcoma of the mediastinum compressing his trachea.

  17. The Development and Application of Airway Devices in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangdong; Ma, Wuhua; Liu, Renyu; Yao, Shanglong

    2017-01-01

    Airway management is one of the most important tasks for anesthesiologists. Anesthesiologists are experts in airway management and have made tremendous contribution to the development of the airway devices. Chinese anesthesiologists have made significant contribution in introducing advanced airway management and developing innovative techniques and devices for airway management in China. This article overviews the development and application of airway devices in China as well as the dedication and contribution of Chinese experts in the development of novel airway devices. With the development of science and technology accompanied by the advanced knowledge in airway management, more effective and safe artificial airways will be developed for clinical practice. The authors believe that Chinese experts will continue their outstanding contribution to the development of innovative airway devices, systems and knowledge. PMID:28191485

  18. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  19. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  1. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery.

  2. Therapeutic bronchoscopic interventions for malignant airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dalar, Levent; Özdemir, Cengiz; Abul, Yasin; Karasulu, Levent; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Akbaş, Ayşegül; Altın, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no definitive consensus about the factors affecting the choice of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of malignant airway obstruction. The present study defines the choice of the interventional bronchoscopic modality and analyzes the factors influencing survival in patients with malignant central airway obstruction. Totally, over 7 years, 802 interventional rigid bronchoscopic procedures were applied in 547 patients having malignant airway obstruction. There was a significant association between the type of stent and the site of the lesion in the present study. Patients with tracheal involvement and/or involvement of the main bronchi had the worst prognosis. The sites of the lesion and endobronchial treatment modality were independent predictors of survival in the present study. The selection of different types of airway stents can be considered on the base of site of the lesion. Survival can be estimated based on the site of the lesion and endobronchial brochoscopic modality used. PMID:27281104

  3. Taste Receptors in Upper Airway Immunity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ryan M; Lee, Robert J; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors are well known for their role in communicating information from the tongue to the brain about nutritional value or potential toxicity of ingested substances. More recently, it has been shown that taste receptors are expressed in other locations throughout the body, including the airway, gastrointestinal tract, brain and pancreas. The roles of some 'extraoral' taste receptors are largely unknown, but emerging research suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are capable of sensing bacteria and modulating innate immunity. This chapter focuses on the role of bitter and sweet taste receptors in human airway innate immunity and their clinical relevance to rhinosinusitis. The bitter taste receptor T2R38 expressed in sinonasal cilia detects bitter bacterial quorum-sensing molecules and activates a nitric oxide-dependent innate immune response; moreover, there are polymorphisms in T2R38 that underlie susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Bitter and sweet receptors in sinonasal solitary chemosensory cells control secretion of antimicrobial peptides in the upper airway and may have a profound impact on airway infections in patients with CRS and diabetes. Future research on taste receptors in the airway has enormous potential to expand our understanding of host-pathogen immune interactions and provide novel therapeutic targets.

  4. Sensory nerves in lung and airways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Yu, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves innervating the lung and airways play an important role in regulating various cardiopulmonary functions and maintaining homeostasis under both healthy and disease conditions. Their activities conducted by both vagal and sympathetic afferents are also responsible for eliciting important defense reflexes that protect the lung and body from potential health-hazardous effects of airborne particulates and chemical irritants. This article reviews the morphology, transduction properties, reflex functions, and respiratory sensations of these receptors, focusing primarily on recent findings derived from using new technologies such as neural immunochemistry, isolated airway-nerve preparation, cultured airway neurons, patch-clamp electrophysiology, transgenic mice, and other cellular and molecular approaches. Studies of the signal transduction of mechanosensitive afferents have revealed a new concept of sensory unit and cellular mechanism of activation, and identified additional types of sensory receptors in the lung. Chemosensitive properties of these lung afferents are further characterized by the expression of specific ligand-gated ion channels on nerve terminals, ganglion origin, and responses to the action of various inflammatory cells, mediators, and cytokines during acute and chronic airway inflammation and injuries. Increasing interest and extensive investigations have been focused on uncovering the mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity of these airway afferents, and their role in the manifestation of various symptoms under pathophysiological conditions. Several important and challenging questions regarding these sensory nerves are discussed. Searching for these answers will be a critical step in developing the translational research and effective treatments of airway diseases.

  5. Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Airway Responsiveness in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effect of inhaled NO2 on the inherent responsiveness of the airways to challenge by bronchoconstricting agents have had mixed results. In general, existing meta-analyses show statistically significant effects of NO2 on the airway responsiveness of individuals with asthma. However, no meta-analysis has provided a comprehensive assessment of clinical relevance of changes in airway responsiveness, the potential for methodological biases in the original papers, and the distribution of responses. This paper provides analyses showing that a statistically significant fraction, 70% of individuals with asthma exposed to NO2 at rest, experience increases in airway responsiveness following 30-minute exposures to NO2 in the range of 200 to 300 ppb and following 60-minute exposures to 100 ppb. The distribution of changes in airway responsiveness is log-normally distributed with a median change of 0.75 (provocative dose following NO2 divided by provocative dose following filtered air exposure) and geometric standard deviation of 1.88. About a quarter of the exposed individuals experience a clinically relevant reduction in their provocative dose due to NO2 relative to air exposure. The fraction experiencing an increase in responsiveness was statistically significant and robust to exclusion of individual studies. Results showed minimal change in airway responsiveness for individuals exposed to NO2 during exercise. A variety of fa

  6. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  7. Slowly Adapting Sensory Units Have More Receptors in Large Airways than in Small Airways in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Song, Nana; Guardiola, Juan; Roman, Jesse; Yu, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na+/K+-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi) vs. small (bronchioles <500 μm in diameter) airways in the rabbit. We found that even though the sensory structure was bigger in large airways than in small airways (3340 ± 223 vs. 1168 ± 103 μm2; P < 0.0001), there was no difference in receptor sizes (349 ± 14 vs. 326 ± 16 μm2; > 0.05). However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.6 ± 0.3; P < 0.0001). Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities. PMID:28018231

  8. Slowly Adapting Sensory Units Have More Receptors in Large Airways than in Small Airways in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Nana; Guardiola, Juan; Roman, Jesse; Yu, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi) vs. small (bronchioles <500 μm in diameter) airways in the rabbit. We found that even though the sensory structure was bigger in large airways than in small airways (3340 ± 223 vs. 1168 ± 103 μm(2); P < 0.0001), there was no difference in receptor sizes (349 ± 14 vs. 326 ± 16 μm(2); > 0.05). However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.6 ± 0.3; P < 0.0001). Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities.

  9. 28 CFR 36.211 - Maintenance of accessible features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITY BY PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES General Requirements § 36.211 Maintenance of accessible features. (a) A public accommodation shall maintain in operable working condition those features of facilities and equipment that are required to be readily accessible to and usable by persons...

  10. 33 CFR 105.250 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Facility Security Requirements § 105.250 Security systems and equipment maintenance. (a) Security systems and equipment must be in good working order and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security systems and...

  11. 33 CFR 105.250 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Facility Security Requirements § 105.250 Security systems and equipment maintenance. (a) Security systems and equipment must be in good working order and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security systems and...

  12. 33 CFR 105.250 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Facility Security Requirements § 105.250 Security systems and equipment maintenance. (a) Security systems and equipment must be in good working order and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security systems and...

  13. 14 CFR 171.211 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.211 Section 171.211 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES VHF Marker Beacons §...

  14. 14 CFR 171.211 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.211 Section 171.211 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES VHF Marker Beacons §...

  15. 14 CFR 171.211 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.211 Section 171.211 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES VHF Marker Beacons §...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1160 - Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1160 Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.../or hydrochloric acid regeneration plant subject to this subpart shall achieve initial compliance with... reconstructed steel pickling facility and/or hydrochloric acid regeneration plant subject to this subpart...

  17. 14 CFR 171.31 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.31 Section 171.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Nondirectional Radio...

  18. 14 CFR 171.211 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.211 Section 171.211 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES VHF Marker Beacons §...

  19. 14 CFR 171.31 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.31 Section 171.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Nondirectional Radio...

  20. 14 CFR 171.211 - Maintenance and operations requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance and operations requirements. 171.211 Section 171.211 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES VHF Marker Beacons §...

  1. Innovation for maintenance technology improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R. (Editor); Willard, W. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A group of 34 submitted entries (32 papers and 2 abstracts) from the 33rd meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group whose subject was maintenance technology improvement through innovation. Areas of special emphasis included maintenance concepts, maintenance analysis systems, improved maintenance processes, innovative maintenance diagnostics and maintenance indicators, and technology improvements for power plant applications.

  2. Supporting NASA Facilities Through GIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA GIS Team supports NASA facilities and partners in the analysis of spatial data. Geographic Information System (G[S) is an integration of computer hardware, software, and personnel linking topographic, demographic, utility, facility, image, and other geo-referenced data. The system provides a graphic interface to relational databases and supports decision making processes such as planning, design, maintenance and repair, and emergency response.

  3. Technical information report: Plasma melter operation, reliability, and maintenance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1995-03-14

    This document provides a technical report of operability, reliability, and maintenance of a plasma melter for low-level waste vitrification, in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. A process description is provided that minimizes maintenance and downtime and includes material and energy balances, equipment sizes and arrangement, startup/operation/maintence/shutdown cycle descriptions, and basis for scale-up to a 200 metric ton/day production facility. Operational requirements are provided including utilities, feeds, labor, and maintenance. Equipment reliability estimates and maintenance requirements are provided which includes a list of failure modes, responses, and consequences.

  4. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  5. Operation and Maintenance of Wastewater Collection Systems. Volume I. Third Edition. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    Proper installations, inspections, operations, maintenance and repairs of wastewater collection, conveyance and treatment facilities have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs, and the effectiveness of these facilities. This manual is the first volume of a two-part program designed to provide wastewater collection system…

  6. Promotion of airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and alleviation of airway ischemia by deferoxamine nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wen; Sung, Yon K.; Sun, Wenchao; Hsu, Joe L.; Manickam, Sathish; Wagh, Dhananjay; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Semenza, Gregg L.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Airway tissue ischemia and hypoxia in human lung transplantation is a consequence of the sacrifice of the bronchial circulation during the surgical procedure and is a major risk factor for the development of airway anastomotic complications. Augmented expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α promotes microvascular repair and alleviates allograft ischemia and hypoxia. Deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) is an FDA-approved iron chelator which has been shown to upregulate cellular HIF-1α. Here, we developed a nanoparticle formulation of DFO that can be topically applied to airway transplants at the time of surgery. In a mouse orthotopic tracheal transplant (OTT) model, the DFO nanoparticle was highly effective in enhancing airway microvascular perfusion following transplantation through the production of the angiogenic factors, placental growth factor (PLGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1. The endothelial cells in DFO treated airways displayed higher levels of p-eNOS and Ki67, less apoptosis, and decreased production of perivascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to vehicle-treated airways. In summary, a DFO formulation topically-applied at the time of surgery successfully augmented airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and the repair of alloimmune-injured microvasculature. This approach may be an effective topical transplant-conditioning therapy for preventing airway complications following clinical lung transplantation. PMID:24161166

  7. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  8. Two-dimensional airway analysis using probabilistic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Park, Sang Cheol; Pu, Jiantao; Sciurba, Frank C.; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-03-01

    Although 3-D airway tree segmentation permits analysis of airway tree paths of practical lengths and facilitates visual inspection, our group developed and tested an automated computer scheme that was operated on individual 2-D CT images to detect airway sections and measure their morphometry and/or dimensions. The algorithm computes a set of airway features including airway lumen area (Ai), airway cross-sectional area (Aw), the ratio (Ra) of Ai to Aw, and the airway wall thickness (Tw) for each detected airway section depicted on the CT image slice. Thus, this 2-D based algorithm does not depend on the accuracy of 3-D airway tree segmentation and does not require that CT examination encompasses the entire lung or reconstructs contiguous images. However, one disadvantage of the 2-D image based schemes is the lack of the ability to identify the airway generation (Gb) of the detected airway section. In this study, we developed and tested a new approach that uses 2-D airway features to assign a generation number to an airway. We developed and tested two probabilistic neural networks (PNN) based on different sets of airway features computed by our 2-D based scheme. The PNNs were trained and tested on 12 lung CT examinations (8 training and 4 testing). The accuracy for the PNN that utilized Ai and Ra for identifying the generation of airway sections varies from 55.4% - 100%. The overall accuracy of the PNN for all detected airway sections that are spread over all generations is 76.7%. Interestingly, adding wall thickness feature (Tw) to PNN did not improve identification accuracy. This preliminary study demonstrates that a set of 2-D airway features may be used to identify the generation number of an airway with reasonable accuracy.

  9. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  10. 42 CFR 441.181 - Maintenance of effort: Explanation of terms and requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance of effort: Explanation of terms and... Facilities or Programs § 441.181 Maintenance of effort: Explanation of terms and requirements. (a) For... sections in the current quarter, must be included in the maintenance of effort computation if, during...

  11. A Study of the Operating and Maintenance Costs in a Suburban School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugo, John; Mohrenweiser, Gary

    Two aspects of the operation and maintenance of the Suburban Park School District (SPSD) facilities are analyzed: (1) The allocation of funds to operation and maintenance, and (2) the individual custodial workloads. The maintenance and operation expenditures are divided into three categories (custodial salaries, operation expenditures above and…

  12. Mars ultraviolet simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Zill, L P; Mack, R; DeVincenzi, D L

    1979-12-01

    A facility was established for long-duration ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure of natural and synthetic materials in order to test hypotheses concerning Martian soil chemistry observed by the Viking Mars landers. The system utilized a 2500 watt xenon lamp as the radiation source, with the beam passing through a heat-dissipating water filter before impinging upon an exposure chamber containing the samples to be irradiated. The chamber was designed to allow for continuous tumbling of the samples, maintenance of temperatures below 0 degrees C during exposure, and monitoring of beam intensity. The facility also provided for sample preparation under a variety of atmospheric conditions, in addition to the Mars nominal. As many as 33 sealed sample ampules have been irradiated in a single exposure. Over 100 samples have been irradiated for approximately 100 to 700 h. The facility has performed well in providing continuous UV irradiation of multiple samples for long periods of time under simulated Mars atmospheric and thermal conditions.

  13. Airway pressure with chest compressions versus Heimlich manoeuvre in recently dead adults with complete airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Langhelle, A; Sunde, K; Wik, L; Steen, P A

    2000-04-01

    In a previous case report a standard chest compression successfully removed a foreign body from the airway after the Heimlich manoeuvre had failed. Based on this case, standard chest compressions and Heimlich manoeuvres were performed by emergency physicians on 12 unselected cadavers with a simulated complete airway obstruction in a randomised crossover design. The mean peak airway pressure was significantly lower with abdominal thrusts compared to chest compressions, 26.4+/-19.8 cmH(2)O versus 40.8+/-16.4 cmH(2)O, respectively (P=0.005, 95% confidence interval for the mean difference 5.3-23.4 cmH(2)O). Standard chest compressions therefore have the potential of being more effective than the Heimlich manoeuvre for the management of complete airway obstruction by a foreign body in an unconscious patient. Removal of the Heimlich manoeuvre from the resuscitation algorithm for unconscious patients with suspected airway obstruction will also simplify training.

  14. Quantifying the energy benefits of HVAC maintenance training and preventive maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, B.C.; Magee, M.S.

    1999-06-01

    This article summarizes a methodology developed to evaluate the energy savings impact of HVAC maintenance training for community colleges in California. The methodology was developed in a study conducted jointly by Servidyne Systems, Inc. and the California Energy Commission. The study involved: (1) a review of previous literature on attempts to quantify training and preventive maintenance impacts; (2) creation of a simplified calculation model for estimating energy savings that could be attributed to HVAC maintenance training; (3) application of the model to nine sample community colleges, using data taken from energy audits of the colleges; (4) calculations of the range of energy savings that could be anticipated through training at the nine colleges; and (5) field surveys to evaluate HVAC equipment conditions and document typical maintenance problems at community colleges that could be addressed by a training program. The investigation concluded that energy savings attributable to training can be roughly quantified using a relatively simple estimation model. Improved HVAC preventive maintenance resulting directly from technician training has a significant energy savings potential, ranging from 6% to 19% of a typical community college`s total energy bill. The results of this study support the premise that well-trained personnel and proper preventive maintenance can significantly improve a facility`s energy performance.

  15. Examining maintenance responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Lam, K C

    2001-06-01

    This paper has examined the important responsibilities of the two organisations involved in the provision of maintenance service for the vital building services in many of our highly serviced buildings. The issues raised could be put to beneficial use in both clients and maintenance providers. All in all, the clients should work closely with their maintenance providers. Engineering services in buildings will not perform satisfactorily and efficiently if both parties do not work together and understand the maintenance tasks based on a business partnering mode. Put forward is the view that the management of the activities involved in the operation and maintenance process is a "shared commitment/involvement" between the client and the maintenance provider. It is obvious that many factors can influence the continued effectiveness of a quality maintenance scheme set up by client and provider. Some of these factors are: Change in key personnel Updates in technology Amendments to engineering practice Implementation of legislative requirements Changes in operation by client or provider Change of use of building Passage of time These factors must be fully reviewed by both parties from time to time, and necessary actions taken. A cooperative team working relationship and improved communication should be fostered by the client and his provider for the best management of services maintenance. This arrangement will contribute to better building services systems with continuous improvement; improved value for clients and higher return for the maintenance provider.

  16. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  17. EMS-physicians' self reported airway management training and expertise; a descriptive study from the Central Region of Denmark

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prehospital advanced airway management, including prehospital endotracheal intubation is challenging and recent papers have addressed the need for proper training, skill maintenance and quality control for emergency medical service personnel. The aim of this study was to provide data regarding airway management-training and expertise from the regional physician-staffed emergency medical service (EMS). Methods The EMS in this part of The Central Region of Denmark is a two tiered system. The second tier comprises physician staffed Mobile Emergency Care Units. The medical directors of the programs supplied system data. A questionnaire addressing airway management experience, training and knowledge was sent to the EMS-physicians. Results There are no specific guidelines, standard operating procedures or standardised program for obtaining and maintaining skills regarding prehospital advanced airway management in the schemes covered by this study. 53/67 physicians responded; 98,1% were specialists in anesthesiology, with an average of 17,6 years of experience in anesthesiology, and 7,2 years experience as EMS-physicians. 84,9% reported having attended life support course(s), 64,2% an advanced airway management course. 24,5% fulfilled the curriculum suggested for Danish EMS physicians. 47,2% had encountered a difficult or impossible PHETI, most commonly in a patient in cardiac arrest or a trauma patient. Only 20,8% of the physicians were completely familiar with what back-up devices were available for airway management. Conclusions In this, the first Danish study of prehospital advanced airway management, we found a high degree of experience, education and training among the EMS-physicians, but their equipment awareness was limited. Check-outs, guidelines, standard operating procedures and other quality control measures may be needed. PMID:21303510

  18. The Facilities Audit. A Process for Improving Facilities Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    The problems of deferred maintenance and decaying campus infrastructure have troubled higher education for the past two decades. This book, designed to be a tool for facilities managers, describes a process for inspecting and reporting conditions of buildings and infrastructure. The audit process is meant to be a routine part of maintenance…

  19. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Tina; O'Connor, Timothy P; Hackett, Neil R; Wang, Wei; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Attiyeh, Marc A; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223) of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC) criteria established, included: (1) RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN) ≥ 7.0; (2) cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3) the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3%) passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6%) passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04) were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons between arrays that passed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.97 ± 0.01). Inter-array variability was significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) among samples passing the QC criteria compared with samples failing the QC criteria. Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation. PMID:19852842

  20. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  1. Diagnostic significance of nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled air from the airways in allergic rhinitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Krzych-Fałta, Edyta; Samoliński, Bolesław K; Zalewska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the human body is very important due its physiological regulation of the following functions of airways: modulation of ciliary movement and maintenance of sterility in sinuses. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic significance of NO concentrations in exhaled air from the upper and lower airways in patients diagnosed with allergic rhinitis (AR). Material and methods The subjects included in the study were a group of 30 people diagnosed with sensitivity to environmental allergens and a control group consisting of 30 healthy subjects. The measurement of NO in the air exhaled from the lower and upper airways was performed using an on-line method by means of Restricted Exhaled Breath (REB), as well as using the measurement procedure (chemiluminescence) set out in the guidelines prepared in 2005 by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society. Results In the late phase of the allergic reaction, higher values of the level of exhaled NO concentration from the lower airways were observed in the groups of subjects up to the threshold values of 25.17 ppb in the group of subjects with year-round allergic rhinitis and 21.78 ppb in the group with diagnosed seasonal allergic rhinitis. The difference in the concentration of NO exhaled from the lungs between the test group and the control group in the 4th h of the test was statistically significant (p = 0.045). Conclusions Exhaled NO should be considered as a marker of airway inflammation. It plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of allergy. PMID:27279816

  2. Playing Hardball with Facilities Expenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes one school district manager's tactics for successfully controlling district costs and increasing capital improvements while only marginally increasing the facilities maintenance budget. Highlights guidelines for controlling personnel requirements and cost-reduction methods. Discusses specific cost-control measures involving telephone…

  3. Preparation of the patient and the airway for awake intubation

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Venkateswaran

    2011-01-01

    Awake intubation is usually performed electively in the presence of a difficult airway. A detailed airway examination is time-consuming and often not feasible in an emergency. A simple 1-2-3 rule for airway examination allows one to identify potential airway difficulty within a minute. A more detailed airway examination can give a better idea about the exact nature of difficulty and the course of action to be taken to overcome it. When faced with an anticipated difficult airway, the anaesthesiologist needs to consider securing the airway in an awake state without the use of anaesthetic agents or muscle relaxants. As this can be highly discomforting to the patient, time and effort must be spent to prepare such patients both psychologically and pharmacologically for awake intubation. Psychological preparation is best initiated by an anaesthesiologist who explains the procedure in simple language. Sedative medications can be titrated to achieve patient comfort without compromising airway patency. Additional pharmacological preparation includes anaesthetising the airway through topical application of local anaesthetics and appropriate nerve blocks. When faced with a difficult airway, one should call for the difficult airway cart as well as for help from colleagues who have interest and expertise in airway management. Preoxygenation and monitoring during awake intubation is important. Anxious patients with a difficult airway may need to be intubated under general anaesthesia without muscle relaxants. Proper psychological and pharmacological preparation of the patient by an empathetic anaesthesiologist can go a long way in making awake intubation acceptable for all concerned. PMID:22174458

  4. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Hussell, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations) are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition.

  5. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  6. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  7. Progressive Planned Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mary Jo; Jacobs, Richard S.

    A planned maintenance system, which was implemented at Washington State University (WSU), uniquely integrates functions of equipment inventory, scheduling, time reporting, project management, materials inventory, and billing. Management now has immediate access to equipment data, maintenance status, and costs. Staff requirements are readily…

  8. Maintenance of School Gymnasiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finchum, R. N.

    1965-01-01

    Procedures are suggested that may be helpful to those responsible for the operation and maintenance of school buildings and gymnasiums. Most schools with gymnasiums utilize them for both instructional and sports purposes. Maintenance of the multipurpose gym are discussed under four subject areas--(1) floors, (2) lighting, (3) sanitation, and (4)…

  9. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  10. Human factors design guidelines for maintainability of Department of Energy nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bongarra, J.P. Jr.; VanCott, H.P.; Pain, R.F.; Peterson, L.R.; Wallace, R.I.

    1985-06-18

    Intent of these guidelines is to provide design and design review teams of DOE nuclear facilities with human factors principles to enhance the design and aid in the inspection of DOE nuclear facilities, systems, and equipment. These guidelines are concerned with design features of DOE nuclear facilities which can potentially affect preventive and corrective maintenance of systems within DOE nuclear facilities. Maintenance includes inspecting, checking, troubleshooting, adjusting, replacing, repairing, and servicing activities. Other factors which influence maintainability such as repair and maintenance suport facilities, maintenance information, and various aspects of the environment are also addressed.

  11. Gene-environment interactions in a mutant mouse kindred with native airway constrictor hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lawrence H; Eaton, Emily; Chen, Bohao; Fleisher, Jonah; Shuster, Dmitry; McCauley, Joel; Kedainis, Dalius; Siepka, Sandra M; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Song, Eun-Joo; Husain, Aliya; Lakser, Oren J; Mitchell, Richard W; Dowell, Maria L; Brown, Melanie; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Naclerio, Robert; Sperling, Anne I; Levin, Stephen I; Turek, Fred W; Solway, Julian

    2008-01-01

    We mutagenized male BTBR mice with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and screened 1315 of their G3 offspring for airway hyperresponsiveness. A phenovariant G3 mouse with exaggerated methacholine bronchoconstrictor response was identified and his progeny bred in a nonspecific-pathogen-free (SPF) facility where sentinels tested positive for minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus and where softwood bedding was used. The mutant phenotype was inherited through G11 as a single autosomal semidominant mutation with marked gender restriction, with males exhibiting almost full penetrance and very few females phenotypically abnormal. Between G11 and G12, facility infection eradication was undertaken and bedding was changed to hardwood. We could no longer detect airway hyperresponsiveness in more than 37 G12 offspring of 26 hyperresponsive G11 males. Also, we could not identify the mutant phenotype among offspring of hyperresponsive G8-G10 sires rederived into an SPF facility despite 21 attempts. These two observations suggest that both genetic and environmental factors were needed for phenotype expression. We suspect that rederivation into an SPF facility or altered exposure to pathogens or other unidentified substances modified environmental interactions with the mutant allele, and so resulted in disappearance of the hyperresponsive phenotype. Our experience suggests that future searches for genes that confer susceptibility for airway hyperresponsiveness might not be able to identify some genes that confer susceptibility if the searches are performed in SPF facilities. Experimenters are advised to arrange for multigeneration constancy of mouse care in order to clone mutant genes. Indeed, we were not able to map the mutation before losing the phenotype.

  12. Computer Profile of School Facilities Energy Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Felix E.

    This document outlines a computerized management tool designed to enable building managers to identify energy consumption as related to types and uses of school facilities for the purpose of evaluating and managing the operation, maintenance, modification, and planning of new facilities. Specifically, it is expected that the statistics generated…

  13. Does PDC Belong in Facilities Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Whether planning, design, and construction (PDC) of buildings should be part of facilities management, with its traditional operations and maintenance functions, or separated from it, has been a divisive question on many campuses for a long time. Now, although it is not happening everywhere, facilities managers at a number of institutions, public…

  14. Liver enzymes among microelectronics equipment maintenance technicians.

    PubMed

    Upfal, M

    1992-04-01

    Equipment maintenance workers within the microelectronics industry have opportunities for occupational exposure to a variety of toxic agents. This pilot investigation compares liver enzymes in this population with that of other coworkers. Participants (n = 135) were randomly selected from a medical surveillance program at the manufacturing facility. Nine job categories were examined, including equipment maintenance workers and electronic technicians. Although abnormal liver enzymes were detected among equipment maintenance workers (odds ratio 16.4; P less than .008) and electronic technicians (odds ratio 27; P less than .0005), the numbers of participants were small (n = 8, 10). The data suggest that independent and/or interactive etiologic roles of occupation and alcohol should be further investigated. Early detection of subclinical occupational or recreational hepatotoxicity with appropriate employment of industrial hygiene control technology and/or the reduction of alcohol consumption may provide a means of preventing liver disease.

  15. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  16. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  17. Host-microbe interactions in distal airways: relevance to chronic airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Martin, Clémence; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Lepage, Patricia; Andréjak, Claire; de Blic, Jacques; Bourdin, Arnaud; Brouard, Jacques; Chanez, Pascal; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Deslée, Gaetan; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; Touqui, Lhousseine; Dusser, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This article is the summary of a workshop, which took place in November 2013, on the roles of microorganisms in chronic respiratory diseases. Until recently, it was assumed that lower airways were sterile in healthy individuals. However, it has long been acknowledged that microorganisms could be identified in distal airway secretions from patients with various respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other chronic airway diseases (e.g. post-transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans). These microorganisms were sometimes considered as infectious agents that triggered host immune responses and contributed to disease onset and/or progression; alternatively, microorganisms were often considered as colonisers, which were considered unlikely to play roles in disease pathophysiology. These concepts were developed at a time when the identification of microorganisms relied on culture-based methods. Importantly, the majority of microorganisms cannot be cultured using conventional methods, and the use of novel culture-independent methods that rely on the identification of microorganism genomes has revealed that healthy distal airways display a complex flora called the airway microbiota. The present article reviews some aspects of current literature on host-microbe (mostly bacteria and viruses) interactions in healthy and diseased airways, with a special focus on distal airways.

  18. MicroRNA in United Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin-Hao; Callejas-Díaz, Borja; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of united airway diseases (UAD) has received increasing attention in recent years. Sustained and increased inflammation is a common feature of UAD, which is inevitably accompanied with marked gene modification and tight gene regulation. However, gene regulation in the common inflammatory processes in UAD remains unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA), a novel regulator of gene expression, has been considered to be involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although there are an increasing number of studies of miRNAs in inflammatory upper and lower airway diseases, few miRNAs have been identified that directly link the upper and lower airways. In this article, therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies available in order to improve the understanding of the roles of miRNAs in the interaction and pathogenesis of UAD. PMID:27187364

  19. Electrical stimulation of upper airway musculature.

    PubMed

    Smith, P L; Eisele, D W; Podszus, T; Penzel, T; Grote, L; Peter, J H; Schwartz, A R

    1996-12-01

    Investigators have postulated that pharyngeal collapse during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be alleviated by stimulating the genioglossus. The effect of electrical stimulation (ES) of the genioglossus on pharyngeal patency was examined in an isolated feline upper airway preparation and in apneic humans during sleep. We found that stimulation of the genioglossus (n = 8) and of the hypoglossal nerve (n = 1) increased maximum airflow through the isolated feline upper airway in humans during sleep. Additional findings in the isolated feline upper airway suggest that such increases in airflow were due to decreases in pharyngeal collapsibility. The evidence suggests that improvements in airflow dynamics with electrical stimulation are due to selective recruitment of the genioglossus, rather than due to nonspecific activation of the pharyngeal musculature or arousal from sleep. The implications of these results for future therapy with ES are discussed.

  20. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  1. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  2. Cold weather exercise and airway cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Malayer, Jerry R; Vandeventer, Lori; Royer, Christopher M; McKenzie, Erica C; Williamson, Katherine K

    2005-06-01

    Athletes who perform repeated exercise while breathing cold air have a high prevalence of asthmalike chronic airway disease, but the mechanism linking such activity to airway inflammation is unknown. We used a novel animal model (exercising horses) to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced chronic airway disease is caused by exposure of intrapulmonary airways to unconditioned air, resulting in the upregulation of cytokine expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from eight horses 5 h after submaximal exercise while they breathed room temperature or subfreezing air in a random crossover design. BALF total and differential nucleated cell counts were determined, and relative cytokine mRNA expression in BALF nucleated cells was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using primer and probe sequences specific for equine targets. There were no significant changes in total or differential cell concentrations between BALF recovered after warm and cold air exercise, although there was a strong trend toward increased concentrations of airway epithelial cells after cold air exercise (P = 0.0625). T(H)2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were preferentially upregulated after cold air exercise 12-, 9-, and 10-fold, respectively, compared with warm air exercise. Other cytokines (IL-2 and IL-6) were upregulated to a lesser extent (6- and 3-fold, respectively) or not at all (IL-1, IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha). These results suggest that cold weather exercise can lead to asthmalike airway disease through the local induction of cytokines typical of the T(H)2 phenotype.

  3. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  4. Benign Nodular Goiter Causing Upper Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Başoğlu, Mahmut; Öztürk, Gürkan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Yıldırgan, M. İlhan; Atamanalp, S. Selçuk; Celebi, Fehmi

    2009-01-01

    Objective Benign nodular goiter (BNG) can cause narrowing of the upper airway. In some rare cases, obstruction of the upper airway also occurs. The following paper reports our experiences with regard to BNG patients who experienced obstruction of the upper airway. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively investigated the records of 13 patients with acute airway obstruction due to BNG who were admitted to the General Surgery Department of Ataturk University Medical School between January 2000 and December 2007. Results Thirteen patients with airway obstruction secondary to BNG were hospitalized during this period. There were two males and 11 females, and the mean age was 58.5 years (range 37–74 years). For all patients, the primary symptom upon admission was defined as respiratory distress; all patients had varying degrees of respiratory distress upon admission. Three of the patients underwent emergent endotracheal intubation in the emergency room. A preoperative radiological evaluation was performed with thyroid ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT). There were retrosternal or substernal components of the BNG in nine patients. Twelve patients underwent operations, while one patient with mild respiratory distress elected not to be operated on. Ten patients underwent total thyroidectomies, while two patients underwent near-total thyroidectomies. One patient with retrosternal goiter also underwent a median sternotomy. Three patients received a tracheostomy after the operation. Suction drains were utilized in all operations. During the post-operative period, two patients suffered from voice impairment, and seven patients experienced hypocalcemia. Two patients died. Pathological examination of the thyroidectomy tissue revealed BNG in all cases. In addition, two patients had micropapillary carcinomas. Conclusion Although BNG causing upper airway obstruction is rare, it is an important clinical entity because of the need for emergent operation, the

  5. Simple maintenance for dramatic effect.

    PubMed

    Wells, Scott; Collen, Mark

    2012-08-01

    In an article which first appeared in print in the March 2012 issue of The Australian Hospital Engineer, based on a presentation given at the Institute of Hospital Engineering Australia's 2009 National Conference, Scott Wells, energy manager, Engineering & Building Services, at Royal Brisbane Women's Hospital, and Mark Collen, a district account manager, Engineering and Process Development Division, at water treatment specialist, Nalco, discuss how sound, regular, and thorough, maintenance and cleaning of hospital air-handing units will not only enhance their operating efficiency, but will also help reduce airborne infection risk in the healthcare facilities they serve. They also detail practical measures taken at hospitals in Queensland to reduce the energy consumption of air-handling equipment.

  6. Cine CT technique for dynamic airway studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ell, S.R.; Jolles, H.; Keyes, W.D.; Galvin, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    The advent of cine CT scanning with its 50-msec data acquisition time promises a much wider range of dynamic CT studies. The authors describe a method for dynamic evaluation of the extrathoracic airway, which they believe has considerable potential application in nonfixed upper-airway disease, such as sleep apnea and stridor of unknown cause. Conventional CT is limited in such studies by long data acquisition time and can be used to study only prolonged maneuvers such as phonation. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction studies are limited by relatively high radiation dose and inability to image all wall motions simultaneously.

  7. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... provide an emergency airway during upper airway obstruction. (b) Classification. Class II...

  8. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  11. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  18. Infrared Scanning For Electrical Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbath, Steven E.

    1983-03-01

    Given the technological age that we have now entered, the purpose of this paper is to relate how infrared scanning can be used for an electrical preventative maintenance program. An infrared scanner is able to produce an image because objects give off infrared radiation in relationship to their temperature. Most electrical problems will show up as an increase in temperature, thereby making the infrared scanner a useful preventative maintenance tool. Because of the sensitivity of most of the scanners, .1 to .2 of a degree, virtually all electrical problems can be pinpointed long before they become a costly failure. One of the early uses of infrared scanning was to check the power company's electrical distribution system. Most of this was performed via aircraft or truck mounted scanning devices which necessitated its semi-permanent mounting. With the advent of small hand held infrared imagers, along with more portability of the larger systems, infrared scanning has gained more popularity in checking electrical distribution systems. But the distribution systems are now a scaled down model, mainly the in-plant electrical systems. By in-plant, I mean any distribution of electricity; once it leaves the power company's grid. This can be in a hospital, retail outlet, warehouse or manufacturing facility.

  19. Factors Influencing Army Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    ARI Research Note 89-11 (N 00 Factors Influencing Army Maintenance LOloD Debra C. Evans and J. Thomas Roth Applied Science Associates, Inc. for...1.2.7 .2.7.C.1 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassifIcarIon) Factors Influencing Army Maintenance i2. FERSONAL AuTtiOR(S) Evans, Debra C., and Roth, J...y • ’ Factors and variables that influence maintenance for systems and related manpower, per- sonnel, and training (MPT) characteristics were

  20. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  1. Prehospital endotracheal tube airway or esophageal gastric tube airway: a critical comparison.

    PubMed

    Shea, S R; MacDonald, J R; Gruzinski, G

    1985-02-01

    This study compares two similar groups of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest with ventricular fibrillation (VF). In the survival study group of 296 patients, 148 patients received an endotracheal tube airway (ETA) and 148 patients received an esophageal gastric tube airway (EGTA), the improved version of the esophageal obturator airway (EOA). Survival rates, both short term (ETA = 35.8%, EGTA = 39.1%) and long term (ETA = 11.5%, EGTA = 16.2%), and neurological sequelae of survivors showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P greater than .05). In addition, we found that success and complication rates of intubation were similar. Training time was longer for the ETA. We conclude that both airways have a place in the prehospital setting.

  2. Maintenance concept development for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be the next major experimental machine in the US Fusion Program. Its use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations on the machine. These operations consist of removing and repairing such components as diagnostic equipment modules by using remotely operated maintenance equipment. The major equipment being developed for maintenance external to the vacuum vessel includes both bridge-mounted and floor-mounted manipulator systems. Additionally, decontamination (decon) equipment, hot cell repair facilities, and equipment for handling and packaging solid radioactive waste (rad-waste) are being developed. Recent design activities have focused on establishing maintenance system interfaces with the facility design, developing manipulator system requirements, and using mock-ups to support the tokamak configuration design. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Woodwind Instrument Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperl, Gary

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a simple maintenance program for woodwind instruments which includes the care of tendon corks, the need for oiling keys, and methods of preventing cracks in woodwind instruments. (KC)

  4. Care and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Carolyn H.; Hampton, Carol D.

    1979-01-01

    The classroom care and maintenance of terrestrial isopods is described. Includes illustrations of isopod external anatomy, a potato trap for collecting isopods, and a constructed habitat for raising isopods. (MA)

  5. Carpet Maintenance Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses ways to make carpet maintenance in schools easier and effective for keeping carpeted areas in schools attractive and long lasting. Covers cleaning tips for basic spills, ideas for staying on top of stains, and suggestions for eliminating odors. (GR)

  6. Automating Preventive Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshier, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the following aspects of the State University of New York-Brockport's preventive maintenance computerization project: (1) software selection, (2) project implementation; and (3) problems and benefits of the system. (MCG)

  7. Automated preventive maintenance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cea, E. J.; Grieger, T. H.

    1971-01-01

    Maintenance program which is concise and inexpensive to operate adapts to almost any system that has a FORTRAN compiler. Program operates on a stored data base with an output consisting of scheduling information and various management reports.

  8. Timpani Repair and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, F. Michael

    1980-01-01

    Rather than focusing on specific brands of timpani, these guidelines for repair cover mechanical problems of a general nature: pedals, dents, unclear tone, and squeaking. Preventive maintenance is discussed. (Author/SJL)

  9. Expression of ligands for Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 in human airways and airway cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Yu, Huifeng; Fernandes, Steve M.; Wei, Yadong; Gonzalez-Gil, Anabel; Motari, Mary G.; Vajn, Katarina; Stevens, Whitney W.; Peters, Anju T.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Balanced activation and inhibition of the immune system ensures pathogen clearance while avoiding hyperinflammation. Siglecs, sialic acid binding proteins found on subsets of immune cells, often inhibit inflammation: Siglec-8 on eosinophils and Siglec-9 on neutrophils engage sialoglycan ligands on airways to diminish ongoing inflammation. The identities of human siglec ligands and their expression during inflammation are largely unknown. Objective The histological distribution, expression and molecular characteristics of siglec ligands were explored in healthy and inflamed human upper airways and in a cellular model of airway inflammation. Methods Normal and chronically inflamed upper airway tissues were stained for siglec ligands. The ligands were extracted from normal and inflamed tissues and from human Calu-3 cells for quantitative analysis by siglec blotting and isolation by siglec capture. Results Siglec-8 ligands were expressed on a subpopulation of submucosal gland cells of human inferior turbinate, whereas Siglec-9 ligands were expressed more broadly (submucosal glands, epithelium, connective tissue); both were significantly upregulated in chronic rhinosinusitis patients. Human airway (Calu-3) cells expressed Siglec-9 ligands on mucin 5B under inflammatory control via the NF-κB pathway, and mucin 5B carried sialoglycan ligands of Siglec-9 on human upper airway tissue. Conclusion Inflammation results in upregulation of immune inhibitory Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 sialoglycan ligands on human airways. Siglec-9 ligands were upregulated via the NF-κB pathway resulting in their enhanced expression on mucin 5B. Siglec sialoglycan ligand expression in inflamed cells and tissues may contribute to the control of airway inflammation. PMID:25747723

  10. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed.

  11. Techniques of assessing small airways dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, William; Usmani, Omar S.

    2014-01-01

    The small airways are defined as those less than 2 mm in diameter. They are a major site of pathology in many lung diseases, not least chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The small airways are frequently involved early in the course of these diseases, with significant pathology demonstrable often before the onset of symptoms or changes in spirometry and imaging. Despite their importance, they have proven relatively difficult to study. This is in part due to their relative inaccessibility to biopsy and their small size which makes their imaging difficult. Traditional lung function tests may only become abnormal once there is a significant burden of disease within them. This has led to the term ‘the quiet zone’ of the lung. In recent years, more specialised tests have been developed which may detect these changes earlier, perhaps offering the possibility of earlier diagnosis and intervention. These tests are now moving from the realms of clinical research laboratories into routine clinical practice and are increasingly useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of respiratory diseases. This article gives an overview of small airways physiology and some of the routine and more advanced tests of airway function. PMID:26557240

  12. Reproducibility of airway wall thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Owsijewitsch, Michael; de Hoop, Bartjan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2010-03-01

    Airway remodeling and accompanying changes in wall thickness are known to be a major symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), associated with reduced lung function in diseased individuals. Further investigation of this disease as well as monitoring of disease progression and treatment effect demand for accurate and reproducible assessment of airway wall thickness in CT datasets. With wall thicknesses in the sub-millimeter range, this task remains challenging even with today's high resolution CT datasets. To provide accurate measurements, taking partial volume effects into account is mandatory. The Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) method has been shown to be inappropriate for small airways1,2 and several improved algorithms for objective quantification of airway wall thickness have been proposed.1-8 In this paper, we describe an algorithm based on a closed form solution proposed by Weinheimer et al.7 We locally estimate the lung density parameter required for the closed form solution to account for possible variations of parenchyma density between different lung regions, inspiration states and contrast agent concentrations. The general accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated using basic tubular software and hardware phantoms. Furthermore, we present results on the reproducibility of the algorithm with respect to clinical CT scans, varying reconstruction kernels, and repeated acquisitions, which is crucial for longitudinal observations.

  13. Airway-parenchyma uncoupling in nocturnal asthma.

    PubMed

    Irvin, C G; Pak, J; Martin, R J

    2000-01-01

    Airway flow resistance is well known to be dependent upon lung volume. The rise in lung volume that occurs in asthma is therefore thought to be an important mechanism that defends airway patency. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interdependence or mechanical coupling between airways and lung parenchyma during the inflammatory processes that occur in the patient with nocturnal asthma. Five patients with documented nocturnal asthma were studied in both a vertical and a horizontal body plethysmograph. Lung volume was altered with continuous negative pressure as applied to the chest wall with a poncho cuirass in different postures and during sleep. We found during the awake phase that an increase in lung volume decreased lower pulmonary resistance (Rlp); however, within 30 min of sleep onset, functional residual capacity (FRC) fell and Rlp rose more than would be expected for the fall in FRC. Restoring FRC to presleep values either at an early (half-hour) or a late (3-h) time point did not cause Rlp to significantly fall. A second phase of the study showed that the loss of Rlp dependence on lung volume was not due to the assumption of the supine posture. Indirect measurements of lung compliance were consistent with a stiffening of the lung. We conclude that with sleep there is an immediate uncoupling of the parenchyma to the airway, resulting in a loss of interdependence that persists throughout sleep and may contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with nocturnal asthma.

  14. Quercetin Blocks Airway Epithelial Cell Chemokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nanua, Suparna; Zick, Suzanna M.; Andrade, Juan E.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Burgess, John R.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, is an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that quercetin blocks airway epithelial cell chemokine expression via PI 3-kinase–dependent mechanisms. Pretreatment with quercetin and the PI 3–kinase inhibitor LY294002 each reduced TNF-α–induced IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (also called CCL2) expression in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Quercetin also inhibited TNF-α–induced PI 3-kinase activity, Akt phosphorylation, intracellular H2O2 production, NF-κB transactivation, IL-8 promoter activity, and steady-state mRNA levels, consistent with the notion that quercetin inhibits chemokine expression by attenuating NF-κB transactivation via a PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent pathway. Quercetin also reduced TNF-α–induced chemokine secretion in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, while inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)-2α, suggesting that quercetin attenuates chemokine expression by post-transcriptional as well as transcriptional mechanisms. Finally, we tested the effects of quercetin in cockroach antigen–sensitized and –challenged mice. These mice show MCP-1–dependent airways hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Quercetin significantly reduced lung MCP-1 and methacholine responsiveness. We conclude that quercetin blocks airway cell chemokine expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. PMID:16794257

  15. COLCHICINE DECREASES AIRWAY HYPERACTIVITY AFTER PHOSGENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phosgene (COCl(2)) exposure affects an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung, which can be reduced in an animal model by pretreatment with colchicine. Inflammation in the respiratory tract can be associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity. We tested the hypotheses...

  16. Osmotic regulation of airway reactivity by epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Yuan, L X; Chang, V C; Viola, J O; Cutler, D; Pettit, L L

    1999-05-01

    Inhalation of nonisotonic solutions can elicit pulmonary obstruction in asthmatic airways. We evaluated the hypothesis that the respiratory epithelium is involved in responses of the airways to nonisotonic solutions using the guinea pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to restrict applied agents to the mucosal (intraluminal) or serosal (extraluminal) surface of the airway. In methacholine-contracted tracheae, intraluminally applied NaCl or KCl equipotently caused relaxation that was unaffected by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but was attenuated by removal of the epithelium and Na+ and Cl- channel blockers. Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter and nitric oxide synthase blockers caused a slight inhibition of relaxation, whereas Na+,K+-pump inhibition produced a small potentiation. Intraluminal hyperosmolar KCl and NaCl inhibited contractions in response to intra- or extraluminally applied methacholine, as well as neurogenic cholinergic contractions elicited with electric field stimulation (+/- indomethacin). Extraluminally applied NaCl and KCl elicited epithelium-dependent relaxation (which for KCl was followed by contraction). In contrast to the effects of hyperosmolarity, intraluminal hypo-osmolarity caused papaverine-inhibitable contractions (+/- epithelium). These findings suggest that the epithelium is an osmotic sensor which, through the release of epithelium-derived relaxing factor, can regulate airway diameter by modulating smooth muscle responsiveness and excitatory neurotransmission.

  17. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin; Nielsen, Mads; Edula, Goutham; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2010-03-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 manually segmented images extracted from 15 different subjects and shown to give accurate results, with 37% less errors than the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) algorithm and 62% less than a similar graph cut method without coupled surfaces. Common measures of airway wall thickness such as the Interior Area (IA) and Wall Area percentage (WA%) was measured by the proposed method on a total of 723 CT scans from a lung cancer screening study. These measures were significantly different for participants with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) compared to asymptomatic participants. Furthermore, reproducibility was good as confirmed by repeat scans and the measures correlated well with the outcomes of pulmonary function tests, demonstrating the use of the algorithm as a COPD diagnostic tool. Additionally, a new measure of airway wall thickness is proposed, Normalized Wall Intensity Sum (NWIS). NWIS is shown to correlate better with lung function test values and to be more reproducible than previous measures IA, WA% and airway wall thickness at a lumen perimeter of 10 mm (PI10).

  18. Access to the Airways: Rationale and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanks, William; Longini, Peter

    Current movements toward greater public access to the airways are discussed. Traditional practices have limited access to journalists employed by stations and to those who purchase time and have allowed only limited responses to station-initiated editorials. Legal arguments that support citizen demands for more access arise from the First…

  19. Operational maintenance data for power generation distribution and HVAC components

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, H.D.; Hale, P.S. Jr.; Arno, R.G.; Briggs, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the culmination of a 24,000 man hour effort to collect operational and maintenance data on 239 power generation, power distribution and HVAC items, including gas turbine generators, diesel engine generators, switch gear assemblies, cables, boilers, piping, valves and chillers. This program was designed to determine the effects of new technology equipment, i.e., equipment installed after 1971, on availability. The central hypothesis was that this new equipment would exhibit a significant increase in availability, with corresponding decreases in required maintenance and the occurrence of failures. Information was obtained on a variety of commercial and industrial facility types (including office buildings, hospitals, water treatment facilities, prisons, utilities, manufacturing facilities, school universities and bank computer centers), with varying degrees of maintenance quality.

  20. Remote maintenance for a new generation of hot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; Grant, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    For several years the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing facility concepts, designing specialized equipment, and testing prototypical hardware for reprocessing spent fuel from fast breeder reactors. The major facility conceptual design, the Hot Experimental Facility, was based on total remote maintenance to increase plant availability and to reduce radiation exposure. This thrust included designing modular equipment to facilitate maintenance and the manipulation necessary to accomplish maintenance. Included in the design repetoire was the development effort in advanced servomanipulator systems, a remote sampling system, television viewing, and a transporter for manipulator positioning. Demonstration of these developed items is currently ongoing, and the technology is available for applications where production operations in highly radioactive environments are required.

  1. Cigarette smoke induces genetic instability in airway epithelial cells by suppressing FANCD2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hays, L E; Zodrow, D M; Yates, J E; Deffebach, M E; Jacoby, D B; Olson, S B; Pankow, J F; Bagby, G C

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are commonly found in bronchogenic carcinoma cells, but the molecular causes of chromosomal instability (CIN) and their relationship to cigarette smoke has not been defined. Because the Fanconi anaemia (FA)/BRCA pathway is essential for maintenance of chromosomal stability, we tested the hypothesis that cigarette smoke suppresses that activity of this pathway. Here, we show that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) inhibited translation of FANCD2 mRNA (but not FANCC or FANCG) in normal airway epithelial cells and that this suppression of FANCD2 expression was sufficient to induce both genetic instability and programmed cell death in the exposed cell population. Cigarette smoke condensate also suppressed FANCD2 function and induced CIN in bronchogenic carcinoma cells, but these cells were resistant to CSC-induced apoptosis relative to normal airway epithelial cells. We, therefore, suggest that CSC exerts pressure on airway epithelial cells that results in selection and emergence of genetically unstable somatic mutant clones that may have lost the capacity to effectively execute an apoptotic programme. Carcinogen-mediated suppression of FANCD2 gene expression provides a plausible molecular mechanism for CIN in bronchogenic carcinogenesis. PMID:18475298

  2. Complications Associated with the Use of Supraglottic Airway Devices in Perioperative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, William; Vobrubova, Eliska; Hakl, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Supraglottic airway devices are routinely used for airway maintenance in elective surgical procedures where aspiration is not a significant risk and also as rescue devices in difficult airway management. Some devices now have features mitigating risk of aspiration, such as drain tubes or compartments to manage regurgitated content. Despite this, the use of these device may be associated with various complications including aspiration. This review highlights the types and incidence of these complications. They include regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents, compression of vascular structures, trauma, and nerve injury. The incidence of such complications is quite low, but as some carry with them a significant degree of morbidity the need to follow manufacturers' advice is underlined. The incidence of gastric content aspiration associated with the devices is estimated to be as low as 0.02% with perioperative regurgitation being significantly higher but underreported. Other serious, but extremely rare, complications include pharyngeal rupture, pneumomediastinum, mediastinitis, or arytenoid dislocation. Mild short-lasting adverse effects of the devices have significantly higher incidence than serious complications and involve postoperative sore throat, dysphagia, pain on swallowing, or hoarseness. Devices may have deleterious effect on cervical mucosa or vasculature depending on their cuff volume and pressure. PMID:26783527

  3. Upper Airway Variation and Frequent Alcohol Consumption Can Affect Compliance With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong In; Kim, Hyo Yeol; Hong, Sang Duk; Ryu, Gwanghui; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Eun; Dhong, Hun-Jong; Chung, Seung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment remains a primary concern for improving treatment outcomes of obstructive sleep apnea. There are few studies that have considered the role of upper airway anatomy on the compliance with CPAP. We hypothesized that upper airway anatomy would influence the compliance with CPAP. Methods One hundred out of 161 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The following possible determinants were tested against CPAP use: demographic and anthropometric data, minimal cross-sectional area on acoustic rhinometry, cephalometric and polysomnographic data, questionnaires of Epworth sleepiness scale and Beck depression index, and histories of previous upper airway surgery, degree of nasal obstruction, daily cigarette consumption, and weekly frequency of alcohol intake. Results Univariate analysis showed that histories of previous upper airway surgery and less frequent alcohol consumption, and longer mandibular plane-hyoid length (MP-H) on cephalometry were associated with longer average daily CPAP use. After adjustment for the confounding factors with multiple linear regression analysis, alcohol consumption and MP-H were still associated with the compliance with CPAP significantly. Conclusion To improve compliance with CPAP, careful evaluations of upper airway problems and life style are important before initiating CPAP. PMID:27334512

  4. Report of the Task Group on operation Department of Energy tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the operation of DOE Tritium facilities: Environment, Safety, and Health Aspects of Tritium; Management of Operations and Maintenance Functions; Safe Shutdown of Tritium Facilities; Management of the Facility Safety Envelope; Maintenance of Qualified Tritium Handling Personnel; DOE Tritium Management Strategy; Radiological Control Philosophy; Implementation of DOE Requirements; Management of Tritium Residues; Inconsistent Application of Requirements for Measurement of Tritium Effluents; Interdependence of Tritium Facilities; Technical Communication among Facilities; Incorporation of Confinement Technologies into New Facilities; Operation/Management Requirements for New Tritium Facilities; and Safety Management Issues at Department of Energy Tritium Facilities.

  5. Chibby functions to preserve normal ciliary morphology through the regulation of intraflagellar transport in airway ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Saul S; Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Airway cilia provide the coordinated motive force for mucociliary transport, which prevents the accumulation of mucus, debris, pollutants, and bacteria in our respiratory tracts. As airway cilia are constantly exposed to the environment and, hence, are an integral component of the pathogenesis of several congenital and chronic pulmonary disorders, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that control ciliated cell differentiation and ciliogenesis. We have previously reported that loss of the basal body protein Chibby (Cby) results in chronic upper airway infection in mice due to a significant reduction in the number of airway cilia. In the present work, we demonstrate that Cby is required for normal ciliary structure and proper distribution of proteins involved in the bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which consists of 2 distinct sub-complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, and is essential for ciliary biogenesis and maintenance. In fully differentiated ciliated cells, abnormal paddle-like cilia with dilated ciliary tips are observed in Cby-/- airways and primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). In addition, IFT88, an IFT-B sub-complex protein, robustly accumulates within the dilated tips of both multicilia in Cby-/- MTECs and primary cilia in Cby-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, we show that only IFT-B components, including IFT20 and IFT57, but not IFT-A and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins, amass with IFT88 in these distended tips in Cby-/- ciliated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Cby plays a role in the proper distribution of IFT particles to preserve normal ciliary morphology in airway ciliated cells.

  6. Estimation of airway obstruction using oximeter plethysmograph waveform data

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald H; Spiro, David M; Desmond, Renee' A; Hagood, James S

    2005-01-01

    Background Validated measures to assess the severity of airway obstruction in patients with obstructive airway disease are limited. Changes in the pulse oximeter plethysmograph waveform represent fluctuations in arterial flow. Analysis of these fluctuations might be useful clinically if they represent physiologic perturbations resulting from airway obstruction. We tested the hypothesis that the severity of airway obstruction could be estimated using plethysmograph waveform data. Methods Using a closed airway circuit with adjustable inspiratory and expiratory pressure relief valves, airway obstruction was induced in a prospective convenience sample of 31 healthy adult subjects. Maximal change in airway pressure at the mouthpiece was used as a surrogate measure of the degree of obstruction applied. Plethysmograph waveform data and mouthpiece airway pressure were acquired for 60 seconds at increasing levels of inspiratory and expiratory obstruction. At each level of applied obstruction, mean values for maximal change in waveform area under the curve and height as well as maximal change in mouth pressure were calculated for sequential 7.5 second intervals. Correlations of these waveform variables with mouth pressure values were then performed to determine if the magnitude of changes in these variables indicates the severity of airway obstruction. Results There were significant relationships between maximal change in area under the curve (P < .0001) or height (P < 0.0001) and mouth pressure. Conclusion The findings suggest that mathematic interpretation of plethysmograph waveform data may estimate the severity of airway obstruction and be of clinical utility in objective assessment of patients with obstructive airway diseases. PMID:15985171

  7. Deposition of Graphene Nanoparticles in Human Upper Airways

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon-Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene materials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanoparticles in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanoparticles in the human airways is considered essential for an integral graphene occupational health study. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original data of graphene nanoparticle airway deposition. In this study, size classified graphene nanoparticles were delivered into human airway replicas (both nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and efficiency of graphene nanoparticle in the airway were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene nanoparticles in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiencies in each airway section were generally lower than 0.03. These results implies that the majority of the graphene nanoparticles inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced. PMID:26317666

  8. Airway evaluation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Boris A; Maurer, Joachim T

    2008-12-01

    As the interest in sleep-disordered breathing has increased, various attempts have been made to assess upper airway anatomy in patients with this relatively frequent disorder. The aim is not only to reveal potential differences in upper airway anatomy to better understand origin and pathophysiology of the disease but also to improve patient management and treatment success. The present review is based on a systematic literature search with regard to upper airway evaluation in sleep-disordered breathing; the articles were selected and discussed in light of our clinical experiences. Based on clinical assessment including endoscopy during wakefulness, the value of the Mueller Maneuver, static radiologic imaging techniques (X-ray cephalometry, computed tomography (CT) scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), dynamic scanning protocols (e.g. ultrafast CT or cine MRI), upper airway endoscopy during sleep and sedated sleep, pressure measurements and the assessment of the critical closing pressure are discussed. Each technique itself and its history in the field of sleep medicine are briefly reviewed and problems of standardization and interpretation are discussed when appropriate. Insights into the pathophysiology of the disease gained with the help of the investigational techniques are presented and the impact of the techniques on patient management is reported. Although all these additional techniques for upper airway assessment have substantially improved our understanding of sleep-disordered breathing, their significance in daily practice is limited. In contrast to the widespread use of the Mueller maneuver and sedated endoscopy, convincing data supporting their use in terms of treatment outcome are lacking. So far, there is only very limited evidence that selected techniques improve treatment outcome for selected indications. In general, there is not enough evidence that these techniques are superior to the routine clinical assessment.

  9. The Diagnosis and Management of Airway Complications Following Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Amit K; Folch, Erik; Khandhar, Sandeep J; Channick, Colleen L; Santacruz, Jose F; Mehta, Atul C; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-03-05

    Airway complications following lung transplantation result in considerable morbidity and are associated with a mortality of 2-4 percent. The incidence of lethal and non-lethal airway complications has decreased since the early experiences with double- and single-lung transplantation. The most common risk factor associated with post-lung transplant airway complications is anastomotic ischemia. Airway complications include development of exophytic granulation tissue, bronchial stenosis, bronchomalacia, airway fistula, endobronchial infection, and anastomotic dehiscence. The broadening array of bronchoscopic therapies has enhanced treatment options for lung transplant recipients with airway complications. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical manifestations, and treatments of airway complications following lung transplantation, and provides our expert opinion where evidence is lacking.

  10. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  11. 40 CFR 279.52 - General facility standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... processing and re-refining facilities must comply with the following requirements: (1) Maintenance and... (voice or signal) to facility personnel; (ii) A device, such as a telephone (immediately available at the... used oil processing and re-refining facilities must comply with the following requirements: (1)...

  12. New Mexico's Model for Funding School Facilities' Greatest Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorrell, Robert; Salamone, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The New Mexico Public Schools Facilities Authority (NM-PSFA) is a relatively small state agency (50 staff members) that manages the allocation of funding for public school facilities in the state while assisting school districts and state-chartered charter schools in facility planning, construction, and maintenance. Like the majority of other…

  13. 75 FR 77954 - Transfer of Federally Assisted Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Charlottesville Facilities Maintenance Division of Public Works. The facility and land sit within a secure Public... Charlottesville Public Works Yard, and includes no street frontage. The north side of the facility is bounded by... adjoining Public Works Yard. The railway embankment to the north of the buildings is steep, wooded, and...

  14. FGD maintenance guidelines. Volume 2: FGD maintenance information. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, L.N.; Miller, G.P.; Wedig, C.P.

    1986-07-01

    The ''FGD Maintenance Guidelines'' was written to fill the need for maintenance information that applies specifically to flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Previously there was no single source of data describing FGD maintenance. Usually maintenance managers relied on suppliers' operating and maintenance manuals, past FGD experience, or procedures from other areas of a power plant. There are two volumes in the Guidelines intended to assist utility personnel in planning and performing maintenance for FGD systems. Different aspects of maintenance are emphasized in each volume. Volume 1, FGD Maintenance Programs, provides guidance for supervisory personnel involved in planning maintenance. It describes the utility industry's experience with FGD maintenance programs, a procedure for organizing and managing maintenance programs, and ways to design FGD systems for maintainability. The section about implementing a maintenance program contains a detailed example to illustrate the procedure, based on experience of an actual operating FGD system. Volume 2, FGD Maintenance Information, has practical information, useful in understanding FGD systems and their maintenance needs. It describes the major types of FGD systems operating in the US and typical maintenance associated with each. Also, in this volume, there is information about maintenance needs and procedures for the most common types of FGD equipment. 21 refs., 48 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, David B.; Burwinkle, T. W.; Cannon, T. R.; Ford, M. K.; Holder, Jr., L.; Clotfelter, O. K.; Faulkner, R. L.; Smith, D. L.; Wooten, H. O.

    1991-12-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

  16. Detection of Upper Airway Status and Respiratory Events by a Current Generation Positive Airway Pressure Device

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing Yun; Berry, Richard B.; Goetting, Mark G.; Staley, Bethany; Soto-Calderon, Haideliza; Tsai, Sheila C.; Jasko, Jeffrey G.; Pack, Allan I.; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare a positive airway pressure (PAP) device's detection of respiratory events and airway status during device-detected apneas with events scored on simultaneous polysomnography (PSG). Design: Prospective PSGs of patients with sleep apnea using a new-generation PAP device. Settings: Four clinical and academic sleep centers. Patients: Forty-five patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and complex sleep apnea (Comp SA) performed a PSG on PAP levels adjusted to induce respiratory events. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: PAP device data identifying the type of respiratory event and whether the airway during a device-detected apnea was open or obstructed were compared to time-synced, manually scored respiratory events on simultaneous PSG recording. Intraclass correlation coefficients between device-detected and PSG scored events were 0.854 for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 0.783 for apnea index, 0.252 for hypopnea index, and 0.098 for respiratory event-related arousals index. At a device AHI (AHIFlow) of 10 events/h, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.98, with sensitivity 0.92 and specificity 0.84. AHIFlow tended to overestimate AHI on PSG at values less than 10 events/h. The device detected that the airway was obstructed in 87.4% of manually scored obstructive apneas. Of the device-detected apneas with clear airway, a minority (15.8%) were manually scored as obstructive apneas. Conclusions: A device-detected apnea-hypopnea index (AHIFlow) < 10 events/h on a positive airway pressure device is strong evidence of good treatment efficacy. Device-detected airway status agrees closely with the presumed airway status during polysomnography scored events, but should not be equated with a specific type of respiratory event. Citation: Li QY, Berry RB, Goetting MG, Staley B, Soto-Calderon H, Tsai SC, Jasko JG, Pack AI, Kuna ST. Detection of upper airway status and respiratory events by a current generation positive

  17. Do-It-Now building maintenance reengineering project

    SciTech Connect

    Apoddaca, L.; Ayotte, A.; Coffman, J.; Dukes, L.; Jojola, S.; Kadlec, J.; Letourneau, S.; Matthews, R.; Paul, G.

    1996-09-01

    The Do-It-Now (DIN) building maintenance system is proposed to reduce the cost of routine building maintenance and repairs and to improve customer satisfaction with maintenance services. DIN uses a team approach to periodically inspect buildings and provide maintenance services on the spot. It emphasizes communications between the customers and the craftspeople performing the work. The system was designed using a reengineering approach that characterized the existing maintenance work control system, analyzed comparable systems in other DOE laboratories, envisioned an ideal system, and proposed a workable, testable system for initial implementation. At each stage, input was solicited from customer representatives and Facilities management to ensure meeting customer requirements with an implementable system.

  18. Use of the virtual reality in maintenance operation at EDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nouailhas, B.; Tonnoir, S.; Laureillard, P.

    2006-07-01

    Today, a high level of availability for generating facilities is essential for electricity producers. In this context, optimizing the maintenance operation tasks is a necessity for EDF. To achieve this objective, EDF R and D has created the 3D Maintenance Project. The main goal of this project is to provide an organization and work methods linked with a 3D tool to support the maintenance staff in their tasks of coordination and moving packages during outages. In this paper present the moving packages tool and its experimentation in a nuclear power plant. (authors)

  19. Airway Progenitor Clone Formation Is Enhanced by Y-27632-Dependent Changes in the Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Susan D; Rios, Cydney; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Zhuang, Yongbin; Pinter, Mary; Happoldt, Carrie; Hill, Cynthia L; Lallier, Scott W; Cosgrove, Gregory P; Solomon, George M; Nichols, David P; Seibold, Max A

    2016-09-01

    The application of conditional reprogramming culture (CRC) methods to nasal airway epithelial cells would allow more wide-spread incorporation of primary airway epithelial culture models into complex lung disease research. In this study, we adapted the CRC method to nasal airway epithelial cells, investigated the growth advantages afforded by this technique over standard culture methods, and determined the cellular and molecular basis of CRC cell culture effects. We found that the CRC method allowed the production of 7.1 × 10(10) cells after 4 passages, approximately 379 times more cells than were generated by the standard bronchial epithelial growth media (BEGM) method. These nasal airway epithelial cells expressed normal basal cell markers and could be induced to form a mucociliary epithelium. Progenitor cell frequency was significantly higher using the CRC method in comparison to the standard culture method, and progenitor cell maintenance was dependent on addition of the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis demonstrated widespread gene expression changes in Y-27632-treated basal cells. We found that Y-27632 treatment altered expression of genes fundamental to the formation of the basal cell cytoskeleton, cell-cell junctions, and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Importantly, we found that Y-27632 treatment up-regulated expression of unique basal cell intermediate filament and desmosomal genes. Conversely, Y-27632 down-regulated multiple families of protease/antiprotease genes involved in ECM remodeling. We conclude that Y-27632 fundamentally alters cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions, which preserves basal progenitor cells and allows greater cell amplification.

  20. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  1. Building Maintenance, Management, and Budgeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawsey, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Australian methods and formulas for funding building maintenance and management are outlined and found to be haphazard. Discussed are: ultimate costs of deferred maintenance, major plant replacements, life cycle costing, types of maintenance programs (including full preventive maintenance), use of computer programs for planning, and organization…

  2. Syk Regulates Neutrophilic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness in a Chronic Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen; Scott, Jeremy A.; Chow, Chung-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR), reversible airway obstruction, and airway inflammation and remodeling. We previously showed that Syk modulates methacholine-induced airways contractility in naïve mice and in mice with allergic airways inflammation. We hypothesize that Syk plays a role in the pathogenesis of AHR; this was evaluated in a chronic 8-week mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airways inflammation. Methods We used the Sykflox/flox//rosa26CreERT2 conditional Syk knock-out mice to assess the role of Syk prior to HDM exposure, and treated HDM-sensitized mice with the Syk inhibitor, GSK143, to evaluate its role in established allergic airways inflammation. Respiratory mechanics and methacholine (MCh)-responsiveness were assessed using the flexiVent® system. Lungs underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to isolate inflammatory cells or were frozen for determination of gene expression in tissues. Results MCh-induced AHR was observed following HDM sensitization in the Syk-intact (Sykflox/flox) and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. MCh responsiveness was reduced to control levels in HDM-sensitized Sykdel/del mice and in BALB/c and Sykflox/flox mice treated with GSK143. Both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice mounted appropriate immune responses to HDM, with HDM-specific IgE levels that were comparable to Sykflox/flox and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. HDM-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice, due primarily to decreased neutrophil recruitment. Gene expression analysis of lung tissues revealed that HDM-induced expression of IL-17 and CXCL-1 was significantly attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice. Conclusion Syk inhibitors may play a role in the management of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:28107345

  3. Does the length dependency of airway smooth muscle force contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Pascoe, Chris D; Couture, Christian; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-11-01

    Airway wall remodeling and lung hyperinflation are two typical features of asthma that may alter the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) by affecting its operating length. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to describe in detail the "length dependency of ASM force" in response to different spasmogens; and 2) to predict, based on morphological data and a computational model, the consequence of this length dependency of ASM force on airway responsiveness in asthmatic subjects who have both remodeled airway walls and hyperinflated lungs. Ovine tracheal ASM strips and human bronchial rings were isolated and stimulated to contract in response to increasing concentrations of spasmogens at three different lengths. Ovine tracheal strips were more sensitive and generated greater force at longer lengths in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and K(+). Equipotent concentrations of ACh were approximately a log less for ASM stretched by 30% and approximately a log more for ASM shortened by 30%. Similar results were observed in human bronchi in response to methacholine. Morphometric and computational analyses predicted that the ASM of asthmatic subjects may be elongated by 6.6-10.4% (depending on airway generation) due to remodeling and/or hyperinflation, which could increase ACh-induced force by 1.8-117.8% (depending on ASM length and ACh concentration) and enhance the increased resistance to airflow by 0.4-4,432.8%. In conclusion, elongation of ASM imposed by airway wall remodeling and/or hyperinflation may allow ASM to operate at a longer length and to consequently generate more force and respond to lower concentration of spasmogens. This phenomenon could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness.

  4. What Constitutes Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In most cases the facilities inventory of an educational institution is its largest fiscal asset. The physical plant or facilities management department is the steward for keeping that asset from becoming a liability. Its principal charge is to make sure that the building inventory maintains its ability to function as intended, that it is safe and…

  5. Save a Penny, Lose a School: The Real Cost of Deferred Maintenance. Policy Brief Series on Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Barbara Kent

    Deferring maintenance in small rural schools creates poor conditions that can affect the health and safety of everyone who uses the facility, damage the morale of students and teachers, impair their ability to teach and learn, and threaten the facility itself. Numerous recommendations for policy changes that affect maintenance are presented. A…

  6. Arginine Vasopressin Alters Both Spontaneous and Phase-Locked Synaptic Inputs to Airway Vagal Preganglionic Neuron via Activation of V1a Receptor: Insights into Stress-Related Airway Vagal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xianxia; Chen, Xingxin; Guo, Yuhong; He, Ding; Chen, Yonghua; Xia, Chunmei; Wang, Jijiang

    2017-01-01

    The airway vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus (eNA) play a major role in the vagal control of tracheobronchial smooth muscle tone and maintenance of airway resistance. The eNA receives vasopressinergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the key node for the genesis of psychological stress. Since airway vagal excitation is reportedly to be associated with the psychological stress-induced/exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatics, arginine vasopressin (AVP) might be involved in stress-related airway vagal excitation. However, this possibility has not been validated. This study aimed to test whether and how AVP regulates AVPNs. In rhythmically active medullary slices of newborn rats, retrogradely labeled AVPNs were identified as inspiratory-activated and inspiratory-inhibited AVPNs (IA- and II-AVPNs) using patch-clamp techniques according to their inspiratory-related firing behavior and synaptic activities. The results show that under current clamp, AVP depolarized both IA- and II-AVPNs, and significantly increased their spontaneous firing rate. Under voltage clamp, AVP elicited a slow inward current, and significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in both types of AVPNs. In addition, AVP significantly enhanced the phase-locked excitatory inspiratory inward current in inspiratory-activated airway vagal preganglionic neurons (IA-AVPNs), but significantly suppressed the phase-locked inhibitory inspiratory outward current in II-AVPNs. In both types AVPNs, AVP significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of pharmacologically isolated spontaneous GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). All of the AVP-induced effects were prevented by SR49059, an antagonist of V1a receptors, but unaffected by SSR149415, an antagonist of V1b receptors. AVP did not cause significant changes in the miniature excitatory

  7. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  8. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  9. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  10. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  11. The Diacetyl-exposed Human Airway Epithelial Secretome: New Insights Into Flavoring Induced Airways Disease.

    PubMed

    Brass, David M; Gwinn, William M; Valente, Ashlee M; Kelly, Francine L; Brinkley, Christie D; Nagler, Andrew E; Moseley, M Arthur; Morgan, Daniel L; Palmer, Scott M; Foster, Matthew W

    2017-03-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is an increasingly important lung disease characterized by fibroproliferative airway lesions and decrements in lung function. Occupational exposure to the artificial food flavoring ingredient diacetyl, commonly used to impart a buttery flavor to microwave popcorn, has been associated with BO development. In the occupational setting, diacetyl vapor is first encountered by the airway epithelium. To better understand the effects of diacetyl vapor on the airway epithelium we used an unbiased proteomic approach to characterize both the apical and basolateral secretomes of air liquid interface cultures of primary human airway epithelial cells from four unique donors after exposure to an occupationally relevant ~1100 ppm of diacetyl vapor or PBS as a control on alternating days. Basolateral and apical supernatants collected 48 hours after the third exposure were analyzed using one-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Paired t-tests adjusted for multiple comparisons were used to assess differential expression between diacetyl and PBS exposure. Of the significantly differentially expressed proteins identified, 61 were unique to the apical secretome, 81 were unique to the basolateral secretome and there were an additional 11 present in both. Pathway enrichment analysis using publicly available databases reveals that proteins associated with matrix remodeling including degradation, assembly and new matrix organization were over-represented in the data sets. Similarly, protein modifiers of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling were significantly altered. The ordered changes in protein expression suggest that the airway epithelial response to diacetyl may contribute to BO pathogenesis.

  12. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway vs tracheal intubation: a systematic review on airway complications.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Babette F; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has advantages over the tracheal tube (TT) in terms of incidence of cough, sore throat, laryngospasm, dysphagia, dysphonia, and blood staining. This is a systematic literature review performed at the Universtity Medical Center of Utrecht. The online databases PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials. Two independent reviewers selected relevant articles after title, abstract, and full text screening. Articles were assessed on risk of bias in accordance with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Study results of the LMA and the TT were related to the method of selection of the device size and the method for cuff inflation. Of the 1718 unique articles, we included 19 studies which used the LMA Classic, the LMA Proseal, the Flexible Reinforced LMA, and the LMA Supreme compared with TT. After methodological inspection, data could not be pooled due to heterogeneity among the selected studies. Overall, no clear advantage of the LMA over the TT was found but the LMA Supreme was related to the lowest incidence of airway complications. In this review, no clear difference in incidence of postoperative airway complications could be demonstrated between LMA and TT. The LMA Supreme may reduce the incidence of airway complication in comparison to the TT but high quality randomized trials are recommended to further objectify if use of the LMA decreases the risk on postoperative airway complications.

  13. Environmental restoration plan for the transfer of surplus facilities to the Facility Transition Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report will provide guidance on management, coordination, and integration of plans to transition facilities to the Facility Transition Program and activities as related to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration Program facilities. This report gives (1) guidance on the steps necessary for identifying ORNL surplus facilities, (2) interfaces of Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and Isotope Facility Deactivation program managers, (3) roles and responsibilities of the facility managers, and (4) initial S and M requirements upon acceptance into the Facility Transition Program.

  14. Advances in upper airway cough syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Xu, Xianghuai; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-05-01

    Upper airway cough syndrome (UACS), previously referred to as postnasal drip syndrome, is one of the most common causes of chronic cough. However, the pathogenesis of UACS/postnasal drip syndrome remains unclear, and physicians in countries throughout the world have different definitions and ways of treating this disease. The various proposed pathogeneses of UACS include the early postnasal drip theory, subsequent chronic airway inflammation theory, and a recent sensory neural hypersensitivity theory. Additionally, some researchers suggest that UACS is a clinical phenotype of cough hypersensitivity syndrome. While the general principles involved in treating UACS are similar throughout the world, the specific details of treatment differ. This review summarizes the various definitions, pathogenic mechanisms, treatments, and other aspects of UACS, to aid clinicians in expanding their knowledge of how to diagnose and treat this syndrome.

  15. When continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) fails

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly prevalent, particularly in the context of the obesity epidemic, and is associated with a significant social, health and economic impact. The gold standard of treatment for moderate to severe OSA is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However compliance rates can be low. Methodology to improve patient tolerance to CPAP alongside with alternative, non-surgical and surgical, management strategies are discussed. All patients that fail CPAP therapy would benefit from formal upper airway evaluation by the otolaryngologist to identify any obvious causes and consider site-specific surgical therapies. Patient selection is integral to ensuring successful outcomes. A multidisciplinary team is needed to manage these patients. PMID:27867577

  16. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  17. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo.

  18. Endoscopic low coherence interferometry in upper airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacrétaz, Yves; Boss, Daniel; Lang, Florian; Depeursinge, Christian

    2009-07-01

    We introduce Endoscopic Low Coherence Interferometry to obtain topology of upper airways through commonly used rigid endoscopes. Quantitative dimensioning of upper airways pathologies is crucial to provide maximum health recovery chances, for example in order to choose the correct stent to treat endoluminal obstructing pathologies. Our device is fully compatible with procedures used in day-to-day examinations and can potentially be brought to bedside. Besides this, the approach described here can be almost straightforwardly adapted to other endoscopy-related field of interest, such as gastroscopy and arthroscopy. The principle of the method is first exposed, then filtering procedure used to extract the depth information is described. Finally, demonstration of the method ability to operate on biological samples is assessed through measurements on ex-vivo pork bronchi.

  19. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  20. Liquid secretion properties of airway submucosal glands

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Stephen T; Inglis, Sarah K

    2004-01-01

    The tracheobronchial submucosal glands secrete liquid that is important for hydrating airway surfaces, supporting mucociliary transport, and serving as a fluid matrix for numerous secreted macromolecules including the gel-forming mucins. This review details the essential structural elements of airway glands and summarizes what is currently known regarding the ion transport processes responsible for producing the liquid component of gland secretion. Liquid secretion most likely arises from serous cells and is principally under neural control with muscarinic agonists, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) functioning as effective secretogogues. Liquid secretion is driven by the active transepithelial secretion of both Cl− and HCO3− and at least a portion of this process is mediated by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which is highly expressed in glands. The potential role of submucosal glands in cystic fibrosis lung disease is discussed. PMID:14660706

  1. Airway inflammation in aluminium potroom asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sjaheim, T; Halstensen, T; Lund, M; Bjortuft, O; Drablos, P; Malterud, D; Kongerud, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine whether asthma induced by exposure to aluminium potroom emissions (potroom asthma) is associated with inflammatory changes in the airways. Methods: Bronchial biopsy specimens from 20 asthmatic workers (8 non-smokers and 12 smokers), 15 healthy workers (8 non-smokers and 7 smokers), and 10 non-exposed controls (all non-smokers) were analysed. Immunohistofluorescent staining was performed to identify mucosal total leucocytes (CD45+ leucocytes), neutrophils, and mast cells. Results: Median RBM thickness was significantly increased in both asthmatic workers (8.2 µm) and healthy workers (7.4 µm) compared to non-exposed controls (6.7 µm). Non-smoking asthmatic workers had significantly increased median density of lamina propria CD45+ leucocytes (1519 cells/mm2v 660 and 887 cells/mm2) and eosinophils (27 cells/mm2v 10 and 3 cells/mm2) and significantly increased concentrations of exhaled NO (18.1 ppb v 6.5 and 5.1 ppb) compared to non-smoking healthy workers and non-exposed controls. Leucocyte counts and exhaled NO concentrations varied with smoking habits and fewer leucocytes were observed in asthmatic smokers than in non-smokers Asthmatic smokers had significantly increased numbers of eosinophils in lamina propria compared to non-exposed controls (10 v 3 cells/mm2). Both eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic phenotypes of asthma were recognised in the potroom workers and signs of airway inflammation were also observed in healthy workers. Conclusions: Airway inflammation is a central feature of potroom asthma and exposure to potroom emissions induces pathological alterations similar to those described in other types of asthma. Cigarette smoking seems to affect the underlying mechanisms involved in asthma, as the cellular composition of airway mucosa appears different in asthmatic smokers and non-smokers. PMID:15317920

  2. Project Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Project Surveillance and Maintenance Plan (PSMP) describes the procedures that will be used by the US Department of Energy (DOE), or other agency as designated by the President to verify that inactive uranium tailings disposal facilities remain in compliance with licensing requirements and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for remedial actions. The PSMP will be used as a guide for the development of individual Site Surveillance and Maintenance Plans (part of a license application) for each of the UMTRA Project sites. The PSMP is not intended to provide minimum requirements but rather to provide guidance in the selection of surveillance measures. For example, the plan acknowledges that ground-water monitoring may or may not be required and provides the (guidance) to make this decision. The Site Surveillance and Maintenance Plans (SSMPs) will form the basis for the licensing of the long-term surveillance and maintenance of each UMTRA Project site by the NRC. Therefore, the PSMP is a key milestone in the licensing process of all UMTRA Project sites. The Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1984a) describes the licensing process. 11 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Airway wall stiffening increases peak wall shear stress: a fluid-structure interaction study in rigid and compliant airways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-05-01

    The airflow characteristics in a computed tomography (CT) based human airway bifurcation model with rigid and compliant walls are investigated numerically. An in-house three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method is applied to simulate the flow at different Reynolds numbers and airway wall stiffness. As the Reynolds number increases, the airway wall deformation increases and the secondary flow becomes more prominent. It is found that the peak wall shear stress on the rigid airway wall can be five times stronger than that on the compliant airway wall. When adding tethering forces to the model, we find that these forces, which produce larger airway deformation than without tethering, lead to more skewed velocity profiles in the lower branches and further reduced wall shear stresses via a larger airway lumen. This implies that pathologic changes in the lung such as fibrosis or remodeling of the airway wall-both of which can serve to restrain airway wall motion-have the potential to increase wall shear stress and thus can form a positive feed-back loop for the development of altered flow profiles and airway remodeling. These observations are particularly interesting as we try to understand flow and structural changes seen in, for instance, asthma, emphysema, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

  4. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  5. Techniques of endoscopic airway tumor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mhanna, Laurent; Droneau, Sylvain; Plat, Gavin; Didier, Alain; Mazieres, Julien; Hermant, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Interventional bronchoscopy has a predominant role in the management of both early and advanced-stage airway tumors. Given the very poor prognosis of lung cancer, there is a need for new tools to improve early detection and bronchoscopic treatment of endo-bronchial precancerous lesions. In more advanced stages, interventional bronchoscopy plays an important role, as nearly a third of lung cancers lead to proximal airway obstruction. This will cause great discomfort or even life-threatening symptoms related to local extension, such as dyspnea, post-obstructive pneumonia, and hemoptysis. Surgery for very locally advanced disease is only effective for a limited number of patients and the effects of conventional antitumor therapies, like radiation therapy or chemotherapy, are inconstant and are too delayed in a palliative context. In this review, we aim to provide pulmonologists with an exhaustive technical overview of (I) the bronchoscopic management of benign endobronchial lesions; (II) the bronchoscopic management of malignant tumors, including the curative treatment of localized lesions and palliative management of malignant proximal airway stenosis; and (III) descriptions of the emerging endoscopic techniques used to treat peripheral lung tumors. PMID:28066616

  6. Surgery of the airway: historic notes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the 20th century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20th century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection. PMID:26981261

  7. Voxel classification based airway tree segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Pechin; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a voxel classification based method for segmenting the human airway tree in volumetric computed tomography (CT) images. In contrast to standard methods that use only voxel intensities, our method uses a more complex appearance model based on a set of local image appearance features and Kth nearest neighbor (KNN) classification. The optimal set of features for classification is selected automatically from a large set of features describing the local image structure at several scales. The use of multiple features enables the appearance model to differentiate between airway tree voxels and other voxels of similar intensities in the lung, thus making the segmentation robust to pathologies such as emphysema. The classifier is trained on imperfect segmentations that can easily be obtained using region growing with a manual threshold selection. Experiments show that the proposed method results in a more robust segmentation that can grow into the smaller airway branches without leaking into emphysematous areas, and is able to segment many branches that are not present in the training set.

  8. Airway mucus: From production to secretion.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatunji W; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Kim, Victor; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Christopher M

    2006-05-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a phenotype associated with multiple obstructive lung diseases. However, in spite of its nefarious reputation under pathologic conditions, there are significant benefits to having low levels of mucus present in the airways at baseline, such as the ability to trap and eliminate inhaled particles and to prevent desiccation of airway surfaces. Mucins are high-molecular-weight glycoproteins that are the chief components that render viscoelastic and gel-forming properties to mucus. Recent advances in animal models and in vitro systems have provided a wealth of information regarding the identification of the mucin genes that are expressed in the lungs, the signal transduction pathways that regulate the expression of these mucins, and the secretory pathways that mediate their release into the airways. In addition, the clinical and pathologic literature has corroborated many of the basic laboratory findings. As a result, mucin overproduction and hypersecretion are moving away from being markers of disease and toward being testable as functional components of lung disease processes.

  9. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  10. Oral airway flow dynamics in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amis, T C; O'Neill, N; Wheatley, J R

    1999-02-15

    1. Oral airway resistance (RO) is an important determinant of oro-nasal partitioning of airflow (e.g. during exercise and sleep); however, little is known of factors influencing its magnitude and measurement. 2. We developed a non-invasive standardized technique for measuring RO (based on a modification of posterior rhinomanometry) and examined inspiratory RO in 17 healthy male subjects (age, 36 +/- 2 years (mean +/- s.e.m.); height, 177 +/- 2 cm; weight, 83 +/- 3 kg). 3. Inspiratory RO (at 0.4 l s-1) was 0.86 +/- 0.23 cmH2O l-1 s-1 during resting mouthpiece breathing in the upright posture. RO was unaffected by assumption of the supine posture, tended to decrease with head and neck extension and increased to 1.22 +/- 0.19 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (n = 10 subjects, P < 0.01) with 40-45 deg of head and neck flexion. When breathing via a mouth-mask RO was 2.98 +/- 0.42 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (n = 7) and not significantly different from nasal airway resistance. 4. Thus, in awake healthy male subjects with constant jaw position, RO is unaffected by body posture but increases with modest degrees of head and neck flexion. This influence on upper airway patency may be important when oral route breathing is associated with alterations in head and neck position, e.g. during sleep.

  11. Airways obstruction, coal mining, and disability.

    PubMed Central

    Lapp, N L; Morgan, W K; Zaldivar, G

    1994-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the inhalation of coal in the absence of complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) or smoking can lead to disabling airways obstruction. The cause of such obstruction has been variously attributed to emphysema or bronchitis. The frequency of significant airways obstruction in a group of United States coal miners seeking compensation for occupationally induced pulmonary impairment was therefore determined. In a sample of 611 "Black Lung" claimants there was only one subject who was a non-smoker and who in the absence of other non-occupationally related diseases,--for example, asthma and bronchiectasis--had sufficient airways obstruction to render it difficult for him to carry out hard labour. An alternative explanation for his reduced ventilatory capacity other than coal dust or smoking may be available. If the inhalation of coal dust in the absence of smoking and complicated CWP ever induces sufficient ventilatory impairment to preclude a miner from working, it is indeed rare. PMID:8199664

  12. Electrical Maintenance Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 30 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of electrical maintenance technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific…

  13. Floors: Care and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post Office Dept., Washington, DC.

    Guidelines, methods and policies regarding the care and maintenance of post office building floors are overviewed in this handbook. Procedures outlined are concerned with maintaining a required level of appearance without wasting manpower. Flooring types and characteristics and the particular cleaning requirements of each type are given along with…

  14. Horticulture: Grounds Maintenance Employee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, James; And Others

    The unit of individualized learning activities is designed to provide training in grounds maintenance. The materials in the unit are divided into two sections. The developmental or preliminary phase (15 pages) is for use by the instructor and includes brief descriptions of the job and of the student population, along with listings of the specific…

  15. Operations and maintenance philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, G.P.

    1999-10-28

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Philosophy document is intended to establish a future O&M vision, with an increased focus on minimizing worker exposure, ensuring uninterrupted retrieval operations, and minimizing operation life-cycle cost. It is intended that this document would incorporate O&M lessons learned into on-going and future project upgrades.

  16. Floors: Selection and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Bernard

    Flooring for institutional, commercial, and industrial use is described with regard to its selection, care, and maintenance. The following flooring and subflooring material categories are discussed--(1) resilient floor coverings, (2) carpeting, (3) masonry floors, (4) wood floors, and (5) "formed-in-place floors". The properties, problems,…

  17. Maintenance Crisis vs Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Susie

    Industrial maintenance in Northeast Georgia is facing an acute crisis. Contributing factors are economic development that is depleting the work force, aging of the population, downsizing of the military, and lack of technical school graduates. Solutions to the crisis fall into three categories: short-term, mid-term, and long-term. For short-term…

  18. Playground Inspection & Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds, Gerard

    People today demand a safer work environment and a safer play environment for children. Accidents such as broken arms are no longer accepted as an inevitable part of growing up. This paper presents recommendations for the maintenance of safe playground areas and equipment, covering three main areas: (1) inspections, which should follow a specified…

  19. School Maintenance Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The United States is full of schools built in the 1950s and 60s that supported the boomer school-age enrollment increase. These schools, once beacons of the neighborhood, are 50 to 60 years old and susceptible to becoming the community "eyesore." Budgeting for maintenance was fairly systematic for school districts for the first 10 to 20…

  20. Care and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Carol D.; Hampton, Carolyn H.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for bringing the sea into the classroom by setting up a saltwater aquarium. Included is selection of an aquarium, filtering systems, water (whether natural salt or synthetic sea salts), bottom materials, setting up an aquarium, system stabilization, stocking an aquarium, and maintenance of the aquarium. (DS)