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Sample records for airway goblet cell

  1. Continuity of airway goblet cells and intraluminal mucus in the airways of patients with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Shimura, S; Andoh, Y; Haraguchi, M; Shirato, K

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the formation of the widespread mucous-plugging observed in autopsied lungs from patients with bronchial asthma. We performed morphometric analysis of airways of autopsied lungs from eight patients with bronchial asthma (Group BA), and compared it with those of six chronic bronchitics (Group CB) and four control patients (Control). The following parameters were measured in paraffin sections: volume proportion of bronchial glands to bronchial wall (Gland%); goblet cell granules to total epithelial layer (Goblet %); intraluminal mucus expressed as the mucus occupying ratio (MOR); volume ratio of intraluminal mucus continuous with goblet cells to total intraluminal mucus (Vc/Vtol %); and surface ratio of the contact surface of intraluminal mucus continuous with goblet cells to the total luminal surface (Sc/Stot %). Gland%, Goblet %, and MOR or inflammatory cell numbers in the airway walls both from Group BA and CB were larger than those from the Control group. However, no significant differences were observed between Group BA and CB in Gland%, Goblet %, MOR or inflammatory cell numbers, except for the eosinophil number: i.e. 23 +/- 3, 22 +/- 3 and 6 +/- 2% in Gland%; 22 +/- 9, 5 +/- 4 and 2 +/- 2% in Goblet%; 10 +/- 3, 18 +/- 3 and 0.3 +/- 0.5% in MOR; 199 +/- 68, 10 +/- 3 and 2 +/- 2 cells. mm-2 in eosinophil number of the peripheral airways from Groups BA, CB and Control, respectively. In contrast, marked and significant increases were observed both in Vc/Vtot% and Sc/Stot% in Group BA compared to Groups CB and Control both in central and peripheral airways: i.e. Vc/Vtot% in the peripheral airways was 53 +/- 5, 4 +/- 3 and 0.8 +/- 0.8% from Groups BA, CB and Control, respectively (BA vs CB or BA vs Control, p < 0.01 each). These findings suggest that the continuity of goblet cells and intraluminal mucus or lack of full release of mucus, from goblet cells, is peculiar to asthmatic airways, and may contribute to

  2. PAF mediates cigarette smoke-induced goblet cell metaplasia in guinea pig airways.

    PubMed

    Komori, M; Inoue, H; Matsumoto, K; Koto, H; Fukuyama, S; Aizawa, H; Hara, N

    2001-03-01

    Goblet cell metaplasia is an important morphological feature in the airways of patients with chronic airway diseases; however, the precise mechanisms that cause this feature are unknown. We investigated the role of endogenous platelet-activating factor (PAF) in airway goblet cell metaplasia induced by cigarette smoke in vivo. Guinea pigs were exposed repeatedly to cigarette smoke for 14 consecutive days. The number of goblet cells in each trachea was determined with Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff staining. Differential cell counts and PAF levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were also evaluated. Cigarette smoke exposure significantly increased the number of goblet cells. Eosinophils, neutrophils, and PAF levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were also significantly increased after cigarette smoke. Treatment with a specific PAF receptor antagonist, E-6123, significantly attenuated the increases in the number of airway goblet cells, eosinophils, and neutrophils observed after cigarette smoke exposure. These results suggest that endogenous PAF may play a key role in goblet cell metaplasia induced by cigarette smoke and that potential roles exist for inhibitors of PAF receptor in the treatment of hypersecretory airway diseases. PMID:11159026

  3. Airway epithelial SPDEF integrates goblet cell differentiation and pulmonary Th2 inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rajavelu, Priya; Chen, Gang; Xu, Yan; Kitzmiller, Joseph A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial cells that line the conducting airways provide the initial barrier and innate immune responses to the abundant particles, microbes, and allergens that are inhaled throughout life. The transcription factors SPDEF and FOXA3 are both selectively expressed in epithelial cells lining the conducting airways, where they regulate goblet cell differentiation and mucus production. Moreover, these transcription factors are upregulated in chronic lung disorders, including asthma. Here, we show that expression of SPDEF or FOXA3 in airway epithelial cells in neonatal mice caused goblet cell differentiation, spontaneous eosinophilic inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. SPDEF expression promoted DC recruitment and activation in association with induction of Il33, Csf2, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (Tslp), and Ccl20 transcripts. Increased Il4, Il13, Ccl17, and Il25 expression was accompanied by recruitment of Th2 lymphocytes, group 2 innate lymphoid cells, and eosinophils to the lung. SPDEF was required for goblet cell differentiation and pulmonary Th2 inflammation in response to house dust mite (HDM) extract, as both were decreased in neonatal and adult Spdef(-/-) mice compared with control animals. Together, our results indicate that SPDEF causes goblet cell differentiation and Th2 inflammation during postnatal development and is required for goblet cell metaplasia and normal Th2 inflammatory responses to HDM aeroallergen. PMID:25866971

  4. VAMP8 is a vesicle SNARE that regulates mucin secretion in airway goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lisa C; Moussa, Lama; Fulcher, M Leslie; Zhu, Yunxiang; Hudson, Elizabeth J; O'Neal, Wanda K; Randell, Scott H; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C; Kreda, Silvia M

    2012-02-01

    Mucin secretion is an innate defence mechanism, which is noxiously upregulated in obstructive lung diseases (e.g. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis and asthma). Mucin granule exocytosis is regulated by specific protein complexes, but the SNARE exocytotic core has not been defined in airway goblet cells. In this study, we identify VAMP8 as one of the SNAREs regulating mucin granule exocytosis. VAMP8 mRNA was present in human airway and lung epithelial cells, and deep-sequencing and expression analyses of airway epithelial cells revealed that VAMP8 transcripts were expressed at 10 times higher levels than other VAMP mRNAs. In human airway epithelial cell cultures and freshly excised tissues, VAMP8 immunolocalised mainly to goblet cell mucin granules. The function of VAMP8 in airway mucin secretion was tested by RNA interference techniques. Both VAMP8 short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) reduced mucin secretion induced by PAR agonists, neutrophil elastase and ATP in two airway epithelial cell culture models. Notably, basal (non-agonist elicited) mucin secretion was also reduced in these experiments. VAMP8 knockdown was also effective in decreasing mucin secretion in airway epithelial cell cultures with induced mucous metaplasia/mucin hypersecretion. Unlike VAMP8 silencing, knockdown of VAMP2 or VAMP3 did not affect mucin secretion. Importantly, in VAMP8 knock-out (KO) mice with IL-13-induced mucous metaplasia, mucin content in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and ATP-stimulated mucin secretion in the trachea were reduced compared to WT-matched littermates. Our data indicate that VAMP8 is an essential SNARE in airway mucin granule exocytosis. Reduction of VAMP8 activity/expression may provide a novel therapeutic target to ameliorate airway mucus obstruction in lung diseases. PMID:22144578

  5. miR-125b inhibits goblet cell differentiation in allergic airway inflammation by targeting SPDEF.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoe; Chen, Xing; Wu, Qiaoling; Song, Jia; Wang, Lijun; Li, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a disease characterized by goblet cell differentiation, mucus hypersecretion, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness. miR-125b was downregulated as normal human bronchial epithelial cells differentiation to pseudostratified epithelium. However, its role in asthma remains unknown especially in regulating goblet cell differentiation. miR-125b expression in the sputum of 50 asthmatic children and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Meanwhile, expressions of miR-125b and SAM pointed domain-containing ETS transcription factor (SPDEF) in normal human tracheal epithelial (HTEpC) and A549 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 2h were detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. Furthermore, the predicted miR-125b target was determined in silico and confirmed with dual-luciferase reporter assay. Additionally, intranasal delivery of miR-125b mimic in mice was performed to study its effects on house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation mouse models. We found that miR-125b expression was decreased in the sputum of the asthmatic patients especially in eosinophilic asthma. After stimulation with LPS, miR-125b expression was downregulated, accompanied by the upregulation of SPDEF in HTEpC and A549 cells. Moreover, SPDEF is a target of miR-125b, which regulates SPDEF at the posttranscriptional level. Additionally, intranasal delivery of miR-125b decreased SPDEF protein levels, goblet cell differentiation, mucus hypersecretion, and altered relevant gene expressions. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-125b inhibits SPDEF expression modulating goblet cell differentiation and mucus secretion in asthma. PMID:27112664

  6. A soluble secreted glycoprotein (eCLCA1) is overexpressed due to goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Range, F; Mundhenk, L; Gruber, A D

    2007-11-01

    The equine putative chloride channel protein eCLCA1 is thought to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) via modulation of the hydration of airway mucins. A recent study revealed a strong increase of eCLCA1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the lungs of horses with RAO. In this study, eCLCA1 protein and mRNA expression were quantified in airway goblet cells of 9 horses affected with RAO and 9 control horses by using immunohistochemistry and laser microdissection followed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Horses affected by RAO had strong goblet cell metaplasia in bronchioles and goblet cell hyperplasia in bronchi and the trachea. Expression of the eCLCA1 protein was tightly linked to all airway goblet cells in both groups. No differences were detected in the ratio of eCLCA1 mRNA copy numbers to the mRNA copy numbers of the housekeeping gene EF-1a per goblet cell between horses affected with RAO and unaffected horses, suggesting that the increase in eCLCA1 expression is because of increased numbers of goblet cells and not transcriptional upregulation of the eCLCA1 gene. In addition, biochemical analyses of the eCLCA1 protein after in vitro translation and heterologous expression in cultured cells revealed that eCLCA1 is a secreted glycoprotein and not an integral membrane protein. Taken together, the results suggest that eCLCA1 mediates its effect as a soluble constituent of airway mucins that is overexpressed in RAO airways because of goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia, not transcriptional upregulation. PMID:18039903

  7. Simvastatin Inhibits Goblet Cell Hyperplasia and Lung Arginase in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma: A Novel Treatment for Airway Remodeling?

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Rabowsky, Michelle; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Airway remodeling in asthma contributes to airway hyperreactivity, loss of lung function, and persistent symptoms. Current therapies do not adequately treat the structural airway changes associated with asthma. The statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step of cholesterol biosynthesis in the mevalonate pathway. These drugs have been associated with improved respiratory health and ongoing clinical trials are testing their therapeutic potential in asthma. We hypothesized that simvastatin treatment of ovalbumin-exposed mice would attenuate early features of airway remodeling, by a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. BALB/c mice were initially sensitized to ovalbumin, and then exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol for 2 weeks after sensitization for a total of six exposures. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Treatment with simvastatin attenuated goblet cell hyperplasia, arginase-1 protein expression, and total arginase enzyme activity, but did not alter airway hydroxyproline content or transforming growth factor-β1. Inhibition of goblet cell hyperplasia by simvastatin was mevalonate-dependent. No appreciable changes to airway smooth muscle cells were observed in any of the control or treatment groups. In conclusion, in an acute mouse model of allergic asthma, simvastatin inhibited early hallmarks of airway remodeling, indicators that can lead to airway thickening and fibrosis. Statins are potentially novel treatments for airway remodeling in asthma. Further studies utilizing sub-chronic or chronic allergen exposure models are needed to extend these initial findings. PMID:21078495

  8. P2u purinoceptor regulation of mucin secretion in SPOC1 cells, a goblet cell line from the airways.

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, L H; Davis, S W; Burch, L; Yamauchi, M; Randell, S H; Nettesheim, P; Davis, C W

    1996-01-01

    The SPOC1 cell, a novel goblet cell line derived from rat trachea, was tested for its ability to exhibit regulated mucin secretion in response to purinergic (P2) agonists. High-molecular mass glycoconjugates (HMMGs) purified by CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation had a buoyant density of 1.45 g/ml. The purified HMMG material exhibited a single major band with an apparent molecular mass of greater than 1000 kDa in SDS/ polyacrylamide gels stained with silver or blotted and stained with soya-bean agglutinin. [3H]HMMG was resistant to proteoglycan-degrading enzymes, but was susceptible to neuraminidase. The HMMG was approx. 91% carbohydrate by weight, and the glycosides were O-linked. The HMMG amino acid composition was enriched in Ser and Thr (sum 27%). Thus SPOC1-cell HMMG possess the characteristics of mucin. Mucin secretion by SPOC1 cells, grown on permeable supports and perfused luminally, was stimulated by ATP, UTP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (100 microM) 4-5-fold over a baseline of 4 ng/min. The three dose-effect relations were nearly identical (K0.5 approximately 4 microM). SPOC1 cells grown on plastic and rat tracheal epithelial primary cells responded similarly to ATP and/or UTP. SPOC1 cells failed to respond to other purinergic agonists, either luminally or serosally, and consequently seem to possess an apical membrane P2u purinoceptor. SPOC1-cell total RNA was probed for P2u purinoceptor mRNA. Using conserved primers for both reverse transcriptase and PCR, a single band of the predicted size was observed, which had a nucleotide base sequence identical with the rat P2u purinoceptor mRNA. Thus SPOC1 cells secrete mucin under the control of a P2u purinoceptor; they should prove useful in dissecting the associated cellular regulatory pathways. PMID:8670174

  9. A mouse model of airway disease: oncostatin M-induced pulmonary eosinophilia, goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness are STAT6 dependent, and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is STAT6 independent.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Dominik K; Kerr, Christine; Fattouh, Ramzi; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Khan, Waliul I; Jordana, Manel; Richards, Carl D

    2011-01-15

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a pleiotropic cytokine of the gp130 cytokine family, has been implicated in chronic allergic inflammatory and fibrotic disease states associated with tissue eosinophilia. Mouse (m)OSM induces airway eosinophilic inflammation and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in vivo and regulates STAT6 activation in vitro. To determine the requirement of STAT6 in OSM-induced effects in vivo, we examined wild-type (WT) and STAT6-knockout (STAT6(-/-)) C57BL/6 mouse lung responses to transient ectopic overexpression of mOSM using an adenoviral vector (AdmOSM). Intratracheal AdmOSM elicited persistent eosinophilic lung inflammation that was abolished in STAT6(-/-) mice. AdmOSM also induced pronounced pulmonary remodeling characterized by goblet cell hyperplasia and parenchymal interstitial fibrosis. Goblet cell hyperplasia was STAT6 dependent; however, parenchymal interstitial fibrosis was not. OSM also induced airway hyperresponsiveness in WT mice that was abolished in STAT6(-/-) mice. OSM stimulated an inflammatory signature in the lungs of WT mice that demonstrated STAT6-dependent regulation of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13), chemokines (eotaxin-1/2, MCP-1, keratinocyte chemoattractant), and extracellular matrix modulators (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, matrix metalloproteinase-13), but STAT6-independent regulation of IL-4Rα, total lung collagen, collagen-1A1, -1A2 mRNA, and parenchymal collagen and α smooth muscle actin accumulation. Thus, overexpression of mOSM induces STAT6-dependent pulmonary eosinophilia, mucous/goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness but STAT6-independent mechanisms of lung tissue extracellular matrix accumulation. These results also suggest that eosinophil or neutrophil accumulation in mouse lungs is not required for OSM-induced lung parenchymal collagen deposition and that OSM may have unique roles in the pathogenesis of allergic and fibrotic lung disease. PMID:21160052

  10. Prenatal secondhand cigarette smoke promotes Th2 polarization and impairs goblet cell differentiation and airway mucus formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Peña-Philippides, Juan C; Rir-Sima-ah, Jules; Mishra, Neerad C; Wilder, Julie A; Langley, Raymond J; Smith, Kevin R; Sopori, Mohan L

    2011-11-01

    Parental, particularly maternal, smoking increases the risk for childhood allergic asthma and infection. Similarly, in a murine allergic asthma model, prenatal plus early postnatal exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke (SS) exacerbates airways hyperreactivity and Th2 responses in the lung. However, the mechanism and contribution of prenatal versus early postnatal SS exposure on allergic asthma remain unresolved. To identify the effects of prenatal and/or early postnatal SS on allergic asthma, BALB/c dams and their offspring were exposed gestationally and/or 8-10 wk postbirth to filtered air or SS. Prenatal, but not postnatal, SS strongly increased methacholine and allergen (Aspergillus)-induced airway resistance, Th2 cytokine levels, and atopy and activated the Th2-polarizing pathway GATA3/Lck/ERK1/2/STAT6. Either prenatal and/or early postnatal SS downregulated the Th1-specific transcription factor T-bet and, surprisingly, despite high levels of IL-4/IL-13, dramatically blocked the allergen-induced mucous cell metaplasia, airway mucus formation, and the expression of mucus-related genes/proteins: Muc5ac, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors, and SAM pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor. Given that SS/nicotine exposure of normal adult mice promotes mucus formation, the results suggested that fetal and neonatal lung are highly sensitive to cigarette smoke. Thus, although the gestational SS promotes Th2 polarization/allergic asthma, it may also impair and/or delay the development of fetal and neonatal lung, affecting mucociliary clearance and Th1 responses. Together, this may explain the increased susceptibility of children from smoking parents to allergic asthma and childhood respiratory infections. PMID:21930963

  11. Baseline Goblet Cell Mucin Secretion in the Airways Exceeds Stimulated Secretion over Extended Time Periods, and Is Sensitive to Shear Stress and Intracellular Mucin Stores

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Sean P.; Nguyen, Kristine; Ribeiro, Carla M. P.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Forest, M. Gregory; Lethem, Michael I.; Dickey, Burton F.; Davis, C. William

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucin secretion studies have focused on goblet cell responses to exogenous agonists almost to the exclusion of baseline mucin secretion (BLMS). In human bronchial epithelial cell cultures (HBECCs), maximal agonist-stimulated secretion exceeds baseline by ~3-fold as measured over hour-long periods, but mucin stores are discharged completely and require 24 h for full restoration. Hence, over 24 h, total baseline exceeds agonist-induced secretion by several-fold. Studies with HBECCs and mouse tracheas showed that BLMS is highly sensitive to mechanical stresses. Harvesting three consecutive 1 h baseline luminal incubations with HBECCs yielded equal rates of BLMS; however, lengthening the middle period to 72 h decreased the respective rate significantly, suggesting a stimulation of BLMS by the gentle washes of HBECC luminal surfaces. BLMS declined exponentially after washing HBECCs (t1/2 = 2.75 h), to rates approaching zero. HBECCs exposed to low perfusion rates exhibited spike-like increases in BLMS when flow was jumped 5-fold: BLMS increased >4 fold, then decreased within 5 min to a stable plateau at 1.5–2-fold over control. Higher flow jumps induced proportionally higher BLMS increases. Inducing mucous hyperplasia in HBECCs increased mucin production, BLMS and agonist-induced secretion. Mouse tracheal BLMS was ~6-fold higher during perfusion, than when flow was stopped. Munc13-2 null mouse tracheas, with their defect of accumulated cellular mucins, exhibited similar BLMS as WT, contrary to predictions of lower values. Graded mucous metaplasia induced in WT and Munc13-2 null tracheas with IL-13, caused proportional increases in BLMS, suggesting that naïve Munc13-2 mouse BLMS is elevated by increased mucin stores. We conclude that BLMS is, [i] a major component of mucin secretion in the lung, [ii] sustained by the mechanical activity of a dynamic lung, [iii] proportional to levels of mucin stores, and [iv] regulated differentially from agonist-induced mucin

  12. Baseline Goblet Cell Mucin Secretion in the Airways Exceeds Stimulated Secretion over Extended Time Periods, and Is Sensitive to Shear Stress and Intracellular Mucin Stores.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunxiang; Abdullah, Lubna H; Doyle, Sean P; Nguyen, Kristine; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Vasquez, Paula A; Forest, M Gregory; Lethem, Michael I; Dickey, Burton F; Davis, C William

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucin secretion studies have focused on goblet cell responses to exogenous agonists almost to the exclusion of baseline mucin secretion (BLMS). In human bronchial epithelial cell cultures (HBECCs), maximal agonist-stimulated secretion exceeds baseline by ~3-fold as measured over hour-long periods, but mucin stores are discharged completely and require 24 h for full restoration. Hence, over 24 h, total baseline exceeds agonist-induced secretion by several-fold. Studies with HBECCs and mouse tracheas showed that BLMS is highly sensitive to mechanical stresses. Harvesting three consecutive 1 h baseline luminal incubations with HBECCs yielded equal rates of BLMS; however, lengthening the middle period to 72 h decreased the respective rate significantly, suggesting a stimulation of BLMS by the gentle washes of HBECC luminal surfaces. BLMS declined exponentially after washing HBECCs (t1/2 = 2.75 h), to rates approaching zero. HBECCs exposed to low perfusion rates exhibited spike-like increases in BLMS when flow was jumped 5-fold: BLMS increased >4 fold, then decreased within 5 min to a stable plateau at 1.5-2-fold over control. Higher flow jumps induced proportionally higher BLMS increases. Inducing mucous hyperplasia in HBECCs increased mucin production, BLMS and agonist-induced secretion. Mouse tracheal BLMS was ~6-fold higher during perfusion, than when flow was stopped. Munc13-2 null mouse tracheas, with their defect of accumulated cellular mucins, exhibited similar BLMS as WT, contrary to predictions of lower values. Graded mucous metaplasia induced in WT and Munc13-2 null tracheas with IL-13, caused proportional increases in BLMS, suggesting that naïve Munc13-2 mouse BLMS is elevated by increased mucin stores. We conclude that BLMS is, [i] a major component of mucin secretion in the lung, [ii] sustained by the mechanical activity of a dynamic lung, [iii] proportional to levels of mucin stores, and [iv] regulated differentially from agonist-induced mucin

  13. Secretory Phospholipases A2 Are Secreted From Ciliated Cells and Increase Mucin and Eicosanoid Secretion From Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawaji, Tadasuke; Kanoh, Soichiro; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) initiate the biosynthesis of eicosanoids, are increased in the airways of people with severe asthma, and induce mucin hypersecretion. We used IL-13-transformed, highly enriched goblet cells and differentiated (ciliary cell-enriched) human bronchial epithelial cell culture to evaluate the relative contribution of ciliated and goblet cells to airway sPLA2 generation and response. We wished to determine the primary source(s) of sPLA2 and leukotrienes in human airway epithelial cells. METHODS: Human bronchial epithelial cells from subjects without lung disease were differentiated to a ciliated-enriched or goblet-enriched cell phenotype. Synthesis of sPLA2, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), and airway mucin messenger RNA and protein was measured by real-time-polymerase chain reaction and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the localization of mucin and sPLA2 to specific cells types was confirmed by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: sPLA2 group IIa, V, and X messenger RNA expression was increased in ciliated-enriched cells (P < .001) but not in goblet-enriched cells. sPLA2 were secreted from the apical (air) side of ciliated-enriched cells but not goblet-enriched cells (P < .001). Immunostaining of sPLA2 V was strongly positive in ciliated-enriched cells but not in goblet-enriched cells. sPLA2 released cysLTs from goblet-enriched cells but not from ciliated-enriched cells, and this result was greatest with sPLA2 V (P < .05). sPLA2 V increased goblet-enriched cell mucin secretion, which was inhibited by inhibitors of lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase (P < .02). CONCLUSIONS: sPLA2 are secreted from ciliated cells and appear to induce mucin and cysLT secretion from goblet cells, strongly suggesting that airway goblet cells are proinflammatory effector cells. PMID:25429648

  14. SPDEF is required for mouse pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and regulates a network of genes associated with mucus production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Korfhagen, Thomas R.; Xu, Yan; Kitzmiller, Joseph; Wert, Susan E.; Maeda, Yutaka; Gregorieff, Alexander; Clevers, Hans; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Various acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli increase the number and activity of pulmonary mucus-producing goblet cells, and goblet cell hyperplasia and excess mucus production are central to the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases. However, little is known about the transcriptional programs that regulate goblet cell differentiation. Here, we show that SAM-pointed domain–containing Ets-like factor (SPDEF) controls a transcriptional program critical for pulmonary goblet cell differentiation in mice. Initial cell-lineage–tracing analysis identified nonciliated secretory epithelial cells, known as Clara cells, as the progenitors of goblet cells induced by pulmonary allergen exposure in vivo. Furthermore, in vivo expression of SPDEF in Clara cells caused rapid and reversible goblet cell differentiation in the absence of cell proliferation. This was associated with enhanced expression of genes regulating goblet cell differentiation and protein glycosylation, including forkhead box A3 (Foxa3), anterior gradient 2 (Agr2), and glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 3, mucin type (Gcnt3). Consistent with these findings, levels of SPDEF and FOXA3 were increased in mouse goblet cells after sensitization with pulmonary allergen, and the proteins were colocalized in goblet cells lining the airways of patients with chronic lung diseases. Deletion of the mouse Spdef gene resulted in the absence of goblet cells in tracheal/laryngeal submucosal glands and in the conducting airway epithelium after pulmonary allergen exposure in vivo. These data show that SPDEF plays a critical role in regulating a transcriptional network mediating the goblet cell differentiation and mucus hyperproduction associated with chronic pulmonary disorders. PMID:19759516

  15. New developments in goblet cell mucus secretion and function

    PubMed Central

    Birchenough, George M.H.; Johansson, Malin E.V.; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Bergström, Joakim H.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2015-01-01

    Goblet cells and their main secretory product, mucus, have long been poorly appreciated; however, recent discoveries have changed this and placed these cells at the center stage of our understanding of mucosal biology and the immunology of the intestinal tract. The mucus system differs substantially between the small and large intestine, although it is built around MUC2 mucin polymers in both cases. Furthermore, that goblet cells and the regulation of their secretion also differ between these two parts of the intestine is of fundamental importance for a better understanding of mucosal immunology. There are several types of goblet cell which can be delineated based on their location and function. The surface colonic goblet cells secrete continuously to maintain the inner mucus layer, whereas goblet cells of the colonic and small intestinal crypts secrete upon stimulation, for example after endocytosis or in response to acetyl choline. However, despite much progress in recent years our understanding of goblet cell function and regulation is still in its infancy. PMID:25872481

  16. Interaction of tobacco smoke exposure and ovalbumin-sensitization promotes goblet cell and submucosal gland metaplasia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pavuluri, Suresh; Hanus, Veronica; Bergren, Dale R

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to irritants such as tobacco smoke (TS) causes acute airway inflammation. Chronic exposure may cause airway remodeling contributing to enhanced airway resistance. We hypothesize that combining airway sensitization and inhalation of irritants enhances the number of mucous producing cells beyond either agent alone. Guinea pigs were antigen sensitized or treated with its vehicle. These two groups were further divided into daily exposure to TS or air. After 3 months airway reactivity to ovalbumin (OA) was determined, airway and blood samples were examined and lung substance P quantified. Combining sensitization and TS exposure increased airway reactivity to OA, goblet cell and submucosal gland populations. Airway eosinophilia was greatest in the OA-sensitized group exposed to air rather than with its combination with TS exposure. Lung substance P levels were similarly elevated in both OA-sensitized groups. Airway irritant exposure in which airway sensitization exists enhances the potential of mucus production, airway resistance and mucus plugging of the airways through increasing the number of goblet cells and submucosal glands. PMID:23933030

  17. Entrapment of Conjunctival Goblet Cells by Desiccation-Induced Cornification

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Cintia Sade; Li, De-Quan; Farley, William Johnson; Henriksson, Johanna Tukler; Bergmanson, Jan Per Gustav; Pflugfelder, Stephen Carl

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of desiccating stress on conjunctival goblet cell density and morphology and the expression of cornified envelope precursors by the ocular surface epithelia. Methods. Experimental dry eye (EDE) was created in C57BL/6 mice. Real-time PCR evaluated the expression of cornified envelope (CE) precursor proteins (involucrin and small proline-rich [Sprr] -1a, -1b, -2a, -2b, -2f, and -2g proteins), the cross-linking transglutaminase 1 enzyme (Tg-1) and Muc5AC mRNA transcripts by the ocular surface epithelia. Laser scanning confocal microscopy evaluated the expression of the CE precursor proteins Tg-1 and Muc5AC in cryosections. Tg-1 activity was measured by a fluorescein cadaverine assay. Muc5AC concentration was measured by ELISA. Results. Levels of involucrin; Sprr-1a, -1b, -2a, -2b, -2f, and -2g; and Tg1–1 mRNA transcripts in ocular surface tissues increased in response to desiccating stress. Expression and activity of Tg in the conjunctiva markedly increased after EDE. Desiccating stress caused progressive loss of mucin-filled goblet cells. The apical portion of the remaining conjunctival goblet cells became entrapped by adjacent stratified apical epithelia expressing increased levels of cornified envelope precursors. Conclusions. Exposure to desiccating stress stimulates ocular surface epithelia to produce cornified envelope precursors and the tissue transglutaminase enzyme that cross-links them. This effect is accompanied by loss of mucin-filled goblet cells and entrapment of mucin contents in the remaining ones by cornifying cells that block the egress of mucin contents to the ocular surface. This mechanism may contribute to the conjunctival mucin deficiency that develops in dry eye. PMID:21421863

  18. SAM pointed domain ETS factor (SPDEF) regulates terminal differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, Taeko K.; Kazanjian, Avedis; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH ; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-02-01

    Background and Aims: SPDEF (also termed PDEF or PSE) is an ETS family transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the prostate and goblet cell hyperplasia in the lung. Spdef has been reported to be expressed in the intestine. In this paper, we identify an important role for Spdef in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and differentiation. Methods: SPDEF expression was inhibited in colon cancer cells to determine its ability to control goblet cell gene activation. The effects of transgenic expression of Spdef on intestinal differentiation and homeostasis were determined. Results: In LS174T colon cancer cells treated with Notch/{gamma}-secretase inhibitor to activate goblet cell gene expression, shRNAs that inhibited SPDEF also repressed expression of goblet cell genes AGR2, MUC2, RETLNB, and SPINK4. Transgenic expression of Spdef caused the expansion of intestinal goblet cells and corresponding reduction in Paneth, enteroendocrine, and absorptive enterocytes. Spdef inhibited proliferation of intestinal crypt cells without induction of apoptosis. Prolonged expression of the Spdef transgene caused a progressive reduction in the number of crypts that expressed Spdef, consistent with its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Conclusions: Spdef was sufficient to inhibit proliferation of intestinal progenitors and induce differentiation into goblet cells; SPDEF was required for activation of goblet cell associated genes in vitro. These data support a model in which Spdef promotes terminal differentiation into goblet cells of a common goblet/Paneth progenitor.

  19. Transition between columnar absorptive cells and goblet cells in the rat jejunal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kurosumi, K; Shibuichi, I; Tosaka, H

    1981-11-01

    Electron microscopic observation of the jejunal epithelium of rats demonstrated morphological evidence of a transition between columnar absorptive cells and growing goblet cells. The columnar cells in both the villi and crypts have features suggestive of absorptive functions. They are provided with apical invaginations continuous to the intermicrovillous space. Absorbed lipid is observed in small vesicles in the terminal web layer, and chylomicrons derived here from are contained in large vacuoles near the Golgi apparatus. Ferritin particles artificially infused into the gut lumen were absorbed into the vacuoles in the subapical zone of columnar cells of suckling rats. Growing goblet cells situated in the crypt epithelium contain surface invaginations and lysosomes which are the same in structure as those found in absorptive cells nearby. Fat droplets evidently absorbed by the growing goblet cell were observed among immature mucus droplets. Artificially infused ferritin particles were found in vacuoles and lysosomes near the Golgi apparatus of some goblet cells of suckling rats. Some goblet cells on the intestinal villi of suckling rats looked immature and their microvilli and cytoplasmic matrix were clear like those of columnar absorptive cells. The transition between these goblet cells with clear cytoplasm and the mature goblet cells with dark cytoplasm was observed. These morphological evidences indicate that some of columnar cells already differentiated to absorptive cells are capable of transforming into mucus-producing (goblet) cells. It is suggested that not only undifferentiated columnar cells in the crypt base but also considerably differentiated columnar cells with absorptive function can differentiate into goblet cells. PMID:7325782

  20. Human colonic goblet cells. Demonstration of distinct subpopulations defined by mucin-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, D K; Fournier, D A; Lynch, K E

    1986-01-01

    We studied glycoprotein content of human colonic goblet cells, using a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against purified human colonic mucin (HCM). Using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), we found that 17 of 23 anti-HCM MAbs stained some or all goblet cells of normal human colonic mucosa. We observed a variety of cellular staining patterns, including (a) diffuse (homogeneous) staining of intracellular mucin, (b) speckled (inhomogeneous) staining of mucin droplets, (c) peripheral staining of intracellular droplets, (d) cytoplasmic staining of goblet cells, and (e) apical (luminal) surface staining. Staining patterns were not associated with particular HCM species. In addition to variable patterns of IIF within individual cells, anti-HCM MAbs varied in the proportion of goblet cells stained. Some MAbs stained all goblet cells, while others stained a limited number of goblet cells. Although each goblet cell contained more than one type mucin, HCM species III, and IV and V appeared to exist in mutually exclusive goblet cell populations and it was possible to define at least seven subpopulations of goblet cells in colonic mucosa by their content of various combinations of HCM species. Anti-HCM MAbs stained goblet cells from other sites within the gastrointestinal tract to a varying extent. Anti-HCM MAbs also showed extensive cross-reactivity with rodent, rabbit, and monkey colonic mucosa. However, several anti-HCM MAbs stained only human colonic mucosa. These data show that human colonic mucosa contains discrete subpopulations of goblet cells that produce distinctive combinations of specific mucin glycoprotein species. Images PMID:2420829

  1. Ultrastructural characterization of goblet-shaped particles from the cell wall of Flexibacter polymorphus.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, H F

    1977-09-01

    The ultrastructure of submicroscopic goblet-shaped particles ("goblets') from the cell wall of the marine-gliding microbe Flexibacter polymorphus was investigated. The goblets, which were partially purified by CsCl density-gradient centrifugation, were rich in protein, exhibiting a single absorption maximum in the ultraviolet at about 276 nm; they also contained a small amount of carbohydrate. As determined by electron microscopy, goblets negatively contrasted with ammonium molybdate were about 30 nm in diameter by 36 nm in length. When viewed in profile, each apparently consisted of five morphologically distinct kinds of components: the C-1, C-2, and C-3 subunits which formed the cup-shaped moiety of the goblet; a globular base unit; and a tubular stem-like structure connecting the cup with the base unit. In addition, a long fiber emerged from the interior of some goblets. The fine structural evidence suggested that goblets may be constructed from three stacked subunit rings (each composed of repeating C-1, C-2, or C-3 protomers) arranged concentrically. X-ray images of a clay model closely resembled electron micrographs of negatively stained goblets; thereby lending support to the proposed structure. It is speculated that goblets function in vivo as macromolecular pores through the outer membrane which mediate extrusion of extracellular fibers, possibly of importance in gliding motility or in attachment of cells to solid surfaces. PMID:907917

  2. Differential inhibitory effects of opioids on cigarette smoke, capsaicin and electrically-induced goblet cell secretion in guinea-pig trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, H. P.; Rohde, J. A.; Barnes, P. J.; Rogers, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    1. Goblet cell secretion in guinea-pig airways is under neural control. Opioids have previously been shown to inhibit neurogenic plasma exudation and bronchoconstriction in guinea-pig airways. We have now examined the effects of morphine and opioid peptides on tracheal goblet cell secretion induced by either electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus nerves, exogenous capsaicin, or acute inhalation of cigarette smoke. The degree of goblet cell secretion was determined by a morphometric method and expressed as a mucus score which is inversely related to mucus discharge. 2. Morphine, 1 mg kg-1, completely blocked goblet cell secretion induced by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves. Morphine also inhibited the response to cigarette smoke given either at a low dose (10 breaths of 1:10 diluted in air), which principally activates cholinergic nerves, or at a high dose (20 breaths of undiluted), which activates capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves, by 100% and 73% respectively. In contrast, morphine had no significant inhibitory effect on capsaicin-induced goblet cell secretion. The inhibitory effect of morphine was reversed by naloxone. 3. Selective mu- or delta-opioid receptor agonists, [D-Ala2, NMePhe4, Glyol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) or [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE) respectively, caused a dose-related inhibition of low dose cigarette smoke-induced goblet cell discharge, with DPDPE more potent than DAMGO. A kappa-receptor agonist, trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrollidinyl)cyclohexyl) benzeneacetamine (U-50,488H), had no inhibitory effect. DPDPE had no inhibitory effect on goblet cell secretion induced by exogenous methacholine. 4. DAMGO dose-dependently blocked the response to high dose cigarette smoke with a maximal inhibition of 95% at 2 x 10(-7) mol kg-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1373100

  3. Goblet cell types in intestine of tiger barb and black tetra (Cyprinidae, Characidae: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Leknes, I L

    2014-10-01

    Histochemical properties of goblet cells in intestine of a stomach-less teleost, tiger barb (Puntius tetrazona), and a stomach-containing teleost, black tetra (Gymnocorymbus ternetzi), are described and compared. The intestine goblet cells were mostly wide in both species, but in tiger barb, some of them were markedly thinner. In black tetra, all the intestine goblet cells displayed magenta colour after PAS, whereas in the tiger barb, only the thinner goblet cells displayed such affinity. The latter cell type was coloured strongly magenta when the tissue was treated with alcian blue (pH 2.5) followed by PAS, whereas the wide goblet cells in tiger barb and all goblet cells in black tetra displayed mainly a blue colour after such treatment. Further, the goblet cells in both species were coloured cleanly blue after high iron diamine followed by alcian blue (pH 2.5). The intestine goblet cells in both species displayed a moderate affinity to WGA and concanavalin A lectins and no affinity to DBA. Most of the goblet cells displayed no affinity to PNA, but some of them in the tiger barb displayed a moderate or strong affinity to this lectin. The affinity to WGA was somewhat strengthened after pre-treatment with neuraminidase. These results suggest that tiger barb contains two types or variants of intestinal goblet cells: high numbers of wide cells filled by acidic, non-sulphated mucin and some thinner cells filled by neutral mucin. The intestine goblet cells in black tetra were filled by variable amounts of neutral and acidic mucin, but the total number of such cells is much less than in tiger barb. The present lectin and neuraminidase results suggest that the intestinal mucins in both species contain significant amounts of N-acetylglucosamine, sialic acid and glucose/mannose, but seem to lack N-acetylgalactosamine. However, some of these cells in tiger barb contain moderate to large amounts of galactose. Together, these results suggest significant species

  4. Interleukin-13 induces goblet cell differentiation in primary cell culture from Guinea pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mitsuko; Tamaoki, Jun; Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Nakata, Junko; Nagai, Atsushi

    2002-11-01

    The Th2 cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, bind to IL-4Ralpha, and cause goblet cell metaplasia/hyperplasia with increased mucin expression in vivo. However, there is not enough evidence that these cytokines directly induce mucin production in vitro. In this study, primary epithelial cells from guinea pig trachea were cultured at an air-liquid interface, and immediately after achieving confluence at Day 7 they were treated with human recombinant IL-4 or IL-13 for 14 d. IL-13-treated cells consisted of a large number of fully mature goblet cells with a smaller number of ciliated cells. Secretory granules of the goblet cells were positive for both periodic acid-Schiff and toluidine blue, and showed exocytosis. By contrast, IL-4 failed to induce goblet cell differentiation. The electric resistances of IL-13-treated cells were lower than those of IL-4-treated cells and nontreated cells, suggesting leaky epithelia. MUC5AC protein level in cell lysates measured by ELISA was several-fold higher in IL-13-treated cells than in nontreated cells, whereas the level in IL-4-treated cells was not changed. These data suggest that human recombinant IL-13, but not IL-4, can induce differentiation into mature goblet cells that produce MUC5AC protein in guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. PMID:12397012

  5. Effects of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor on LPS-induced goblet cell metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Je Hyeong; Lee, Sung Yong; Bak, Sang Myeon; Suh, In Bum; Lee, Sang Yeub; Shin, Chol; Shim, Jae Jeong; In, Kwang Ho; Kang, Kyung Ho; Yoo, Se Hwa

    2004-07-01

    Bacterial infections of the lung are known to induce inflammatory responses, which lead to mucus hypersecretion. Moreover, mucin synthesis in the airways has been reported to be regulated by neutrophilic inflammation-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and its activation. Furthermore, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP-9, have been reported to promote the transmigration of activated neutrophils. In this study, we investigated the associations between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced goblet cell (GC) metaplasia and EGFR expression and the effects of MMP inhibitor (MMPI). Various concentrations of LPS were instilled into the tracheas of pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats, and airways were examined at different times after LPS instillation. To examine the role of MMP-9, we treated rats 3 days before LPS instillation and daily thereafter with MMPI. Neutrophilic infiltration, Alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff (AB/PAS) staining, and immunohistochemical staining for MUC5AC, EGFR, and MMP-9 were performed. The instillation of LPS increased AB/PAS and MUC5AC staining in time- and dose-dependent manners, and treatment with MMPI significantly prevented GC metaplasia. The instillation of LPS into the trachea also induced neutrophilic infiltration and EGFR and MMP-9 expression in the airway epithelium, and MMPI was found to significantly prevent neutrophil recruitment, GC metaplasia, and EGFR and MMP-9 expression. This study demonstrates that the MMP-9 and EGFR cascades are associated with LPS-induced mucus hypersecretion. PMID:15020297

  6. IL-4/IL-13 independent goblet cell hyperplasia in experimental helminth infections

    PubMed Central

    Marillier, Reece G; Michels, Chesney; Smith, Elizabeth M; Fick, Lizette CE; Leeto, Mosiuoa; Dewals, Benjamin; Horsnell, William GC; Brombacher, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucus production by hyperplasic goblet cells is a striking pathological feature of many parasitic helminth infections and is related to intestinal protection and worm expulsion. Induction of goblet cell hyperplasia is associated with TH2 immune responses, which in helminth infections are controlled primarily by IL-13, and also IL-4. In the study presented here we examine the goblet cell hyperplasic response to three experimental parasitic helminth infections; namely Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia obvelata and Schistosoma mansoni. Results As expected N. brasiliensis infection induced a strong goblet cell hyperplasia dependent on IL-4/IL-13/IL-4Rα expression. In contrast, and despite previously published transiently elevated IL-4/IL-13 levels, S. obvelata infections did not increase goblet cell hyperplasia in the colon. Furthermore, induction of goblet cell hyperplasia in response to S. mansoni eggs traversing the intestine was equivalent between BALB/c, IL-4/IL-13-/- and IL-4Rα-/- mice. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia can be independent of TH2 immune responses associated with parasitic helminth infections. PMID:18373844

  7. Stimulation of proteolytic digestion by intestinal goblet cell mucus.

    PubMed

    Shora, W; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1975-03-01

    Intestinal goblet cell mucus (GCM) was added to incubations of casein and trypsin (or chymotrypsin) to discover whether mucus could inhibit proteolysis. Contrary to expectation, GCM stimulated casein hydrolysis, reaching a maximum effect at a GCM to casein ratio (w/w) of 0.083. GCM did not contain proteolytic enzymes or proenzymes as contaminants, nor did GCM serve as a substrate for trypsin. Stimulation was not reduced by removing 85% of the sialic acid from GCM. Harsh physical treatment (boiling and freezing) of casein decreased (50%) the GCM effect, as did partial predigestion of casein by trypsin, and elevation of trypsin concentration beyond 3 mug per ml. Thus the undegraded structure of casein appeared to be important for the stimulation of proteolysis by GCM. GCM also enhanced the hydrolysis by trypsin of intestinal brush border membrane protein, but had no effect on the hydrolysis of hemoglobin, albumin, or benzoyl arginine ethyl ester. These results suggest that GCM reacts with specific substrates, in a fashion which promotes their digestion by trypsin or chymotrypsin. PMID:1112451

  8. Interaction of IFN-γ with Cholinergic Agonists to Modulate Rat and Human Goblet Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    García-Posadas, L; Hodges, RR; Li, D; Shatos, MA; Storr-Paulsen, T; Diebold, Y; Dartt, DA

    2015-01-01

    Goblet cells populate wet-surfaced mucosa including the conjunctiva of the eye, intestine, and nose, among others. These cells function as part of the innate immune system by secreting high molecular weight mucins that interact with environmental constituents including pathogens, allergens, and particulate pollutants. Herein we determined whether IFN-γ, a Th1 cytokine increased in dry eye, alters goblet cell function. Goblet cells from rat and human conjunctiva were cultured. Changes in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i), high molecular weight glycoconjugate secretion, and proliferation were measured after stimulation with IFN-γ with or without the cholinergic agonist carbachol. IFN-γ itself increased [Ca2+]i in rat and human goblet cells and prevented the increase in [Ca2+]i caused by carbachol. Carbachol prevented IFN-γ-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i. This cross-talk between IFN-γ and muscarinic receptors may be partially due to use of the same Ca2+i reservoirs, but also from interaction of signaling pathways proximal to the increase in [Ca2+]i. IFN-γ blocked carbachol-induced high molecular weight glycoconjugate secretion and reduced goblet cell proliferation. We conclude that increased levels of IFN-γ in dry eye disease could explain the lack of goblet cells and mucin deficiency typically found in this pathology. IFN-γ could also function similarly in respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:26129651

  9. Detection and density estimation of goblet cells in confocal endoscopy for the evaluation of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Boschetto, D; Mirzaei, H; Leong, R W L; Grisan, E

    2015-08-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy, diagnosed in the clinical practice by intestinal biopsy and the concomitant presence of a positive celiac serology. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) allows skilled and trained experts to potentially perform in vivo virtual histology of small-bowel mucosa. In particular, it allows the qualitative evaluation of mucosa alteration such as a decrease in goblet cells density, presence of villous atrophy or crypt hypertrophy. We present a semi-automatic computer-based method for the detection of goblet cells from confocal endoscopy images, whose density changes in case of pathological tissue. After a manual selection of a suitable region of interest, the candidate columnar and goblet cells' centers are first detected and the cellular architecture is estimated from their position using a Voronoi diagram. The region within each Voronoi cell is then analyzed and classified as goblet cell or other. The results suggest that our method is able to detect and label goblet cells immersed in a columnar epithelium in a fast, reliable and automatic way. Accepting 0.44 false positives per image, we obtain a sensitivity value of 90.3%. Furthermore, estimated and real goblet cell densities are comparable (error: 9.7 ± 16.9%, correlation: 87.2%, R(2) = 76%). PMID:26737720

  10. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12–13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6–11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  11. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12-13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6-11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human and Rat Conjunctival Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGilligan, Victoria E.; Gregory-Ksander, Meredith S.; Li, Dayu; Moore, Jonathan E.; Hodges, Robin R.; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The conjunctiva is a moist mucosal membrane that is constantly exposed to an array of potential pathogens and triggers of inflammation. The NACHT, leucine rich repeat (LRR), and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) is a Nod-like receptor that can sense pathogens or other triggers, and is highly expressed in wet mucosal membranes. NLRP3 is a member of the multi-protein complex termed the NLRP3 inflammasome that activates the caspase 1 pathway, inducing the secretion of biologically active IL-1β, a major initiator and promoter of inflammation. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine whether NLRP3 is expressed in the conjunctiva and (2) determine whether goblet cells specifically contribute to innate mediated inflammation via secretion of IL-1β. We report that the receptors known to be involved in the priming and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, the purinergic receptors P2X4 and P2X7 and the bacterial Toll-like receptor 2 are present and functional in conjunctival goblet cells. Toxin-containing Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, increased the expression of the inflammasome proteins NLRP3, ASC and pro- and mature caspase 1 in conjunctival goblet cells. The biologically active form of IL-1β was detected in goblet cell culture supernatants in response to S. aureus, which was reduced when the cells were treated with the caspase 1 inhibitor Z-YVAD. We conclude that the NLRP3 inflammasome components are present in conjunctival goblet cells. The NRLP3 inflammasome appears to be activated in conjunctival goblet cells by toxin-containing S. aureus via the caspase 1 pathway to secrete mature IL1-β. Thus goblet cells contribute to the innate immune response in the conjunctiva by activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:24040145

  13. Sox2 Is Required for Maintenance and Differentiation of Bronchiolar Clara, Ciliated, and Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Wert, Susan E.; Keiser, Angela R.; Smith, April N.; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    The bronchioles of the murine lung are lined by a simple columnar epithelium composed of ciliated, Clara, and goblet cells that together mediate barrier function, mucociliary clearance and innate host defense, vital for pulmonary homeostasis. In the present work, we demonstrate that expression of Sox2 in Clara cells is required for the differentiation of ciliated, Clara, and goblet cells that line the bronchioles of the postnatal lung. The gene was selectively deleted in Clara cells utilizing Scgb1a1-Cre, causing the progressive loss of Sox2 in the bronchioles during perinatal and postnatal development. The rate of bronchiolar cell proliferation was decreased and associated with the formation of an undifferentiated, cuboidal-squamous epithelium lacking the expression of markers of Clara cells (Scgb1a1), ciliated cells (FoxJ1 and α-tubulin), and goblet cells (Spdef and Muc5AC). By adulthood, bronchiolar cell numbers were decreased and Sox2 was absent in extensive regions of the bronchiolar epithelium, at which time residual Sox2 expression was primarily restricted to selective niches of CGRP staining neuroepithelial cells. Allergen-induced goblet cell differentiation and mucus production was absent in the respiratory epithelium lacking Sox2. In vitro, Sox2 activated promoter-luciferase reporter constructs for differentiation markers characteristic of Clara, ciliated, and goblet cells, Scgb1a1, FoxJ1, and Agr2, respectively. Sox2 physically interacted with Smad3 and inhibited TGF-β1/Smad3-mediated transcriptional activity in vitro, a pathway that negatively regulates proliferation. Sox2 is required for proliferation and differentiation of Clara cells that serve as the progenitor cells from which Clara, ciliated, and goblet cells are derived. PMID:20011520

  14. Effect of topical rebamipide on conjunctival goblet cell recovery after vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kumiko; Takashima, Yuko; Matsunaga, Koichi; Sugimoto, Masahiko; Matsubara, Hisashi; Hirano, Koji; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that topical rebamipide will increase the number of goblet cells in the bulbar conjunctiva. The purpose of this study was to determine whether topical rebamipide will enhance the recovery of conjunctival goblet cells that were damaged during vitrectomy. Forty patients who underwent vitrectomy surgery were studied. The 40 patients consisted of 20 with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 20 patients without DM. They were randomized in a 1:1 ratio into groups that were treated or not treated with topical 2% rebamipide after the surgery. Impression cytology was performed at the end of surgery and at 14 days after the surgery. The mean goblet cell density of each specimen was determined by averaging the total number of goblet cells obtained from three consecutive high magnification microscopic images. In patients without DM, the mean goblet cell density at 14 days after the vitrectomy was significantly higher in eyes with topical rebemipide than in eyes without rebemipide (P < 0.01). In patients with DM, a similar tendency was observed but the difference was not significant (P = 0.09). These results suggest that topical rebamipide can be helpful in patients with globlet cell damage that occur during and after vitrectomy. PMID:26762482

  15. Natural anti-intestinal goblet cell autoantibody production from marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Daiju; Asano, Masanao; Shinton, Susan A; Brill-Dashoff, Joni; Formica, Anthony M; Velcich, Anna; Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-15

    Expression of a germline VH3609/D/JH2 IgH in mice results in the generation of B1 B cells with anti-thymocyte/Thy-1 glycoprotein autoreactivity by coexpression of Vk21-5/Jk2 L chain leading to production of serum IgM natural autoantibody. In these same mice, the marginal zone (MZ) B cell subset in spleen shows biased usage of a set of Ig L chains different from B1 B cells, with 30% having an identical Vk19-17/Jk1 L chain rearrangement. This VH3609/Vk19-17 IgM is reactive with intestinal goblet cell granules, binding to the intact large polymatrix form of mucin 2 glycoprotein secreted by goblet cells. Analysis of a μκ B cell AgR (BCR) transgenic (Tg) mouse with this anti-goblet cell/mucin2 autoreactive (AGcA) specificity demonstrates that immature B cells expressing the Tg BCR become MZ B cells in spleen by T cell-independent BCR signaling. These Tg B cells produce AGcA as the predominant serum IgM, but without enteropathy. Without the transgene, AGcA autoreactivity is low but detectable in the serum of BALB/c and C.B17 mice, and this autoantibody is specifically produced by the MZ B cell subset. Thus, our findings reveal that AGcA is a natural autoantibody associated with MZ B cells. PMID:25480561

  16. Irreversible bronchial goblet cell metaplasia in hamsters with elastase-induced panacinar emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, T G; Korthy, A L; Snider, G L; Hayes, J A

    1977-01-01

    A single intratracheal instillation of pancreatic elastase in hamsters induces a lesion resembling human panacinar emphysema. This paper reports the occurrence of irreversible goblet cell metaplasia in the bronchial epithelium of hamsters similarly exposed to elastase. The goblet cell change was dose related; a dose of 0.1 mg/100 g body wt or less at 16 days, produced slight or moderate goblet cell metaplasia in fewer than half the animals, whereas 84% of animals treated with a dose between 0.2 and 0.5 mg/100 g body wt developed goblet cell metaplastic lesions, more than half of which were considered to be severe. The percentage of goblet cells in the epithelium of elastase-treated hamsters (32.5) was significantly higher (P less than 0.005) than that of unexposed (12.2) and saline-exposed controls (18.7). All hamsters examined 6 and 12 mo after elastase treatment showed the lesion. The pathogenesis of the changes is unclear but the possibility is raised that the bronchial changes may be due to disturbance of an endogenous protease-antiprotease system. The findings suggest the hypothesis that, under appropriate circumstances, a single pulmonary insult in man could lead to a permanent lung injury demonstrating the anatomic lesions of both chronic bronchitis and panacinar emphysema. Images PMID:838856

  17. Production of 3-D Airway Organoids From Primary Human Airway Basal Cells and Their Use in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Hild, Marc; Jaffe, Aron B

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human airway basal cells to serve as progenitor cells in the conducting airway makes them an attractive target in a number of respiratory diseases associated with epithelial remodeling. This unit describes a protocol for the culture of 'bronchospheres', three-dimensional (3-D) organoids that are derived from primary human airway basal cells. Mature bronchospheres are composed of functional multi-ciliated cells, mucin-producing goblet cells, and airway basal cells. In contrast to existing methods used for the culture of well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells, bronchospheres do not require growth on a permeable support and can be cultured in 384-well assay plates. The system provides a mechanism for investigating the regulation of basal cell fate during airway epithelial morphogenesis, as well as a basis for studying the function of the human airway epithelium in high-throughput assays. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27171795

  18. Wakayama symposium: role of canonical Notch signaling in conjucntival goblet cell differentiation and dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Yang

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes a recent finding regarding the intrinsic canonical Notch signaling pathway in regulating normal ocular surface morphogenesis and its role in the pathogenesis of goblet cell deficiency-associated keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS, or dry eye). Specifically, we used novel transgenic mice to investigate the mechanism of how the Notch1 activation may serve as the upstream control of expression of transcription factors Krüppel-like factors 4 or 5 (Klf4 or Klf5) which in turn controls goblet cell differentiation and activates mucin 5/ac synthesis during ocular surface morphogenesis. PMID:26818247

  19. Gastric mucous neck cell and intestinal goblet cell phenotypes in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, N R; Bhathal, P S

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phenotype of cells comprising diffuse and intestinal-type gastric cancers using monoclonal antibodies to two antigens. One antigen (designated D10) is characteristic of gastric mucous neck cells, cardiac glands, pyloric glands, and Brunner's glands. The second antigen (designated 17NM) is specific to the mucous vacuole of intestinal goblet cells. METHODS: Thirty two gastrectomy specimens with adenocarcinoma were studied. Serial paraffin sections were stained immunohistochemically for D10 and 17NM and histochemically for acid and neutral mucins. The cancers were classified histologically as of either diffuse or intestinal type according to Lauren. RESULTS: Of 15 diffuse-type gastric carcinomas, 11 showed the majority of cancer cells staining for D10 while four were typical signet ring cell cancers staining predominantly for 17NM; five tumours displayed both phenotypes with the two phenotypes segregated in different areas of the tumours. In contrast, of 16 intestinal-type cancers, six expressed 17NM, three D10, five neither antigen, and two expressed both antigens. One indeterminate-type cancer expressed both antigens. The staining of individual cells for D10 and 17NM was mutually exclusive in both diffuse and intestinal types. In contrast to the diffuse cancers, intestinal-type cancers typically expressed either antigen only in occasional small groups of cells and individual cells. CONCLUSIONS: In disease, the gastric stem cell can assume the capacity of the duodenal stem cell for divergent differentiation into either intestinal goblet cells (for example, as in intestinal metaplasia) or Brunner's gland cells (for example, as in pyloric gland/Brunner's gland metaplasia). With neoplastic transformation, this potential for divergent differentiation is maintained and gives rise to diffuse-type cancers that display either the D10 phenotype, the 17NM phenotype, or the clonal expression of both phenotypes. In the more cell cohesive (intestinal

  20. Aqueous Tear Deficiency Increases Conjunctival Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) Expression and Goblet Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Moore, Quianta L.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Li, De-Quan; Gumus, Koray; Zaheer, Mahira L.; Corrales, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the hypothesis that increased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) expression is associated with conjunctival goblet cell loss in subjects with tear dysfunction. Methods Goblet cell density (GCD) was measured in impression cytology from the temporal bulbar conjunctiva, and gene expression was measured in cytology samples from the nasal bulbar conjunctiva obtained from 68 subjects, including normal control, meibomian gland disease (MGD), non-Sjögren syndrome (non-SSATD)-, and Sjögren syndrome (SSATD)-associated aqueous tear deficiency. Gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. Tear meniscus height (TMH) was measured by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein and lissamine green dye staining evaluated corneal and conjunctival disease, respectively. Between-group mean differences and correlation coefficients were calculated. Results Compared to control, IFN-γ expression was significantly higher in both ATD groups, and its receptor was higher in SSATD. Expression of IL-13 and its receptor was similar in all groups. Goblet cell density was lower in the SSATD group; expression of MUC5AC mucin was lower and cornified envelope precursor small proline-rich region (SPRR)-2G higher in both ATD groups. Interferon-γ transcript number was inversely correlated with GCD (r = −0.37, P < 0.04) and TMH (r = −0.37, P = 0.02), and directly correlated with lissamine green staining (r = 0.51, P < 0.001) and SPRR-2G expression (r = 0.32, P < 0.05). Conclusions Interferon-γ expression in the conjunctiva was higher in aqueous deficiency and correlated with goblet cell loss and severity of conjunctival disease. These results support findings of animal and culture studies showing that IFN-γ reduces conjunctival goblet cell number and mucin production. PMID:26618646

  1. Spontaneous remission of edema and regranulation of goblet cells in rat tracheae after capsaicin-induced acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Jang; Wang, Di-Seng; Huang, Hung-Tu

    2003-03-01

    Previous studies have investigated the short-term effect of capsaicin on edema formation and goblet-cell secretion in the trachea. The present study sought to investigate the long-term effect of a high dose of capsaicin (90 micro g/ml/kg), administered intravenously, on changes in the formation of endothelial gaps among venular endothelial cells, mucosal tissue edema and the secretory activity of goblet cells, including the number and size of goblet cells, and the mucus score and secretory ratio of goblet-cell mucus secretion in the trachea of rats. The tracheal whole mounts with silver staining, those stained with chloroacetate esterase reagent and Alcian blue and tracheal tissue sections stained with Alcian blue and periodic acid-Schiff reagent were used for evaluation. Formation of endothelial gaps occurred a few min after administration of capsaicin, and gaps almost closed within 12 min after capsaicin injection. Five min after capsaicin, the leaky blood vessels were numerous and the subepithelial edema ratio (% of length of edema along the inner circumference of tracheal cross section) was found to be 57.8+/-3.0% ( n=6). The number of Alcian blue-positive goblet cells (1,090+/-220 per mm(2) of mucosal surface) was reduced to half the number of goblet cells in the vehicle-treated rats (2,200+/-230). The mucus score of goblet cell secretion was not changed. The secretory ratio was greatly increased. One day after capsaicin, the edema ratio remained large and the number of Alcian blue-positive goblet cells was also small. The mucus score was also not changed. The secretory ratio was still large. On day 3, the edema ratio remained large, but the number of Alcian blue-positive goblet cells was increased to the level of the controls. The mucus score and secretory ratio returned to the control level. On day 5, the edema ratio was greatly decreased, but it was still significantly larger than that of the controls. The mucus score and secretory ratio remained at the

  2. Autophagy proteins control goblet cell function by potentiating reactive oxygen species production

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Khushbu K; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Beatty, Wandy L; Head, Richard D; Malvin, Nicole P; Cadwell, Ken; Guan, Jun-Lin; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Seglen, Per O; Dinauer, Mary C; Virgin, Herbert W; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of granule contents to epithelial surfaces by secretory cells is a critical physiologic process. In the intestine, goblet cells secrete mucus that is required for homeostasis. Autophagy proteins are required for secretion in some cases, though the mechanism and cell biological basis for this requirement remain unknown. We found that in colonic goblet cells, proteins involved in initiation and elongation of autophagosomes were required for efficient mucus secretion. The autophagy protein LC3 localized to intracellular multi-vesicular vacuoles that were consistent with a fusion of autophagosomes and endosomes. Using cultured intestinal epithelial cells, we found that NADPH oxidases localized to and enhanced the formation of these LC3-positive vacuoles. Both autophagy proteins and endosome formation were required for maximal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidases. Importantly, generation of ROS was critical to control mucin granule accumulation in colonic goblet cells. Thus, autophagy proteins can control secretory function through ROS, which is in part generated by LC3-positive vacuole-associated NADPH oxidases. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which autophagy proteins can control secretion. PMID:24185898

  3. A sentinel goblet cell guards the colonic crypt by triggering Nlrp6-dependent Muc2 secretion.

    PubMed

    Birchenough, George M H; Nyström, Elisabeth E L; Johansson, Malin E V; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2016-06-24

    Innate immune signaling pathways contribute to the protection of host tissue when bacterially challenged. Colonic goblet cells are responsible for generating the two mucus layers that physically separate the luminal microbiota from the host epithelium. Analysis of colonic tissues from multiple mouse strains allowed us to identify a "sentinel" goblet cell (senGC) localized to the colonic crypt entrance. This cell nonspecifically endocytoses and reacts to the TLR2/1, TLR4, and TLR5 ligands by activating the Nlrp6 inflammasome downstream of TLR- and MyD88-dependent Nox/Duox reactive oxygen species synthesis. This triggers calcium ion-dependent compound exocytosis of Muc2 mucin from the senGC and generates an intercellular gap junction signal; in turn, this signal induces Muc2 secretion from adjacent goblet cells in the upper crypt, which expels bacteria. Thus, senGCs guard and protect the colonic crypt from bacterial intruders that have penetrated the inner mucus layer. PMID:27339979

  4. Ambient Levels of Air Pollution Induce Goblet-Cell Hyperplasia in Human Conjunctival Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Novaes, Priscila; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilário; Kara-José, Newton; Macchione, Mariângela; Matsuda, Monique; Racca, Lourdes; Berra, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Background Ocular mucosa is exposed constantly to the external environment, and chronic exposure to air pollution may affect the ocular surface. Objective We assessed the effect of air pollution on the ocular surface by combining determinations of individual exposure and conjunctival impression cytology. Methods A panel study was conducted with 29 volunteers recruited in two locations with different pollution levels: São Paulo (n = 13) and Divinolândia (n = 16). We assessed mean individual levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure for 7 days, using a passive sampler. Impression cytology samples were obtained from inferior tarsal conjunctiva. Comparisons between the two groups in terms of NO2 exposure and goblet-cell counts were performed using the Student t-test. Correlations between goblet-cells counts and corresponding individual NO2 exposure levels were determined using Spearman’s correlation. Results Individuals living in São Paulo received a significantly (p = 0.005) higher dose of NO2 (mean 32.47; SD 9.83) than those living in Divinolândia (mean 19.33; SD 5.24). There was a steady increase in goblet-cell counts, proportional to NO2 exposure (Spearman’s correlation = 0.566, p = 0.001), with a dose–response pattern. Conclusions A positive and significant association between exposure to air pollution and goblet-cell hyperplasia in human conjunctiva was detected. The combination of simple measurements of exposure and impression cytology was an effective and noninvasive approach for characterizing human response to ambient levels of air pollution. PMID:18087595

  5. EGF shifts human airway basal cell fate toward a smoking-associated airway epithelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ionwa; Fukui, Tomoya; Witover, Bradley; Brekman, Angelika; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-07-16

    The airway epithelium of smokers acquires pathological phenotypes, including basal cell (BC) and/or goblet cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, structural and functional abnormalities of ciliated cells, decreased number of secretoglobin (SCGB1A1)-expressing secretory cells, and a disordered junctional barrier. In this study, we hypothesized that smoking alters airway epithelial structure through modification of BC function via an EGF receptor (EGFR)-mediated mechanism. Analysis of the airway epithelium revealed that EGFR is enriched in airway BCs, whereas its ligand EGF is induced by smoking in ciliated cells. Exposure of BCs to EGF shifted the BC differentiation program toward the squamous and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypes with down-regulation of genes related to ciliogenesis, secretory differentiation, and markedly reduced junctional barrier integrity, mimicking the abnormalities present in the airways of smokers in vivo. These data suggest that activation of EGFR in airway BCs by smoking-induced EGF represents a unique mechanism whereby smoking can alter airway epithelial differentiation and barrier function. PMID:23818594

  6. Effects of Yersinia enterocolitica infection on rabbit intestinal and colonic goblet cells and mucin: morphometrics, histochemistry, and biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Atkins, E; Kelly, J; Thakore, E; Buret, A; Gall, D G

    1991-01-01

    The effects of Yersinia enterocolitica on intestinal goblet cells were investigated in New Zealand white rabbits. Animals infected with Y enterocolitica were compared with weight matched and pair fed controls. Goblet cell hyperplasia developed in the distal small intestine of infected rabbits on day 1, in the mid small intestine on day 3, and in the upper small intestine on day 6. In all regions hyperplasia persisted throughout the 14 day study. The degree of hyperplasia was greater in the distal small intestine than the upper and mid regions. Goblet cells in the proximal colon of infected animals seemed to respond as those in the distal small intestine. Thus goblet cell hyperplasia developed more rapidly and to a greater extent in the ileocaecal region where mucosal injury was most severe. These changes resulted directly from Y enterocolitica infection since goblet cell numbers did not increase in pair fed controls. Histochemically, goblet cell mucins from infected rabbits were unchanged at either six or 14 days. Biochemical analysis, however, established that purified mucins from animals on day 6 after infection were less sialylated (in the small intestine) and more sulphated (in the small intestine and proximal colon). In addition, mucins from the distal small intestine and the proximal colon seemed to contain fewer but longer oligosaccharide chains. PMID:1955167

  7. Label-free imaging of goblet cells as a marker for differentiating colonic polyps by multiphoton microscopy Label-free imaging of goblet cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, S. M.; Wu, G. Z.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Xie, S. S.

    2012-06-01

    Discrimination of adenomas from hyperplastic polyps can reduce the risk of unnecessary complications and healthcare cost. However, it is challenging during colonoscopy screening, and histological analysis remains the ``gold standard'' for the final diagnosis. Here, we describe a label-free imaging method, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), to the discrimination between adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. We find that multiphoton imaging provides cellular and subcellular details to the identification of adenomas from hyperplastic polyps. In particular, there is significant difference in the population density of goblet cells among normal colon, hyperplastic polyp, and adenoma, providing substantial potential to become a quantitative intrinsic marker for in vivo clinical diagnosis of early colonic lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the potential of MPM for differentiation of colonic polyps.

  8. A Rare Combination of Ovarian and Uterine Leiomyomas with Goblet Cell Carcinoid of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Abdulrahman F.; Darwish, Abdulla; Nagaraj, Veena; Alsada, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of the rare combination of unilateral ovarian leiomyoma, uterine leiomyoma, and goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix in a premenopausal woman who presented with right iliac pain. Immunohistochemistry study for desmin (muscle marker) and chromogranin and synaptophysin (neuroendocrine markers) confirmed immunophenotyping origin. Interestingly, both tumors showed positive reaction for estrogen receptor. To our knowledge, such a combination has not been reported previously in the literature. In this paper, the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of both types of tumors are discussed. PMID:25685587

  9. Microbial sensing by goblet cells controls immune surveillance of luminal antigens in the colon.

    PubMed

    Knoop, K A; McDonald, K G; McCrate, S; McDole, J R; Newberry, R D

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of luminal substances across the intestinal epithelium to the immune system is a critical event in immune surveillance, resulting in tolerance to dietary antigens and immunity to pathogens. How this process is regulated is largely unknown. Recently goblet cell-associated antigen passages (GAPs) were identified as a pathway delivering luminal antigens to underlying lamina propria (LP) dendritic cells in the steady state. Here, we demonstrate that goblet cells (GCs) form GAPs in response to acetylcholine (ACh) acting on muscarinic ACh receptor 4. GAP formation in the small intestine was regulated at the level of ACh production, as GCs rapidly formed GAPs in response to ACh analogs. In contrast, colonic GAP formation was regulated at the level of GC responsiveness to ACh. Myd88-dependent microbial sensing by colonic GCs inhibited the ability of colonic GCs to respond to Ach to form GAPs and deliver luminal antigens to colonic LP-antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Disruption of GC microbial sensing in the setting of an intact gut microbiota opened colonic GAPs, and resulted in recruitment of neutrophils and APCs and production of inflammatory cytokines. Thus GC intrinsic sensing of the microbiota has a critical role regulating the exposure of the colonic immune system to luminal substances. PMID:25005358

  10. Lectin binding patterns to plasmalemmal glycoconjugates of goblet cells undergoing differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Frisch, E B; Phillips, T E

    1990-09-01

    The plasmalemmal glycoconjugates of the HT29-18N2 (N2) cell line were characterized on cells grown as 1) undifferentiated multilayers in glucose-containing culture media and 2) monolayers of columnar cells acquiring the goblet cell phenotype in glucose-free media. Lectins were unable to bind sheets of detached N2 cells in the absence of fixation. Following fixation with aldehydes, a dramatic unmasking of lectin binding sites was seen. When fixed monolayers were stained prior to embedding, biotinylated lectins, visualized by the avidin-biotin-complexed peroxidase technique, were more efficient than collodial gold-coupled lectins. Lectin binding sites could also be detected by using collodial gold-coupled lectins to stain monolayers embedded in LR White, Lowicryl K4M, and Lowicryl HM20. The binding of 5 lectins (wheat germ, Dolichos bifluros, peanut, soybean, and Ulex europeus) was found to be independent of the stage of differentiation; "pre-differentiated" columnar cells which had prominent microvilli and no or few mucous secretory granules had identical staining patterns as well-differentiated goblet cells with large numbers of secretory granules. Ricinus communis I was the only lectin whose binding was influenced by the stage of differentiation; it intensely labeled undifferentiated multilayers of N2 cells but only weakly labeled basolateral membranes of differentiated monolayers. Canavalia ensiformas (ConA) caused a moderate and even labeling of both apical and basolateral membranes of fixed monolayers stained prior to embedding, but post-embedding labeling revealed heavy labeling along the lateral margins of all columnar cells and weak to moderate binding along the apical and basal cell surface. PMID:2213229

  11. Impact of Cigarette Smoking on Tear Function and Correlation between Conjunctival Goblet Cells and Tear MUC5AC Concentration in Office Workers

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Yuichi; Uchino, Miki; Yokoi, Norihiko; Dogru, Murat; Kawashima, Motoko; Komuro, Aoi; Sonomura, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Argüeso, Pablo; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to clarify whether cigarette smoking affects tear secretion, goblet cell density, and tear MUC5AC concentration. The second purpose was to evaluate the correlations of conjunctival goblet cell density with tear MUC5AC concentration and other ocular surface evaluation factors. This cross-sectional study included 88 office workers. All subjects were required to fill in dry eye and smoking questionnaires, in addition to ocular surface evaluation. Tear wash fluid was collected from inferior fornix, and conjunctival epithelium was obtained by impression cytology. Tear MUC5AC concentration was quantified using enzyme-linked immunoassay, and conjunctival goblet cell density was counted after Periodic-acid Schiff staining. Tear MUC5AC concentration had significant positive correlation with conjunctival goblet cell density (r = 0.181, P = 0.03). In current smokers, Schirmer I test value, goblet cell density and tear MUC5AC concentration were significantly lower than non-smokers. Pack-years of smoking have significant negative correlation with goblet cell density (r = −0.174, P = 0.036) and tear MUC5AC concentration (r = −0.183, P = 0.028). We concluded that smoking might decrease tear secretion, goblet cell density and tear MUC5AC concentration. In addition, MUC5AC concentration in tears depends on goblet cell density in the conjunctiva among office workers. PMID:27297822

  12. Characterisation of a novel proteolytic enzyme localised to goblet cells in rat and man.

    PubMed Central

    Nexø, E; Poulsen, S S; Hansen, S N; Kirkegaard, P; Olsen, P S

    1984-01-01

    A proteolytic enzyme, ingobsin , purified from rat duodenal extracts is shown to be localised to intestinal goblet cells of both man and rat. Enzyme positive cells decrease in number from duodenum to colon. The enzyme is a 33 000 Mr protein with an isoelectric point of 5.1. The pH optimum for enzymatic activity is 7.4-8.0. Based on substrate specificity for arg-x, lys-x and to a lesser degree tyr-x, on the effect of diisopropylphosphorofluoride , Trasylol and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride and on proteolytic activity towards intact proteins, ingobsin is classified as a serine proteinase with endoproteolytic activity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:6735249

  13. Intestinal Goblet Cells and Mucins in Health and Disease: Recent Insights and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samuel B.

    2010-01-01

    The mucus layer coating the gastrointestinal tract is the front line of innate host defense, largely because of the secretory products of intestinal goblet cells. Goblet cells synthesize secretory mucin glycoproteins (MUC2) and bioactive molecules such as epithelial membrane-bound mucins (MUC1, MUC3, MUC17), trefoil factor peptides (TFF), resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ), and Fc-γ binding protein (Fcgbp). The MUC2 mucin protein forms trimers by disulfide bonding in cysteine-rich amino terminal von Willebrand factor (vWF) domains, coupled with crosslinking provided by TFF and Fcgbp proteins with MUC2 vWF domains, resulting in a highly viscous extracellular layer. Colonization by commensal intestinal microbiota is limited to an outer “loose” mucus layer, and interacts with the diverse oligosaccharides of mucin glycoproteins, whereas an “inner” adherent mucus layer is largely devoid of bacteria. Defective mucus layers resulting from lack of MUC2 mucin, mutated Muc2 mucin vWF domains, or from deletion of core mucin glycosyltransferase enzymes in mice result in increased bacterial adhesion to the surface epithelium, increased intestinal permeability, and enhanced susceptibility to colitis caused by dextran sodium sulfate. Changes in mucin gene expression and mucin glycan structures occur in cancers of the intestine, contributing to diverse biologic properties involved in the development and progression of cancer. Further research is needed on identification and functional significance of various components of mucus layers and the complex interactions among mucus layers, microbiota, epithelial cells, and the underlying innate and adaptive immunity. Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms involved in mucin changes in cancer and inflammation may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:20703838

  14. An ultrastructural study of goblet cells in rat nasal mucosa as revealed by the quick-freezing method.

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, S; Hisamatsu, K; Fujii, Y; Ohno, S

    1996-01-01

    In order to clarify the natural ultrastructure of goblet cells in the rat nasal mucosa, they were examined by the quick-freezing and freeze-substitution (QF-FS) or deep-etching (QF-DE) methods for comparison with conventional fixation methods. Some nasal mucosal tissues were unstimulated; others were stimulated with acetylcholine or substance P. The QF-FS method yielded fewer artefacts on transmission electron microscopy than conventional fixation methods. In the stimulated goblet cells, most of the secretory granules appeared to be loose in the matrix and more distorted in shape. By the QF-DE method, they were observed 3-dimensionally to be larger in size and aggregated together. In contrast, the secretory granules in the unstimulated goblet cells were mostly round and small, and separate from each other. It is concluded that the ultrastructure of secretory granules is artefactually modified by conventional fixation methods and that granule structure in goblet cells alters during the secretory process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8763482

  15. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s) responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5) whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK) and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS). This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27073869

  16. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    PubMed

    Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s) responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5) whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK) and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS). This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27073869

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Removal or Tyrphostin AG1478 Treatment Reduces Goblet Cells & Mucus Secretion of Epithelial Cells from Asthmatic Children Using the Air-Liquid Interface Model

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jeremy C.; Douglas, Isobel; Bell, Jennifer; Comer, David; Bailie, Keith; Skibinski, Grzegorz; Heaney, Liam G.; Shields, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Epithelial remodelling in asthma is characterised by goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus hypersecretion for which no therapies exist. Differentiated bronchial air-liquid interface cultures from asthmatic children display high goblet cell numbers. Epidermal growth factor and its receptor have been implicated in goblet cell hyperplasia. Objectives We hypothesised that EGF removal or tyrphostin AG1478 treatment of differentiating air-liquid interface cultures from asthmatic children would result in a reduction of epithelial goblet cells and mucus secretion. Methods In Aim 1 primary bronchial epithelial cells from non-asthmatic (n = 5) and asthmatic (n = 5) children were differentiated under EGF-positive (10ng/ml EGF) and EGF-negative culture conditions for 28 days. In Aim 2, cultures from a further group of asthmatic children (n = 5) were grown under tyrphostin AG1478, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, conditions. All cultures were analysed for epithelial resistance, markers of differentiation using immunocytochemistry, ELISA for MUC5AC mucin secretion and qPCR for MUC5AC mRNA. Results In cultures from asthmatic children the goblet cell number was reduced in the EGF negative group (p = 0.01). Tyrphostin AG1478 treatment of cultures from asthmatic children had significant reductions in goblet cells at 0.2μg/ml (p = 0.03) and 2μg/ml (p = 0.003) as well as mucus secretion at 2μg/ml (p = 0.04). Conclusions We have shown in this preliminary study that through EGF removal and tyrphostin AG1478 treatment the goblet cell number and mucus hypersecretion in differentiating air-liquid interface cultures from asthmatic children is significantly reduced. This further highlights the epidermal growth factor receptor as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus hypersecretion in asthma. PMID:26057128

  18. Airway basal stem cells: a perspective on their roles in epithelial homeostasis and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jason R; Randell, Scott H; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2010-01-01

    The small airways of the human lung undergo pathological changes in pulmonary disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiolitis obliterans and cystic fibrosis. These clinical problems impose huge personal and societal healthcare burdens. The changes, termed 'pathological airway remodeling', affect the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and the reciprocal trophic interactions that occur between these tissues. Most of the normal human airway is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium of ciliated cells, secretory cells and 6-30% basal cells, the proportion of which varies along the proximal-distal axis. Epithelial abnormalities range from hypoplasia (failure to differentiate) to basal- and goblet-cell hyperplasia, squamous- and goblet-cell metaplasia, dysplasia and malignant transformation. Mesenchymal alterations include thickening of the basal lamina, smooth muscle hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation. Paradoxically, given the prevalence and importance of airway remodeling in lung disease, its etiology is poorly understood. This is due, in part, to a lack of basic knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maintenance and repair of the airway epithelium. Specifically, little is known about the proliferation and differentiation of basal cells, a multipotent stem cell population of the pseudostratified airway epithelium. This Perspective summarizes what we know, and what we need to know, about airway basal cells to evaluate their contributions to normal and abnormal airway remodeling. We contend that exploiting well-described model systems using both human airway epithelial cells and the pseudostratified epithelium of the genetically tractable mouse trachea will enable crucial discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of airway disease. PMID:20699479

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine. PMID:25721301

  20. Imaging of goblet cells as a marker for intestinal metaplasia of the stomach by one-photon and two-photon fluorescence endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hongchun; Boussioutas, Alex; Reynolds, Jeremy; Russell, Sarah; Gu, Min

    2009-11-01

    Goblet cells are a requirement for the diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia of the stomach. The gastric mucosa is lined by a monolayer of columnar epithelium with some specialization at the crypts, but there are no goblet cells in normal gastric epithelium. The appearance of goblet cells in gastric epithelium is an indicator of potential malignant progression toward adenocarcinoma. Therefore, in vivo three-dimensional imaging of goblet cells is essential for diagnoses of a premalignant stage of gastric cancers called intestinal metaplasia. We used mouse intestine, which has goblet cells, as a model of intestinal metaplasia. One-photon confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy and two-photon fluorescence endomicroscopy are employed for 3-D imaging of goblet cells. The penetration depth, the sectioning ability, and the photobleaching information of imaging are demonstrated. Both endomicroscopy techniques can three-dimensionally observe goblet cells in mouse large intestine and achieve an imaging depth of 176 μm. The two-photon fluorescence endomicroscopy shows higher resolution and contrast of the imaging sections at each depth. In addition, two-photon fluorescence endomicroscopy also has advantages of sectioning ability and less photobleaching. These results prove that two-photon fluorescence endomicroscopy is advantageous in diagnoses of a premalignant stage of gastric cancers.

  1. Foxa2 and Hif1ab regulate maturation of intestinal goblet cells by modulating agr2 expression in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yun-Ren; Lu, Yu-Fen; Lien, Huang-Wei; Huang, Chang-Jen; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian anterior gradient 2 (AGR2), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein disulfide-isomerase (PDI), is involved in cancer cell growth and metastasis, asthma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mice lacking Agr2 exhibit decreased Muc2 protein in intestinal goblet cells, abnormal Paneth cell development, ileitis and colitis. Despite its importance in cancer biology and inflammatory diseases, the mechanisms regulating agr2 expression in the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms that control agr2 expression in the pharynx and intestine of zebrafish by transient/stable transgenesis, coupled with motif mutation, morpholino knockdown, mRNA rescue and ChIP. A 350 bp DNA sequence with a hypoxia-inducible response element (HRE) and forkhead-response element (FHRE) within a region -4.5 to -4.2 kbp upstream of agr2 directed EGFP expression specifically in the pharynx and intestine. No EGFP expression was detected in the intestinal goblet cells of Tg(HREM:EGFP) or Tg(FHREM:EGFP) embryos with mutated HRE or FHRE, whereas EGFP was expressed in the pharynx of Tg(HREM:EGFP), but not Tg(FHREM:EGFP), embryos. Morpholino knockdown of foxa1 (forkhead box A1) reduced agr2 levels in the pharynx, whereas knockdown of foxa2 or hif1ab decreased intestinal agr2 expression and affected the differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells. These results demonstrate that Foxa1 regulates agr2 expression in the pharynx, whereas both Foxa2 and Hif1ab control agr2 expression in intestinal goblet cells to regulate maturation of these cells. PMID:27222589

  2. Goblet cells: are they an unspecific barrier against Giardia intestinalis or a gate?

    PubMed

    Ponce-Macotela, Martha; González-Maciel, Angélica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Martínez-Gordillo, Mario N

    2008-02-01

    Giardiosis is one of the major intestinal parasitic diseases of human beings as well as wild and domesticated animals. Several protective mechanisms against infection have been described. However, specific information about relationship between giardiosis and the increased proliferation of goblet cells (GC) in patients infected with Giardia intestinalis (Syn. G. duodenalis, G. lamblia) is scarce. In this work, we compare and quantify the number of GC, and have inferred their metabolic state in the small intestine of dogs parasitized with Giardia intestinalis compared to dogs without parasites. Small intestine segments were processed using routine methods for histology and electron microscopy; areas and cells were screened with an Axiovision Ver. 4.0 system. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and comparison of averages. Parasitized dogs showed higher GC numbers than nonparasitized ones. Averages were: 20+/-0.81 GC/25 microm(2) with independent mucin granules and 11+/-1.53 GC/25 microm(2) that were expelling mucus, compared to 11+/-0.94 GC/25 microm(2) and 1+/-0.27 GC/25 microm(2), respectively, in nonparasitized dogs (Tukey, p<0.001). The increases in GC number seem to be an unspecific defensive mechanism against Giardia trophozoites. However, we found some evidence supporting that GC hyperplasia could be a prejudicial to epithelial barrier that gives rise to gates allowing for Giardia-tissue invasion. PMID:18038237

  3. Epithelial hyperplasia, airways

    Cancer.gov

    Number of respiratory epithelial cells is increased diffusely or focally. Frequently luminal protrusions are observed, sometimes forming papillae. Mucous (goblet) cell metaplastic hyperplasia is a variant, in which the respiratory epithelium of conducting airways is replaced by mucous cells either as a single or a pseudostratified layer.

  4. [Behaviour of intestinal goblet cells following application of oxidated water soluble terpenes. A pilot study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brunner, P; Kaduk, B; Gunselmann, W; Husemann, B

    1977-01-01

    1 and 3 h after i.p. application of Ozothin, an oxidation product of Bordeaux terpin oil, in rats there is a significant increase in goblet cells both totally and in the tightly filled ones (respectively in the villi of the small intestine). Double i.v. injection of therapeutic doses of Ozothin (first 14 h and booster 2 h preoperatively) induces a significant decrease in the number of the tightly filled goblet cells. These contradictory results may partly be explained as an initially timed ischesis of mucigenous glands by Ozothin. Statistically significant differences among the different series of tests could be found only in the epithelium of the villi. In the crypts there were similar results lacking statistical significance. PMID:577433

  5. Antigenic and structural features of goblet-cell mucin of human small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1984-01-01

    With the use of a newly developed solid-phase radioimmunoassay method, the major antigenic determinants of human small-intestinal goblet-cell mucin were investigated and related to the overall tertiary structure of the mucin. Preliminary hapten inhibition studies with various oligosaccharides of known sequence and structure suggested that the determinants did not reside in carbohydrate. Exhaustive thiol reduction, however, almost abolished antigenicity, caused breakdown of the mucin into small heterogeneous glycopeptides, and liberated a 'link' peptide of Mr 118000. Western 'blots' of reduced mucin from polyacrylamide gels on to nitrocellulose sheets showed that a small amount of residual antigenicity remained in large-Mr glycopeptides (Mr greater than 200000). The 'link' peptide was not antigenic. Timed Pronase digestion of native mucin resulted in a progressive loss of antigenic determinants. Gel electrophoresis revealed that after 8h of digestion the 118000-Mr peptide had disappeared, whereas antigenicity, which was confined to large-Mr glycopeptides, was destroyed much more slowly with time (70% by 24h, 100% by 72h). Despite the loss of antigenicity, 72h-Pronase-digested glycopeptides retained all of the carbohydrate of the native mucin. Therefore the antibody to human small-intestinal mucin appears to recognize a 'naked' (non-glycosylated and Pronase-susceptible) peptide region(s) of mucin glycopeptides. For full antigenicity, however, disulphide bonds are required to stabilize a specific three-dimensional configuration of the 'naked' region. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:6199017

  6. Rapid identification of goblet cells in unstained colon thin sections by means of quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kröger-Lui, N; Gretz, N; Haase, K; Kränzlin, B; Neudecker, S; Pucci, A; Regenscheit, A; Schönhals, A; Petrich, W

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the volume covered by mucin-secreting goblet cell regions within colon thin sections may serve as a means to differentiate between ulcerative colitis and infectious colitis. Here we show that rapid, quantum cascade laser-based mid-infrared microspectroscopy might be able to contribute to the differential diagnosis of colitis ulcerosa, an inflammatory bowel disease. Infrared hyperspectral images of mouse colon thin sections were obtained within 7.5 minutes per section with a pixel size of 3.65 × 3.65 μm(2) and a field of view of 2.8 × 3.1 mm(2). The spectra were processed by training a random decision forest classifier on the basis of k-means clustering on one thin section. The trained algorithm was then applied to 5 further thin sections for a blinded validation and it was able to identify goblet cells in all sections. The rapid identification of goblet cells within these unstained, paraffinized thin sections of colon tissue was enabled by the high content of glycopeptides within the goblet cells as revealed by the pronounced spectral signatures in the 7.6 μm-8.6 μm and the 9.2 μm-9.7 μm wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. More so, the simple calculation of the ratio between the absorbance values at 9.29 μm and 8.47 μm provides the potential to further shorten the time for measurement and analysis of a thin section down to well below 1 minute. PMID:25649324

  7. Kalanchoe pinnata inhibits mast cell activation and prevents allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, E A; Reuter, S; Martin, H; Dehzad, N; Muzitano, M F; Costa, S S; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Buhl, R; Stassen, M; Taube, C

    2012-01-15

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata (Kp) have been found effective in models to reduce acute anaphylactic reactions. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Kp and the flavonoid quercetin (QE) and quercitrin (QI) on mast cell activation in vitro and in a model of allergic airway disease in vivo. Treatment with Kp and QE in vitro inhibited degranulation and cytokine production of bone marrow-derived mast cells following IgE/FcɛRI crosslinking, whereas treatment with QI had no effect. Similarly, in vivo treatment with Kp and QE decreased development of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia and production of IL-5, IL-13 and TNF. In contrast, treatment with QI had no effect on these parameters. These findings demonstrate that treatment with Kp or QE is effective in treatment of allergic airway disease, providing new insights to the immunomodulatory functions of this plant. PMID:21802918

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells and serelaxin synergistically abrogate established airway fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Shen, Matthew; Patel, Krupesh P; Huuskes, Brooke M; Ricardo, Sharon D; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2015-11-01

    This study determined if the anti-fibrotic drug, serelaxin (RLN), could augment human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated reversal of airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) associated with chronic allergic airways disease (AAD/asthma). Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic AAD were either untreated or treated with MSCs alone, RLN alone or both combined from weeks 9-11. Changes in airway inflammation (AI), epithelial thickness, goblet cell metaplasia, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, subepithelial and total lung collagen deposition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression, and AHR were then assessed. MSCs alone modestly reversed OVA-induced subepithelial and total collagen deposition, and increased MMP-9 levels above that induced by OVA alone (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). RLN alone more broadly reversed OVA-induced epithelial thickening, TGF-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, airway fibrosis and AHR (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). Combination treatment further reversed OVA-induced AI and airway/lung fibrosis compared to either treatment alone (all p<0.05 vs either treatment alone), and further increased MMP-9 levels. RLN appeared to enhance the therapeutic effects of MSCs in a chronic disease setting; most likely a consequence of the ability of RLN to limit TGF-β1-induced matrix synthesis complemented by the MMP-promoting effects of MSCs. PMID:26426509

  9. γδ T-cell-deficient mice show alterations in mucin expression, glycosylation, and goblet cells but maintain an intact mucus layer.

    PubMed

    Kober, Olivia I; Ahl, David; Pin, Carmen; Holm, Lena; Carding, Simon R; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by a hierarchy of immune defenses acting in concert to minimize contact between luminal microorganisms and the intestinal epithelial cell surface. The intestinal mucus layer, covering the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells, contributes to mucosal homeostasis by limiting bacterial invasion. In this study, we used γδ T-cell-deficient (TCRδ(-/-)) mice to examine whether and how γδ T-cells modulate the properties of the intestinal mucus layer. Increased susceptibility of TCRδ(-/-) mice to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is associated with a reduced number of goblet cells. Alterations in the number of goblet cells and crypt lengths were observed in the small intestine and colon of TCRδ(-/-) mice compared with C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Addition of keratinocyte growth factor to small intestinal organoid cultures from TCRδ(-/-) mice showed a marked increase in crypt growth and in both goblet cell number and redistribution along the crypts. There was no apparent difference in the thickness or organization of the mucus layer between TCRδ(-/-) and WT mice, as measured in vivo. However, γδ T-cell deficiency led to reduced sialylated mucins in association with increased gene expression of gel-secreting Muc2 and membrane-bound mucins, including Muc13 and Muc17. Collectively, these data provide evidence that γδ T cells play an important role in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis by regulating mucin expression and promoting goblet cell function in the small intestine. PMID:24503767

  10. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, goblet cells and VIP-IR submucosal neurons of jejunum rats infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Ana, Débora M G; Góis, Marcelo B; Zanoni, Jacqueline N; da Silva, Aristeu V; da Silva, Cleverton J T; Araújo, Eduardo J A

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) crosses the intestinal barrier in oral infections and can lead to changes in different cell types, including the neurons located there. In the gastrointestinal system, the autonomous nervous system component that regulate blood flow and mucous secretion is the submucosal plexus. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of T. gondii infection on intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), goblet cells and submucosal neurons that are immunoreactive to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP-IR) of rat jejunum. Twenty male rats distributed as a control group (CG) and an infected group (IG), which received a suspension with 500 parasite oocysts (strain ME-49, genotype II) orally, were assessed. Routine histological sections were used to quantify IELs and to detect mucins secreted by goblet cells. Whole mounts including the submucosal layer were examined using immunofluorescence to detect the VIP neurotransmitter. Quantitative alterations in IELs were not observed. However, the reduction (P < 0.05) in the number of goblet cells that produce neutral mucins (PAS+) and sulphomucins (AB pH 1.0) and the maintenance of sialomucin-secreting cells (AB pH 2.5) resulting in a more fluid mucous were observed. Concerning the VIP-IR submucosal neurons, an increase in fluorescence on IG animals was observed. There was a reduction (P < 0.05) in the number of VIP-IR submucosal neurons and atrophy of their cell bodies in IG rats. Infection with T. gondii caused alterations in the chemical composition of the intestinal mucous and reduction in the neuron number and atrophy of the remaining neurons in this cell subpopulation. PMID:22804764

  11. New Role of Nod Proteins in Regulation of Intestinal Goblet Cell Response in the Context of Innate Host Defense in an Enteric Parasite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaqing; Kim, Janice J.; Denou, Emmanuel; Gallagher, Amanda; Thornton, David J.; Shajib, M. Sharif; Xia, Lijun; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Grencis, Richard K.; Philpott, Dana J.

    2015-01-01

    Mucins secreted by intestinal goblet cells are considered an important component of innate defense in a number of enteric infections, including many parasitic infections, but also likely provide protection against the gut microbiota. Nod proteins are intracellular receptors that play key roles in innate immune response and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Nod proteins in regulation of intestinal goblet cell response in naive mice and mice infected with the enteric parasite Trichuris muris. We observed significantly fewer periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained intestinal goblet cells and less mucin (Muc2) in Nod1 and Nod2 double-knockout (Nod DKO) mice after T. muris infection than in wild-type (WT) mice. Expulsion of parasites from the intestine was significantly delayed in Nod DKO mice. Treatment of naive WT mice with Nod1 and Nod2 agonists simultaneously increased numbers of PAS-stained goblet cells and Muc2-expressing cells, whereas treatment with Nod1 or Nod2 separately had no significant effect. Stimulation of mucin-secreting LS174T cells with Nod1 and Nod2 agonists upregulated core 3 β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C3GnT; an important enzyme in mucin synthesis) and MUC2. We also observed lower numbers of PAS-stained goblet cells and less Muc2 in germfree mice. Treatment with Nod1 and Nod2 agonists enhanced the production of PAS-stained goblet cells and Muc2 in germfree mice. These data provide novel information on the role of Nod proteins in goblet cell response and Muc2 production in relation to intestinal innate defense. PMID:26527214

  12. Lawsonia intracellularis infection of intestinal crypt cells is associated with specific depletion of secreted MUC2 in goblet cells

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Wilson, Alison D.; Finlayson, Heather; Matika, Oswald; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    The expression patterns of secreted (MUC2 and MUC5AC) and membrane-tethered (MUC1, MUC4, MUC12 and MUC13) mucins were monitored in healthy pigs and pigs challenged orally with Lawsonia intracellularis. These results showed that the regulation of mucin gene expression is distinctive along the GI tract of the healthy pig, and may reflect an association between the function of the mucin subtypes and different physiological demands at various sites. We identified a specific depletion of secreted MUC2 from goblet cells in infected pigs that correlated with the increased level of intracellular bacteria in crypt cells. We concluded that L. intracellularis may influence MUC2 production, thereby altering the mucus barrier and enabling cellular invasion. PMID:26377360

  13. Lawsonia intracellularis infection of intestinal crypt cells is associated with specific depletion of secreted MUC2 in goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Rebecca J; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Wilson, Alison D; Finlayson, Heather; Matika, Oswald; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Smith, Sionagh H; Archibald, Alan L; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-11-15

    The expression patterns of secreted (MUC2 and MUC5AC) and membrane-tethered (MUC1, MUC4, MUC12 and MUC13) mucins were monitored in healthy pigs and pigs challenged orally with Lawsonia intracellularis. These results showed that the regulation of mucin gene expression is distinctive along the GI tract of the healthy pig, and may reflect an association between the function of the mucin subtypes and different physiological demands at various sites. We identified a specific depletion of secreted MUC2 from goblet cells in infected pigs that correlated with the increased level of intracellular bacteria in crypt cells. We concluded that L. intracellularis may influence MUC2 production, thereby altering the mucus barrier and enabling cellular invasion. PMID:26377360

  14. Goblet Cells and Mucus Types in the Digestive Intestine and Respiratory Intestine in Bronze Corydoras (Callichthyidae: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Leknes, I L

    2015-10-01

    The structure and histochemical properties of the intestine in bronze corydoras (Corydoras aeneus), a stomach-containing teleost, are described, with emphasis on goblet cells and mucin types. The proximal intestine displayed a normal structure for teleosts, whereas the distal intestine was wide, translucent, thin-walled, richly vascularized and constantly filled with air, suggesting an important respiratory role. Goblet cells were common throughout the entire intestine and displayed a variable, but mainly faint metachromatic colour after toluidine blue. They were moderately coloured by alcian blue at both pH 2.5 and 0.2 and displayed no colour after periodic acid followed by Schiff's solution (PAS), but a distinct purple-brown colour after high iron diamine followed by alcian blue (pH 2.5). Together, these results suggest that the mucin in the intestine goblet cells consists mainly of sulphated proteoglycans. Further, the results from the present lectin and neuraminidase tests suggest that these mucins contain much N-acetylglucoseamines and some N-acetylgalactosamines and sialic acid, but seem to lack glucose and mannose. They also contain some galactose-N-acetylgalactosamines sequences, normally hidden by sialic acid. The distinct brush border and mucus layer on the epithelial cells in the respiratory intestine may indicate some digestive roles, such as absorption of water, ions and simple carbohydrates. As sulphated proteoglycans are tough and attract much water, this mucus may play important roles in the protection against mechanical and chemical damages and in the defence against micro-organisms throughout the entire intestine, but in the respiratory intestine it may impede significantly the oxygen uptake. However, as this part of the intestine usually contains no digesta, but is completely filled with air, frequently renewed by dry air from the atmosphere, and the main function of the mucus may be to protect the respiratory epithelium against a destroying and

  15. The goblet cell-derived mediator RELM-β drives spontaneous colitis in Muc2-deficient mice by promoting commensal microbial dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Morampudi, V; Dalwadi, U; Bhinder, G; Sham, H P; Gill, S K; Chan, J; Bergstrom, K S B; Huang, T; Ma, C; Jacobson, K; Gibson, D L; Vallance, B A

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal goblet cells are potentially key players in controlling susceptibility to ulcerative colitis (UC). Although impaired mucin (Muc2) production by goblet cells increases microbial stimulation of the colonic mucosa, goblet cells secrete other mediators that may influence or promote UC development. Correspondingly, Muc2-deficient ((-/-)) mice develop spontaneous colitis, concurrent with the dramatic upregulation of the goblet cell mediator, resistin-like molecule-beta (RELM-β). Testing RELM-β's role, we generated Muc2(-/-)/Retnlb(-/-) mice, finding that RELM-β deficiency significantly attenuated colitis development and symptoms compared with Muc2(-/-) mice. RELM-β expression in Muc2(-/-) mice strongly induced the production/secretion of the antimicrobial lectin RegIIIβ, that exerted its microbicidal effect predominantly on Gram-positive Lactobacillus species. Compared with Muc2(-/-)/Retnlb(-/-) mice, this worsened intestinal microbial dysbiosis with a selective loss of colonic Lactobacilli spp. in Muc2(-/-) mice. Orally replenishing Muc2(-/-) mice with murine Lactobacillus spp., but not with a probiotic formulation containing several human Lactobacillus spp. (VSL#3), ameliorated their spontaneous colitis in concert with increased production of short-chain fatty acids. These studies demonstrate that the goblet cell mediator RELM-β drives colitis in Muc2(-/-) mice by depleting protective commensal microbes. The ability of selective commensal microbial replacement to ameliorate colitis suggests that personalized bacterial therapy may prove beneficial for treatment of UC. PMID:26813339

  16. In vitro study of IL-8 and goblet cells: possible role of IL-8 in the aetiology of otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Marina G; Birchall, John P; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2002-03-01

    One of the main characteristics of otitis media with effusion (OME) is the differentiation of basal cells into goblet cells with subsequent proliferation in a modified respiratory epithelium leading to the formation of mucin-rich effusion in the middle ear cleft. In order to determine the effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines identified in OME, e.g. IL-1beta, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-6 and IL-8, on goblet cells, and to clarify the role of IL-8 in particular, we used the human goblet cell line HT29-MTX, which secretes two OME-related mucins: MUC5AC and MUC5B. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha stimulated the secretion of IL-8 in HT29-MTX goblet cells. Dose- (2-200 ng/ml) and time- (0-5 days) response studies of IL-8-induced mucin secretion were carried out. IL-8 upregulated the secretion of MUC5AC and MUC5B mucins in a concentration-dependent manner, with a maximum response at an IL-8 concentration of 20 ng/ml. IL-8 (20 ng/ml)-mediated mucin secretion persisted for up to 5 days, with a peak response 72 h after the addition of cytokine. These results suggest that: (i) goblet cells are target cells for the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-8 and can contribute to the pathogenesis of OME by increasing both the concentration of IL-8 and the secretion of mucin; and (ii) IL-8 stimulates prolonged mucin secretion from goblet cells and may be involved in the maintenance of the disease in the chronic stage. PMID:11936905

  17. [Carcinoid of the Appendix Goblet Cells Metastasize to the Orbit - a Clinical Case Report and Review of the Literature].

    PubMed

    Matějka, V M; Mukenšnabl, P; Tupý, R; Fiala, O; Fínek, J

    2016-01-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) of the appendix is extremely rare, representing approximately 5% of all primary appendiceal neoplasms. Histologically there are three groups of GCC: group A (typical GCC), adenocarcinoma ex GCC signet ring cell type (group B), and adenocarcinoma ex GCC poorly differentiated carcinoma type (group C), which is the most aggressive. GCC metastasizes in 15-60% of cases, mainly to the ovaries, pelvis, abdominal cavity, ribs, vertebrae, and lymph nodes. Hematogenous metastasis to the liver or other parenchymal organs can occur, but this is very rare. The different organs metastases havent been described yet. The primary mode of treatment is radical surgical resection or debulking, followed by chemotherapy; however, patients with unresectable or recurrent GCC are candidates for systemic therapy. Here, we report a case of very aggressive GCC of the appendix, which had metastazed to the liver at the time of diagnosis and subsequently metastasized to the orbit. PMID:27296408

  18. Expression of IL-4/IL-13 receptors in differentiating human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    White, Steven R; Martin, Linda D; Stern, Randi; Laxman, Bharathi; Marroquin, Bertha A

    2010-11-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 elicit several important responses in airway epithelium including chemokine secretion and mucous secretion that may contribute to airway inflammation, cell migration, and differentiation. These cytokines have overlapping but not identical effector profiles likely due to shared subunits in their receptor complexes. These receptors are variably described in epithelial cells, and the relative expression, localization, and function of these receptors in differentiated and repairing epithelial cells are not clear. We examined IL-4/IL-13 receptor expression and localization in primary airway epithelial cells collected from normal human lungs and grown under conditions yielding both undifferentiated and differentiated cells inclusive of basal, goblet, and ciliated cell phenotypes. Gene expression of the IL-4Rα, IL-2Rγc, IL-13Rα1, and IL-13Rα2 receptor subunits increased with differentiation, but different patterns of localization and protein abundance were seen for each subunit based on both differentiation and the cell subtypes present. Increased expression of receptor subunits observed in more differentiated cells was associated with more substantial functional responses to IL-4 stimulation including increased eotaxin-3 expression and accelerated migration after injury. We demonstrate substantial differences in IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunit expression and responsiveness to IL-4 based on the extent of airway epithelial cell differentiation and suggest that these differences may have functional consequences in airway inflammation. PMID:20729386

  19. Contrasting roles for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products on structural cells in allergic airway inflammation vs. airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Akihiko; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Waseda, Koichi; Kurimoto, Etsuko; Fujii, Utako; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Gelfand, Erwin W; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kanehiro, Arihiko

    2015-10-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. RAGE is reported to be involved in various inflammatory disorders; however, studies that address the role of RAGE in allergic airway disease are inconclusive. RAGE-sufficient (RAGE+/+) and RAGE-deficient (RAGE-/-) mice were sensitized to ovalbumin, and airway responses were monitored after ovalbumin challenge. RAGE-/- mice showed reduced eosinophilic inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia, lower T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production from spleen and peribronchial lymph node mononuclear cells, and lower numbers of group 2 innate lymphoid cells in the lung compared with RAGE+/+ mice following sensitization and challenge. Experiments using irradiated, chimeric mice showed that the mice expressing RAGE on radio-resistant structural cells but not hematopoietic cells developed allergic airway inflammation; however, the mice expressing RAGE on hematopoietic cells but not structural cells showed reduced airway inflammation. In contrast, absence of RAGE expression on structural cells enhanced innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the absence of RAGE, increased interleukin (IL)-33 levels in the lung were detected, and blockade of IL-33 receptor ST2 suppressed innate AHR in RAGE-/- mice. These data identify the importance of RAGE expressed on lung structural cells in the development of allergic airway inflammation, T helper type 2 cell activation, and group 2 innate lymphoid cell accumulation in the airways. RAGE on lung structural cells also regulated innate AHR, likely through the IL-33-ST2 pathway. Thus manipulating RAGE represents a novel therapeutic target in controlling allergic airway responses. PMID:26472810

  20. Soluble maltase-glucoamylase is alternatively spliced and secreted by Paneth and goblet cells in enterocyte maltase-glucoamylase Null mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is the major energy source in the mouse diet. Knockout of intestinal membrane-bound maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) in mice revealed presence of soluble starch digesting activity in Null jejunum and ileum that is secreted by Paneth and goblet cells. Hypotheses: 1. WT have two Mgam mRNAs, Mgamme...

  1. High Goblet Cell Count Is Inversely Associated with Ploidy Abnormalities and Risk of Adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carissa A.; Liu, Karen; Fong, Pui Yee; Li, Xiaohong; Cowan, David S.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Reid, Brian J.; Blount, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Goblet cells may represent a potentially successful adaptive response to acid and bile by producing a thick mucous barrier that protects against cancer development in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between goblet cells (GC) and risk of progression to adenocarcinoma, and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, in BE patients. Experimental Design Baseline mucosal biopsies (N=2988) from 213 patients, 32 of whom developed cancer during the follow up period, enrolled in a prospective dynamic cohort of BE patients were scored in a blinded fashion, for the total number (#) of GC, mean # of GC/crypt (GC density), # of crypts with ≥ 1 GC, and the proportion of crypts with ≥1 GC, in both dysplastic and non-dysplastic epithelium separately. The relationship between these four GC parameters and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities and adenocarcinoma outcome was compared, after adjustment for age, gender, and BE segment length. Results High GC parameters were inversely associated with DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, such as aneuploidy, ploidy >2.7N, and an elevated 4N fraction > 6%, and with risk of adenocarcinoma. However, a Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the total # of GC and the total # crypts with ≥1 GC were the only significant GC parameters (p<0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions The results of this study show, for the first time, an inverse relationship between high GC counts and flow cytometric abnormalities and risk of adenocarcinoma in BE. Further studies are needed to determine if GC depleted foci within esophageal columnar mucosa are more prone to neoplastic progression or whether loss of GC occurs secondary to underlying genetic abnormalities. PMID:26230607

  2. Foxm1 Transcription Factor Is Critical for Proliferation and Differentiation of Clara Cells during Development of Conducting Airways

    PubMed Central

    Ustiyan, Vladimir; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Wang, I-Ching; Kalin, Tanya V.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Kalinichenko, Kalinichenko

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory epithelial cells are derived from cell progenitors in the foregut endoderm that subsequently differentiate into the distinct cell types lining the conducting and alveolar regions of the lung. To identify transcriptional mechanisms regulating differentiation and maintenance of respiratory epithelial cells, we conditionally deleted Foxm1 transcription factor from the conducting airways of the developing mouse lung. Conditional deletion of Foxm1 from Clara cells, controlled by the Scgb1a1 promoter, dramatically altered airway structure and caused peribronchial fibrosis, resulting in airway hyperreactivity in adult mice. Deletion of Foxm1 inhibited proliferation of Clara cells and disrupted the normal patterning of epithelial cell differentiation in the bronchioles, causing squamous and goblet cell metaplasia, and the loss of Clara and ciliated cells. Surprisingly, conducting airways of Foxm1-deficient mice contained highly differentiated cuboidal type II epithelial cells that are normally restricted to the alveoli. Lineage tracing studies showed that the ectopic alveolar type II cells in Foxm1-deficient airways were derived from Clara cells. Deletion of Foxm1 inhibited Sox2 and Scgb1a1, both of which are critical for differentiation and function of Clara cells. In co-transfection experiments, Foxm1 directly bound to and induced transcriptional activity of Scgb1a1 and Sox2 promoters. Foxm1 is required for differentiation and maintenance of epithelial cells lining conducting airways. PMID:22885335

  3. Intermittent oral coadministration of a gamma secretase inhibitor with dexamethasone mitigates intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Shirley A; Liu, Ling; Hosea, Natilie A; Scott, Wesley; May, Jeffrey R; Burns-Naas, Leigh Ann; Randolph, Sophia; Denlinger, Robert H; Han, Bora

    2014-01-01

    Dexamethasone was given in 2 oral dosing regimens with repeat dose oral administration of the gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI), PF-03084014, in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in order to evaluate the effects of coadministration of dexamethasone on GSI-induced goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH) in the intestinal tract. Safety end points were evaluated in 1 week and 1 month studies. The dosing regimens tested in the 1-month studies included a 1-week pretreatment with 1.0 mg/kg dexamethasone followed by a 3-week repeat dose treatment with 100 mg/kg GSI or concurrent intermittent treatment with 1.0 mg/kg dexamethasone on weeks 1 and 3 and repeat dose treatment with 100 mg/kg GSI for 4 weeks. Pretreatment with dexamethasone for 1 week transiently mitigated the severity of intestinal GCH for up to 1 week. Intermittent coadministration of dexamethasone on weeks 1 and 3 with GSI repeat dosing for 4 weeks mitigated intestinal GCH for up to 4 weeks post treatment. Treatment-related morbidity and mortality occurred on day 7 with 150 mg/kg GSI and 5 mg/kg dexamethasone coadministration, and on days 13, 14, and 23 with 100 mg/kg GSI and 1 mg/kg dexamethasone coadministration. PMID:23651588

  4. A secretory cell type develops alongside multiciliated cells, ionocytes and goblet cells, and provides a protective, anti-infective function in the frog embryonic mucociliary epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Dubaissi, Eamon; Rousseau, Karine; Lea, Robert; Soto, Ximena; Nardeosingh, Siddarth; Schweickert, Axel; Amaya, Enrique; Thornton, David J.; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The larval epidermis of Xenopus is a bilayered epithelium, which is an excellent model system for the study of the development and function of mucosal and mucociliary epithelia. Goblet cells develop in the outer layer while multiciliated cells and ionocytes sequentially intercalate from the inner to the outer layer. Here, we identify and characterise a fourth cell type, the small secretory cell (SSC). We show that the development of these cells is controlled by the transcription factor Foxa1 and that they intercalate into the outer layer of the epidermis relatively late, at the same time as embryonic hatching. Ultrastructural and molecular characterisation shows that these cells have an abundance of large apical secretory vesicles, which contain highly glycosylated material, positive for binding of the lectin, peanut agglutinin, and an antibody to the carbohydrate epitope, HNK-1. By specifically depleting SSCs, we show that these cells are crucial for protecting the embryo against bacterial infection. Mass spectrometry studies show that SSCs secrete a glycoprotein similar to Otogelin, which may form the structural component of a mucus-like protective layer, over the surface of the embryo, and several potential antimicrobial substances. Our study completes the characterisation of all the epidermal cell types in the early tadpole epidermis and reinforces the suitability of this system for the in vivo study of complex epithelia, including investigation of innate immune defences. PMID:24598166

  5. The mucus and mucins of the goblet cells and enterocytes provide the first defense line of the gastrointestinal tract and interact with the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Bergström, Joakim H.; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Ermund, Anna; Birchenough, George M. H.; Schütte, André; van der Post, Sjoerd; Svensson, Frida; Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M.; Nyström, Elisabeth E.L.; Wising, Catharina; Johansson, Malin E.V.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus that has different properties in the stomach, small intestine and colon. The large highly glycosylated gel-forming mucins MUC2 and MUC5AC are the major components of the mucus in the intestine and stomach, respectively. In the small intestine mucus limits the number of bacteria that can reach the epithelium and the Peyer’s patches. In the large intestine the inner mucus layer separates the commensal bacteria from the host epithelium. The outer colonic mucus layer is the natural habitat for the commensal bacteria. The intestinal goblet cells not only secrete the MUC2 mucin, but also a number of typical mucus components: CLCA1, FCGBP, AGR2, ZG16, and TFF3. The goblet cells have recently been shown to have a novel gate-keeping role for the presentation of oral antigens to the immune system. Goblet cells deliver small intestinal luminal material to the lamina propria dendritic cells of the tolerogenic CD103+-type. In addition to the gel forming mucins, the transmembrane mucins MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 form the enterocyte glycocalyx that can reach about a micrometer out from the brush border. The MUC17 mucin can shuttle from a surface to an intracellular vesicle localization suggesting that enterocytes might control and report epithelial microbial challenge. There is not only communication from the epithelial cells to the immune system, but also in the opposite direction. One example of this is IL10 that can affect and improve the properties of the inner colonic mucus layer. The mucus and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract are the primary gate keepers and controllers of bacterial interactions with the host immune system, but our understanding of this relationship is still in its infancy. PMID:24942678

  6. Statistical analysis of anionic detergent-induced changes in the goblet mucous cells of opercular epidermis and gill epithelium of Rita rita (Ham.) (Bagridae: Pisces).

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1988-06-01

    Rita rita exposed to 96-hr LC50 (6.9 mg/liter) of an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, show significant changes in the number and size of goblet mucous cells in the opercular epidermis as well as in the lining epithelium of the gill arch and the gill filament at different time intervals of treatment. A shift in the staining nature of these cells from acidic glycoprotein to neutral glycoprotein, acidic glycosaminoglycans in the opercular epidermis and acidic glycoprotein to neutral glycoprotein and then again to acidic glycoprotein + acidic glycosaminoglycans in the gill filament epithelium reflects a change in the physiological status of fish. PMID:3168874

  7. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Innate lymphoid cells in the airways.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer A; McKenzie, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    The airways, similar to other mucosal surfaces, are continuously exposed to the outside environment and a barrage of antigens, allergens, and microorganisms. Of critical importance therefore is the ability to mount rapid and effective immune responses to control commensal and pathogenic microbes, while simultaneously limiting the extent of these responses to prevent immune pathology and chronic inflammation. The function of the adaptive immune response in controlling these processes at mucosal surfaces has been well documented but the important role of the innate immune system, particularly the recently identified family of innate lymphoid cells, has only lately become apparent. In this review, we give an overview of the innate lymphoid cells that exist in the airways and examine the evidence pertaining to their emerging roles in airways immunity, inflammation, and homeostasis. PMID:22678892

  9. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  10. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs. PMID:21695198

  11. STAT6 Expression and IL-13 Production in Association with Goblet Cell Hyperplasia and Worm Expulsion of Gymnophalloides seoi from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Joo; Kim, Donghee; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Min-Ki; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2013-01-01

    In intestinal helminth infections, Th2 immune respones are generally associated with mucin secretion for worm expulsion from the host intestine. In particular, IL-4 and IL-13 are the important cytokines related with intestinal mucus production via STAT6 signalling in nematode infections. However, this perspective has never been studied in Gymnophalloides seoi infection. The present study aimed to observe the STAT6 signalling and cytokine responses in C57BL/6 mice, a mouse strain resistant to infection with this trematode. The results showed that worm expulsion occurred actively during days 1-2 post-infection (PI), when goblet cells began to proliferate in the small intestine. The STAT6 gene expression in the mouse spleen became remarkable from day 2 PI. Moreover, G. seoi infection induced a significant increase of IL-13 from day 4 PI in the spleen of infected mice. Our results suggested that goblet cell hyperplasia and worm expulsion in G. seoi-infected mice should be induced by STAT6 signalling, in which IL-13 may be involved as a dominant triggering cytokine. PMID:24327788

  12. Trichinella spiralis: the influence of short chain fatty acids on the proliferation of lymphocytes, the goblet cell count and apoptosis in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, J; Miśta, D; Houszka, M; Króliczewska, B; Zawadzki, W; Gorczykowski, M

    2011-08-01

    This study was carried out to determine the influence of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) on spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte proliferation, goblet cells and apoptosis in the mouse small intestine during invasion by Trichinella spiralis. BALB/c mice were infected with 250 larvae of T. spiralis. An SCFA water solution containing acetic, propionic and butyric acids (30:15:20 mM) was administered orally starting 5 days before infection and ending 20 days post infection (dpi). Fragments of the jejunum were collected by dissection 7 and 10 dpi, and were examined for apoptotic cells in the lamina propria of the intestinal mucosa, and for goblet cells. The proliferation index of the cultured spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes with MTT test was also determined. The orally administered SCFA solution decreased the proliferation of mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes in the mice infected with T. spiralis at both examination times, but did not influence the proliferative activity of the spleen cells. Seven dpi, both in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, the highest proliferation index of concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes was found in the group of uninfected animals receiving SCFA animals. This tendency could still be seen 10 dpi in the mesenteric lymph nodes but not in the spleen, where the proliferation index in this group had significantly decreased. In vitro studies revealed, that butyric and propionic acids added to the cell cultures suppressed the proliferation of Con A-stimulated mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen lymphocytes taken from uninfected and T. spiralis-infected mice. Acetic acid stimulated proliferation of splenocytes taken from uninfected mice but did not affect lymphocyte proliferation in mesenteric lymph nodes from uninfected or infected mice. Orally administered SCFA increased the number of goblet cells found in the epithelium of the jejunum 7 dpi, but this number had decreased 10 dpi. The number of apoptotic cells in the

  13. Fungal glycan interactions with epithelial cells in allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to fungi results in a wide range of health outcomes, from invasive disease or allergy to immune tolerance. Inhaled fungi contact airway epithelial cells as an early event, and this host:fungal interaction can shape the eventual immunological outcome. Emerging evidence points to exposure to fungal cell wall carbohydrates in the development of allergic airway disease. Herein, we describe determinants of fungal allergenicity, and review the responses of airway epithelial cells to fungal carbohydrates. A greater understanding of the recognition of and response to fungal carbohydrates by airway epithelial cells may lead to the development of targeted therapies that ameliorate allergic airway disease. PMID:23602359

  14. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 increases intestinal goblet cell differentiation through an mTOR/Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuning; Wang, Qingding; Weiss, Heidi L.; Evers, B. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa undergoes a continual process of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. Previously, we have shown that the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) is involved in the regulation of intestinal enterocyte differentiation. Here we show that treatment with sodium chloride (NaCl), which activates NFAT5 signaling, increased mTORC1 repressor regulated in development and DNA damage response 1 (REDD1) protein expression and inhibited mTOR signaling; these alterations were attenuated by knockdown of NFAT5. Knockdown of NFAT5 activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and significantly inhibited REDD1 mRNA expression and protein expression. Consistently, overexpression of NFAT5 increased REDD1 expression. In addition, knockdown of REDD1 activated mTOR and Notch signaling, whereas treatment with mTOR inhibitor rapamycin repressed Notch signaling and increased the expression of the goblet cell differentiation marker mucin 2 (MUC2). Moreover, knockdown of NFAT5 activated Notch signaling and decreased MUC2 expression, while overexpression of NFAT5 inhibited Notch signaling and increased MUC2 expression. Our results demonstrate a role for NFAT5 in the regulation of mTOR signaling in intestinal cells. Importantly, these data suggest that NFAT5 participates in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis via the suppression of mTORC1/Notch signaling pathway. PMID:25057011

  15. Kaempferol Inhibits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Mucus Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells And Ovalbumin-Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is an important pathological feature of chronic airway diseases, such as asthma and pulmonary diseases. MUC5AC is a major component of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways. The initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated stress responses contributes to the pathogenesis of airway diseases. The present study investigated that ER stress was responsible for airway mucus production and this effect was blocked by the flavonoid kaempferol. Oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol suppressed mucus secretion and goblet cell hyperplasia observed in the bronchial airway and lung of BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). TGF-β and tunicamycin promoted MUC5AC induction after 72 h in human bronchial airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells, which was dampened by 20 μM kaempferol. Kaempferol inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress of airway epithelial cells through disturbing the activation of the ER transmembrane sensor ATF6 and IRE1α. Additionally, this compound demoted the induction of ER chaperones such as GRP78 and HSP70 and the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA by tunicamycin. The in vivo study further revealed that kaempferol attenuated the induction of XBP-1 and IRE1α in epithelial tissues of OVA-challenged mice. TGF-β and tunicamycin induced TRAF2 with JNK activation and such induction was deterred by kaempferol. The inhibition of JNK activation encumbered the XBP-1 mRNA splicing and MUC5AC induction by tunicamycin and TGF-β. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated asthmatic mucus hypersecretion through blocking bronchial epithelial ER stress via the inhibition of IRE1α-TRAF2-JNK activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting mucus hypersecretion-associated pulmonary diseases. PMID:26599511

  16. Bronchoconstriction and airway biology: potential impact and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gosens, Reinoud; Grainge, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that mechanical forces occurring in the airway as a consequence of bronchoconstriction are sufficient to not only induce symptoms but also influence airway biology. Animal and human in vitro and in vivo work demonstrates that the airways are structurally and functionally altered by mechanical stress induced by bronchoconstriction. Compression of the airway epithelium and mechanosensing by the airway smooth muscle trigger the activation and release of growth factors, causing cell proliferation, extracellular matrix protein accumulation, and goblet cell differentiation. These effects of bronchoconstriction are of major importance to asthma pathophysiology and appear sufficient to induce remodeling independent of the inflammatory response. We review these findings in detail and discuss previous studies in light of this new evidence regarding the influence of mechanical forces in the airways. Furthermore, we highlight potential impacts of therapies influencing mechanical forces on airway structure and function in asthma. PMID:25732446

  17. Expulsion of Trichuris muris is associated with increased expression of angiogenin 4 in the gut and increased acidity of mucins within the goblet cell

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, Riccardo; deSchoolmeester, Matthew L; Zeef, Leo AH; Wright, Steven H; Pemberton, Alan D; Else, Kathryn J

    2009-01-01

    Background Trichuris muris in the mouse is an invaluable model for infection of man with the gastrointestinal nematode Trichuris trichiura. Three T. muris isolates have been studied, the Edinburgh (E), the Japan (J) and the Sobreda (S) isolates. The S isolate survives to chronicity within the C57BL/6 host whereas E and J are expelled prior to reaching fecundity. How the S isolate survives so successfully in its host is unclear. Results Microarray analysis was used as a tool to identify genes whose expression could determine the differences in expulsion kinetics between the E and S T. muris isolates. Clear differences in gene expression profiles were evident as early as day 7 post-infection (p.i.). 43 probe sets associated with immune and defence responses were up-regulated in gut tissue from an E isolate-infected C57BL/6 mouse compared to tissue from an S isolate infection, including the message for the anti-microbial protein, angiogenin 4 (Ang4). This led to the identification of distinct differences in the goblet cell phenotype post-infection with the two isolates. Conclusion Differences in gene expression levels identified between the S and E-infected mice early during infection have furthered our knowledge of how the S isolate persists for longer than the E isolate in the C57BL/6 mouse. Potential new targets for manipulation in order to aid expulsion have been identified. Further we provide evidence for a potential new marker involving the acidity of the mucins within the goblet cell which may predict outcome of infection within days of parasite exposure. PMID:19852835

  18. Increasing fat content from 20 to 45 wt% in a complex diet induces lower endotoxemia in parallel with an increased number of intestinal goblet cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Bérengère; Laugerette, Fabienne; Plaisancié, Pascale; Géloën, Alain; Bodennec, Jacques; Estienne, Monique; Pineau, Gaëlle; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Vidal, Hubert; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of high-fat diets (HFDs) on the onset of metabolic endotoxemia and low-grade inflammation are well established in rodent models. However, the dose-effect of dietary lipid intakes on these parameters is not known. We hypothesized that increasing dietary lipid amounts could be linked to parallel increases of endotoxemia, low-grade inflammation, and metabolic and intestinal alterations. Six-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat diet (LFD, 2.6 wt% of lipids), a moderate HFD (mHFD, 22 wt% of lipids), or a very HFD (vHFD, 45 wt% of lipids) formulated mainly using chow ingredients and milk fat. After 12 weeks, white adipose tissues, liver, intestine, distal colon contents, and plasma were collected. Only vHFD mice significantly increased body weight and fat mass vs LFD mice. This was associated with increases of plasma concentrations of triglycerides, leptin and adiponectin, and liver lipids. No such differences were observed between LFD and mHFD mice. However, mHFD developed metabolic endotoxemia and inflammation, unlike vHFD mice. In turn, vHFD mice showed more goblet cells in all intestine segments vs both other groups and a decrease of Bacteroides-Prevotella in their microbiota vs LFD mice. Finally, mHFD mice colon exhibited a decrease in lactobacilli and in the levels of occludin phosphorylation. Altogether, using complex HFD, no associations were observed between dietary lipid amounts and the magnitude of endotoxemia, inflammation, and physiological alterations developed. These results reveal the impact of the diet composition on intestinal goblet cells and mucus coat, bringing new insights about further consequences on HFD-induced metabolic disorders. PMID:25687164

  19. Applications of mouse airway epithelial cell culture for asthma research.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Dickinson, John D; Brody, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Primary airway epithelial cell culture provides a valuable tool for studying cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions, and the role of immune system factors in asthma pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss the application of mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures for the study of asthma biology. A major advantage of this system is the ability to use airway epithelial cells from mice with defined genetic backgrounds. The in vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse airway epithelial cells uses the air-liquid interface condition to generate well-differentiated epithelia with characteristics of native airways. Protocols are provided for manipulation of differentiation, induction of mucous cell metaplasia, genetic modification, and cell and pathogen coculture. Assays for the assessment of gene expression, responses of cells, and analysis of specific cell subpopulations within the airway epithelium are included. PMID:23943446

  20. Epidermal growth factor system regulates mucin production in airways

    PubMed Central

    Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Dabbagh, Karim; Lee, Heung-Man; Agustí, Carlos; Lausier, James A.; Ueki, Iris F.; Grattan, Kathleen M.; Nadel, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    Goblet-cell hyperplasia is a critical pathological feature in hypersecretory diseases of airways. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown, and no effective therapy exists. Here we show that stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) by its ligands, EGF and transforming growth factor α (TGFα), causes MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells both in in vitro and in vivo. We found that a MUC5AC-inducing epithelial cell line, NCI-H292, expresses EGF-R constitutively; EGF-R gene expression was stimulated further by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). EGF-R ligands increased the expression of MUC5AC at both gene and protein levels, and this effect was potentiated by TNFα. Selective EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked MUC5AC expression induced by EGF-R ligands. Pathogen-free rats expressed little EGF-R protein in airway epithelial cells; intratracheal instillation of TNFα induced EGF-R in airway epithelial cells, and subsequent instillation of EGF-R ligands increased the number of goblet cells, Alcian blue–periodic acid–Schiff staining (reflecting mucous glycoconjugates), and MUC5AC gene expression, whereas TNFα, EGF, or TGFα alone was without effect. In sensitized rats, three intratracheal instillations of ovalbumin resulted in EGF-R expression and goblet-cell production in airway epithelium. Pretreatment with EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, BIBX1522, prevented goblet-cell production both in rats stimulated by TNFα-EGF-R ligands and in an asthma model. These findings suggest potential roles for inhibitors of the EGF-R cascade in hypersecretory diseases of airways. PMID:10077640

  1. Collaborative interactions between type 2 innate lymphoid cells and antigen-specific CD4+ Th2 cells exacerbate murine allergic airway diseases with prominent eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-04-15

    Type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and the acquired CD4(+) Th2 and Th17 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of experimental asthma; however, their roles in Ag-driven exacerbation of chronic murine allergic airway diseases remain elusive. In this study, we report that repeated intranasal rechallenges with only OVA Ag were sufficient to trigger airway hyperresponsiveness, prominent eosinophilic inflammation, and significantly increased serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE in rested mice that previously developed murine allergic airway diseases. The recall response to repeated OVA inoculation preferentially triggered a further increase of lung OVA-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, whereas CD4(+) Th17 and ILC2 cell numbers remained constant. Furthermore, the acquired CD4(+) Th17 cells in Stat6(-/-)/IL-17-GFP mice, or innate ILC2s in CD4(+) T cell-ablated mice, failed to mount an allergic recall response to OVA Ag. After repeated OVA rechallenge or CD4(+) T cell ablation, the increase or loss of CD4(+) Th2 cells resulted in an enhanced or reduced IL-13 production by lung ILC2s in response to IL-25 and IL-33 stimulation, respectively. In return, ILC2s enhanced Ag-mediated proliferation of cocultured CD4(+) Th2 cells and their cytokine production, and promoted eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia driven by adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells. Thus, these results suggest that an allergic recall response to recurring Ag exposures preferentially triggers an increase of Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, which facilitates the collaborative interactions between acquired CD4(+) Th2 cells and innate ILC2s to drive the exacerbation of a murine allergic airway diseases with an eosinophilic phenotype. PMID:25780046

  2. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  3. Observing planar cell polarity in multiciliated mouse airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Lee, Yin Loon; Stearns, Tim; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The concerted movement of cilia propels inhaled contaminants out of the lungs, safeguarding the respiratory system from toxins, pathogens, pollutants, and allergens. Motile cilia on the multiciliated cells (MCCs) of the airway epithelium are physically oriented along the tissue axis for directional motility, which depends on the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway. The MCCs of the mouse respiratory epithelium have emerged as an important model for the study of motile ciliogenesis and the PCP signaling mechanism. Unlike other motile ciliated or planar polarized tissues, airway epithelial cells are relatively easily accessible and primary cultures faithfully model many of the essential features of the in vivo tissue. There is growing interest in understanding how cells acquire and polarize motile cilia due to the impact of mucociliary clearance on respiratory health. Here, we present methods for observing and quantifying the planar polarized orientation of motile cilia both in vivo and in primary culture airway epithelial cells. We describe how to acquire and evaluate electron and light microscopy images of ciliary ultrastructural features that reveal planar polarized orientation. Furthermore, we describe the immunofluorescence localization of PCP pathway components as a simple readout for airway epithelial planar polarization and ciliary orientation. These methods can be adapted to observe ciliary orientation in other multi- and monociliated cells and to detect PCP pathway activity in any tissue or cell type. PMID:25837385

  4. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha; Rabowsky, Michelle F.; Last, Michael S.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia. PMID:20953358

  5. Interferon-γ-Induced Unfolded Protein Response in Conjunctival Goblet Cells as a Cause of Mucin Deficiency in Sjögren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coursey, Terry G; Tukler Henriksson, Johanna; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Goblet cells (GCs) are specialized secretory cells that produce mucins and a variety of other proteins. Significant conjunctival GC loss occurs in both experimental dry eye models and patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca due to the induction of interferon (IFN)-γ. With the use of a primary murine culture model, we found that GCs are highly sensitive to IFN-γ with significantly reduced proliferation and altered structure with low concentrations. GC cultures treated with IFN-γ have increased gene expression of Muc2 and Muc5AC but do not express these mucin glycoproteins. We hypothesized that IFN-γ induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in GCs. Cultures treated with IFN-γ increased expression of UPR-associated genes and proteins. Increased GRP78 and sXBP1 expression was found in experimental dry eye and Sjögren syndrome models and was GC specific. Increased GRP78 was also found in the conjunctiva of patients with Sjögren syndrome at the gene and protein levels. Treatment with dexamethasone inhibited expression of UPR-associated genes and increased mucin production. These results indicate that induction of UPR by IFN-γ is an important cause of GC-associated mucin deficiency observed in aqueous-deficient dry eye. Therapies to block the effects of IFN-γ on the metabolically active endoplasmic reticulum in these cells might enhance synthesis and secretion of the protective GC mucins on the ocular surface. PMID:27085137

  6. Expression of ligands for Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 in human airways and airway cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Yu, Huifeng; Fernandes, Steve M.; Wei, Yadong; Gonzalez-Gil, Anabel; Motari, Mary G.; Vajn, Katarina; Stevens, Whitney W.; Peters, Anju T.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Balanced activation and inhibition of the immune system ensures pathogen clearance while avoiding hyperinflammation. Siglecs, sialic acid binding proteins found on subsets of immune cells, often inhibit inflammation: Siglec-8 on eosinophils and Siglec-9 on neutrophils engage sialoglycan ligands on airways to diminish ongoing inflammation. The identities of human siglec ligands and their expression during inflammation are largely unknown. Objective The histological distribution, expression and molecular characteristics of siglec ligands were explored in healthy and inflamed human upper airways and in a cellular model of airway inflammation. Methods Normal and chronically inflamed upper airway tissues were stained for siglec ligands. The ligands were extracted from normal and inflamed tissues and from human Calu-3 cells for quantitative analysis by siglec blotting and isolation by siglec capture. Results Siglec-8 ligands were expressed on a subpopulation of submucosal gland cells of human inferior turbinate, whereas Siglec-9 ligands were expressed more broadly (submucosal glands, epithelium, connective tissue); both were significantly upregulated in chronic rhinosinusitis patients. Human airway (Calu-3) cells expressed Siglec-9 ligands on mucin 5B under inflammatory control via the NF-κB pathway, and mucin 5B carried sialoglycan ligands of Siglec-9 on human upper airway tissue. Conclusion Inflammation results in upregulation of immune inhibitory Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 sialoglycan ligands on human airways. Siglec-9 ligands were upregulated via the NF-κB pathway resulting in their enhanced expression on mucin 5B. Siglec sialoglycan ligand expression in inflamed cells and tissues may contribute to the control of airway inflammation. PMID:25747723

  7. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on inhibiting airway remodeling and airway inflammation in chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Bai, Chong; Yang, Jianming; Lou, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Ruohua

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies proved that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could improve a variety of immune-mediated disease by its immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effect on airway remodeling and airway inflammation by administrating BMSCs in chronic asthmatic mice. Forty-eight female BALB/c mice were randomly distributed into PBS group, BMSCs treatment group, BMSCs control group, and asthmatic group. The levels of cytokine and immunoglobulin in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and morphometric analysis was determined by flow cytometry, hematoxylin-eosin, immunofluorescence staining, periodic-acid Schiff, and masson staining, respectively. We found that airway remodeling and airway inflammation were evident in asthmatic mice. Moreover, low level of IL-12 and high levels of IL-13, IL-4, OVA-specific IgG1, IgE, and IgG2a and the fewer number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells were present in asthmatic group. However, transplantation of BMSCs significantly decreased airway inflammation and airway remodeling and level of IL-4, OVA-specific IgE, and OVA-specific IgG1, but elevated level of IL-12 and the number of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma (P < 0.05). However, BMSCs did not contribute to lung regeneration and had no significant effect on levels of IL-10, IFN-Y, and IL-13. In our study, BMSCs engraftment prohibited airway inflammation and airway remodeling in chronic asthmatic group. The beneficial effect of BMSCs might involved the modulation imbalance cytokine toward a new balance Th1-Th2 profiles and up-regulation of protective CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma, but not contribution to lung regeneration. PMID:23334934

  8. Control of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weitnauer, M; Mijošek, V; Dalpke, A H

    2016-03-01

    The lung is ventilated by thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbial compounds, most of them harmless contaminants. Airway epithelial cells are known to have innate sensor functions, thus being able to detect microbial danger. To avoid chronic inflammation, the pulmonary system has developed specific means to control local immune responses. Even though airway epithelial cells can act as proinflammatory promoters, we propose that under homeostatic conditions airway epithelial cells are important modulators of immune responses in the lung. In this review, we discuss epithelial cell regulatory functions that control reactivity of professional immune cells within the microenvironment of the airways and how these mechanisms are altered in pulmonary diseases. Regulation by epithelial cells can be divided into two mechanisms: (1) mediators regulate epithelial cells' innate sensitivity in cis and (2) factors are produced that limit reactivity of immune cells in trans. PMID:26627458

  9. Effects of Dietary Supplementation of Barodon, an Anionic Alkali Mineral Complex, on Growth Performance, Feed Utilization, Innate Immunity, Goblet Cell and Digestibility in Olive Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chang-Hoon; Cha, Ji-Hoon; Rahimnejad, Samad; Jeong, Joon-Bum; Yoo, Byung-Woo; Lee, Bo-Kyeun; Ahn, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Soo-Il; Choi, Yun-Jeong; Park, Yong-Ho; Kim, Jeong-Dae; Lee, Kyeong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A 15-wk feeding trial was conducted to examine the supplemental effects of Barodon on growth performance, gastrointestinal histology, feed digestibility and innate immunity in olive founder. A basal commercial diet was used as a control and two other diets were prepared by spraying 0.1% or 0.2% of Barodon. Triplicate groups of fish (BW, 145 g) were fed one of the test diets to apparent satiation twice daily. At the end of the feeding trial, fish growth performance was not significantly affected by dietary treatments; however, feed utilization was significantly improved (linear and quadratic, p<0.05) by Barodon supplementation. Significantly higher (p<0.05) survival rates were obtained in fish fed Barodon containing diets. Hepatosomatic index increased significantly in Barodon treated groups. Also, the use of Barodon resulted in significant increase (linear and quadratic, p<0.05) of intestine length and number of goblet cells. Significantly higher (Quadratic, p<0.05) apparent digestibility coefficient of DM was obtained by supplementation of Barodon. Lysozyme and myeloperoxidase activities increased quadratically and linearly, respectively, in Barodon treated fish. Also, significantly higher (linear and quadratic, p<0.05) superoxide dismutase activity was found in Barodon fed fish. The findings in this study show that inclusion of Barodon in diets for olive flounder improves feed utilization and digestibility, and positively affects digestive tract histology and innate immunity. PMID:25049965

  10. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  11. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  12. Regulated Mucin Secretion from Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Kenneth B.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Dickey, Burton F.

    2013-01-01

    Secretory epithelial cells of the proximal airways synthesize and secrete gel-forming polymeric mucins. The secreted mucins adsorb water to form mucus that is propelled by neighboring ciliated cells, providing a mobile barrier which removes inhaled particles and pathogens from the lungs. Several features of the intracellular trafficking of mucins make the airway secretory cell an interesting comparator for the cell biology of regulated exocytosis. Polymeric mucins are exceedingly large molecules (up to 3 × 106 Da per monomer) whose folding and initial polymerization in the ER requires the protein disulfide isomerase Agr2. In the Golgi, mucins further polymerize to form chains and possibly branched networks comprising more than 20 monomers. The large size of mucin polymers imposes constraints on their packaging into transport vesicles along the secretory pathway. Sugar side chains account for >70% of the mass of mucins, and their attachment to the protein core by O-glycosylation occurs in the Golgi. Mature polymeric mucins are stored in large secretory granules ∼1 μm in diameter. These are translocated to the apical membrane to be positioned for exocytosis by cooperative interactions among myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate, cysteine string protein, heat shock protein 70, and the cytoskeleton. Mucin granules undergo exocytic fusion with the plasma membrane at a low basal rate and a high stimulated rate. Both rates are mediated by a regulated exocytic mechanism as indicated by phenotypes in both basal and stimulated secretion in mice lacking Munc13-2, a sensor of the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol (DAG). Basal secretion is induced by low levels of activation of P2Y2 purinergic and A3 adenosine receptors by extracellular ATP released in paracrine fashion and its metabolite adenosine. Stimulated secretion is induced by high levels of the same ligands, and possibly by inflammatory mediators as well. Activated receptors are coupled to

  13. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naïve T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune response and helminth infection. PMID:21440530

  14. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  15. High-dose but not low-dose mainstream cigarette smoke suppresses allergic airway inflammation by inhibiting T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Thomas H.; Benson, Randi P.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke as a significant risk factor for the onset and exacerbation of asthma, but studies of smoking in adults are less conclusive, and mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) has been reported to both enhance and attenuate allergic airway inflammation in animal models. We sensitized mice to ovalbumin (OVA) and exposed them to MCS in a well-characterized exposure system. Exposure to MCS (600 mg/m3 total suspended particulates, TSP) for 1 h/day suppresses the allergic airway response, with reductions in eosinophilia, tissue inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia, IL-4 and IL-5 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and OVA-specific antibodies. Suppression is associated with a loss of antigen-specific proliferation and cytokine production by T cells. However, exposure to a lower dose of MCS (77 mg/m3 TSP) had no effect on the number of BAL eosinophils or OVA-specific antibodies. This is the first report to demonstrate, using identical smoking methodologies, that MCS inhibits immune responses in a dose-dependent manner and may explain the observation that, although smoking provokes a systemic inflammatory response, it also inhibits T cell-mediated responses involved in a number of diseases. PMID:18567739

  16. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puchelle, E; Peault, B

    2000-01-01

    Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa. PMID:11667974

  17. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  18. Proton-Sensing Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 on Dendritic Cells Is Required for Airway Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Takeshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Kamide, Yosuke; Ichimonji, Isao; Tomura, Hideaki; Tobo, Masayuki; Sato, Koichi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Dobashi, Kunio; Mori, Tetsuya; Harada, Akihiro; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) stimulation by extracellular protons causes the activation of G proteins and subsequent cellular functions. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of OGR1 in airway responses remain largely unknown. In the present study, we show that OGR1-deficient mice are resistant to the cardinal features of asthma, including airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and goblet cell metaplasia, in association with a remarkable inhibition of Th2 cytokine and IgE production, in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Intratracheal transfer to wild-type mice of OVA-primed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from OGR1-deficient mice developed lower AHR and eosinophilia after OVA inhalation compared with the transfer of those from wild-type mice. Migration of OVA-pulsed DCs to peribronchial lymph nodes was also inhibited by OGR1 deficiency in the adoption experiments. The presence of functional OGR1 in DCs was confirmed by the expression of OGR1 mRNA and the OGR1-sensitive Ca2+ response. OVA-induced expression of CCR7, a mature DC chemokine receptor, and migration response to CCR7 ligands in an in vitro Transwell assay were attenuated by OGR1 deficiency. We conclude that OGR1 on DCs is critical for migration to draining lymph nodes, which, in turn, stimulates Th2 phenotype change and subsequent induction of airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:24244587

  19. Adalimumab ameliorates OVA-induced airway inflammation in mice: Role of CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) regulatory T-cells.

    PubMed

    Elsakkar, Mohamed G; Sharaki, Olla A; Abdallah, Dina M; Mostafa, Dalia K; Shekondali, Fadia T

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory heterogeneous disorder initiated by a dysregulated immune response which drives disease development in susceptible individuals. Though T helper 2 (TH2) biased responses are usually linked to eosinophilic asthma, other Th cell subsets induce neutrophilic airway inflammation which provokes the most severe asthmatic phenotypes. A growing evidence highlights the role of T regulatory (Treg) cells in damping abnormal Th responses and thus inhibiting allergy and asthma. Therefore, strategies to induce or augment Treg cells hold promise for treatment and prevention of allergic airway inflammation. Recently, the link between Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Treg has been uncovered, and TNF-α antagonists are increasingly used in many autoimmune diseases. Yet, their benefits in allergic airway inflammation is not clarified. We investigated the effect of Adalimumab, a TNF-α antagonist, on Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation in CD1 mice and explored its impact on Treg cells. Our results showed that Adalimumab treatment attenuated the OVA-induced increase in serum IgE, TH2 and TH1 derived inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IFN-γ, respectively) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, suppressed recruitment of inflammatory cells in BAL fluid and lung, and inhibited BAL fluid neutrophilia. It also ameliorated goblet cell metaplasia and bronchial fibrosis. Splenocytes flow cytometry revealed increased percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) Treg cells by Adalimumab that was associated with increase in their suppressive activity as shown by elevated BAL fluid IL-10. We conclude that the beneficial effects of Adalimumab in this CD1 neutrophilic model of allergic airway inflammation are attributed to augmentation of Treg cell number and activity. PMID:27262379

  20. Inhibition of airway epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis by kaempferol in endotoxin-induced epithelial cells and ovalbumin-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ju-Hyun; Cho, In-Hee; Shin, Daekeun; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Sin-Hye; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Chronic airway remodeling is characterized by structural changes within the airway wall, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, submucosal fibrosis and epithelial shedding. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental mechanism of organ fibrosis, which can be induced by TGF-β. In the in vitro study, we investigated whether 1-20 μM kaempferol inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bronchial EMT in BEAS-2B cells. The in vivo study explored demoting effects of 10-20 mg/kg kaempferol on airway fibrosis in BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). LPS induced airway epithelial TGF-β1 signaling that promoted EMT with concurrent loss of E-cadherin and induction of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Nontoxic kaempferol significantly inhibited TGF-β-induced EMT process through reversing E-cadherin expression and retarding the induction of N-cadherin and α-SMA. Consistently, OVA inhalation resulted in a striking loss of epithelial morphology by displaying myofibroblast appearance, which led to bronchial fibrosis with submucosal accumulation of collagen fibers. Oral administration of kaempferol suppressed collagen deposition, epithelial excrescency and goblet hyperplasia observed in the lung of OVA-challenged mice. The specific inhibition of TGF-β entailed epithelial protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) as with 20 μM kaempferol. The epithelial PAR-1 inhibition by SCH-79797 restored E-cadherin induction and deterred α-SMA induction, indicating that epithelial PAR-1 localization was responsible for resulting in airway EMT. These results demonstrate that dietary kaempferol alleviated fibrotic airway remodeling via bronchial EMT by modulating PAR1 activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting asthmatic airway constriction. PMID:24378645

  1. Critical role of actin-associated proteins in smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dale D

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling, which are largely attributed to increased airway smooth muscle contractility and cell proliferation. It is known that both chemical and mechanical stimulation regulates smooth muscle contraction. Recent studies suggest that contractile activation and mechanical stretch induce actin cytoskeletal remodeling in smooth muscle. However, the mechanisms that control actin cytoskeletal reorganization are not completely elucidated. This review summarizes our current understanding regarding how actin-associated proteins may regulate remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton in airway smooth muscle. In particular, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) plays a critical role in regulating airway smooth muscle contraction and cell proliferation in vitro, and airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in vivo. These studies indicate that Abl may be a novel target for the development of new therapy to treat asthma. PMID:26517982

  2. Trefoil factor-2 reverses airway remodeling changes in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Lim, Clarice; Muljadi, Ruth C; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C; Giraud, Andrew S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a small peptide with an important role in mucosal repair. TFF2 is up-regulated in asthma, suggesting a role in asthma pathogenesis. Given its known biological role in promoting epithelial repair, TFF2 might be expected to exert a protective function in limiting the progression of airway remodeling in asthma. The contribution of TFF2 to airway remodeling in asthma was investigated by examining the expression of TFF2 in the airway and lung, and evaluating the effects of recombinant TFF2 treatment on established airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD). BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 9 weeks, whereas mice with established OVA-induced AAD were treated with TFF2 or vehicle control (intranasally for 14 d). Effects on airway remodeling, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness were then assessed, whereas TFF2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. TFF2 expression was significantly increased in the airways of mice with AAD, compared with expression levels in control mice. TFF2 treatment resulted in reduced epithelial thickening, subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet-cell metaplasia, bronchial epithelium apoptosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness (all P < 0.05, versus vehicle control), but TFF2 treatment did not influence airway inflammation. The increased expression of endogenous TFF2 in response to chronic allergic inflammation is insufficient to prevent the progression of airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic AAD. However, exogenous TFF2 treatment is effective in reversing aspects of established airway remodeling. TFF2 has potential as a novel treatment for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22652198

  3. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Davies, Donna E.; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL–8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4–6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  4. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M; Collins, Jane E; Davies, Donna E; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL-8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4-6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  5. The Three A's in Asthma - Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Keglowich, L F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  6. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  7. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lance; E, Xueping; Tarsi, Jaime; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor; Horiuchi, Todd K.; Cochran, Rebecca; DeMartino, Steve; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Hussain, Iftikhar; Holtzman, Michael J.; Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Despite long-term therapy with corticosteroids, patients with severe asthma develop irreversible airway obstruction. Objectives: To evaluate if there are structural and functional differences in the airway epithelium in severe asthma associated with airway remodeling. Methods: In bronchial biopsies from 21 normal subjects, 11 subjects with chronic bronchitis, 9 subjects with mild asthma, and 31 subjects with severe asthma, we evaluated epithelial cell morphology: epithelial thickness, lamina reticularis (LR) thickness, and epithelial desquamation. Levels of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), Ki67, and Bcl-2 were measured, reflecting cellular proliferation and death. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to study cellular apoptosis. Measurements and Main Results: Airway epithelial and LR thickness was greater in subjects with severe asthma compared with those with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects (p = 0.009 and 0.033, respectively). There was no significant difference in epithelial desquamation between groups. Active, hypophosphorylated Rb expression was decreased (p = 0.002) and Ki67 was increased (p < 0.01) in the epithelium of subjects with severe asthma as compared with normal subjects, indicating increased cellular proliferation. Bcl-2 expression was decreased (p < 0.001), indicating decreased cell death suppression. There was a greater level of apoptotic activity in the airway biopsy in subjects with severe asthma as compared with the normal subjects using the TUNEL assay (p = 0.002), suggesting increased cell death. Conclusions: In subjects with severe asthma, as compared with subjects with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects, we found novel evidence of increased cellular proliferation in the airway contributing to a thickened epithelium and LR. These changes may contribute to the progressive decline in lung function and airway remodeling in patients with severe

  8. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  9. AIRWAY CELL AND NUCLEAR DEPTH DISTRIBUTION IN HUMAN RAT LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To predict the critical cells that are subject to injury from inhaled radon and other alpha particle sources it is necessary to calculate the dose absorbed by the different cells in the lungs. n order to provide information necessary to make these dose determinations, the airway ...

  10. Intratracheal transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells reduced airway inflammation and up-regulated CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T cells in asthmatic mouse.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Bai, Chong; Yang, Jianming; Lou, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Ruohua

    2013-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells attenuate the severity of lung injury due to their immunomodulatory properties. The effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on asthma is seldom reported. We have examined the effect of BMSCs on airway inflammation in asthma. Forty female BALB/c mice were equally randomised into PBS group, BMSCs treatment group, BMSCs control group and asthmatic group. Reactivity of the airway to acetylcholine was measured by barometric plethysmography. Cytokine profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Morphometric analysis was done with haematoxylin and periodic-acid Schiff staining. Engraftment of BMSCs in asthmatic mice significantly decreased the number of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the airway (P < 0.05). Both goblet cell hyperplasia and responsiveness to acetylcholine were significantly reduced in BMSCs treatment groups. Moreover, BMSCs engraftment caused significant increases the ratio of Treg in pulmonary lymph node and interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-12 levels in BALF and serum. We conclude that BMSCs engraftment ameliorated airway inflammation and improved lung function in asthmatic mouse and the protective effect might be mediated by upregulating Treg and partly involved with increasing IL-10. PMID:23483727

  11. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  12. Characterization of side population cells from human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Jacoby, David B; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M; Knight, Darryl A

    2008-10-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45(-) SP, CD45(+) SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45(-) SP cells made up 0.12% +/- 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% +/- 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45(-) SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45(-) SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45(-) SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and long-term proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18653771

  13. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  14. Generation of airway epithelial cells with native characteristics from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Susumu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Ikeda, Masakazu; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Omori, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are expected to be a useful source for the regeneration of airway epithelium. Our preliminary study of embryoid body (EB) formation and the air-liquid interface (ALI) method suggested that mouse iPS cells can differentiate into airway epithelial cells. However, whether the cells generated from mouse iPS cells had the character and phenotype of native airway epithelial cells remained uninvestigated. In this study, we generated airway epithelial cells from EBs by culturing them under serum-free conditions supplemented with Activin and bFGF and by the ALI method and characterized the iPS cell-derived airway epithelial cells in terms of their gene expression, immunoreactivity, morphology, and function. Analysis by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) revealed that the expression of the undifferentiated cell marker Nanog decreased time-dependently after the induction of differentiation, whereas definitive endoderm markers Foxa2 and Cxcr4 were transiently up-regulated. Thereafter, the expression of airway epithelium markers such as Tubb4a, Muc5ac, and Krt5 was detected by RT-PCR and immunostaining. The formation of tight junctions was also confirmed by immunostaining and permeability assay. Analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the cells generated from mouse iPS cells formed airway-epithelium-like tissue and had cilia, the movement of which was visualized and observed to be synchronized. These results demonstrate that the airway epithelial cells generated by our method have native characteristics and open new perspectives for the regeneration of injured airway epithelium. PMID:26590823

  15. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease. PMID:25959386

  16. Suppressive effect of compact bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells on chronic airway remodeling in murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ogulur, Ismail; Gurhan, Gulben; Aksoy, Ayca; Duruksu, Gokhan; Inci, Cigdem; Filinte, Deniz; Kombak, Faruk Erdem; Karaoz, Erdal; Akkoc, Tunc

    2014-05-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed in the treatment of asthma besides vaccines and pharmacotherapies. For the development of novel therapies, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a promising approach in regenerative medicine. Delivery of compact bone (CB) derived MSCs to the injured lungs is an alternative treatment strategy for chronic asthma. In this study, we aimed to isolate highly enriched population of MSCs from mouse CB with regenerative capacity, and to investigate the impact of these cells in airway remodeling and inflammation in experimental ovalbumin-induced mouse model of chronic asthma. mCB-MSCs were isolated, characterized, labeled with GFP and then transferred into mice with chronic asthma developed by ovalbumin (OVA) provocation. Histopathological changes including basement membrane, epithelium, subepithelial smooth thickness and goblet cell hyperplasia, and MSCs migration to lung tissues were evaluated. These histopathological alterations were increased in ovalbumin-treated mice compared to PBS group (P<0.001). Intravenous administration of mCB-MSC significantly reduced these histopathological changes in both distal and proximal airways (P<0.001). We showed that GFP-labeled MSCs were located in the lungs of OVA group 2weeks after intravenous induction. mCB-MSCs also significantly promoted Treg response in ovalbumin-treated mice (OVA+MSC group) (P<0.037). Our studies revealed that mCB-MSCs migrated to lung tissue and suppressed histopathological changes in murine model of asthma. The results reported here provided evidence that mCB-MSCs may be an alternative strategy for the treatment of remodeling and inflammation associated with chronic asthma. PMID:24613203

  17. Take the Wnt out of the inflammatory sails: modulatory effects of Wnt in airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Sebastian; Beckert, Hendrik; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic diseases that are associated with inflammation and structural changes in the airways and lungs. Recent findings have implicated Wnt pathways in critically regulating inflammatory responses, especially in asthma. Furthermore, canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways are involved in structural changes such as airway remodeling, goblet cell metaplasia, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation. In COPD, Wnt pathways are not only associated with structural changes in the airways but also involved in the development of emphysema. The present review summarizes the role and function of the canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathway with regard to airway inflammation and structural changes in asthma and COPD. Further identification of the role and function of different Wnt molecules and pathways could help to develop novel therapeutic options for these diseases. PMID:26595171

  18. Limonene inhalation reduces allergic airway inflammation in Dermatophagoides farinae-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Ryoji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Bhatti, Sabah Asif; Ngatu, Nlandu Roger; Muzembo, Basilua Andre; Dumavibhat, Narongpon; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Sawamura, Masayoshi; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2012-05-01

    Limonene is one of the main flavonoids which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the production of reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether limonene can inhibit Dermatophagoides farinae-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilic infiltration and other histological changes in the lung, T helper (Th) 2 cytokine production and airway remodeling in a mice model of asthma. Treatment with limonene significantly reduced the levels of IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin, MCP-1, and TGF-β₁ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The goblet cell metaplasia, thickness of airway smooth muscle, and airway fibrosis were markedly decreased in limonene-treated mice. Furthermore, AHR to acetylcholine was significantly abrogated in limonene-treated mice. These results indicate that limonene has a potential to reduce airway remodeling and AHR in asthma model. PMID:22564095

  19. Human airway smooth muscle cells secrete amphiregulin via bradykinin/COX-2/PGE2, inducing COX-2, CXCL8, and VEGF expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC) contribute to asthma pathophysiology through an increased smooth muscle mass and elevated cytokine/chemokine output. Little is known about how HASMC and the airway epithelium interact to regulate chronic airway inflammation and remodeling. Amphiregulin is a member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agonists with cell growth and proinflammatory roles and increased expression in the lungs of asthma patients. Here we show that bradykinin (BK) stimulation of HASMC increases amphiregulin secretion in a mechanism dependent on BK-induced COX-2 expression, increased PGE2 output, and the stimulation of HASMC EP2 and EP4 receptors. Conditioned medium from BK treated HASMC induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 mRNA and protein accumulation in airway epithelial cells, which were blocked by anti-amphiregulin antibodies and amphiregulin siRNA, suggesting a paracrine effect of HASMC-derived amphiregulin on airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, recombinant amphiregulin induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 in airway epithelial cells. Finally, we found that conditioned media from amphiregulin-stimulated airway epithelial cells induced amphiregulin expression in HASMC and that this was dependent on airway epithelial cell COX-2 activity. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic axis of interaction between HASMC and epithelial cells that amplifies CXCL8, VEGF, COX-2, and amphiregulin production. PMID:26047642

  20. Dendritic Cell-Nerve Clusters Are Sites of T Cell Proliferation in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Tibor Z.; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell–T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell–cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell–T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa. PMID:19179611

  1. Immunomodulation of airway epithelium cell activation by mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1α and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  2. Upper Airway Genioglossal Activity in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Allen, Julian L.; Arens, Raanan; Bowdre, Cheryl Y.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Marcus, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be higher than that in the general pediatric population. However, not all subjects with SCD develop OSAS. We hypothesized that SCD patients with OSAS have a blunted neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them more likely to develop upper airway collapse. Design: Subjects with SCD with and without OSAS underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep using intraoral surface electrodes to measure genioglossal EMG (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease the nasal pressure (PN) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. The area under the curve of the inspiratory EMGgg moving time average was analyzed. EMGgg activity was expressed as a percentage of baseline. Changes in EMGgg in response to decrements in nasal pressure were expressed as the slope of the EMGgg vs. nasal pressure (slope of EMGgg-PN). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: 4 children with SCD and OSAS and 18 children with SCD but without OSAS. Results: The major findings of this study were: (1) using the activated but not the hypotonic technique, the slope of EMGgg-PN was more negative in SCD controls than SCD OSAS; (2) the slope of EMGgg-PN was significantly lower using the activated technique compared to the hypotonic technique in SCD controls only; (3) similarly, the critical closing pressure, Pcrit, was more negative using the activated technique than the hypotonic technique in SCD controls but not in SCD OSAS. Conclusion: This preliminary study has shown that children with SCD but without OSAS have more prominent upper airway reflexes than children with SCD and OSAS. Citation: Huang J; Pinto SJ; Allen JL; Arens R; Bowdre CY; Jawad AF; Mason TBA; Ohene-Frempong K; Smith-Whitely K; Marcus CL. Upper airway genioglossal activity in children with sickle cell disease. SLEEP 2011

  3. The role of airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells in chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Michael J.; Byers, Derek E.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Wang, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal immune response to environmental agents is generally thought to be responsible for causing chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Based on studies of experimental models and human subjects, there is increasing evidence that the response of the innate immune system is crucial for the development of this type of airway disease. Airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells represent key components of the pathogenesis of chronic airway disease and are emerging targets for new therapies. In this Review, we summarize the innate immune mechanisms by which airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells regulate the development of chronic respiratory diseases. We also explain how these pathways are being targeted in the clinic to treat patients with these diseases. PMID:25234144

  4. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  5. Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D.; Garofalo, R.P.; Casola, A.

    2007-11-10

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

  6. AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO HUMAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    X, Bao; T, Liu; L, Spetch; D, Kolli; R.P, Garofalo; A, Casola

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immuno-modulatory mediators. PMID:17655903

  7. Control of regulatory T cells and airway tolerance by lung macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Croft, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Airway tolerance, a state of immunological surveillance, suppresses the development of lung inflammatory disorders that are driven by various pathological effector cells of the immune system. Tolerance in the lung to inhaled antigens is primarily mediated by regulatory T cells (Treg cells) that can inhibit effector T cells via a myriad of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence suggests that regulatory antigen-presenting cells are critical for generating Treg cells and/or maintaining the suppressive environment in the lung. This review focuses on the control of airway tolerance by Treg cells and the role of regulatory lung tissue and alveolar macrophages, and lung and lymph node dendritic cells, in contributing to airway tolerance that is associated with suppression of allergic asthmatic disease. PMID:25525738

  8. OZONE-INDUCED RELEASE OF CYTOKINES AND FIBRONECTIN BY ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although airway epithelial cells appear damaged following exposure of humans and animals to ozone, the contribution of these cells to inflammation observed after ozone exposure is unclear. ince human airway cells are infrequently available for in vitro studies, we have investigat...

  9. A Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitor Reduces Airway Remodeling in a Murine Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun H.; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  10. A plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor reduces airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun H; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  11. Mucin-Related Molecular Responses of Bronchial Epithelial Cells in Rats Infected with the Nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Koichi; Yamada, Minoru; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Arizono, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Although mucins are essential for the protection of internal epithelial surfaces, molecular responses involving mucin production and secretion in response to various infectious agents in the airway have not been fully elucidated. The present study analysed airway goblet cell mucins in rats infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, which migrates to the lungs shortly after infection. Goblet cell hyperplasia occurred in the bronchial epithelium 3–10 days after infection. The high iron diamine-alcian blue staining combined with neuraminidase treatment showed that sialomucin is the major mucin in hyperplastic goblet cells. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that goblet cell mucins were immunoreactive with both the major airway mucin core peptide, Muc5AC, and the major intestinal mucin core peptide Muc2. Reverse transcription real-time PCR studies demonstrated upregulation of gene transcription levels of Muc5AC, Muc2, the sialyltransferase St3gal4, and the resistin-like molecule beta (Retnlb) in the lungs. These results showed that nematode infection induces airway epithelial responses characterised by the production of sialomucin with Muc5AC and Muc2 core peptides. These mucins, as well as Retnlb, might have important roles in the protection of mucosa from migrating nematodes in the airway. PMID:27335862

  12. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients. PMID:27595800

  13. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients. PMID:27595800

  14. Airway epithelial homeostasis and planar cell polarity signaling depend on multiciliated cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Nayak, Jayakar V.; Milla, Carlos E.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Motile airway cilia that propel contaminants out of the lung are oriented in a common direction by planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, which localizes PCP protein complexes to opposite cell sides throughout the epithelium to orient cytoskeletal remodeling. In airway epithelia, PCP is determined in a 2-phase process. First, cell-cell communication via PCP complexes polarizes all cells with respect to the proximal-distal tissue axis. Second, during ciliogenesis, multiciliated cells (MCCs) undergo cytoskeletal remodeling to orient their cilia in the proximal direction. The second phase not only directs cilium polarization, but also consolidates polarization across the epithelium. Here, we demonstrate that in airway epithelia, PCP depends on MCC differentiation. PCP mutant epithelia have misaligned cilia, and also display defective barrier function and regeneration, indicating that PCP regulates multiple aspects of airway epithelial homeostasis. In humans, MCCs are often sparse in chronic inflammatory diseases, and these airways exhibit PCP dysfunction. The presence of insufficient MCCs impairs mucociliary clearance in part by disrupting PCP-driven polarization of the epithelium. Consistent with defective PCP, barrier function and regeneration are also disrupted. Pharmacological stimulation of MCC differentiation restores PCP and reverses these defects, suggesting its potential for broad therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27570836

  15. Epithelial cell deformation during surfactant-mediated airway reopening: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Naire, Shailesh; Jensen, Oliver E

    2005-08-01

    A theoretical model is presented describing the reopening by an advancing air bubble of an initially liquid-filled collapsed airway lined with deformable epithelial cells. The model integrates descriptions of flow-structure interaction (accounting for nonlinear deformation of the airway wall and viscous resistance of the airway liquid flow), surfactant transport around the bubble tip (incorporating physicochemical parameters appropriate for Infasurf), and cell deformation (due to stretching of the airway wall and airway liquid flows). It is shown how the pressure required to drive a bubble into a flooded airway, peeling apart the wet airway walls, can be reduced substantially by surfactant, although the effectiveness of Infasurf is limited by slow adsorption at high concentrations. The model demonstrates how the addition of surfactant can lead to the spontaneous reopening of a collapsed airway, depending on the degree of initial airway collapse. The effective elastic modulus of the epithelial layer is shown to be a key determinant of the relative magnitude of strains generated by flow-induced shear stresses and by airway wall stretch. The model also shows how epithelial-layer compressibility can mediate strains arising from flow-induced normal stresses and stress gradients. PMID:15802368

  16. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  17. Influence of airway wall compliance on epithelial cell injury and adhesion during interfacial flows

    PubMed Central

    Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Mihai, Cosmin; Hansford, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial flows during cyclic airway reopening are an important source of ventilator-induced lung injury. However, it is not known how changes in airway wall compliance influence cell injury during airway reopening. We used an in vitro model of airway reopening in a compliant microchannel to investigate how airway wall stiffness influences epithelial cell injury. Epithelial cells were grown on gel substrates with different rigidities, and cellular responses to substrate stiffness were evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, mechanics, morphology, and adhesion. Repeated microbubble propagations were used to simulate cyclic airway reopening, and cell injury and detachment were quantified via live/dead staining. Although cells cultured on softer gels exhibited a reduced elastic modulus, these cells experienced less plasma membrane rupture/necrosis. Cells on rigid gels exhibited a minor, but statistically significant, increase in the power law exponent and also exhibited a significantly larger height-to-length aspect ratio. Previous studies indicate that this change in morphology amplifies interfacial stresses and, therefore, correlates with the increased necrosis observed during airway reopening. Although cells cultured on stiff substrates exhibited more plasma membrane rupture, these cells experienced significantly less detachment and monolayer disruption during airway reopening. Western blotting and immunofluorescence indicate that this protection from detachment and monolayer disruption correlates with increased focal adhesion kinase and phosphorylated paxillin expression. Therefore, changes in cell morphology and focal adhesion structure may govern injury responses during compliant airway reopening. In addition, these results indicate that changes in airway compliance, as occurs during fibrosis or emphysema, may significantly influence cell injury during mechanical ventilation. PMID:25213636

  18. Coupling of airway ciliary activity and mucin secretion to mechanical stresses by purinergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Davis, C William; Lazarowski, Eduardo

    2008-11-30

    The mucociliary clearance system is comprised of three components, ion transport activities controlling the height of airway surface liquid (ASL), mucin secretion, and ciliary activity. These activities in humans are controlled principally by local agonists, extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides released from the epithelium. Importantly, mechanical stresses stimulate goblet cell mucin secretion, ciliary beating, and Cl- and fluid secretion through mechanically induced nucleotide release. Emerging evidence also implicates co-secretion of nucleotides and mucin from goblet cells as a source of extracellular agonist. At rest, ATP is released onto airway surfaces at approximately 370fmol/mincm2, but only approximately 3% of released ATP is recovered in ASL. Secreted UTP meets with a similar fate. A wide variety of hydrolytic and transphosphorylating ecto-enzymes convert the triphosphate nucleotides into ADP, AMP, and adenosine, UDP, UMP, and uridine. Of these, ATP, adenosine, UTP, and UDP act as agonists at apical P2Y2 (ATP, UTP), P2Y6 (UDP), and A2B (adenosine) receptors on ciliated and/or goblet cells to regulate mucociliary clearance. PMID:18635403

  19. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  20. Circulating progenitor epithelial cells traffic via CXCR4/CXCL12 in response to airway injury.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Brigitte N; Belperio, John A; Rao, P Nagesh; Randell, Scott H; Fishbein, Michael C; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2006-02-01

    Recipient airway epithelial cells are found in human sex-mismatched lung transplants, implying that circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to the repair of the airway epithelium. Markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells and mechanisms for their trafficking remain to be elucidated. We demonstrate that a population of progenitor epithelial cells exists in the bone marrow and the circulation of mice that is positive for the early epithelial marker cytokeratin 5 (CK5) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We used a mouse model of sex-mismatched tracheal transplantation and found that CK5+ circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to re-epithelialization of the airway and re-establishment of the pseudostratified epithelium. The presence of CXCL12 in tracheal transplants provided a mechanism for CXCR4+ circulating progenitor epithelial cell recruitment to the airway. Depletion of CXCL12 resulted in the epithelium defaulting to squamous metaplasia, which was derived solely from the resident tissue progenitor epithelial cells. Our findings demonstrate that CK5+CXCR4+ cells are markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells in the bone marrow and circulation and that CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated recruitment of circulating progenitor epithelial cells is necessary for the re-establishment of a normal pseudostratified epithelium after airway injury. These findings support a novel paradigm for the development of squamous metaplasia of the airway epithelium and for developing therapeutic strategies for circulating progenitor epithelial cells in airway diseases. PMID:16424223

  1. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  2. Dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Crapster-Pregont, Margaret; Yeo, Janice; Sanchez, Raquel L.; Kuperman, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background IL-13 in the airway induces pathologies that are highly characteristic of asthma, including mucus metaplasia, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and airway inflammation. As such, it is important to identify the IL-13–responding cell types that mediate each of the above pathologies. For example, IL-13’s effects on epithelium contribute to mucus metaplasia and AHR. IL-13’s effects on smooth muscle also contribute to AHR. However, it has been difficult to identify the cell types that mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Objective We sought to determine which cell types mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Methods We treated the airways of mice with IL-13 alone or in combination with IFN-γ. We associated the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production with cell types in the lung that coexpress IL-13 and IFN-γ receptors. We then evaluated IL-13–induced responses in CD11c promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor–expressing mice that were depleted of both dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages and in CD11b promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor– expressing mice that were depleted of dendritic cells. Results Dendritic cell and alveolar macrophage depletion protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL11, CCL24, CCL22, and CCL17 chemokine production. Preferential depletion of dendritic cells protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL22 and CCL17 chemokine production but not from IL-13–induced CCL11 and CCL24 chemokine production. In either case mice were not protected from IL-13–induced AHR and mucus metaplasia. Conclusions Pulmonary dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012;129:1621-7.) PMID:22365581

  3. Boosting airway T-regulatory cells by gastrointestinal stimulation as a strategy for asthma control.

    PubMed

    Strickland, D H; Judd, S; Thomas, J A; Larcombe, A N; Sly, P D; Holt, P G

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of atopic asthma is transient airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) preceded by aeroallergen-induced Th-cell activation. This is preceded by upregulation of CD86 on resident airway dendritic cells (DCs) that normally lack competence in T-cell triggering. Moreover, AHR duration is controlled via T-regulatory (Treg) cells, which can attenuate CD86 upregulation on DC. We show that airway mucosal Treg/DC interaction represents an accessible therapeutic target for asthma control. Notably, baseline airway Treg activity in sensitized rats can be boosted by microbe-derived stimulation of the gut, resulting in enhanced capacity to control CD86 expression on airway DC triggered by aeroallergen and accelerated resolution of AHR. PMID:20668438

  4. Development of cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis airway cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zabner, Joseph; Karp, Phil; Seiler, Michael; Phillips, Stacia L; Mitchell, Calista J; Saavedra, Mimi; Welsh, Michael; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we utilized the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, hTERT, and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 genes to transform normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial (HAE) cells. One cell line, designated NuLi-1 (normal lung, University of Iowa), was derived from HAE of normal genotype; three cell lines, designated CuFi (cystic fibrosis, University of Iowa)-1, CuFi-3, and CuFi-4, were derived from HAE of various CF genotypes. When grown at the air-liquid interface, the cell lines were capable of forming polarized differentiated epithelia that exhibited transepithelial resistance and maintained the ion channel physiology expected for the genotypes. The CF transmembrane conductance regulator defect in the CuFi cell lines could be corrected by infecting from the basolateral surface using adenoviral vectors. Using nuclear factor-kappaB promoter reporter constructs, we also demonstrated that the NuLi and CuFi cell lines retained nuclear factor-kappaB responses to lipopolysaccharide. These cell lines should therefore be useful as models for studying ion physiology, therapeutic intervention for CF, and innate immunity. PMID:12676769

  5. The Goblet Cell Protein Clca1 (Alias mClca3 or Gob-5) Is Not Required for Intestinal Mucus Synthesis, Structure and Barrier Function in Naive or DSS-Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mundhenk, Lars; Arike, Liisa; Glauben, Rainer; Heimesaat, Markus M.; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Birchenough, George M. H.; Gruber, Achim D.; Johansson, Malin E. V.

    2015-01-01

    The secreted, goblet cell-derived protein Clca1 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated-1) has been linked to diseases with mucus overproduction, including asthma and cystic fibrosis. In the intestine Clca1 is found in the mucus with an abundance and expression pattern similar to Muc2, the major structural mucus component. We hypothesized that Clca1 is required for the synthesis, structure or barrier function of intestinal mucus and therefore compared wild type and Clca1-deficient mice under naive and at various time points of DSS (dextran sodium sulfate)-challenged conditions. The mucus phenotype in Clca1-deficient compared to wild type mice was systematically characterized by assessment of the mucus protein composition using proteomics, immunofluorescence and expression analysis of selected mucin genes on mRNA level. Mucus barrier integrity was assessed in-vivo by analysis of bacterial penetration into the mucus and translocation into sentinel organs combined analysis of the fecal microbiota and ex-vivo by assessment of mucus penetrability using beads. All of these assays revealed no relevant differences between wild type and Clca1-deficient mice under steady state or DSS-challenged conditions in mouse colon. Clca1 is not required for mucus synthesis, structure and barrier function in the murine colon. PMID:26162072

  6. A computational prediction for the effective drug and stem cell treatment of human airway burns.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman

    2016-08-01

    Burns in the airway from inhaling hot gases lead to one of the most common causes of death in the United States. In order to navigate tissues with large burn areas, the velocity, temperature, and heat flux distributions throughout the human airway system are computed for the inhalation of hot air using the finite-element method. From there, the depth of burned tissue is estimated for a range of exposure times. Additionally, the effectiveness of drug or stem cell delivery to the burned airway tissue is considered for a range of drug or cell sizes. Results showed that the highest temperature and lowest heat flux regions are observed near the pharynx and just upstream of the glottis. It was found that large particles such as stem cells (>20 μm) are effective for treatment of the upper airways, whereas small particles (<10 μm) such as drug nanoparticles are effective in the lower airways. PMID:26513000

  7. Mast cell-cholinergic nerve interaction in mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Letitia A; Myers, Allen C; Meeker, Sonya; Undem, Bradley J

    2009-07-01

    We addressed the mechanism by which antigen contracts trachea isolated from actively sensitized mice. Trachea were isolated from mice (C57BL/6J) that had been actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). OVA (10 microg ml(-1)) caused histamine release (approximately total tissue content), and smooth muscle contraction that was rapid in onset and short-lived (t(1/2) < 1 min), reaching approximately 25% of the maximum tissue response. OVA contraction was mimicked by 5-HT, and responses to both OVA and 5-HT were sensitive to 10 microm-ketanserin (5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) and strongly inhibited by atropine (1microm). Epithelial denudation had no effect on the OVA-induced contraction. Histological assessment revealed about five mast cells/tracheal section the vast majority of which contained 5-HT. There were virtually no mast cells in the mast cell-deficient (sash -/-) mouse trachea. OVA failed to elicit histamine release or contractile responses in trachea isolated from sensitized mast cell-deficient (sash -/-) mice. Intracellular recordings of the membrane potential of parasympathetic neurons in mouse tracheal ganglia revealed a ketanserin-sensitive 5-HT-induced depolarization and similar depolarization in response to OVA challenge. These data support the hypothesis that antigen-induced contraction of mouse trachea is epithelium-independent, and requires mast cell-derived 5-HT to activate 5-HT(2) receptors on parasympathetic cholinergic neurons. This leads to acetylcholine release from nerve terminals, and airway smooth muscle contraction. PMID:19403609

  8. Injury induces direct lineage segregation of functionally distinct airway basal stem/progenitor cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Law, Brandon M; Tata, Purushothama Rao; Villoria, Jorge; Saez, Borja; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-02-01

    Following injury, stem cells restore normal tissue architecture by producing the proper number and proportions of differentiated cells. Current models of airway epithelial regeneration propose that distinct cytokeratin 8-expressing progenitor cells, arising from p63(+) basal stem cells, subsequently differentiate into secretory and ciliated cell lineages. We now show that immediately following injury, discrete subpopulations of p63(+) airway basal stem/progenitor cells themselves express Notch pathway components associated with either secretory or ciliated cell fate commitment. One basal cell population displays intracellular Notch2 activation and directly generates secretory cells; the other expresses c-myb and directly yields ciliated cells. Furthermore, disrupting Notch ligand activity within the basal cell population at large disrupts the normal pattern of lineage segregation. These non-cell-autonomous effects demonstrate that effective airway epithelial regeneration requires intercellular communication within the broader basal stem/progenitor cell population. These findings have broad implications for understanding epithelial regeneration and stem cell heterogeneity. PMID:25658372

  9. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  10. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma. PMID:22792275

  11. Dendritic cell-derived tumor necrosis factor α modifies airway epithelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, R; Ledford, J R; Zhou, P; Lewkowich, I P; Page, K

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal dendritic cells (DC) are intimately associated with the airway epithelium and thus are ideally situated to be first responders to pathogens. We hypothesize that DC drive innate immune responses through early release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, which drives airway epithelial cell responses. In a mouse model, TNFα release was significantly increased following a single exposure to German cockroach (GC) frass, an event independent of neutrophil recruitment into the airways. While lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages failed to release TNFα following GC frass exposure, bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) produced substantial amounts of TNFα suggesting their importance as early responding cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry of pulmonary myeloid DC. Addition of GC frass-pulsed BMDC or conditioned media from GC frass-pulsed BMDC to primary mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC) or MLE-15 cells induced chemokine (C-C) motif ligand (CCL) 20 and granulocyte macrophage (GM) colony-stimulating factor (CSF), both of which are important for DC recruitment, survival and differentiation. Importantly, DC do not produce CCL20 or GM-CSF following allergen exposure. Blocking TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) completely abolished chemokine production, suggesting that BMDC-derived TNFα induced airway epithelial cell activation and enhancement of the innate immune response. Lastly, blocking TNFR1 in vivo resulted in significantly decreased CCL20 and GM-CSF production in the lungs of mice. Together, our data strongly suggest that DC-derived TNFα plays a crucial role in the initiation of innate immune responses through the modification of airway epithelial cell responses. PMID:22517116

  12. Generation of ESC-derived Mouse Airway Epithelial Cells Using Decellularized Lung Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Lee, Joyce; Wang, Jinxia; Ackerley, Cameron; Post, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lung lineage differentiation requires integration of complex environmental cues that include growth factor signaling, cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Due to this complexity, recapitulation of lung development in vitro to promote differentiation of stem cells to lung epithelial cells has been challenging. In this protocol, decellularized lung scaffolds are used to mimic the 3-dimensional environment of the lung and generate stem cell-derived airway epithelial cells. Mouse embryonic stem cell are first differentiated to the endoderm lineage using an embryoid body (EB) culture method with activin A. Endoderm cells are then seeded onto decellularized scaffolds and cultured at air-liquid interface for up to 21 days. This technique promotes differentiation of seeded cells to functional airway epithelial cells (ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells) without additional growth factor supplementation. This culture setup is defined, serum-free, inexpensive, and reproducible. Although there is limited contamination from non-lung endoderm lineages in culture, this protocol only generates airway epithelial populations and does not give rise to alveolar epithelial cells. Airway epithelia generated with this protocol can be used to study cell-matrix interactions during lung organogenesis and for disease modeling or drug-discovery platforms of airway-related pathologies such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:27214388

  13. Airway Surface Dehydration Aggravates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Hallmarks of COPD in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seys, Leen J. M.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Dupont, Lisa L.; Desauter, Elke; Duerr, Julia; Seyhan Agircan, Ayca; Conickx, Griet; Joos, Guy F.; Brusselle, Guy G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Airway surface dehydration, caused by an imbalance between secretion and absorption of ions and fluid across the epithelium and/or increased epithelial mucin secretion, impairs mucociliary clearance. Recent evidence suggests that this mechanism may be implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of airway surface dehydration in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD remains unknown. Objective We aimed to investigate in vivo the effect of airway surface dehydration on several CS-induced hallmarks of COPD in mice with airway-specific overexpression of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC). Methods βENaC-Tg mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were exposed to air or CS for 4 or 8 weeks. Pathological hallmarks of COPD, including goblet cell metaplasia, mucin expression, pulmonary inflammation, lymphoid follicles, emphysema and airway wall remodelling were determined and lung function was measured. Results Airway surface dehydration in βENaC-Tg mice aggravated CS-induced airway inflammation, mucin expression and destruction of alveolar walls and accelerated the formation of pulmonary lymphoid follicles. Moreover, lung function measurements demonstrated an increased compliance and total lung capacity and a lower resistance and hysteresis in βENaC-Tg mice, compared to WT mice. CS exposure further altered lung function measurements. Conclusions We conclude that airway surface dehydration is a risk factor that aggravates CS-induced hallmarks of COPD. PMID:26066648

  14. Pseudomonas pyocyanine alters calcium signaling in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Denning, G M; Railsback, M A; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D; Britigan, B E

    1998-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen, causes both acute and chronic lung disease. P. aeruginosa exerts many of its pathophysiological effects by secreting virulence factors, including pyocyanine, a redox-active compound that increases intracellular oxidant stress. Because oxidant stress has been shown to affect cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in other cell types, we studied the effect of pyocyanine on [Ca2+]c in human airway epithelial cells (A549 and HBE). At lower concentrations, pyocyanine inhibits inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation and [Ca2+]c increases in response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists. Conversely, at higher concentrations, pyocyanine itself increases [Ca2+]c. The pyocyanine-dependent [Ca2+]c increase appears to be oxidant dependent and to result from increased inositol trisphosphate and release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Ca2+ plays a central role in epithelial cell function, including regulation of ion transport, mucus secretion, and ciliary beat frequency. By disrupting Ca2+ homeostasis, pyocyanine could interfere with these critical functions and contribute to the pathophysiological effects observed in Pseudomonas-associated lung disease. PMID:9609727

  15. The in vitro generation of lung and airway progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sarah X L; Green, Michael D; de Carvalho, Ana Toste; Mumau, Melanie; Chen, Ya-Wen; D’Souza, Sunita L.; Snoeck, Hans-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Lung and airway epithelial cells generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening and studies of human lung development. Here we describe a strategy for directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into developmental lung progenitors, and their subsequent differentiation into predominantly distal lung epithelial cells. The protocol entails four stages that recapitulate lung development and takes approximately 50 days. First, definitive endoderm is induced in the presence of high concentrations of Activin A. Subsequently, lung-biased anterior foregut endoderm is specified by sequential inhibition of BMP, TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Anterior foregut endoderm is then ventralized by applying Wnt, BMP, FGF and RA signaling to obtain lung and airway progenitors. Finally, these are further differentiated into more mature epithelial cells types using Wnt, FGF, c-AMP and glucocorticoid agonism. This protocol is conducted in defined conditions, does not involve genetic manipulation of the cells, and results in cultures where the majority of the cells express markers of various lung and airway epithelial cells, with a predominance of cells identifiable as functional type II alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:25654758

  16. Alternaria extract activates autophagy that induces IL-18 release from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murai, Hiroki; Okazaki, Shintaro; Hayashi, Hisako; Kawakita, Akiko; Hosoki, Koa; Yasutomi, Motoko; Sur, Sanjiv; Ohshima, Yusei

    2015-09-01

    Alternaria alternata is a major outdoor allergen that causes allergic airway diseases. Alternaria extract (ALT-E) has been shown to induce airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 and thereby initiate Th2-type responses. We investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in IL-18 release from ALT-E-stimulated airway epithelial cells. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were stimulated with ALT-E in the presence of different inhibitors of autophagy or caspases. IL-18 levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. The numbers of autophagosomes, an LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and p62 degradation were determined by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin, which inhibit the formation of preautophagosomal structures and autolysosomes, respectively, suppressed ALT-E-induced IL-18 release by cells, whereas caspase 1 and 8 inhibitors did not. ALT-E-stimulation increased autophagosome formation, LC-3 conversion, and p62 degradation in airway epithelial cells. LPS-stimulation induced the LC3 conversion in A549 cells, but did not induce IL-18 release or p62 degradation. Unlike LPS, ALT-E induced airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 via an autophagy dependent, caspase 1 and 8 independent pathway. Although autophagy has been shown to negatively regulate canonical inflammasome activity in TLR-stimulated macrophages, our data indicates that this process is an unconventional mechanism of IL-18 secretion by airway epithelial cells. PMID:26032499

  17. Innate BALB/c enteric epithelial responses to Trichinella spiralis: inducible expression of a novel goblet cell lectin, intelectin-2, and its natural deletion in C57BL/10 mice.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Alan D; Knight, Pamela A; Gamble, John; Colledge, William H; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Pierce, Michael; Miller, Hugh R P

    2004-08-01

    Infection of mice with the nematode parasite Trichinella spiralis induces changes in the proteome of the jejunal epithelium, including substantial up-regulation of a novel variant of interlectin. In this study we sequence this novel lectin, termed intelectin-2, and compare expression levels during T. spiralis infection of resistant (BALB/c) with susceptible (C57BL/10) mouse strains. Intelectin-2 was cloned and sequenced from BALB/c mRNA extracted on day 14 of infection, and was found to have 91% amino acid identity with intelectin (within our study termed intelectin-1). Intelectin-2 transcripts were up-regulated early (day 3) during infection with T. spiralis in BALB/c mice, suggesting an innate response, and levels remained high through to day 14 (time of parasite rejection). Immunohistochemistry of jejunal sections with a rabbit polyclonal Ab to Xenopus laevis 35-kDa cortical granule lectin (XL35; 68% identity with intelectin-2) followed a similar pattern, with intense labeling of goblet and Paneth cells at day 14. However, intelectin-2 transcripts and protein were absent, and immunohistochemistry negative when C57BL/10 mice were infected with T. spiralis. Genomic PCR and Southern blotting confirmed that the intelectin-2 gene is absent from the C57BL/10 genome. The presence of intelectin-2 in resistant BALB/c mice, its absence from the susceptible C57BL/10 strain and the kinetics of its up-regulation during T. spiralis infection suggest that this novel lectin may serve a protective role in the innate immune response to parasite infection. PMID:15265922

  18. GP2-expressing cells in the conjunctiva and tear ducts of mice: identification of a novel type of cells in the squamous stratified epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shunsuke; Kishimoto, Ayuko; Mutoh, Mami; Takahashi-Iwanaga, Hiromi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    GP2 is a membrane-associated secretory protein originally identified in zymogen granules of pancreatic acinar cells. Recently, this glycoprotein has attracted attention as a marker substance of M cells of Peyer's patches and for its involvement in the selective uptake of pathological bacteria via M cells. When we stained the conjunctiva and tear ducts of mice using a GP2 antibody, all goblet cells in the squamous stratified epithelium of the conjunctiva were intensely immunolabeled, while goblet cells in the intestine and airway were devoid of the immunoreactivity, indicating that the conjunctiva contains a special type of goblet cell. Further immunostaining for GP-2 labeled dispersed cells of peculiar shapes within the stratified squamous epithelium in the lacrimal canaliculi, lacrimal sac, and nasolacrimal duct. The GP2-immunoreactive cells in the tear duct projected arched or branched processes toward the basement membrane. Electron-microscopically, immunogold particles for GP2 outlined the basolateral plasma membrane of both the conjuntival goblet cells and the peculiarly shaped cells in the tear duct. Intracellularly, GP2 products of the goblet cells were localized around secretory granules in the apical cytoplasm and those of the tear duct cells inside the vesicles. The luminal contents close to apical plasma membrane were heavily labeled with immunogold particles, suggesting an exocytosis-based targeting of GP2 to the plasma membrane and its release into the lumen. The possible function of GP2 in tear ducts is discussed in relation to a defense system against invasive microoranisms and antigens. PMID:26299485

  19. Plasticity of Airway Epithelial Cell Transcriptome in Response to Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Joan G.; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Basom, Ryan S.; Gharib, Sina A.

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI) represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium. PMID:25668187

  20. Plasticity of airway epithelial cell transcriptome in response to flagellin.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joan G; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Basom, Ryan S; Gharib, Sina A

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI) represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium. PMID:25668187

  1. Detonation Nanodiamond Toxicity in Human Airway Epithelial Cells Is Modulated by Air Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detonational nanodiamonds (DND), a nanomaterial with an increasing range of industrial and biomedical applications, have previously been shown to induce a pro-inflammatory response in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). We now show that surface modifications induced by...

  2. Relationship of small airway chymase-positive mast cells and lung function in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Balzar, Silvana; Chu, Hong Wei; Strand, Matthew; Wenzel, Sally

    2005-03-01

    Distal lung inflammation may be important in asthma pathophysiology. The goal of this study was to measure cellular inflammation in the large airway and four distal lung regions (small airway inner and outer wall, alveolar attachments, and peripheral alveolar tissue) and to correlate the specific inflammatory cells with several lung function parameters. Sections of concurrently obtained endobronchial and transbronchial/surgical biopsy tissue from 20 individuals with severe asthma were immunostained for T-lymphocyte, eosinophil, monocyte/macrophage, neutrophil, and two mast cell markers (tryptase and chymase). Specific cell distributions were determined and correlated with lung function measures. The number of inflammatory cells generally increased toward the periphery, but the percentage of T-lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes/macrophages, and neutrophils remained similar or decreased from large to small airways. In contrast, mast cell number, percentage, and the chymase-positive phenotype increased in small airway regions. After the analysis was adjusted for multiple comparisons, only chymase-positive mast cells significantly and positively correlated with lung function. Such a relationship was seen only in the small airway/alveolar attachments lung region (r(s) = 0.61-0.89; p cells, particularly in the small airway outer wall/alveolar attachments region, may be protective for lung function in severe asthma. PMID:15563633

  3. Restoration of Chloride Efflux by Azithromycin in Airway Epithelial Cells of Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Rebeyrol, Carine; Ruffin, Manon; Roque, Telma; Guillot, Loïc; Jacquot, Jacky; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) has shown promising anti-inflammatory properties in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and clinical studies have presented an improvement in the respiratory condition of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate, in human airway cells, the mechanism by which AZM has beneficial effects in CF. We demonstrated that AZM did not have any anti-inflammatory effect on CF airway cells but restored Cl− efflux. PMID:21220528

  4. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  5. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibition enhances airway epithelial Basal-cell proliferation and lentivirus transduction.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Nath, Aditya; Wasserman, Mollie G; Huang, Tao; Brody, Steven L

    2013-09-01

    The identification of factors that regulate airway epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation are essential for understanding the pathophysiology of airway diseases. Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCKs) are downstream effector proteins of RhoA GTPase that direct the functions of cell cytoskeletal proteins. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 has been shown to enhance the survival and cloning of human embryonic stem cells and pluripotent cells in other tissues. We hypothesized that Y27632 treatment exerts a similar effect on airway epithelial basal cells, which function as airway epithelial progenitor cells. Treatment with Y27632 enhanced basal-cell proliferation in cultured human tracheobronchial and mouse tracheal epithelial cells. ROCK inhibition accelerated the maturation of basal cells, characterized by a diminution of the cell size associated with cell compaction and the expression of E-cadherin at cell-cell junctions. Transient treatment of cultured basal cells with Y27632 did not affect subsequent ciliated or mucous cell differentiation under air-liquid interface conditions, and allowed for the initial use of lower numbers of human or mouse primary airway epithelial cells than otherwise possible. Moreover, the use of Y27632 during lentivirus-mediated transduction significantly improved posttransduction efficiency and the selection of a transduced cell population, as determined by reporter gene expression. These findings suggest an important role for ROCKs in the regulation of proliferation and maturation of epithelial basal cells, and demonstrate that the inhibition of ROCK pathways using Y27632 provides an adjunctive tool for the in vitro genetic manipulation of airway epithelial cells by lentivirus vectors. PMID:23713995

  6. Tissue-Specific stem cell differentiation in an in vitro airway model.

    PubMed

    Prytherch, Zoë; Job, Claire; Marshall, Hilary; Oreffo, Victor; Foster, Martyn; BéruBé, Kelly

    2011-11-10

    The respiratory tract is the primary site of exposure to airborne compounds, with the bronchial epithelium providing one of the first lines of defence. A growing need exists for an accurate in vitro model of the bronchial epithelium. Here, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells cultured at an air/liquid interface create a fully differentiated, in-vivo-like model of the human bronchial epithelium. Developmental characterisation includes (i) trans-epithelial electrical resistance, (ii) morphology and (iii) bronchial cell specific stains/markers. It is concluded that the basal/progenitor cells create a pseudo-stratified, mucociliary NHBE model containing basal, serous, Clara, goblet and ciliated cells, reflective of the normal human bronchial epithelium (days 24-33 ALI culture). PMID:21994115

  7. ΔF508 CFTR processing correction and activity in polarized airway and non-airway cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, SM; Pyle, LC; Jurkevante, A; Varga, K; Collawn, J; Sloane, PA; Woodworth, B; Mazur, M; Fulton, J; Fan, L; Li, Y; Fortenberry, J; Sorscher, EJ; Clancy, JP

    2010-01-01

    We examined the activity of ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) stably expressed in polarized cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells (CFBE41o−) human airway cells and Fisher Rat Thyroid (FRT) cells following treatment with low temperature and a panel of small molecule correctors of ΔF508 CFTR misprocessing. Corr-4a increased ΔF508 CFTR-dependent Cl− conductance in both cell types, whereas treatment with VRT-325 or VRT-640 increased activity only in FRT cells. Total currents stimulated by forskolin and genistein demonstrated similar dose/response effects to Corr-4a treatment in each cell type. When examining the relative contribution of forskolin and genistein to total stimulated current, CFBE41o− cells had smaller forskolin-stimulated Isc following either low temperature or corr-4a treatment (10–30% of the total Isc produced by the combination of both CFTR agonists). In contrast, forskolin consistently contributed greater than 40% of total Isc in ΔF508 CFTR expressing FRT cells corrected with low temperature, and corr-4a treatment preferentially enhanced forskolin dependent currents only in FRT cells (60% of total Isc). ΔF508 CFTR cDNA transcript levels, ΔF508 CFTR C band levels, or cAMP signaling did not account for the reduced forskolin response in CFBE41o− cells. Treatment with non-specific inhibitors of phosphodiesterases (papaverine) or phosphatases (endothall) did not restore ΔF508 CFTR activation by forskolin in CFBE41o− cells, indicating that the Cl− transport defect in airway cells is distal to cAMP or its metabolism. The results identify important differences in ΔF508 CFTR activation in polarizing epithelial models of CF, and have important implications regarding detection of rescued of ΔF508 CFTR in vivo. PMID:20226262

  8. Pluripotent Allospecific CD8+ Effector T Cells Traffic to Lung in Murine Obliterative Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    West, Erin E.; Lavoie, Tera L.; Orens, Jonathan B.; Chen, Edward S.; Ye, Shui Q.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; McDyer, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term success in lung transplantation is limited by obliterative bronchiolitis, whereas T cell effector mechanisms in this process remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse heterotopic allogeneic airway transplant model, we studied T cell effector responses during obliterative airways disease (OAD). Allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells were detected in airway allografts, with significant coexpression of TNF-α and granzyme B. Therefore, using IFN-γ as a surrogate marker, we assessed the distribution and kinetics of extragraft allo-specific T cells during OAD. Robust allospecific IFN-γ was produced by draining the lymph nodes, spleen, and lung mononuclear cells from allograft, but not isograft recipients by Day 14, and significantly decreased by Day 28. Although the majority of allospecific T cells were CD8+, allospecific CD4+ T cells were also detected in these compartments, with each employing distinct allorecognition pathways. An influx of pluripotent CD8+ effector cells with a memory phenotype were detected in the lung during OAD similar to those seen in the allografts and secondary lymphoid tissue. Antibody depletion of CD8+ T cells markedly reduced airway lumen obliteration and fibrosis at Day 28. Together, these data demonstrate that allospecific CD8+ effector T cells play an important role in OAD and traffic to the lung after heterotopic airway transplant, suggesting that the lung is an important immunologic site, and perhaps a reservoir, for effector cells during the rejection process. PMID:16195540

  9. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Satoshi; Gotoh, Shimpei; Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Korogi, Yohei; Nagasaki, Tadao; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Tsukita, Sachiko; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs) play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1+-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs), we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM+ VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a “9 + 2” microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26724905

  10. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Satoshi; Gotoh, Shimpei; Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Korogi, Yohei; Nagasaki, Tadao; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Tsukita, Sachiko; Mishima, Michiaki

    2016-01-12

    Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs) play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1(+)-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs), we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM(+) VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a "9 + 2" microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26724905

  11. Distinct Tlr4-expressing cell compartments control neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    McAlees, J W; Whitehead, G S; Harley, I T W; Cappelletti, M; Rewerts, C L; Holdcroft, A M; Divanovic, S; Wills-Karp, M; Finkelman, F D; Karp, C L; Cook, D N

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic, inflammatory lung disease. Some forms of allergic asthma are characterized by T helper type 2 (Th2)-driven eosinophilia, whereas others are distinguished by Th17-driven neutrophilia. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells (AECs) contributes to the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and allergens, but the specific contribution of TLR4 in these cell compartments to airway inflammatory responses remains poorly understood. We used novel, conditionally mutant Tlr4(fl/fl) mice to define the relative contributions of AEC and hematopoietic cell Tlr4 expression to LPS- and allergen-induced airway inflammation. We found that Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic cells is critical for neutrophilic airway inflammation following LPS exposure and for Th17-driven neutrophilic responses to the house dust mite (HDM) lysates and ovalbumin (OVA). Conversely, Tlr4 expression by AECs was found to be important for robust eosinophilic airway inflammation following sensitization and challenge with these same allergens. Thus, Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells controls distinct arms of the immune response to inhaled allergens. PMID:25465099

  12. Chrysin alleviates allergic inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Jiang, Mingzi; Zhang, Yunshi; Liu, Xing; Du, Qiang; Feng, Ganzhu

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder and progresses mainly due to airway remodeling. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess multiple biologic activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-proliferation. The present study aimed to investigate whether chrysin could relieve allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma and the mechanism involved. The female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) successfully developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation and remodeling. The experimental data showed that chrysin could alleviate OVA-induced AHR. Chrysin could also reduce OVA-induced increases in the number of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, interleukin (IL) -4, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total IgE in serum. The decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) level in BALF was also upregulated by chrysin. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) around bronchioles were suppressed by chrysin. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) could be decreased by chrysin, which are associated with airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. These results indicate the promising therapeutic effect of chrysin on chronic asthma, especially the progression of airway remodeling. PMID:26780233

  13. Continuous exposure to house dust mite elicits chronic airway inflammation and structural remodeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Wiley, Ryan E; Fattouh, Ramzi; Swirski, Filip K; Gajewska, Beata U; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Ellis, Russ; Inman, Mark D; Jordana, Manel

    2004-02-01

    It is now fully appreciated that asthma is a disease of a chronic nature resulting from intermittent or continued aeroallergen exposure leading to airway inflammation. To investigate responses to continuous antigen exposure, mice were exposed to either house dust mite extract (HDM) or ovalbumin intranasally for five consecutive days, followed by 2 days of rest, for up to seven consecutive weeks. Continuous exposure to HDM, unlike ovalbumin, elicited severe and persistent eosinophilic airway inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an accumulation of CD4+ lymphocytes in the lung with elevated expression of inducible costimulator a marker of T cell activation, and of T1/ST2, a marker of helper T Type 2 effector cells. We also detected increased and sustained production of helper T cell Type 2-associated cytokines by splenocytes of HDM-exposed mice on in vitro HDM recall. Histologic analysis of the lung showed evidence of airway remodeling in mice exposed to HDM, with goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, and peribronchial accumulation of contractile tissue. In addition, HDM-exposed mice demonstrated severe airway hyperreactivity to methacholine. Finally, these responses were studied for up to 9 weeks after cessation of HDM exposure. We observed that whereas airway inflammation resolved fully, the remodeling changes did not resolve and airway hyperreactivity resolved only partly. PMID:14597485

  14. Role of Rho kinase isoforms in murine allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Liu, P-Y; Kasahara, D I; Williams, A S; Verbout, N G; Halayko, A J; Fedulov, A; Shoji, T; Williams, E S; Noma, K; Shore, S A; Liao, J K

    2011-10-01

    Inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinases (ROCKs) reduces allergic airway responses in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the roles of the two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, in these responses. Wildtype (WT) mice and heterozygous ROCK1 and ROCK2 knockout mice (ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-), respectively) were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin. ROCK expression and activation were assessed by western blotting. Airway responsiveness was measured by forced oscillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the lungs were fixed for histological assessment. Compared with WT mice, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression were 50% lower in lungs of ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice, respectively, without changes in the other isoform. In WT lungs, ROCK activation increased after ovalbumin challenge and was sustained for several hours. This activation was reduced in ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) lungs. Airway responsiveness was comparable in WT, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice challenged with PBS. Ovalbumin challenge caused airway hyperresponsiveness in WT, but not ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. Lavage eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia were significantly reduced in ovalbumin-challenged ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) versus WT mice. Ovalbumin-induced changes in lavage interleukin-13, interleukin-5 and lymphocytes were also reduced in ROCK1(+/-) mice. In conclusion, both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are important in regulating allergic airway responses. PMID:21565918

  15. Image-based finite element modeling of alveolar epithelial cell injury during airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Dailey, H L; Ricles, L M; Yalcin, H C; Ghadiali, S N

    2009-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by fluid accumulation in small pulmonary airways. The reopening of these fluid-filled airways involves the propagation of an air-liquid interface that exerts injurious hydrodynamic stresses on the epithelial cells (EpC) lining the airway walls. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that these hydrodynamic stresses may cause rupture of the plasma membrane (i.e., cell necrosis) and have postulated that cell morphology plays a role in cell death. However, direct experimental measurement of stress and strain within the cell is intractable, and limited data are available on the mechanical response (i.e., deformation) of the epithelium during airway reopening. The goal of this study is to use image-based finite element models of cell deformation during airway reopening to investigate how cell morphology and mechanics influence the risk of cell injury/necrosis. Confocal microscopy images of EpC in subconfluent and confluent monolayers were used to generate morphologically accurate three-dimensional finite element models. Hydrodynamic stresses on the cells were calculated from boundary element solutions of bubble propagation in a fluid-filled parallel-plate flow channel. Results indicate that for equivalent cell mechanical properties and hydrodynamic load conditions, subconfluent cells develop higher membrane strains than confluent cells. Strain magnitudes were also found to decrease with increasing stiffness of the cell and membrane/cortex region but were most sensitive to changes in the cell's interior stiffness. These models may be useful in identifying pharmacological treatments that mitigate cell injury during airway reopening by altering specific biomechanical properties of the EpC. PMID:19008489

  16. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  17. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  18. Intracellular insulin-like growth factor-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chand, Hitendra S; Harris, Jennifer Foster; Mebratu, Yohannes; Chen, Yangde; Wright, Paul S; Randell, Scott H; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2012-05-01

    Bcl-2, a prosurvival protein, regulates programmed cell death during development and repair processes, and it can be oncogenic when cell proliferation is deregulated. The present study investigated what factors modulate Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells and identified the pathways involved. Microarray analysis of mRNA from airway epithelial cells captured by laser microdissection showed that increased expression of IL-1β and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) coincided with induced Bcl-2 expression compared with controls. Treatment of cultured airway epithelial cells with IL-1β and IGF-1 induced Bcl-2 expression by increasing Bcl-2 mRNA stability with no discernible changes in promoter activity. Silencing the IGF-1 expression using short hairpin RNA showed that intracellular IGF-1 (IC-IGF-1) was increasing Bcl-2 expression. Blocking epidermal growth factor receptor or IGF-1R activation also suppressed IC-IGF-1 and abolished the Bcl-2 induction. Induced expression and colocalization of IC-IGF-1 and Bcl-2 were observed in airway epithelial cells of mice exposed to LPS or cigarette smoke and of patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis but not in the respective controls. These studies demonstrate that IC-IGF-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in epithelial cells via IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, and targeting IC-IGF-1 could be beneficial to treat chronic airway diseases. PMID:22461702

  19. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Katsuyuki; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2016-06-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  20. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  1. Spatiotemporally separated antigen uptake by alveolar dendritic cells and airway presentation to T cells in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Emily E.; Looney, Mark R.; Bose, Oishee; Sen, Debasish; Sheppard, Dean; Locksley, Richard; Huang, Xiaozhu

    2012-01-01

    Asthma pathogenesis is focused around conducting airways. The reasons for this focus have been unclear because it has not been possible to track the sites and timing of antigen uptake or subsequent antigen presentation to effector T cells. In this study, we use two-photon microscopy of the lung parenchyma and note accumulation of CD11b+ dendritic cells (DCs) around the airway after allergen challenge but very limited access of these airway-adjacent DCs to the contents of the airspace. In contrast, we observed prevalent transepithelial uptake of particulate antigens by alveolar DCs. These distinct sites are temporally linked, as early antigen uptake in alveoli gives rise to DC and antigen retention in the airway-adjacent region. Antigen-specific T cells also accumulate in the airway-adjacent region after allergen challenge and are activated by the accumulated DCs. Thus, we propose that later airway hyperreactivity results from selective retention of allergen-presenting DCs and antigen-specific T cells in airway-adjacent interaction zones, not from variation in the abilities of individual DCs to survey the lung. PMID:22585735

  2. Suppression of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma by exogenous mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hai-Feng; Huang, Yun; Hu, Xing-Bin; Wu, Chang-Gui

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have significant immunomodulatory effects in the development of acute lung inflammation and fibrosis. However, it is still unclear as to whether MSCs could attenuate allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We firstly investigated whether exogenous MSCs can relocate to lung tissues in asthmatic mice and analyzed the chemotactic mechanism. Then, we evaluated the in vivo immunomodulatory effect of exogenous MSCs in asthma. MSCs (2 × 10(6)) were administered through the tail vein to mice one day before the first airway challenge. Migration of MSCs was evaluated by flow cytometry. The immunomodulatory effect of MSCs was evaluated by cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), histology, mast cell degranulation, airway hyperreactivity and cytokine profile in BALF. Exogenous MSCs can migrate to sites of inflammation in asthmatic mice through a stromal cell-derived factor-1α/CXCR4-dependent mechanism. MSCs can protect mice against a range of allergic airway inflammatory pathologies, including the infiltration of inflammatory cells, mast cell degranulation and airway hyperreactivity partly via shifting to a T-helper 1 (Th1) from a Th2 immune response to allergens. So, immunotherapy based on MSCs may be a feasible, efficient therapy for asthma. PMID:22114062

  3. Insights into Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Human Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Karta, Maya R; Broide, David H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries have led to the identification of a novel group of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). The members of this group are divided into three subpopulations: ILC1s, ILC2s, and ILC3s. ILC2s produce Th2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, upon activation by epithelial cell-derived cytokines, lipid mediators (cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2), and TNF family member TL1A and promote structural and immune cell responses in the airways after antigen exposure. In addition, ILC2 function is also influenced by inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS)/ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L) interactions via direct contact between immune cells. The most common airway antigens are allergens and viruses which are highly linked to the induction of airway diseases with underlying type 2 inflammation including asthma and allergic rhinitis. Based on recent findings linking ILC2s and airway Th2 responses, there is intensive investigation into the role of ILC2s in human disease with the hope of a better understanding of the pathophysiology and the discovery of novel potential therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the recent advances made in elucidating ILC2 involvement in human Th2 airway disease. PMID:26746844

  4. A critical role for dendritic cells in the evolution of IL-1β-mediated murine airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Goodsell, Amanda; Ma, Royce; Moermans, Catherine; McKnelly, Kate J.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation and fibrosis, known as airway remodeling, are defining features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and are refractory to current treatments. How and if chronic inflammation contributes to airway fibrosis remains controversial. Here, we use a model of COPD airway disease utilizing adenoviral (Ad) delivery of IL-1β to determine that adaptive T-cell immunity is required for airway remodeling since mice deficient in α/β T-cells (tcra −/−) are protected. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around COPD airways and are critical to prime adaptive immunity, but have not been shown to directly influence airway remodeling. We show that DC depletion or deficiency in the crucial DC chemokine receptor, ccr6, both protect from Ad-IL-1β-induced airway adaptive T-cell immune responses, and fibrosis in mice. These results provide evidence that chronic airway inflammation, mediated by accumulation of α/β T-cells and driven by DCs, is critical to airway fibrosis. PMID:25786688

  5. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  6. Regulation of Cl^- Channels in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells by Extracellular ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutts, M. J.; Chinet, T. C.; Mason, S. J.; Fullton, J. M.; Clarke, L. L.; Boucher, R. C.

    1992-03-01

    The rate of Cl^- secretion by human airway epithelium is determined, in part, by apical cell membrane Cl^- conductance. In cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, defective regulation of Cl^- conductance decreases the capability to secrete Cl^-. Here we report that extracytosolic ATP in the luminal bath of cultured human airway epithelia increased transepithelial Cl^- secretion and apical membrane Cl^- permeability. Single-channel studies in excised membrane patches revealed that ATP increased the open probability of outward rectifying Cl^- channels. The latter effect occurs through a receptor mechanism that requires no identified soluble second messengers and is insensitive to probes of G protein function. These results demonstrate a mode of regulation of anion channels by binding ATP at the extracellular surface. Regulation of Cl^- conductance by external ATP is preserved in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

  7. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Liu, Xiaoyang; Periasamy, Sivakumar; Ma, Aiying; Tang, Jin; Jenkins, Mark; Tuo, Wenbin; Song, Wenxia; Keegan, Achsah D.; Conrad, Daniel H.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human low affinity IgE receptor, CD23 (FcεRII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monolayer in vitro. However, it remains unknown whether the CD23-dependent IgE transfer pathway in AECs initiates and facilitates allergic inflammation in vivo, and whether inhibition of this pathway attenuates allergic inflammation. To this end, we show that in wild-type (WT) mice, epithelial CD23 transcytosed both IgE and ovalbumin (OVA)-IgE complexes across the airway epithelial barrier, while neither type of transcytosis was observed in CD23 knockout (KO) mice. In chimeric mice, OVA sensitization and aerosol challenge of WT/WT (bone-marrow transfer from the WT to WT) or CD23KO/WT (CD23KO to WT) chimeric mice, which express CD23 on radioresistant airway structural cells (mainly epithelial cells) resulted in airway eosinophilia, including collagen deposition and a significant increase in goblet cells, and increased airway hyperreactivity. In contrast, the absence of CD23 expression on airway structural or epithelial cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, in WT/CD23KO (the WT to CD23KO) chimeric mice significantly reduced OVA-driven allergic airway inflammation. In addition, inhalation of the CD23-blocking B3B4 antibody in sensitized WT mice before or during airway challenge suppressed the salient features of asthma, including bronchial hyperreactivity. Taken together, these results identify a previously unproven mechanism in which epithelial CD23 plays a central role in the development of allergic inflammation. Further, our study suggests that functional inhibition of CD23 in the airway is a potential therapeutic approach with which to inhibit the development of asthma. PMID:25783969

  8. The role of mast cells in citric acid-induced airway constriction and cough.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yih-Loong; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Tai-Yin; Lin, Chien-He

    2009-11-30

    Inhalation of citric acid (CA) causes airway constriction and coughing. To investigate the role of mast cells in CA-induced airway constriction and cough, three experiments using guinea pigs were carried out. In the first experiment, we used compound 48/80 to deplete mast cells, cromolyn sodium to stabilize mast cells, MK-886 to inhibit synthesis of leukotrienes, pyrilamine to antagonize histamine H1 receptor, methysergide to antagonize serotonin receptor, and indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In the second experiment, compound 48/80-pretreated animals were divided into 2 parts; the first one was used to test the role of exogenous leukotriene (LT) C4, while the second one to test the role of exogenous histamine. Decreases in respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 sec (FEV0.1) were used as indicators for airway constriction in anesthetized guinea pigs. CA-induced cough was recorded for 12 min using a barometric body plethysmograph in conscious animals. In the third experiment, the activation of mast cells upon CA inhalation was investigated by determining lung tissue or arterial plasma histamine concentration in animals. Exposure to CA induced marked airway constriction and increase in cough number. Compound 48/80, cromolyn sodium, MK-886 and pyrilamine, but not indomethacin or methysergide, significantly attenuated CA-induced airway constriction and cough. Injection of LTC4 or histamine caused a significant increase in CA-induced airway constriction and cough in compound 48/80-pretreated animals. In addition, CA inhalation caused significant increase in lung tissue and plasma histamine concentrations, which were blocked by compound 48/80 pretreatment. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in CA aerosol inhalation-induced airway constriction and cough via perhaps mediators including LTs and histamine. PMID:20359123

  9. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  10. Expansive Generation of Functional Airway Epithelium From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Brendan A.S.; Alev, Cantas; Mechael, Rami; Salci, Kyle R.; Lee, Jung Bok; Fiebig-Comyn, Aline; Guezguez, Borhane; Wu, Yuping; Sheng, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Production of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived lung progenitors has broad applicability for drug screening and cell therapy; however, this is complicated by limitations in demarcating phenotypic changes with functional validation of airway cell types. In this paper, we reveal the potential of hESCs to produce multipotent lung progenitors using a combined growth factor and physical culture approach, guided by the use of novel markers LIFRα and NRP1. Lung specification of hESCs was achieved by priming differentiation via matrix-specific support, followed by air-liquid interface to allow generation of lung progenitors capable of in vitro maturation into airway epithelial cell types, resulting in functional characteristics such as secretion of pulmonary surfactant, ciliation, polarization, and acquisition of innate immune activity. This approach provided a robust expansion of lung progenitors, allowing in vivo assessment, which demonstrated that only fully differentiated hESC-derived airway cells were retained in the distal airway, where they aided in physiological recovery in immunocompromised mice receiving airway injury. Our study provides a basis for translational applications of hESCs for lung diseases. PMID:24300555

  11. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  12. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells. PMID:25313408

  13. Creation and characterization of an airway epithelial cell line for stable expression of CFTR variants

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Laura B.; Vecchio-Pagan, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Han, Sangwoo T.; Franca, Arianna; Wohler, Elizabeth S.; Batista, Denise A.S.; Goff, Loyal A.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Analysis of the functional consequences and treatment response of rare CFTR variants is challenging due to the limited availability of primary airways cells. Methods A Flp recombination target (FRT) site for stable expression of CFTR was incorporated into an immortalized CF bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o−). CFTR cDNA was integrated into the FRT site. Expression was evaluated by western blotting and confocal microscopy and function measured by short circuit current. RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptional profile of the resulting CF8Flp cell line to primary cells and tissues. Results Functional CFTR was expressed from integrated cDNA at the FRT site of the CF8Flp cell line at levels comparable to that seen in native airway cells. CF8Flp cells expressing WT-CFTR have a stable transcriptome comparable to that of primary cultured airway epithelial cells, including genes that play key roles in CFTR pathways. Conclusion CF8Flp cells provide a viable substitute for primary CF airway cells for the analysis of CFTR variants in a native context. PMID:26694805

  14. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  15. Mechanisms of surface-tension-induced epithelial cell damage in a model of pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Anastacia M; Dee, Kay C; Gaver, Donald P

    2003-02-01

    Airway collapse and reopening due to mechanical ventilation exerts mechanical stress on airway walls and injures surfactant-compromised lungs. The reopening of a collapsed airway was modeled experimentally and computationally by the progression of a semi-infinite bubble in a narrow fluid-occluded channel. The extent of injury caused by bubble progression to pulmonary epithelial cells lining the channel was evaluated. Counterintuitively, cell damage increased with decreasing opening velocity. The presence of pulmonary surfactant, Infasurf, completely abated the injury. These results support the hypotheses that mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening injure pulmonary epithelial cells and that pulmonary surfactant protects the epithelium from this injury. Computational simulations identified the magnitudes of components of the stress cycle associated with airway reopening (shear stress, pressure, shear stress gradient, or pressure gradient) that may be injurious to the epithelial cells. By comparing these magnitudes to the observed damage, we conclude that the steep pressure gradient near the bubble front was the most likely cause of the observed cellular damage. PMID:12433851

  16. TGF-β-dependent dendritic cell chemokinesis in murine models of airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Ma, Royce; Murray, Lynne A.; Tsui, Ping; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Small airway chronic inflammation is a major pathologic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is refractory to current treatments. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around small airways in COPD. DCs are critical mediators of antigen surveillance and antigen presentation and amplify adaptive immune responses. How DCs accumulate around airways remains largely unknown. We use 2-photon DC imaging of living murine lung sections to directly visualize the dynamic movement of living DCs around airways in response to either soluble mediators (IL-1β) or environmental stimuli (cigarette smoke or TLR3 ligands) implicated in COPD pathogenesis. We find that DCs accumulate around murine airways primarily by increasing velocity (chemokinesis) rather than directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to all three stimuli. DC accumulation maximally occurs in a specific zone located 26-50 μm from small airways, which overlaps with zones of maximal DC velocity. Our data suggest that increased accumulation of DCs around airways results from increased numbers of highly chemokinetic DCs entering the lung from the circulation with balanced rates of immigration and emigration. Increases in DC accumulation and chemokinesis are partially dependent on ccr6, a crucial DC chemokine receptor, and fibroblast expression of the integrin αvβ8, a critical activator of TGF-β αvβ8-mediated TGF-β activation is known to enhance IL-1β-dependent fibroblast expression of the only known endogenous ccr6 chemokine ligand, ccl20. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which αvβ8, ccl20 and ccr6 interact to lead to DC accumulation around airways in response to COPD-relevant stimuli. PMID:26109638

  17. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  18. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs. PMID:25724668

  19. Wound repair and anti-oxidative capacity is regulated by ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Liu, Hui-jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-rong; Zhu, Xiao-lin; Qin, Xiao-qun

    2010-08-01

    Integrin beta 4 (ITGB4) is a structural adhesion molecule which engages in maintaining the integrity of airway epithelial cells. Its specific cytomembrane structural feature strongly indicates that ITGB4 may engage in many signaling pathways and physiologic processes. However, in addition to adhesion, the specific biologic significance of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells is almost unknown. In this article, we investigated the expression and functional properties of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14O-cells) and primary rat tracheal epithelial cells (RTE cells) were used to determine ITGB4 expression under ozone tress or mechanical damage, respectively. An ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged asthma model was used to investigate ITGB4 expression after antigen exposure in vivo. In addition, an ITGB4 overexpression vector and ITGB4 silence virus vector were constructed and transfected into RTE cells. Then, wound repair ability and anti-oxidation capacity was evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, on the edge of mechanically wounded cell areas, ITGB4 expression was increased after mechanical injury. After ozone stress, upregulation expression of ITGB4 was also detected. In the OVA-challenged asthma model, ITGB4 expression was decreased on airway epithelial cells accompanying with structural disruption and damage of anti-oxidation capacity. Besides, our study revealed that upregulation of ITGB4 promotes wound repair ability and anti-oxidative ability, while such abilities were blocked when ITGB4 was silenced. Taken together, these results showed that ITGB4 was a new interesting molecule involved in the regulation of wound repair and anti-oxidation processes for airway epithelial cells. PMID:20364299

  20. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINATORIAL EXPOSURE OF PRO-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RELEASE OF CHEMOTACTIC MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 15 million individuals nationally. Within the inflamed asthmatic airway there exist complex interactions between many cells and the cytokines they release, in particular mast cells, eosinophils, T-lymphocy...

  1. Store-operated Ca2+ channels in airway epithelial cell function and implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B

    2016-08-01

    The epithelial cells of the lung are at the interface of a host and its environment and are therefore directly exposed to the inhaled air-borne particles. Rather than serving as a simple physical barrier, airway epithelia detect allergens and other irritants and then help organize the subsequent immune response through release of a plethora of secreted signals. Many of these signals are generated in response to opening of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane. In this review, we describe the properties of airway store-operated channels and their role in regulating airway epithelial cell function.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377718

  2. Store-operated Ca2+ channels in airway epithelial cell function and implications for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the lung are at the interface of a host and its environment and are therefore directly exposed to the inhaled air-borne particles. Rather than serving as a simple physical barrier, airway epithelia detect allergens and other irritants and then help organize the subsequent immune response through release of a plethora of secreted signals. Many of these signals are generated in response to opening of store-operated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane. In this review, we describe the properties of airway store-operated channels and their role in regulating airway epithelial cell function. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377718

  3. Bronchial Epithelial Cells Produce IL-5: Implications for Local Immune Responses in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol A.; Peluso, John J.; Zhu, Li; Lingenheld, Elizabeth G.; Walker, Sharale T.; Puddington, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    IL-5 is a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes eosinophil differentiation and survival. While naïve bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) produce low levels of IL-5, the role of BEC-derived IL-5 in allergic airway inflammation is unknown. We now show that BEC, isolated from mice with OVA-induced allergic airway disease (AAD), produced elevated levels of IL-5 mRNA and protein as compared to BEC from naïve mice. To determine the contribution of BEC-derived IL-5 to effector responses in the airways, IL-5 deficient bone marrow chimeric mice were generated in which IL-5 expression was restricted to stromal (e.g. BEC) or hematopoietic cells. When subjected to AAD, IL-5 produced by BECs contributed to mucous metaplasia, airway eosinophilia, and OVA-specific IgA levels. Thus, IL-5 production by BEC can impact the microenvironment of the lung, modifying pathologic and protective immune responses in the airways. PMID:20494340

  4. Expression of taste receptors in Solitary Chemosensory Cells of rodent airways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemical irritation of airway mucosa elicits a variety of reflex responses such as coughing, apnea, and laryngeal closure. Inhaled irritants can activate either chemosensitive free nerve endings, laryngeal taste buds or solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs). The SCC population lies in the nasal respiratory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, and larynx, as well as deeper in the airway. The objective of this study is to map the distribution of SCCs within the airways and to determine the elements of the chemosensory transduction cascade expressed in these SCCs. Methods We utilized a combination of immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques (rtPCR and in situ hybridization) on rats and transgenic mice where the Tas1R3 or TRPM5 promoter drives expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results Epithelial SCCs specialized for chemoreception are distributed throughout much of the respiratory tree of rodents. These cells express elements of the taste transduction cascade, including Tas1R and Tas2R receptor molecules, α-gustducin, PLCβ2 and TrpM5. The Tas2R bitter taste receptors are present throughout the entire respiratory tract. In contrast, the Tas1R sweet/umami taste receptors are expressed by numerous SCCs in the nasal cavity, but decrease in prevalence in the trachea, and are absent in the lower airways. Conclusions Elements of the taste transduction cascade including taste receptors are expressed by SCCs distributed throughout the airways. In the nasal cavity, SCCs, expressing Tas1R and Tas2R taste receptors, mediate detection of irritants and foreign substances which trigger trigeminally-mediated protective airway reflexes. Lower in the respiratory tract, similar chemosensory cells are not related to the trigeminal nerve but may still trigger local epithelial responses to irritants. In total, SCCs should be considered chemoreceptor cells that help in preventing damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled irritants and pathogens. PMID:21232137

  5. Altered Regulation of Airway Epithelial Cell Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Rechkemmer, Gerhard; Shoemaker, Richard L.

    1986-08-01

    In many epithelial cells the chloride conductance of the apical membrane increases during the stimulation of electrolyte secretion. Single-channel recordings from human airway epithelial cells showed that β -adrenergic stimulation evoked apical membrane chloride channel activity, but this response was absent in cells from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, when membrane patches were excised from CF cells into media containing sufficient free calcium (approximately 180 nanomolar), chloride channels were activated. The chloride channels of CF cells were similar to those of normal cells as judged by their current-voltage relations, ion selectivity, and kinetic behavior. These findings demonstrate the presence of chloride channels in the apical membranes of CF airway cells. Their regulation by calcium appears to be intact, but cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent control of their activity is defective.

  6. Long-term cultures of polarized airway epithelial cells from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Jornot, Lan; Dudez, Tecla; Pagano, Alessandra; Rochat, Thierry; Lacroix, Jean Silvain; Suter, Susanne; Chanson, Marc

    2006-01-01

    The poor ability of respiratory epithelial cells to proliferate and differentiate in vitro into a pseudostratified mucociliated epithelium limits the general use of primary airway epithelial cell (AEC) cultures generated from patients with rare diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we describe a procedure to amplify AEC isolated from nasal polyps and generate long-term cultures of the respiratory epithelium. AEC were seeded onto microporous permeable supports that carried on their undersurface a preformed feeder layer of primary human airway fibroblasts. The use of fibroblast feeder layers strongly stimulated the proliferation of epithelial cells, allowing the expansion of the cell pool with successive passages. AEC at increasing passage were seeded onto supports undercoated with airway fibroblasts and exposed to air. Either freshly isolated or amplified AEC could differentiate into a pseudostratified mucociliated epithelium for at least 10 mo. Thus, CF epithelia cultures showed elevated Na+ transport, drastic hyperabsorption of surface liquid, and absence of cAMP-induced Cl- secretion as compared with non-CF cultures. They were also characterized by thick apical secretion that hampered the movement of cell surface debris by cilia. However, CF respiratory epithelia did not show increased production of mucins or IL-8. The method described here is now routinely used in our laboratory to establish long-term cultures of well differentiated respiratory epithelia from human airway biopsies. PMID:16179582

  7. Pulmonary dendritic cell distribution and prevalence in guinea pig airways: effect of ovalbumin sensitization and challenge.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T E; Millecchia, L L; Frazer, D G; Fedan, J S

    1997-08-01

    We characterized the localization and prevalence of dendritic cells (DC) in guinea pig airways before and after s.c. sensitization and aerosol challenge with ovalbumin (OVA). DC, eosinophils, macrophages, T cells and B cells in lung and trachea were identified and quantified in frozen sections using monoclonal antibodies and computer-assisted image analysis. Airway reactivity of conscious animals to inhaled methacholine was examined. In unsensitized animals, DC were localized primarily within the lamina propria of the trachea and bronchi, in the submucosa of the trachea and in the adventitia of the bronchi. In contrast to reported studies on rats, few DC were noted in the epithelium. After OVA challenge, sensitized animals demonstrated an early obstructive response and a late-phase response that was well developed by 18 hr. Challenge with OVA increased DC prevalence in the lamina propria and submucosa of the trachea and in the lamina propria and adventitia of the bronchi. There was widespread eosinophilia throughout the airways, but no changes in B cells or T cells were evident. Macrophages were increased in the epithelium of both OVA-treated and saline-treated animals. At 18 hr after challenge, sensitized guinea pigs but not saline-treated controls were hyperreactive to inhaled methacholine. Except for macrophages, none of these effects were observed after saline treatment. Our findings indicate that inflammation in the airways of OVA-sensitized guinea pigs involves infiltration of DC, which is seen at the time animals are hyperreactive to inhaled methacholine. PMID:9262368

  8. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  9. Klotho expression is reduced in COPD airway epithelial cells: effects on inflammation and oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Jingying; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Wiegman, Coen H.; Barnes, Peter J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Huang, Mao

    2015-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is associated with sustained inflammation, excessive injury, and accelerated lung aging. Human Klotho (KL) is an anti-aging protein that protects cells against inflammation and damage. In the present study, we quantified KL expression in the lungs of COPD patients and in an ozone-induced mouse model of COPD, and investigated the mechanisms that control KL expression and function in the airways. KL distribution and levels in human and mouse airways were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The effect of CSE (cigarette smoke extract) on KL expression was detected in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the effect of KL on CSE-mediated inflammation and hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular injury/apoptosis was determined using siRNAs. KL expression was decreased in the lungs of smokers and further reduced in patients with COPD. Similarly, 6 weeks of exposure to ozone decreased KL levels in airway epithelial cells. CSE and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) decreased KL expression and release from airway epithelial cells, which was associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, KL depletion increased cell sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage. These effects involved the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathways. Reduced KL expression in COPD airway epithelial cells was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with the accelerated lung aging in COPD development. PMID:26201096

  10. Klotho expression is reduced in COPD airway epithelial cells: effects on inflammation and oxidant injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Jingying; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Wiegman, Coen H; Barnes, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is associated with sustained inflammation, excessive injury, and accelerated lung aging. Human Klotho (KL) is an anti-aging protein that protects cells against inflammation and damage. In the present study, we quantified KL expression in the lungs of COPD patients and in an ozone-induced mouse model of COPD, and investigated the mechanisms that control KL expression and function in the airways. KL distribution and levels in human and mouse airways were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The effect of CSE (cigarette smoke extract) on KL expression was detected in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the effect of KL on CSE-mediated inflammation and hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular injury/apoptosis was determined using siRNAs. KL expression was decreased in the lungs of smokers and further reduced in patients with COPD. Similarly, 6 weeks of exposure to ozone decreased KL levels in airway epithelial cells. CSE and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) decreased KL expression and release from airway epithelial cells, which was associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, KL depletion increased cell sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage. These effects involved the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathways. Reduced KL expression in COPD airway epithelial cells was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with the accelerated lung aging in COPD development. PMID:26201096

  11. TLR-2 IS INVOLVED IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONE TO AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary cultures of normal human airway epithelial cells (NHBE) respond to ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) by increased production of the cytokine IL-8, and the induction of a number of oxidant stress response genes. Components of ambient air PM responsible for stim...

  12. CULTURE CONDITIONS AFFECT HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO DIESEL PARTICLE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant that may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter inhalation. In vitro studies have shown that DEP exposure induces pro-inflammatory proteins in human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) with varying...

  13. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  14. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  15. Airway Epithelial Cells are the Site of Expression of a Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptide Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Gill; Jones, Douglas E.; Bevins, Charles L.

    1993-05-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide from the bovine tracheal mucosa, which we called tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP). We now show the TAP gene is expressed throughout the adult conducting airway, from nasal to bronchiolar tissue, but not in tissues other than airway mucosa, as determined by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of airway sections localizes TAP mRNA to columnar cells of the pseudostratified epithelium. We report the structural organization of the TAP gene and show that TAP is a member of a large family of related sequences with high nucleotide identity in the 5'exon. The data support the hypothesis that antimicrobial peptides contribute to host defense of the respiratory tract.

  16. Airborne pollutant ROFA enhances the allergic airway inflammation through direct modulation of dendritic cells in an uptake-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Arantes-Costa, Fernanda Magalhaes; Grund, Lidiane Zito; Martins, Milton Arruda; Lima, Carla

    2014-09-01

    Studies suggest that airborne pollutants are important cofactors in the exacerbation of lung diseases. The role of DC on the exacerbation of lung inflammation induced by particulate matter pollutants is unclear. We evaluated the effects of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in vitro and lung dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, and the subsequent T-cell response. In a model of asthma, exposure to ROFA exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, which was attributed to the increase of eosinophils, IL-5- and IFN-γ-producing T cells, and goblet cells as well as decreased number of Treg and pDC. However, the ROFA showed no ability to modulate the production of anaphylactic IgE. In vitro studies showed that ROFA directly induced the maturation of DCs up-regulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines and MMP production in an uptake-dependent and oxidative stress-dependent manner. Furthermore, ROFA-pulsed BMDC transferred to allergic mice exacerbated eosinophilic inflammation as well as promoted increased epithelial and goblet cells changes. Thus, pollutants may constitute an important and risk factor in the exacerbation of asthma with inhibition of the negative regulatory signals in the lung, with enhanced mDC activation that sustains the recruitment of effector T lymphocytes and eosinophil. PMID:24975839

  17. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Meagan; Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Eisenhauer, Philip; Ziats, Nicholas P; LeClair, Laurie; Poynter, Matthew E; Steele, Chad; Rincon, Mercedes; Weiss, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) mitigate inflammation in mouse models of acute lung injury. However, specific mechanisms of BMSC actions on CD4 T lymphocyte-mediated inflammation in vivo remain poorly understood. Limited data suggests promotion of Th2 phenotype in models of Th1-mediated diseases. However, whether this might alleviate or worsen Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic asthma is unknown. To ascertain the effects of systemic administration of BMSCs in a mouse model of Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airways inflammation was induced in wild-type C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice as well as in interferon-γ (IFNγ) receptor null mice. Effects of systemic administration during antigen sensitization of either syngeneic or allogeneic BMSC on airways hyperreactivity, lung inflammation, antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes, and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Both syngeneic and allogeneic BMSCs inhibited airways hyperreactivity and lung inflammation through a mechanism partly dependent on IFNγ. However, contrary to existing data, BMSCs did not affect antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte proliferation but rather promoted Th1 phenotype in vivo as assessed by both OVA-specific CD4 T lymphocyte cytokine production and OVA-specific circulating immunoglobulins. BMSCs treated to prevent release of soluble mediators and a control cell population of primary dermal skin fibroblasts only partly mimicked the BMSC effects and in some cases worsened inflammation. In conclusion, BMSCs inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation by influencing antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte differentiation. Promotion of a Th1 phenotype in antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes by BMSCs is sufficient to inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation through an IFNγ-dependent process. PMID:21544902

  18. Airway basal cells of healthy smokers express an embryonic stem cell signature relevant to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Hackett, Neil R; Leung, Roland; Moore, Malcolm A S; Sima, Camelia S; Chao, Ion Wa; Downey, Robert J; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    Activation of the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) signature genes has been observed in various epithelial cancers. In this study, we found that the hESC signature is selectively induced in the airway basal stem/progenitor cell population of healthy smokers (BC-S), with a pattern similar to that activated in all major types of human lung cancer. We further identified a subset of 6 BC-S hESC genes, whose coherent overexpression in lung adenocarcinoma (AdCa) was associated with reduced lung function, poorer differentiation grade, more advanced tumor stage, remarkably shorter survival, and higher frequency of TP53 mutations. BC-S shared with hESC and a considerable subset of lung carcinomas a common TP53 inactivation molecular pattern which strongly correlated with the BC-S hESC gene expression. These data provide transcriptome-based evidence that smoking-induced reprogramming of airway BC toward the hESC-like phenotype might represent a common early molecular event in the development of aggressive lung carcinomas in humans. PMID:23857717

  19. Host cell autophagy modulates early stages of adenovirus infections in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xuehuo; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2013-02-01

    Human adenoviruses typically cause mild infections in the upper or lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or ocular epithelium. However, adenoviruses may be life-threatening in patients with impaired immunity and some serotypes cause epidemic outbreaks. Attachment to host cell receptors activates cell signaling and virus uptake by endocytosis. At present, it is unclear how vital cellular homeostatic mechanisms affect these early steps in the adenovirus life cycle. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway for recycling intracellular components that is upregulated during periods of cell stress. Autophagic cargo is sequestered in double-membrane structures called autophagosomes that fuse with endosomes to form amphisomes which then deliver their content to lysosomes. Autophagy is an important adaptive response in airway epithelial cells targeted by many common adenovirus serotypes. Using two established tissue culture models, we demonstrate here that adaptive autophagy enhances expression of the early region 1 adenovirus protein, induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and production of new viral progeny in airway epithelial cells infected with adenovirus type 2. We have also discovered that adenovirus infections are tightly regulated by endosome maturation, a process characterized by abrupt exchange of Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases, associated with early and late endosomes, respectively. Moreover, endosome maturation appears to control a pool of early endosomes capable of fusing with autophagosomes which enhance adenovirus infection. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to induce autophagy in order to aid their own replication. Our studies reveal a novel role for host cell autophagy that could have a significant impact on the outcome of respiratory infections. PMID:23236070

  20. Treatment with Pyranopyran-1, 8-Dione Attenuates Airway Responses in Cockroach Allergen Sensitized Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  1. Treatment with pyranopyran-1, 8-dione attenuates airway responses in cockroach allergen sensitized asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Park, Min-Sun; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  2. Junctional abnormalities in human airway epithelial cells expressing F508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brandon; Moriarty, Hannah K.; Kim, Agnes H.; McCarty, Nael A.; Koval, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a profound impact on airway physiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that intercellular junctions are impaired in CF. We examined changes to CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function, tight junctions, and gap junctions in NuLi-1 (CFTRwt/wt) and CuFi-5 (CFTRΔF508/ΔF508) cells. Cells were studied at air-liquid interface (ALI) and compared with primary human bronchial epithelial cells. On the basis of fluorescent lectin binding, the phenotype of the NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells at week 8 resembled that of serous, glycoprotein-rich airway cells. After week 7, CuFi-5 cells possessed 130% of the epithelial Na+ channel activity and 17% of the CFTR activity of NuLi-1 cells. In both cell types, expression levels of CFTR were comparable to those in primary airway epithelia. Transepithelial resistance of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells stabilized during maturation in ALI culture, with significantly lower transepithelial resistance for CuFi-5 than NuLi-1 cells. We also found that F508del CFTR negatively affects gap junction function in the airway. NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells express the connexins Cx43 and Cx26. While both connexins were properly trafficked by NuLi-1 cells, Cx43 was mistrafficked by CuFi-5 cells. Cx43 trafficking was rescued in CuFi-5 cells treated with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), as assessed by intracellular dye transfer. 4-PBA-treated CuFi-5 cells also exhibited an increase in forskolin-induced CFTR-mediated currents. The Cx43 trafficking defect was confirmed using IB3-1 cells and found to be corrected by 4-PBA treatment. These data support the use of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells to examine the effects of F508del CFTR expression on tight junction and gap junction function in the context of serous human airway cells. PMID:26115671

  3. Junctional abnormalities in human airway epithelial cells expressing F508del CFTR.

    PubMed

    Molina, Samuel A; Stauffer, Brandon; Moriarty, Hannah K; Kim, Agnes H; McCarty, Nael A; Koval, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a profound impact on airway physiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that intercellular junctions are impaired in CF. We examined changes to CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function, tight junctions, and gap junctions in NuLi-1 (CFTR(wt/wt)) and CuFi-5 (CFTR(ΔF508/ΔF508)) cells. Cells were studied at air-liquid interface (ALI) and compared with primary human bronchial epithelial cells. On the basis of fluorescent lectin binding, the phenotype of the NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells at week 8 resembled that of serous, glycoprotein-rich airway cells. After week 7, CuFi-5 cells possessed 130% of the epithelial Na(+) channel activity and 17% of the CFTR activity of NuLi-1 cells. In both cell types, expression levels of CFTR were comparable to those in primary airway epithelia. Transepithelial resistance of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells stabilized during maturation in ALI culture, with significantly lower transepithelial resistance for CuFi-5 than NuLi-1 cells. We also found that F508del CFTR negatively affects gap junction function in the airway. NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells express the connexins Cx43 and Cx26. While both connexins were properly trafficked by NuLi-1 cells, Cx43 was mistrafficked by CuFi-5 cells. Cx43 trafficking was rescued in CuFi-5 cells treated with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), as assessed by intracellular dye transfer. 4-PBA-treated CuFi-5 cells also exhibited an increase in forskolin-induced CFTR-mediated currents. The Cx43 trafficking defect was confirmed using IB3-1 cells and found to be corrected by 4-PBA treatment. These data support the use of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells to examine the effects of F508del CFTR expression on tight junction and gap junction function in the context of serous human airway cells. PMID:26115671

  4. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  5. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  6. Current Perspectives in Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapies for Airway Tissue Defects

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Francesco; Rizzo, Stefania; Borri, Alessandro; Casiraghi, Monica; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and respiratory diseases are the third cause of death in industrialized countries; for this reason the airways and cardiopulmonary system have been the focus of extensive investigation, in particular of the new emerging branch of regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a population of undifferentiated multipotent adult cells that naturally reside within the human body, which can differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages when cultured in specific inducing media. MSCs have the ability to migrate and engraft at sites of inflammation and injury in response to cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors at a wound site and they can exert local reparative effects through transdifferentiation and differentiation into specific cell types or via the paracrine secretion of soluble factors with anti-inflammatory and wound-healing activities. Experimental and clinical evidence exists regarding MSCs efficacy in airway defects restoration; although clinical MSCs use, in the daily practice, is not yet completely reached for airway diseases, we can argue that MSCs do not represent any more merely an experimental approach to airway tissue defects restoration but they can be considered as a “salvage” therapeutic tool in very selected patients and diseases. PMID:26167186

  7. Resolution of Allergic Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperreactivity Is Mediated by IL-17–producing γδT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Jenna R.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: γδT lymphocytes are enriched within the epithelial microenvironment, where they are thought to maintain homeostasis and limit immunopathology. γδT cells are postulated to exert a regulatory influence during acute allergic airway disease, but the mechanism is unknown. Although regulation of allergic airway disease has been attributed to IL-17–producing T helper (Th) 17 cells, we have found that γδT cells represent the major source of IL-17 in the allergic lung. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of these IL-17–producing γδT cells to regulation of allergic airway inflammation. Methods: Flow cytometry revealed that IL-17–producing γδT cells are more prevalent than IL-17+αβT cells (Th17) in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation. Measurements and Main Results: Transfer of γδT cells at the peak of acute allergic responses ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness with a corresponding acceleration in the resolution of eosinophilic and Th2-driven inflammation. Conversely, functional blockade of γδT cells led to exacerbation of injury. Neither treatment changed pulmonary Th17 cell numbers. Moreover, transfer of Th17 cells had no effect on disease outcome. Importantly, IL-17–deficient γδT cells were unable to promote resolution of injury. These data identify IL-17–producing γδT cells as key regulators of the allergic response in vivo. Conclusions: This unfolds a new perspective for the understanding of γδT cell function with regard to innate regulation of the adaptive immune responses, emphasizing that resolution of responses are important in determining the outcome of acute inflammatory episodes as well as for maintenance of tissue integrity and homeostasis. PMID:20413629

  8. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V; Komarova, Natalia L

    2016-07-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  9. SERCA2 Regulates Non-CF and CF Airway Epithelial Cell Response to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shama; Nichols, David P.; Strand, Matthew; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Randell, Scott H.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Aftab

    2011-01-01

    Calcium mobilization can regulate a wide range of essential functions of respiratory epithelium, including ion transport, ciliary beat frequency, and secretion of mucus, all of which are modified in cystic fibrosis (CF). SERCA2, an important controller of calcium signaling, is deficient in CF epithelium. We conducted this study to determine whether SERCA2 deficiency can modulate airway epithelial responses to environmental oxidants such as ozone. This could contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary exacerbations, which are important and frequent clinical events in CF. To address this, we used air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of non-CF and CF cell lines, as well as differentiated cultures of cells derived from non-CF and CF patients. We found that ozone exposure caused enhanced membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death in CF airway epithelial cell lines relative to non-CF. Ozone exposure caused increased proinflammatory cytokine production in CF airway epithelial cell lines. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production also was observed in shRNA-mediated SERCA2 knockdown cells. Overexpression of SERCA2 reversed ozone-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Ozone-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was NF-κB- dependent. In a stable NF-κB reporter cell line, SERCA2 inhibition and knockdown both upregulated cytomix-induced NF-κB activity, indicating importance of SERCA2 in modulating NF-κB activity. In this system, increased NF-κB activity was also accompanied by increased IL-8 production. Ozone also induced NF-κB activity and IL-8 release, an effect that was greater in SERCA2-silenced NF-κB-reporter cells. SERCA2 overexpression reversed cytomix-induced increased IL-8 release and total nuclear p65 in CFTR-deficient (16HBE-AS) cells. These studies suggest that SERCA2 is an important regulator of the proinflammatory response of airway epithelial cells and could be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22096575

  10. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  11. Relation of circulating T cell profiles to airway inflammation and asthma control in asthmatic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eszes, N; Bohács, A; Cseh, A; Toldi, G; Bikov, A; Ivancsó, I; Müller, V; Horváth, I; Rigó, J; Vásárhelyi, B; Losonczy, Gy; Tamási, L

    2012-09-01

    Asthmatic inflammation during pregnancy poses a risk for maternal and fetal morbidities. Circulating T cell immune phenotype is known to correlate with airway inflammation (detectable by fractional concentration of nitric oxide present in exhaled breath (FENO)) in non-pregnant allergic asthmatics. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of peripheral T cell phenotype to FENO and clinical variables of asthma during pregnancy.We examined 22 pregnant women with allergic asthma in the 2nd/3rd trimester. The prevalence of Th1, Th2, regulatory T (Treg) and natural killer (NK) cell subsets was identified with flow cytometry using cell-specific markers. FENO, Asthma Control Test (ACT) total score and lung function were evaluated.Peripheral blood Th1, Th2, Treg, and NK cell prevalence were not significantly correlated to airway inflammation assessed by FENO in asthmatic pregnant women (all cells p > 0.05; study power > 75%). However, an inverse correlation was detected between Th2 cell prevalence and ACT total scores (p = 0.03) in asthmatic pregnancy.Blunted relationship between T cell profile and airway inflammation may be the result of pregnancy induced immune tolerance in asthmatic pregnancy. On the other hand, increased Th2 response impairs disease control that supports direct relationship between symptoms and cellular mechanisms of asthma during pregnancy. PMID:22982718

  12. Autophagy plays an essential role in cigarette smoke-induced expression of MUC5AC in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Hong-Bin; Wang, Yong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Li, Zhou-Yang; Xuan, Nan-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Hua, Wen; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao; Chen, Zhi-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a common pathological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the molecular basis for this condition remains incompletely understood. We have previously demonstrated a critical role of autophagy in COPD pathogenesis through mediating apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the function of autophagy as well as its upstream and downstream signals in cigarette smoke-induced mucus production in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE), as well as the classical autophagy inducers starvation or Torin-1, significantly triggered MUC5AC expression, and inhibition of autophagy markedly attenuated CSE-induced mucus production. The CSE-induced autophagy was mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitoROS), which regulated mucin expression through the JNK and activator protein-1 pathway. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was also required for CSE-induced MUC5AC in HBE cells, but it exerted inconsiderable effects on the autophagy-JNK signaling cascade. Airways of mice with dysfunctional autophagy-related genes displayed a markedly reduced number of goblet cells and attenuated levels of Muc5ac in response to cigarette smoke exposure. These results altogether suggest that mitoROS-dependent autophagy is essential for cigarette smoke-induced mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelial cells, and reemphasize autophagy inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic airway diseases. PMID:27036871

  13. High mobility group box 1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Statt, Sarah; Wu, Reen; Chang, Hao-Teng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Wang, Chien-Neng; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lee, Chen-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is implicated in bronchial remodeling and loss of lung function in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Previous studies showed the involvement of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in the pathology of chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, the role of HMGB1 in EMT of human airway epithelial cells is still unclear. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to show that HMGB1 treatment regulated EMT-related gene expression in human primary-airway epithelial cells. The top five upregulated genes were SNAI2, FGFBP1, VIM, SPARC (osteonectin), and SERPINE1, while the downregulated genes included OCLN, TJP1 (ZO-1), FZD7, CDH1 (E-cadherin), and LAMA5. We found that HMGB1 induced downregulation of E-cadherin and ZO-1, and upregulation of vimentin mRNA transcription and protein translation in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we observed that HMGB1 induced AKT phosphorylation, resulting in GSK3β inactivation, cytoplasmic accumulation, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin to induce EMT in human airway epithelial cells. Treatment with PI3K inhibitor (LY294006) and β-catenin shRNA reversed HMGB1-induced EMT. Moreover, HMGB1 induced expression of receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE), but not that of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or TLR4, and RAGE shRNA inhibited HMGB1-induced EMT in human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, we found that HMGB1 induced EMT through RAGE and the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26739898

  14. High mobility group box 1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Statt, Sarah; Wu, Reen; Chang, Hao-Teng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Wang, Chien-Neng; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lee, Chen-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is implicated in bronchial remodeling and loss of lung function in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Previous studies showed the involvement of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in the pathology of chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, the role of HMGB1 in EMT of human airway epithelial cells is still unclear. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to show that HMGB1 treatment regulated EMT-related gene expression in human primary-airway epithelial cells. The top five upregulated genes were SNAI2, FGFBP1, VIM, SPARC (osteonectin), and SERPINE1, while the downregulated genes included OCLN, TJP1 (ZO-1), FZD7, CDH1 (E-cadherin), and LAMA5. We found that HMGB1 induced downregulation of E-cadherin and ZO-1, and upregulation of vimentin mRNA transcription and protein translation in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we observed that HMGB1 induced AKT phosphorylation, resulting in GSK3β inactivation, cytoplasmic accumulation, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin to induce EMT in human airway epithelial cells. Treatment with PI3K inhibitor (LY294006) and β-catenin shRNA reversed HMGB1-induced EMT. Moreover, HMGB1 induced expression of receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE), but not that of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or TLR4, and RAGE shRNA inhibited HMGB1-induced EMT in human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, we found that HMGB1 induced EMT through RAGE and the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26739898

  15. Effects of vitamin D on airway epithelial cell morphology and rhinovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Brockman-Schneider, Rebecca A; Pickles, Raymond J; Gern, James E

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D has been linked to reduced risk of viral respiratory illness. We hypothesized that vitamin D could directly reduce rhinovirus (RV) replication in airway epithelium. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (hBEC) were treated with vitamin D, and RV replication and gene expression were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Cytokine/chemokine secretion was measured by ELISA, and transepithelial resistance (TER) was determined using a voltohmmeter. Morphology was examined using immunohistochemistry. Vitamin D supplementation had no significant effects on RV replication, but potentiated secretion of CXCL8 and CXCL10 from infected or uninfected cells. Treatment with vitamin D in the form of 1,25(OH)2D caused significant changes in cell morphology, including thickening of the cell layers (median of 46.5 µm [35.0-69.0] vs. 30 µm [24.5-34.2], p<0.01) and proliferation of cytokeratin-5-expressing cells, as demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis. Similar effects were seen for 25(OH)D. In addition to altering morphology, higher concentrations of vitamin D significantly upregulated small proline-rich protein (SPRR1β) expression (6.3 fold-induction, p<0.01), suggestive of squamous metaplasia. Vitamin D treatment of hBECs did not alter repair of mechanically induced wounds. Collectively, these findings indicate that vitamin D does not directly affect RV replication in airway epithelial cells, but can influence chemokine synthesis and alters the growth and differentiation of airway epithelial cells. PMID:24475177

  16. Inflammatory responses of airway smooth muscle cells and effects of endothelin receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Jungck, David; Behr, Juergen; Strauch, Justus; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ETRAs), authorized for pulmonary hypertension, have failed to prove their utility in chronic lung diseases with corticosteroid-resistant airway inflammation when applied at late disease stages with emphysema/fibrosis. Earlier administration might prove effective by targeting the interaction between airway inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) participate in linking inflammation with remodeling and that associated genes become differentially suppressed by ambrisentan (A-receptor selective ETRA) and bosentan (nonselective/dual ETRA). Inflammatory responses of ex vivo-cultivated HASMCs to TNF-α were investigated by whole-genome microarray analyses. qRT-PCR and ELISA were used to test inflammatory and remodeling genes for sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan and to investigate differential sensitivities mechanistically. ETRA and corticosteroid effects were compared in HASMCs from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. TNF-α induced the expression of 18 cytokines/chemokines and five tissue remodeling genes involved in severe, corticosteroid-insensitive asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and/or pulmonary hypertension. Thirteen cytokines/chemokines, MMP13, and WISP1 were suppressed by ETRAs. Eight genes had differential sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan depending on the endothelin-B receptor impact on transcriptional regulation and mRNA stabilization. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligands 2 and 5, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and MMP13 had increased sensitivity to bosentan or bosentan/dexamethasone combination versus dexamethasone alone. Suppression of cytokine and remodeling gene expression by ETRAs was confirmed in TNF-α-activated human bronchial epithelial cells. HASMCs and human bronchial epithelial cells participate in the interaction of inflammation and tissue remodeling. This interaction is

  17. The effect of ozone on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, A.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to the development of exaggerated bronchoconstrictor responses since a persistent link has been noted between pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. In these studies guinea pigs were exposed to 2.0 ppm ozone for 4 hours, then immediately sacrificed or allowed to breathe filtered air for up to 14 days. Following ozone exposure there was an immediate massive neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophils in lung digest dropped to control values within 3-12 hours post-ozone but remained elevated in BAL fluid for 3 days. There was probable eosinophil degranulation within the first 24 hours post-ozone. Guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to vigal stimulation through 3 days post-ozone. Although they were also hyperresponsive to ACh, responses to MCh were unchanged. Neuronal M[sub 2] receptors were dysfunctional through 3 days post-ozone. There was resolution of inflammation, airway responsiveness, and neuronal M[sub 2] receptor function by 14 days post-exposure. This investigation has (1) confirmed an immediate lung inflammation following acute ozone exposure; (2) established that cells in BAL give a distorted reflection of inflammatory events in lung digest; (3) demonstrated that ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness is at least partially due to efferent cholinergic mechanisms without functional changes of muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle; (4) shown that ACh may not be an appropriate agent to test ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness; and (5) demonstrated that inhibitory neuronal M[sub 2] receptors are dysfunctional following ozone exposure. There was close linkage between these events, suggesting that they may be causally related. This investigation proposes a specific mechanism, dysfunction of neuronal M[sub 2] receptors, by which inflammatory cells could cause airway hyperresponsiveness following acute ozone exposure.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells for repair of the airway epithelium in asthma.

    PubMed

    Knight, Darryl A; Rossi, Fabio M; Hackett, Tillie-Louise

    2010-12-01

    The airway epithelium is constantly faced with inflammatory and potentially injurious stimuli. Following damage, rapid repair mechanisms involving proliferation and differentiation of resident progenitor and stem cell pools are necessary in order to maintain a protective barrier. In asthma, evidence pointing to a compromised ability of the epithelium to properly repair and regenerate is rapidly accumulating. The consequences of this are presently unknown but are likely to have a significant impact on lung function. Mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to serve as a universal source for replacement of specific cells in several diseases and thus offer hope as a potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of the chronic remodeling changes that occur in the asthmatic epithelium. However, controversy exists regarding whether these cells can actually home to and engraft within the airways and contribute to tissue function or whether this mechanism is necessary, since they can have potent paracrine immunomodulatory effects. This article focuses on the current knowledge about specific stem cell populations that may contribute to airway epithelial regeneration and discusses the use of mesenchymal stem cells as a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:21128750

  19. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  20. Effects of miRNA-145 on airway smooth muscle cells function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Sun, Xiuzhen; Wu, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ping; Shi, Hongyang; Xu, Jing; Li, Manxiang

    2015-11-01

    The pathological changes of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contribute to airway remodeling during asthma. Here, we investigated the effect of miR-145 on ASM function. We found that miR-145 was aberrantly more highly expressed in ASM cells exposed to cytokine stimulation that mimic the airway conditions of patients with asthma. Repression of miR-145 resulted in decreased ASM cell proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulation of type I collagen and contractile protein MHC in ASM cells. qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that miR-145 negatively regulated the expression of downstream target Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) protein, and overexpression of KLF4 attenuated the effects of miR-145 on ASM cells. Further studies showed that KLF4 significantly up-regulated the expression of p21 and down-regulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9). In conclusion, miR-145 overexpression in ASM cells significantly inhibited KLF4, and subsequently affected downstream p21, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions, eventually leading to enhanced proliferation and migration of ASM cells in vitro. PMID:26197891

  1. Arsenic Compromises Conducting Airway Epithelial Barrier Properties in Primary Mouse and Immortalized Human Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Liguori, Andrew E.; Olsen, Colin E.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb)] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM) and submicromolar (0.8 μM) arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl) Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway. PMID:24349408

  2. Ciliary beating recovery in deficient human airway epithelial cells after lentivirus ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Chhin, Brigitte; Negre, Didier; Merrot, Olivier; Pham, Jacqueline; Tourneur, Yves; Ressnikoff, Denis; Jaspers, Martine; Jorissen, Mark; Cosset, François-Loïc; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2009-03-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is a heterogeneous genetic disease that is characterized by cilia dysfunction of the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tracts, resulting in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Despite lifelong physiological therapy and antibiotics, the lungs of affected patients are progressively destroyed, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Recessive mutations in Dynein Axonemal Intermediate chain type 1 (DNAI1) gene have been described in 10% of cases of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Our goal was to restore normal ciliary beating in DNAI1-deficient human airway epithelial cells. A lentiviral vector based on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein was used to transduce cultured human airway epithelial cells with a cDNA of DNAI1 driven by the Elongation Factor 1 promoter. Transcription and translation of the transduced gene were tested by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Human airway epithelial cells that were DNAI1-deficient due to compound heterozygous mutations, and consequently had immotile cilia and no outer dynein arm, were transduced by the lentivirus. Cilia beating was recorded and electron microscopy of the cilia was performed. Transcription and translation of the transduced DNAI1 gene were detected in human cells treated with the lentivirus. In addition, immotile cilia recovered a normal beat and outer dynein arms reappeared. We demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a normalization of ciliary beat frequency of deficient human airway epithelial cells by using a lentivirus to transduce cells with the therapeutic gene. This preliminary step constitutes a conceptual proof that is indispensable in the perspective of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia's in vivo gene therapy. This is the first time that recovery of cilia beating is demonstrated in this disease. PMID:19300481

  3. Ciliary Beating Recovery in Deficient Human Airway Epithelial Cells after Lentivirus Ex Vivo Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chhin, Brigitte; Negre, Didier; Merrot, Olivier; Pham, Jacqueline; Tourneur, Yves; Ressnikoff, Denis; Jaspers, Martine; Jorissen, Mark; Cosset, François-Loïc; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is a heterogeneous genetic disease that is characterized by cilia dysfunction of the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tracts, resulting in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Despite lifelong physiological therapy and antibiotics, the lungs of affected patients are progressively destroyed, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Recessive mutations in Dynein Axonemal Intermediate chain type 1 (DNAI1) gene have been described in 10% of cases of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Our goal was to restore normal ciliary beating in DNAI1–deficient human airway epithelial cells. A lentiviral vector based on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein was used to transduce cultured human airway epithelial cells with a cDNA of DNAI1 driven by the Elongation Factor 1 promoter. Transcription and translation of the transduced gene were tested by RT–PCR and western blot, respectively. Human airway epithelial cells that were DNAI1–deficient due to compound heterozygous mutations, and consequently had immotile cilia and no outer dynein arm, were transduced by the lentivirus. Cilia beating was recorded and electron microscopy of the cilia was performed. Transcription and translation of the transduced DNAI1 gene were detected in human cells treated with the lentivirus. In addition, immotile cilia recovered a normal beat and outer dynein arms reappeared. We demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a normalization of ciliary beat frequency of deficient human airway epithelial cells by using a lentivirus to transduce cells with the therapeutic gene. This preliminary step constitutes a conceptual proof that is indispensable in the perspective of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia's in vivo gene therapy. This is the first time that recovery of cilia beating is demonstrated in this disease. PMID:19300481

  4. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26160865

  5. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  6. Dual Oxidase Regulates Neutrophil Recruitment in Allergic Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described, and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13) or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOX to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa−/−) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa−/− mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa−/− mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia, and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa+/+ mice as expected, but was absent in Duoxa−/− mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa−/− mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of

  7. Nanotubes connect CD4+ T cells to airway smooth muscle cells: novel mechanism of T cell survival.

    PubMed

    Al Heialy, Saba; Zeroual, Melissa; Farahnak, Soroor; McGovern, Toby; Risse, Paul-André; Novali, Mauro; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Roman, Horia N; Martin, James G

    2015-06-15

    Contact between airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and activated CD4(+) T cells, a key interaction in diseases such as asthma, triggers ASM cell proliferation and enhances T cell survival. We hypothesized that direct contact between ASM and CD4(+) T cells facilitated the transfer of anti-apoptotic proteins via nanotubes, resulting in increased survival of activated CD4(+) T cells. CD4(+) T cells, isolated from PBMCs of healthy subjects, when activated and cocultured with ASM cells for 24 h, formed nanotubes that were visualized by immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy. Cell-to-cell transfer of the fluorescent dye calcein-AM confirmed cytoplasmic communication via nanotubes. Immunoreactive B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and induced myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein (Mcl-1), two major anti-apoptotic proteins, were present within the nanotubes. Downregulation of Mcl-1 by small interfering RNA in ASM cells significantly increased T cell apoptosis, whereas downregulation of Bcl-2 had no effect. Transfer of GFP-tagged Mcl-1 from ASM cells to CD4(+) T cells via the nanotubes confirmed directionality of transfer. In conclusion, activated T cells communicate with ASM cells via nanotube formation. Direct transfer of Mcl-1 from ASM to CD(+) T cells via nanotubes is involved in T cell survival. This study provides a novel mechanism of survival of CD4(+) T cells that is dependent on interaction with a structural cell. PMID:25934863

  8. Effect of diosmetin on airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ai; Liu, Yanan; Zeng, Xiaoning; Kong, Hui; Ma, Yuan; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Bai, Fangfang; Huang, Mao

    2015-08-01

    Bronchial asthma, one of the most common allergic diseases, is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling. The anti-oxidant flavone aglycone diosmetin ameliorates the inflammation in pancreatitis, but little is known about its impact on asthma. In this study, the effects of diosmetin on chronic asthma were investigated with an emphasis on the modulation of airway remodeling in BALB/c mice challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). It was found that diosmetin significantly relieved inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia, and collagen deposition in the lungs of asthmatic mice and notably reduced AHR in these animals. The OVA-induced increases in total cell and eosinophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were reversed, and the level of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in serum was attenuated by diosmetin administration, implying an anti-Th2 activity of diosmetin. Furthermore, diosmetin remarkably suppressed the expression of smooth muscle actin alpha chain, indicating a potent anti-proliferative effect of diosmetin on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Matrix metallopeptidase-9, transforming growth factor-β1, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were also alleviated by diosmetin, suggesting that the remission of airway remodeling might be attributed to the decline of these proteins. Taken together, our findings provided a novel profile of diosmetin with anti-remodeling therapeutic benefits, highlighting a new potential of diosmetin in remitting the ASMC proliferation in chronic asthma. PMID:26033789

  9. Gene Transfer by Guanidinium-Cholesterol Cationic Lipids into Airway Epithelial Cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Peuchmaur, Michel; Leclerc, Tony; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Lehn, Pierre

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic vectors represent an attractive alternative approach to viral vectors for gene transfer, in particular into airway epithelial cells for lung-directed gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Having recently found that guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipids are efficient reagents for gene transfer into mammalian cell lines in vitro, we have investigated their use for gene delivery into primary airway epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained indicate that the lipid bis (guanidinium)-tren-cholesterol (BGTC) can be used to transfer a reporter gene into primary human airway epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, liposomes composed of BGTC and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) are efficient for gene delivery to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo. Transfected cells were detected both in the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands. In addition, the transfection efficiency of BGTC/DOPE liposomes in vivo was quantitatively assessed by using the luciferase reporter gene system.

  10. Bat airway epithelial cells: a novel tool for the study of zoonotic viruses.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, Isabella; Ehlen, Lukas; Kallies, René; Wollny, Robert; Corman, Victor M; Cottontail, Veronika M; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A

    2014-01-01

    Bats have been increasingly recognized as reservoir of important zoonotic viruses. However, until now many attempts to isolate bat-borne viruses in cell culture have been unsuccessful. Further, experimental studies on reservoir host species have been limited by the difficulty of rearing these species. The epithelium of the respiratory tract plays a central role during airborne transmission, as it is the first tissue encountered by viral particles. Although several cell lines from bats were established recently, no well-characterized, selectively cultured airway epithelial cells were available so far. Here, primary cells and immortalized cell lines from bats of the two important suborders Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat) and Eidolon helvum (Straw-colored fruit bat), were successfully cultured under standardized conditions from both fresh and frozen organ specimens by cell outgrowth of organ explants and by the use of serum-free primary cell culture medium. Cells were immortalized to generate permanent cell lines. Cells were characterized for their epithelial properties such as expression of cytokeratin and tight junctions proteins and permissiveness for viral infection with Rift-Valley fever virus and vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana. These cells can serve as suitable models for the study of bat-borne viruses and complement cell culture models for virus infection in human airway epithelial cells. PMID:24454736

  11. Bat Airway Epithelial Cells: A Novel Tool for the Study of Zoonotic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Eckerle, Isabella; Ehlen, Lukas; Kallies, René; Wollny, Robert; Corman, Victor M.; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    Bats have been increasingly recognized as reservoir of important zoonotic viruses. However, until now many attempts to isolate bat-borne viruses in cell culture have been unsuccessful. Further, experimental studies on reservoir host species have been limited by the difficulty of rearing these species. The epithelium of the respiratory tract plays a central role during airborne transmission, as it is the first tissue encountered by viral particles. Although several cell lines from bats were established recently, no well-characterized, selectively cultured airway epithelial cells were available so far. Here, primary cells and immortalized cell lines from bats of the two important suborders Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat) and Eidolon helvum (Straw-colored fruit bat), were successfully cultured under standardized conditions from both fresh and frozen organ specimens by cell outgrowth of organ explants and by the use of serum-free primary cell culture medium. Cells were immortalized to generate permanent cell lines. Cells were characterized for their epithelial properties such as expression of cytokeratin and tight junctions proteins and permissiveness for viral infection with Rift-Valley fever virus and vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana. These cells can serve as suitable models for the study of bat-borne viruses and complement cell culture models for virus infection in human airway epithelial cells. PMID:24454736

  12. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DUHAIME, MICHAEL J.; PAGE, KHALIPH O.; VARELA, FAUSTO A.; MURRAY, ANDREW S.; SILVERMAN, MICHAEL E.; ZORATTI, GINA L.; LIST, KARIN

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  13. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  14. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    PubMed

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  15. Airway Memory CD4(+) T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S; David, Chella S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-21

    Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs)-SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4(+) T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4(+) T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was dependent on interferon-γ and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV- and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4(+) T cells targeting conserved epitopes might have broad applicability in the context of new CoVs and other respiratory virus outbreaks. PMID:27287409

  16. Early events in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Smoking-induced reprogramming of airway epithelial basal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-12-01

    The airway epithelium is the primary site of the earliest pathologic changes induced by smoking, contributing to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The normal human airway epithelium is composed of several major cell types, including differentiated ciliated and secretory cells, intermediate undifferentiated cells, and basal cells (BC). BC contain the stem/progenitor cell population responsible for maintenance of the normally differentiated airway epithelium. Although inflammatory and immune processes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of COPD, the earliest lesions include hyperplasia of the BC population, suggesting that the disease may start with this cell type. Apart from BC hyperplasia, smoking induces a number of COPD-relevant airway epithelial remodeling phenotypes that are likely initiated in the BC population, including mucous cell hyperplasia, squamous cell metaplasia, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, altered ciliated and nonmucous secretory cell differentiation, and suppression of junctional barrier integrity. Significant progress has been recently made in understanding the biology of human airway BC, including gene expression features, stem/progenitor, and other functions, including interaction with other airway cell types. Accumulating evidence suggests that human airway BC function as both sensors and cellular sources of various cytokines and growth factors relevant to smoking-associated airway injury, as well as the origin of various molecular and histological phenotypes relevant to the pathogenesis of COPD. In the context of these considerations, we suggest that early BC-specific smoking-induced molecular changes are critical to the pathogenesis of COPD, and these represent a candidate target for novel therapeutic approaches to prevent COPD progression in susceptible individuals. PMID:25525728

  17. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma. PMID:24665390

  18. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, A. M.; Gaver, D. P.

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway's walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble's tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls' nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble's speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway's cellular epithelium during airway reopening.

  19. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A M; Gaver, D P

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway's walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble's tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls' nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble's speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway's cellular epithelium during airway reopening. PMID:23745044

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL PROTEINS PHOSPHORYLATED IN RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple studies conducted by NHEERL scientists in recent years have shown that acute exposure to metals found associated with combustion-derived particulate matter (PM) alters phosphoprotein metabolism in human airway epithelial cells causing intracellular signaling. This disreg...

  1. ACTIVATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO UTAH VALLEY PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) in the Utah Valley (UV) has previously been associated with a variety of adverse health effects. To investigate intracellular signaling mechanisms for pulmonary responses to UV PM inhalation, human primary airway epithelial cells (NHBE)...

  2. Aggravation of Allergic Airway Inflammation by Cigarette Smoke in Mice Is CD44-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Smitha; Lanckacker, Ellen; Dentener, Mieke; Bracke, Ken; Provoost, Sharen; De Grove, Katrien; Brusselle, Guy; Wouters, Emiel

    2016-01-01

    Background Although epidemiological studies reveal that cigarette smoke (CS) facilitates the development and exacerbation of allergic asthma, these studies offer limited information on the mechanisms involved. The transmembrane glycoprotein CD44 is involved in cell adhesion and acts as a receptor for hyaluronic acid and osteopontin. We aimed to investigate the role of CD44 in a murine model of CS-facilitated allergic airway inflammation. Methods Wild type (WT) and CD44 knock-out (KO) mice were exposed simultaneously to house dust mite (HDM) extract and CS. Inflammatory cells, hyaluronic acid (HA) and osteopontin (OPN) levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Proinflammatory mediators, goblet cell metaplasia and peribronchial eosinophilia were assessed in lung tissue. T-helper (Th) 1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine production was evaluated in mediastinal lymph node cultures. Results In WT mice, combined HDM/CS exposure increased the number of inflammatory cells and the levels of HA and OPN in BALF and Th2 cytokine production in mediastinal lymph nodes compared to control groups exposed to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)/CS, HDM/Air or PBS/Air. Furthermore, HDM/CS exposure significantly increased goblet cell metaplasia, peribronchial eosinophilia and inflammatory mediators in the lung. CD44 KO mice exposed to HDM/CS had significantly fewer inflammatory cells in BALF, an attenuated Th2 cytokine production, as well as decreased goblet cells and peribronchial eosinophils compared to WT mice. In contrast, the levels of inflammatory mediators were similar or higher than in WT mice. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that the aggravation of pulmonary inflammation upon combined exposure to allergen and an environmental pollutant is CD44-dependent. Data from this murine model of concomitant exposure to CS and HDM might be of importance for smoking allergic asthmatics. PMID:26999446

  3. Ineffective correction of PPARγ signaling in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells undergoing repair.

    PubMed

    Bou Saab, J; Bacchetta, M; Chanson, M

    2016-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) represents a potential target to treat airway mucus hypersecretion in cystic fibrosis (CF). We aimed to determine if PPARγ is altered in CF human airway epithelial cells (HAECs), if PPARγ contributes to mucin expression and HAEC differentiation, and if PPARγ ligand therapy corrects the CF phenotype. To this end, well-differentiated CF and NCF HAEC primary cultures were wounded to monitor the expression of key genes involved in PPARγ activation and mucus homeostasis, and to evaluate the effect of a PPARγ agonist, at different times of repair. Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) converts prostaglandin E2 to 15-keto PGE2 (15kPGE2), an endogenous PPARγ ligand. Interestingly, PPARγ and HPGD expression dramatically decreased in CF HAECs. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the expression of MUC5B. The correlation between PPARγ and MUC5B was confirmed in an airway epithelial cell line after CFTR knock-down. Exposure of HAECs to 15kPGE2 did not correct the CF phenotype but revealed a defect in the process of basal cell (BC) differentiation. The HPGD/PPARγ axis is deregulated in primary HAEC cultures from CF patients, which may impact the maturation of BCs to differentiated luminal cells. Importantly, PPARγ therapy was inefficient in correcting the CF defect. PMID:27484450

  4. Old dilemma: asthma with irreversible airway obstruction or COPD.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Fatemeh; Vonk, Judith M; Bulkmans, Nicole; Fleischeuer, Ruth; Gouw, Annette; Grünberg, Katrien; Mauad, Thais; Popper, Helmut; Felipe-Silva, Aloisio; Vrugt, Bart; Wright, Joanne L; Yang, Hui-Min; Kocks, Janwillem W H; Hylkema, Machteld N; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Ten Hacken, Nick H T

    2015-11-01

    Older asthmatic patients may develop fixed airway obstruction and clinical signs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated the added value of pathological evaluation of bronchial biopsies to help differentiate asthma from COPD, taking into account smoking, age, and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use. Asthma and COPD patients (24 of each category) were matched for ICS use, age, FEV(1), and smoking habits. Five pulmonary and five general pathologists examined bronchial biopsies using an interactive website, without knowing patient information. They were asked to diagnose asthma or COPD on biopsy findings in both a pairwise and randomly mixed order of cases during four different phases, with intervals of 4-6 weeks, covering a maximal period of 36 weeks. Clinically concordant diagnoses of asthma or COPD varied between 63 %-73 %, without important differences between pairwise vs randomly mixed examination or between general vs pulmonary pathologists. The highest percentage of concordant diagnoses was in young asthmatic patients without ICS use and in COPD patients with ICS use. In non ICS users with fixed airway obstruction, a COPD diagnosis was favored if abnormal presence of glands, squamous metaplasia, and submucosal infiltrate was present and an asthma diagnosis in case of abnormal presence of goblet cells. In ICS users with fixed airway obstruction, abnormal presence of submucosal infiltrates, basement membrane thickening, eosinophils, and glands was associated with asthma. Histological characteristics in bronchial biopsies are reproducibly recognized by pathologists, yet the differentiation by histopathology between asthma and COPD is difficult without information about ICS use. PMID:26369547

  5. Murine Cytomegalovirus Influences Foxj1 Expression, Ciliogenesis, and Mucus Plugging in Mice with Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol A.; Peluso, John J.; Shanley, John D.; Puddington, Lynn; Thrall, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    We have followed throughout time the development of allergic airway disease (AAD) in both uninfected mice and mice infected intranasally with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Histological evaluation of lung tissue from uninfected mice with AAD demonstrated mucus plugging after 14 and 21 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge, with resolution of mucus plugging occurring by 42 days. In MCMV/AAD mice, mucus plugging was observed after 7 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge and remained present at 42 days. The level of interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from MCMV/AAD mice was decreased compared with AAD mice and was accompanied by increased levels of interferon-γ. Levels of Muc5A/C, Muc5B, or Muc2 mucin mRNA in the lungs of MCMV/AAD mice were not elevated compared with AAD mice. MCMV was able to infect the airway epithelium, resulting in decreased expression of Foxj1, a transcription factor critical for ciliogenesis, and a loss of ciliated epithelial cells. In addition, an increase in the number of epithelial cells staining positive for periodic acid-Schiff was observed in MCMV/AAD airways. Together, these findings suggest that MCMV infection of the airway epithelium enhances goblet cell metaplasia and diminishes efficient mucociliary clearance in mice with AAD, resulting in increased mucus plugging. PMID:18258850

  6. Parasitic Nematode-Induced CD4+Foxp3+T Cells Can Ameliorate Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Park, Sang Kyun; Jang, Min Seong; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Background The recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T (Treg) cells is one of the most important mechanisms by which parasites down-regulate the immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the effects of Treg cells from Trichinella spiralis-infected mice and uninfected mice on experimental allergic airway inflammation in order to understand the functions of parasite-induced Treg cells. After four weeks of T. spiralis infection, we isolated Foxp3-GFP-expressing cells from transgenic mice using a cell sorter. We injected CD4+Foxp3+ cells from T. spiralis-infected [Inf(+)Foxp3+] or uninfected [Inf(-)Foxp3+] mice into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice before the induction of inflammation or during inflammation. Inflammation was induced by ovalbumin (OVA)-alum sensitization and OVA challenge. The concentrations of the Th2-related cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and the levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 in the serum were lower in mice that received intravenous application of Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells [IV(inf):+(+) group] than in control mice. Some features of allergic airway inflammation were ameliorated by the intravenous application of Inf(-)Foxp3+ cells [IV(inf):+(-) group], but the effects were less distinct than those observed in the IV(inf):+(+) group. We found that Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells migrated to inflammation sites in the lung and expressed higher levels of Treg-cell homing receptors (CCR5 and CCR9) and activation markers (Klrg1, Capg, GARP, Gzmb, OX40) than did Inf(-)Foxp3+ cells. Conclusion/Significance T. spiralis infection promotes the proliferation and functional activation of Treg cells. Parasite-induced Treg cells migrate to the inflammation site and suppress immune responses more effectively than non-parasite-induced Treg cells. The adoptive transfer of Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells is an effective method for the treatment and prevention of allergic airway diseases in mice and is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment

  7. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Erle, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  8. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol

    PubMed Central

    Erle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  9. Inhalation of honey reduces airway inflammation and histopathological changes in a rabbit model of ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Honey is widely used in folk medicine to treat cough, fever, and inflammation. In this study, the effect of aerosolised honey on airway tissues in a rabbit model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma was investigated. The ability of honey to act either as a rescuing agent in alleviating asthma-related symptoms or as a preventive agent to preclude the occurrence of asthma was also assessed. Methods Forty New Zealand white rabbits were sensitized twice with mixture of OVA and aluminium hydroxide on days 1 and 14. Honey treatments were given from day 23 to day 25 at two different doses (25% (v/v) and 50% (v/v) of honey diluted in sterile phosphate buffer saline. In the aerosolised honey as a rescue agent group, animals were euthanized on day 28; for the preventive group, animals were further exposed to aerosolised OVA for 3 days starting from day 28 and euthanized on day 31. The effects of honey on inflammatory cell response, airway inflammation, and goblet cell hyperplasia were assessed for each animal. Results Histopathological analyses revealed that aerosolised honey resulted in structural changes of the epithelium, mucosa, and submucosal regions of the airway that caused by the induction with OVA. Treatment with aerosolised honey has reduced the number of airway inflammatory cells present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and inhibited the goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion In this study, aerosolised honey was used to effectively treat and manage asthma in rabbits, and it could prove to be a promising treatment for asthma in humans. Future studies with a larger sample size and studies at the gene expression level are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which aerosolised honey reduces asthma symptoms. PMID:24886260

  10. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert, Jr.; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Manning, M. Lisa; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-10-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems--both inert and living--have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role.

  11. Sex Steroids Influence Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor Secretion From Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Freeman, Michelle R; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is emerging as an important player in airway inflammation, remodeling, and hyperreactivity. Separately, there is increasing evidence that sex hormones contribute to pathophysiology in the lung. BDNF and sex steroid signaling are thought to be intricately linked in the brain. There is currently little information on BDNF and sex steroid interactions in the airway but is relevant to understanding growth factor signaling in the context of asthma in men versus women. In this study, we assessed the effect of sex steroids on BDNF expression and secretion in human airway smooth muscle (ASM). Human ASM was treated with estrogen (E2 ) or testosterone (T, 10 nM each) and intracellular BDNF and secreted BDNF measured. E2 and T significantly reduced secretion of BDNF; effects prevented by estrogen and androgen receptor inhibitor, ICI 182,780 (1 μM), and flutamide (10 μM), respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were observed in intracellular BDNF mRNA or protein expression. High affinity BDNF receptor, TrkB, was not altered by E2 or T. E2 (but not T) significantly increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. Notably, Epac1 and Epac2 expression were significantly reduced by E2 and T. Furthermore, SNARE complex protein SNAP25 was decreased. Overall, these novel data suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of E2 or T inhibit BDNF secretion in human ASM, suggesting a potential interaction of sex steroids with BDNF in the airway that is different from brain. The relevance of sex steroid-BDNF interactions may lie in their overall contribution to airway diseases such as asthma. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1586-1592, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566264

  12. Ozone-Induced Type 2 Immunity in Nasal Airways. Development and Lymphoid Cell Dependence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chee Bing; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Brooks, Phillip T; Brandenberger, Christina; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Nault, Rance; Zacharewski, Timothy R; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation exposures to ozone commonly encountered in photochemical smog cause airway injury and inflammation. Elevated ambient ozone concentrations have been epidemiologically associated with nasal airway activation of neutrophils and eosinophils. In the present study, we elucidated the temporal onset and lymphoid cell dependency of eosinophilic rhinitis and associated epithelial changes in mice repeatedly exposed to ozone. Lymphoid cell-sufficient C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0 or 0.5 parts per million (ppm) ozone for 1, 2, 4, or 9 consecutive weekdays (4 h/d). Lymphoid cell-deficient, Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice were similarly exposed for 9 weekdays. Nasal tissues were taken at 2 or 24 hours after exposure for morphometric and gene expression analyses. C57BL/6 mice exposed to ozone for 1 day had acute neutrophilic rhinitis, with airway epithelial necrosis and overexpression of mucosal Ccl2 (MCP-1), Ccl11 (eotaxin), Cxcl1 (KC), Cxcl2 (MIP-2), Hmox1, Il1b, Il5, Il6, Il13, and Tnf mRNA. In contrast, 9-day ozone exposure elicited type 2 immune responses in C57BL/6 mice, with mucosal mRNA overexpression of Arg1, Ccl8 (MCP-2), Ccl11, Chil4 (Ym2), Clca1 (Gob5), Il5, Il10, and Il13; increased density of mucosal eosinophils; and nasal epithelial remodeling (e.g., hyperplasia/hypertrophy, mucous cell metaplasia, hyalinosis, and increased YM1/YM2 proteins). Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice exposed to ozone for 9 days, however, had no nasal pathology or overexpression of transcripts related to type 2 immunity. These results provide a plausible paradigm for the activation of eosinophilic inflammation and type 2 immunity found in the nasal airways of nonatopic individuals subjected to episodic exposures to high ambient ozone. PMID:26203683

  13. Effect of modifying quantum dot surface charge on airway epithelial cell uptake in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Eric; Galloway, Justin F.; Nelson, Antoinette; Breysse, Patrick N.; Wirtz, Denis; Searson, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    The respiratory system is one of the portals of entry into the body, and hence inhalation of engineered nanomaterials is an important route of exposure. The broad range of physicochemical properties that influence biological responses necessitate the systematic study to contribute to understanding occupational exposure. Here, we report on the influence of nanoparticle charge and dose on human airway epithelial cells, and show that this platform can be used to evaluate consequences of exposure to engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22783847

  14. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-03-01

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients. PMID:19947928

  15. Baicalin inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Li, Jian-Qiang; Bo, Jian-Ping; Wang, Bei; Tian, Xin-Rui; Liu, Tan-Zhen; Liu, Zhuo-La

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and migration play important roles in airway remodeling in asthma. In vitro platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) induced ASM cell proliferation and migration. Baicalin is one of flavonoid extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis, which has an anti-asthma effect. However, little is known about its role in PDGF-induced proliferation and migration in rat ASM (RASM) cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration. We also identified the signaling pathway by which baicalin influences RASM cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we demonstrated that baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation, arrested PDGF-induced cell-cycle progression. It also suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell migration. Furthermore, baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced expression of phosphorylated p38, ERK1/2 and JNK in RASM cells. In summary, our study is the first to show that baicalin pretreatment can significantly inhibit PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration by suppressing the MAPK signaling pathway, and baicalin may be a useful chemotherapeutic agent for asthma. PMID:26884970

  16. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Lentivirus-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giulia; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Chan, Mario; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Brody, Steven L; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Alton, Eric W F W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis is to provide long-term correction of the genetic defect. This may be achievable by targeting airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells with an integrating vector. Here, we evaluated the ability of a lentiviral vector, derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus and pseudotyped with F and HN envelope proteins from Sendai virus, to transduce progenitor basal cells of the mouse nasal airways. We first transduced basal cell-enriched cultures ex vivo and confirmed efficient transduction of cytokeratin-5 positive cells. We next asked whether progenitor cells could be transduced in vivo. We evaluated the transduction efficiency in mice pretreated by intranasal administration of polidocanol to expose the progenitor cell layer. Compared to control mice, polidocanol treated mice demonstrated a significant increase in the number of transduced basal cells at 3 and 14 days post vector administration. At 14 days, the epithelium of treated mice contained clusters (4 to 8 adjacent cells) of well differentiated ciliated, as well as basal cells suggesting a clonal expansion. These results indicate that our lentiviral vector can transduce progenitor basal cells in vivo, although transduction required denudation of the surface epithelium prior to vector administration. PMID:26471068

  17. Absence of inflammatory response from upper airway epithelial cells after X irradiation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Deutschle, T; Wiegel, T; Riechelmann, H; Bartkowiak, D

    2009-03-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck tumors causes adverse reactions in normal tissue, especially mucositis. The dose- and time-dependent response of upper airway cells to X radiation should be analyzed in terms of the pro-inflammatory potential. Immortalized BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells were treated with 2, 5 and 8 Gy. Out of 1232 genes, those that were transcribed differentially after 2, 6 and 24 h were assigned to biological themes according to the Gene Ontology Consortium. Enrichment of differentially regulated gene clusters was determined with GOTree ( http://bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/gotm ). Eleven cytokines were measured in culture supernatants. The cell cycle response up to 24 h and induction of apoptosis up to 4 days after exposure were determined by flow cytometry. A significant dose- and time-dependent gene activation was observed for the categories response to DNA damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest and cell death/apoptosis but not for immune/inflammatory response. This correlated with functional G(2) arrest and apoptosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines accumulated in supernatants of control cells but not of X-irradiated cells. The complex gene expression pattern of X-irradiated airway epithelial cells is accompanied by cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In vivo, this may impair the epithelial barrier. mRNA and protein expression suggest at most an indirect contribution of epithelial cells to early radiogenic mucositis. PMID:19267554

  18. HB-EGF-Promoted Airway Smooth Muscle Cells and Their Progenitor Migration Contribute to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in Asthmatic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Li, Hequan; Yao, Yinan; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Yuehong; Xia, Dajing; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-03-01

    The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells' proliferation, migration, and their progenitor's migration are currently regarded as causative factors for ASM remodeling in asthma. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), a potent mitogen and chemotactic factor, could promote ASM cell proliferation through MAPK pathways. In this study, we obtained primary ASM cells and their progenitors from C57BL/6 mice and went on to explore the role of HB-EGF in these cells migration and the underlying mechanisms. We found that recombinant HB-EGF (rHB-EGF) intratracheal instillation accelerated ASM layer thickening in an OVA-induced asthmatic mouse. Modified Boyden chamber assay revealed that rHB-EGF facilitate ASM cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and ASM cells from asthmatic mice had a greater migration ability than that from normal counterparts. rHB-EGF could stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 in ASM cells but further migration assay showed that only epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (AG1478) or p38 inhibitor (SB203580), but not ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), could inhibit rHB-EGF-mediated ASM cells migration. Actin cytoskeleton experiments exhibited that rHB-EGF could cause actin stress fibers disassembly and focal adhesions formation of ASM cells through the activation of p38. Finally, airway instillation of rHB-EGF promoted the recruitment of bone marrow-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells, which were transferred via caudal vein, migrating into the airway from the circulation. These observations demonstrated that ASM remodeling in asthma might have resulted from HB-EGF-mediated ASM cells and their progenitor cells migration, via p38 MAPK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:26826248

  19. Adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by inducing regulatory T cells in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-Sup; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Shin-Ae; Park, Hee-Young; Hong, Sung-Lyong; Park, Hye-Kyung; Yu, Hak-Sun; Roh, Hwan-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (ASCs) can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation, the immunomodulatory mechanism of ASCs remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether regulatory T cells (Tregs) induction is a potential mechanism in immunomodulatory effects of ASCs on allergic airway disease and how these induced Tregs orchestrate allergic inflammation. Intravenous administration of ASCs significantly reduced allergic symptoms and inhibited eosinophilic inflammation. Airway hyperresponsiveness, total immune cell and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, mucus production, and serum allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 were significantly reduced after ASCs administration. ASCs significantly inhibited Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and enhanced Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, levels of IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 were significantly increased after ASCs administration. Interestingly, this upregulation was accompanied by increased Treg populations. In conclusion, ASCs ameliorated allergic airway inflammation and improved lung function through the induction of Treg expansion. The induction of Treg by ASCs involves the secretion of soluble factors such as IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 and Treg might be involved in the downregulation of Th2 cytokines and upregulation of Th1 cytokines production. PMID:25246732

  20. Airborne lipid antigens mobilize resident intravascular NKT cells to induce allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Seth T.; Thomas, Seddon Y.; Ferreira, Caroline M.; Bai, Li; Krausz, Thomas; Savage, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne exposure to microbial cell wall lipids such as lipopolysaccharide triggers innate immune responses that regulate susceptibility to allergic airway inflammation. α-Glycosylceramides represent another widespread class of microbial lipids that directly stimulate innate-like, IL-4– and IL-13–producing, CD1d-restricted NKT cells. In this study, we demonstrate that NKT cells constitutively accumulate and reside in the microvasculature of the mouse lung. After a single airborne exposure to lipid antigen, they promptly extravasate to orchestrate the formation of peribronchiolar and interstitial lymphohistiocytic granulomas containing numerous eosinophils. Concomitant airborne exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) induces the priming of OVA-specific Th2 cells and IgE antibodies by the same dendritic cell coexpressing CD1d and MHC class II. Although NKT cell activation remains confined to the lipid-exposed lung and draining lymph nodes, Th2 cells recirculate and seed the lung of a parabiotic partner, conferring susceptibility to OVA challenge months after the initial exposure, in a manner independent of NKT cells and CD1d. Thus, transient recruitment and activation of lung-resident intravascular NKT cells can trigger long-term susceptibility to allergic airway inflammation. PMID:21930768

  1. Characterization of Regulatory T-Cell Markers in CD4+ T Cells of the Upper Airway Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ballke, Christina; Gran, Einar; Baekkevold, Espen S.; Jahnsen, Frode L.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells the regulate immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. Most reports on human Tregs are derived from studies of peripheral blood, although Tregs mainly exert their functions in the periphery. Here we performed a detailed analysis of Tregs in the human upper airway mucosa under non-inflammatory conditions, and found that 10% of all CD4+ T cells expressed the transcription factor FOXP3 and the memory marker CD45RO, as well as high levels of CTLA-4. The majority of FOXP3+CD4+ T cells co-expressed the transcription factor Helios and produced very little cytokines, compatible with being thymus-derived Tregs. FOXP3+Helios-CD4+ T cells were more heterogeneous. A mean of 24% produced the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10, whereas a large fraction also produced IL-2, IFN-μ or IL-17. A significant population (6%) of FOXP3-negative T cells also produced IL-10, usually in combination with IFN-μ. Together, we found that CD4+ T cells in the upper airways differed functionally from their counterparts in peripheral blood, including higher expression of IL-10. Moreover, our findings suggest that several subsets of CD4+ T cells with functionally distinct regulatory properties reside in the upper airway mucosa which should be taken into account when targeting Tregs for therapy. PMID:26866695

  2. Leptin enhances ICAM-1 expression, induces migration and cytokine synthesis, and prolongs survival of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Koketsu, Rikiya; Baba, Shintaro; Igarashi, Sayaka; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2015-10-15

    There is rising interest in how obesity affects respiratory diseases, since epidemiological findings indicate a strong relationship between the two conditions. Leptin is a potent adipokine produced mainly by adipocytes. It regulates energy storage and expenditure and also induces inflammation. Previous studies have shown that leptin is able to activate inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes and granulocytes, but little is known about its effect on lung structural cells. The present study investigated the effects of leptin on human airway epithelial cells by using human primary airway epithelial cells and a human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Flow cytometry showed enhanced ICAM-1 expression by both of those cells in response to leptin, and that effect was abrogated by dexamethasone or NF-κB inhibitor. Flow cytometry and quantitative PCR showed that airway epithelial cells expressed leptin receptor (Ob-R), whose expression level was downregulated by leptin itself. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated enhanced production of CCL11, G-CSF, VEGF, and IL-6 by BEAS-2B cells stimulated with leptin. Furthermore, transfection of Ob-R small interference RNA decreased the effect of leptin on CCL11 production as assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, leptin induced migration of primary airway epithelial cells toward leptin, suppressed BEAS-2B apoptosis induced with TNF-α and IFN-γ, and enhanced proliferation of primary airway epithelial cells. In summary, leptin was able to directly activate human airway epithelial cells by binding to Ob-R and by NF-κB activation, resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1 expression, induction of CCL11, VEGF, G-CSF, and IL-6 synthesis, induction of migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and enhancement of proliferation. PMID:26276826

  3. AMPK agonists ameliorate sodium and fluid transport and inflammation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Michael M; King, J Darwin; Oyster, Nicholas M; Fitch, Adam C; Magill, Amy; Baty, Catherine J; Watkins, Simon C; Kolls, Jay K; Pilewski, Joseph M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2010-06-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits both the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and may inhibit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in epithelia. Here we have tested in primary polarized CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells the effects of AMPK activators, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR), on various parameters that contribute to CF lung disease: ENaC-dependent short-circuit currents (I(sc)), airway surface liquid (ASL) height, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. AMPK activation after overnight treatment with either metformin (2-5 mM) or AICAR (1 mM) substantially inhibited ENaC-dependent I(sc) in both CF and non-CF airway cultures. Live-cell confocal images acquired 60 minutes after apical addition of Texas Red-dextran-containing fluid revealed significantly greater ASL heights after AICAR and metformin treatment relative to controls, suggesting that AMPK-dependent ENaC inhibition slows apical fluid reabsorption. Both metformin and AICAR decreased secretion of various proinflammatory cytokines, both with and without prior LPS stimulation. Finally, prolonged exposure to more physiologically relevant concentrations of metformin (0.03-1 mM) inhibited ENaC currents and decreased proinflammatory cytokine levels in CF HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that novel therapies to activate AMPK in the CF airway may be beneficial by blunting excessive sodium and ASL absorption and by reducing excessive airway inflammation, which are major contributors to CF lung disease. PMID:19617399

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin modulates mucin glycosylation with sialyl-Lewis(x) to increase binding to airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, J L; Jia, J; Choi, W; Choe, S; Miao, J; Xu, Y; Powell, R; Lin, J; Kuang, Z; Gaskins, H R; Lau, G W

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients battle life-long pulmonary infections with the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). An overabundance of mucus in CF airways provides a favorable niche for PA growth. When compared with that of non-CF individuals, mucus of CF airways is enriched in sialyl-Lewis(x), a preferred binding receptor for PA. Notably, the levels of sialyl-Lewis(x) directly correlate with infection severity in CF patients. However, the mechanism by which PA causes increased sialylation remains uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the ability of PA virulence factors to modulate sialyl-Lewis(x) modification in airway mucins. We found pyocyanin (PCN) to be a potent inducer of sialyl-Lewis(x) in both mouse airways and in primary and immortalized CF and non-CF human airway epithelial cells. PCN increased the expression of C2/4GnT and ST3Gal-IV, two of the glycosyltransferases responsible for the stepwise biosynthesis of sialyl-Lewis(x), through a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC)-dependent pathway. Furthermore, PA bound more efficiently to airway epithelial cells pre-exposed to PCN in a flagellar cap-dependent manner. Importantly, antibodies against sialyl-Lewis(x) and anti-TNF-α attenuated PA binding. These results indicate that PA secretes PCN to induce a favorable environment for chronic colonization of CF lungs by increasing the glycosylation of airway mucins with sialyl-Lewis(x). PMID:26555707

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin modulates mucin glycosylation with sialyl-Lewisx to increase binding to airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woosuk; Choe, Shawn; Miao, Jinfeng; Xu, Ying; Powell, Rebecca; Lin, Jingjun; Kuang, Zhizhou; Gaskins, H Rex; Lau, Gee W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients battle life-long pulmonary infections with the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). An overabundance of mucus in CF airways provides a favorable niche for PA growth. When compared to that of non-CF individuals, mucus of CF airways is enriched in sialyl-Lewisx, a preferred binding receptor for PA. Notably, the levels of sialyl-Lewisx directly correlate with infection severity in CF patients. However, the mechanism by which PA causes increased sialylation remains uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the ability of PA virulence factors to modulate sialyl-Lewisx modification in airway mucins. We found pyocyanin (PCN) to be a potent inducer of sialyl-Lewisx in both mouse airways and in primary and immortalized CF and non-CF human airway epithelial cells. PCN increased the expression of C2/4GnT and ST3Gal-IV, two of the glycosyltransferases responsible for the stepwise biosynthesis of sialyl-Lewisx, through a TNF-α-mediated phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) dependent pathway. Furthermore, PA bound more efficiently to airway epithelial cells pre-exposed to PCN through a flagellar cap-dependent manner. Importantly, antibodies against sialyl-Lewisx and anti-TNF-α attenuated PA binding. These results indicate that PCN secretes PCN to induce a favorable environment for chronic colonization of CF lungs by increasing the glycosylation of airway mucins with sialyl-Lewisx. PMID:26555707

  6. Atopy and Inhaled Corticosteroid Use Associate with Fewer IL-17+ Cells in Asthmatic Airways

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Fatemeh; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Lodewijk, Monique; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Postma, Dirkje S.; Timens, Wim; Hylkema, Machteld N.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-17 plays a critical role in numerous immune and inflammatory responses and was recently suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of nonatopic (non-eosinophil/neutrophil-dominant) asthma. We aimed to compare expression of IL-17 in bronchial airways between atopic and nonatopic asthmatics, with/without inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use and to identify its major cellular source. Methods Bronchial biopsies from 114 patients with mild-to-moderate asthma were investigated: 33 nonatopic, 63 non-corticosteroid users, 90 nonsmokers. IL-17 expression was correlated with atopy and inflammatory cell counts (EPX, NP57, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68), taking ICS use and smoking into account. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine the independent factors as well as the most relevant inflammatory cells contributing to IL-17 expression. Double immunostainings were performed to confirm the major cellular source of IL-17. Results In non-ICS users, nonatopic asthmatics had more IL-17+ cells in the airway wall than atopic asthmatics. In both atopic and nonatopic asthmatics, ICS use was associated with lower numbers of IL-17+ cells, independent of smoking. The number of IL-17+ cells was associated with the number of neutrophils (B: 0.26, 95% CI: 0.17–0.35) and eosinophils (B: 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07–0.29). The majority of IL-17+ cells were neutrophils, as confirmed by double immunostaining. Conclusions We show for the first time that atopy and ICS use are associated with lower numbers of IL-17+ cells in asthmatic airways. Importantly, IL-17+ cells were mostly neutrophils which conflicts with the paradigm that lymphocytes (Th17) are the main source of IL-17. PMID:27552197

  7. Cigarette smoke alters primary human bronchial epithelial cell differentiation at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Schamberger, Andrea C.; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A.; Mise-Racek, Nikica; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The differentiated human airway epithelium consists of different cell types forming a polarized and pseudostratified epithelium. This is dramatically altered in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by basal and goblet cell hyperplasia, and squamous cell metaplasia. The effect of cigarette smoke on human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) differentiation remains to be elucidated. We analysed whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affected primary (p)HBEC differentiation and function. pHBEC were differentiated at the air-liquid interface (ALI) and differentiation was quantified after 7, 14, 21, or 28 days by assessing acetylated tubulin, CC10, or MUC5AC for ciliated, Clara, or goblet cells, respectively. Exposure of differentiating pHBEC to CSE impaired epithelial barrier formation, as assessed by resistance measurements (TEER). Importantly, CSE exposure significantly reduced the number of ciliated cells, while it increased the number of Clara and goblet cells. CSE-dependent cell number changes were reflected by a reduction of acetylated tubulin levels, an increased expression of the basal cell marker KRT14, and increased secretion of CC10, but not by changes in transcript levels of CC10, MUC5AC, or FOXJ1. Our data demonstrate that cigarette smoke specifically alters the cellular composition of the airway epithelium by affecting basal cell differentiation in a post-transcriptional manner. PMID:25641363

  8. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD. PMID:24969654

  9. Desialylation of airway epithelial cells during influenza virus infection enhances pneumococcal adhesion via galectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Banerjee, Aditi; Feng, Chiguang; Amin, Mohammed N.; Frieman, Matthew B.; Chen, Wilbur H.; Cross, Alan S.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2015-01-01

    The continued threat of worldwide influenza pandemics, together with the yearly emergence of antigenically drifted influenza A virus (IAV) strains, underscore the urgent need to elucidate not only the mechanisms of influenza virulence, but also those mechanisms that predispose influenza patients to increased susceptibility to subsequent infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Glycans displayed on the surface of epithelia that are exposed to the external environment play important roles in microbial recognition, adhesion, and invasion. It is well established that the IAV hemagglutinin and pneumococcal adhesins enable their attachment to the host epithelia. Reciprocally, the recognition of microbial glycans by host carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) can initiate innate immune responses, but their relevance in influenza or pneumococcal infections is poorly understood. Galectins are evolutionarily conserved lectins characterized by affinity for β-galactosides and a unique sequence motif, with critical regulatory roles in development and immune homeostasis. In this study, we examined the possibility that galectins expressed in the airway epithelial cells might play a significant role in viral or pneumococcal adhesion to airway epithelial cells. Our results in a mouse model for influenza and pneumococcal infection revealed that the murine lung expresses a diverse galectin repertoire, from which selected galectins, including galectin 1 (Gal1) and galectin 3 (Gal3), are released to the bronchoalveolar space. Further, the results showed that influenza and subsequent S. pneumoniae infections significantly alter the glycosylation patterns of the airway epithelial surface and modulate galectin expression. In vitro studies on the human airway epithelial cell line A549 were consistent with the observations made in the mouse model, and further revealed that both Gal1 and Gal3 bind strongly to IAV and S. pneumoniae, and that exposure of the cells to viral neuraminidase or

  10. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Lisa Manning, M.; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems— both inert and living—have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell–cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role. PMID:26237129

  11. Cell migration leads to spatially distinct but clonally related airway cancer precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Kiropoulos, Theodoros S; Teixeira, Vitor H; Brown, James M; Varanou, Aikaterini; Falzon, Mary; Capitanio, Arrigo; Bottoms, Steven E; Carroll, Bernadette; Navani, Neal; McCaughan, Frank; George, Jeremy P; Giangreco, Adam; Wright, Nicholas A; McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor A; Janes, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung is a common cancer with 95% mortality at 5 years. These cancers arise from preinvasive lesions, which have a natural history of development progressing through increasing severity of dysplasia to carcinoma in situ (CIS), and in some cases, ending in transformation to invasive carcinoma. Synchronous preinvasive lesions identified at autopsy have been previously shown to be clonally related. Methods Using autofluorescence bronchoscopy that allows visual observation of preinvasive lesions within the upper airways, together with molecular profiling of biopsies using gene sequencing and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis from both preinvasive lesions and from intervening normal tissue, we have monitored individual lesions longitudinally and documented their visual, histological and molecular relationship. Results We demonstrate that rather than forming a contiguous field of abnormal tissue, clonal CIS lesions can develop at multiple anatomically discrete sites over time. Further, we demonstrate that patients with CIS in the trachea have invariably had previous lesions that have migrated proximally, and in one case, into the other lung over a period of 12 years. Conclusions Molecular information from these unique biopsies provides for the first time evidence that field cancerisation of the upper airways can occur through cell migration rather than via local contiguous cellular expansion as previously thought. Our findings urge a clinical strategy of ablating high-grade premalignant airway lesions with subsequent attentive surveillance for recurrence in the bronchial tree. PMID:24550057

  12. NK cells contribute to persistent airway inflammation and AHR during the later stage of RSV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaoru; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Keting; Li, Wei; Tang, Wei; Chen, Sisi; Zang, Na; Ren, Luo; Deng, Yu; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Lijia; Fu, Zhou; Liu, Enmei

    2016-10-01

    RSV can lead to persistent airway inflammation and AHR and is intimately associated with childhood recurrent wheezing and asthma, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. There are high numbers of NK cells in the lung, which not only play important roles in the acute stage of RSV infection, but also are pivotal in regulating the pathogenesis of asthma. Therefore, in this study, we assumed that NK cells might contribute to persistent airway disease during the later stage of RSV infection. Mice were killed at serial time points after RSV infection to collect samples. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted, lung histopathology was examined, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured by whole-body plethysmography. Cytokines were detected by ELISA, and NK cells were determined by flow cytometry. Rabbit anti-mouse asialo-GM-1 antibodies and resveratrol were used to deplete or suppress NK cells. Inflammatory cells in BALF, lung tissue damage and AHR were persistent for 60 days post-RSV infection. Type 2 cytokines and NK cells were significantly increased during the later stage of infection. When NK cells were decreased by the antibodies or resveratrol, type 2 cytokines, the persistent airway inflammation and AHR were all markedly reduced. NK cells can contribute to the RSV-associated persistent airway inflammation and AHR at least partially by promoting type 2 cytokines. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of NK cells may provide a novel approach to alleviating the recurrent wheezing subsequent to RSV infection. PMID:27329138

  13. Redox warfare between airway epithelial cells and Pseudomonas: dual oxidase versus pyocyanin.

    PubMed

    Rada, Balázs; Leto, Thomas L

    2009-01-01

    The importance of reactive oxygen species-dependent microbial killing by the phagocytic cell NADPH oxidase has been appreciated for some time, although only recently has an appreciation developed for the partnership of lactoperoxidase with related dual oxidases (Duox) within secretions of the airway surface layer. This system produces mild oxidants designed for extracellular killing that are effective against several airway pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Establishment of chronic pseudomonas infections involves adaptations to resist oxidant-dependent killing by expression of a redox-active virulence factor, pyocyanin, that competitively inhibits epithelial Duox activity by consuming intracellular NADPH and producing superoxide, thereby inflicting oxidative stress on the host. PMID:18979077

  14. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Pieter S; McCray, Paul B; Bals, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered to be central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as the first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. Herein, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis will be discussed. PMID:25700381

  15. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Pieter S.; McCray, Paul B.; Bals, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as a first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. In the review, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, are discussed. PMID:25700381

  16. Hyperoxia promotes polarization of the immune response in ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, leading to a TH17 cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nagato, Akinori C; Bezerra, Frank S; Talvani, André; Aarestrup, Beatriz J; Aarestrup, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that hyperoxia-induced stress and oxidative damage to the lungs of mice lead to an increase in IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β expression. Together, IL-6 and TGF-β have been known to direct T cell differentiation toward the TH17 phenotype. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that hyperoxia promotes the polarization of T cells to the TH17 cell phenotype in response to ovalbumin-induced acute airway inflammation. Airway inflammation was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal sensitization and intranasal introduction of ovalbumin, followed by challenge methacholine. After the methacholine challenge, animals were exposed to hyperoxic conditions in an inhalation chamber for 24 h. The controls were subjected to normoxia or aluminum hydroxide dissolved in phosphate buffered saline. After 24 h of hyperoxia, the number of macrophages and lymphocytes decreased in animals with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, whereas the number of neutrophils increased after ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. The results showed that expression of Nrf2, iNOS, T-bet and IL-17 increased after 24 of hyperoxia in both alveolar macrophages and in lung epithelial cells, compared with both animals that remained in room air, and animals with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Hyperoxia alone without the induction of airway inflammation lead to increased levels of TNF-α and CCL5, whereas hyperoxia after inflammation lead to decreased CCL2 levels. Histological evidence of extravasation of inflammatory cells into the perivascular and peribronchial regions of the lungs was observed after pulmonary inflammation and hyperoxia. Hyperoxia promotes polarization of the immune response toward the TH17 phenotype, resulting in tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and the migration of neutrophils to the lung and airways. Elucidating the effect of hyperoxia on ovalbumin-induced acute airway inflammation is relevant to preventing or

  17. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes target airway CD103+ and CD11b+ dendritic cells to suppress allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Daniels, N J; Hyde, E; Ghosh, S; Seo, K; Price, K M; Hoshino, K; Kaisho, T; Okada, T; Ronchese, F

    2016-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is driven by the recognition of inhaled allergen by T helper type 2 (Th2) cells in the airway and lung. Allergen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can strongly reduce airway inflammation, however, the mechanism of their inhibitory activity is not fully defined. We used mouse models to show that allergen-specific CTLs reduced early cytokine production by Th2 cells in lung, and their subsequent accumulation and production of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13. In addition, treatment with specific CTLs also increased the proportion of caspase(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in mediastinal lymph node (MLN), and decreased the numbers of CD103(+) and CD11b(+) DCs in the lung. This decrease required expression of the cytotoxic mediator perforin in CTLs and of the appropriate MHC-antigen ligand on DCs, suggesting that direct CTL-DC contact was necessary. Lastly, lung imaging experiments revealed that in airway-challenged mice XCR1-GFP(+) DCs, corresponding to the CD103(+) DC subset, and XCR1-GFP(-) CD11c(+) cells, which include CD11b(+) DCs and alveolar macrophages, both clustered in the areas surrounding the small airways and were closely associated with allergen-specific CTLs. Thus, allergen-specific CTLs reduce allergic airway inflammation by depleting CD103(+) and CD11b(+) DC populations in the lung, and may constitute a mechanism through which allergic immune responses are regulated. PMID:26104914

  18. Arsenic alters ATP-dependent Ca²+ signaling in human airway epithelial cell wound response.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Cara L; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca²+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., < 4 μM as Na-arsenite) on wound-induced Ca²+ signaling pathways in human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic reduces purinergic Ca²+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca²+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca²+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  19. Functional Invariant NKT Cells in Pig Lungs Regulate the Airway Hyperreactivity: A Potential Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Cordelia; Khatri, Mahesh; Rauf, Abdul; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Dwivedi, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Important roles played by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in asthma pathogenesis have been demonstrated. We identified functional iNKT cells and CD1d molecules in pig lungs. Pig iNKT cells cultured in the presence of α-GalCer proliferated and secreted Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Like in other animal models, direct activation of pig lung iNKT cells using α-GalCer resulted in acute airway hyperreactivity (AHR). Clinically, acute AHR-induced pigs had increased respiratory rate, enhanced mucus secretion in the airways, fever, etc. In addition, we observed petechial hemorrhages, infiltration of CD4+ cells, and increased Th2 cytokines in AHR-induced pig lungs. Ex vivo proliferated iNKT cells of asthma induced pigs in the presence of C-glycoside analogs of α-GalCer had predominant Th2 phenotype and secreted more of Th2 cytokine, IL-4. Thus, baby pigs may serve as a useful animal model to study iNKT cell-mediated AHR caused by various environmental and microbial CD1d-specific glycolipid antigens. PMID:21042929

  20. Airway epithelial cells activate Th2 cytokine production in mast cells via IL-1 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Poposki, Julie A.; Comeau, Michael R.; Biyasheva, Assel; Avila, Pedro C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway epithelial cells are important regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. Although mast cells are known to play a central role in manifestations of allergic inflammation and are found in the epithelium in Th2-related diseases, their role is incompletely understood. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the role of airway epithelial cells in production of Th2 cytokines in mast cells. Methods Normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were stimulated with TNF, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL -17A and dsRNA alone or in combination. Human mast cells were stimulated with epithelial cell-derived supernatants, or co-cultured with NHBE. Th2 cytokine responses were blocked with neutralizing antibodies. Results Supernatants from IL-4 and dsRNA stimulated NHBE significantly enhanced Th2 cytokine production from mast cells. The combination of IL-4 and dsRNA itself or supernatants from NHBE stimulated with other cytokines did not activate mast cells, suggesting that mast cell responses were induced by epithelial cell factors that were only induced by IL-4 and dsRNA. Epithelial supernatant-dependent Th2 cytokine production in mast cells was suppressed by anti-IL-1 and anti-TSLP, and was enhanced by anti-IL-1Ra. Similar results were observed in co-culture experiments. Finally, we found dsRNA-dependent production of IL-1, TSLP, and IL-1Ra in NHBE was regulated by Th cytokines, and their ratio in NHBE correlated with Th2 cytokine production in mast cells. Conclusions Pathogens producing dsRNA, such as respiratory viral infections, may amplify local Th2 inflammation in asthmatics via the production of TSLP and IL-1 by epithelial cells and subsequent activation of Th2 cytokine production by mast cells in the airways. PMID:22633328

  1. GTP-Binding Proteins Inhibit cAMP Activation of Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Kizer, Neil; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    1992-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized, in part, by defective regulation of Cl^- secretion by airway epithelial cells. In CF, cAMP does not activate Cl^- channels in the apical membrane of airway epithelial cells. We report here whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrating that pertussis toxin, which uncouples heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) from their receptors, and guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate, which prevents G proteins from interacting with their effectors, increase Cl^- currents and restore cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells isolated from CF patients. In contrast, the G protein activators guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate and AlF^-_4 reduce Cl^- currents and inhibit cAMP from activating Cl^- currents in normal airway epithelial cells. In CF cells treated with pertussis toxin or guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate and in normal cells, cAMP activates a Cl^- conductance that has properties similar to CF transmembrane-conductance regulator Cl^- channels. We conclude that heterotrimeric G proteins inhibit cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells and that modulation of the inhibitory G protein signaling pathway may have the therapeutic potential for improving cAMP-activated Cl^- secretion in CF.

  2. Using Optical Tweezers to Study Cell Mechanics during Airway Reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Huseyin; Wang, Jing; Ghadiali, Samir; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Patients suffering from the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) must be mechanically ventilated in order to survive. However, these ventilation protocols may generate injurious hydrodynamic stresses especially during low tidal volume (VT) ventilation when the flow of micron-sized air bubbles displace the surrounding liquid. In-vitro studies in our lab revealed that microbubble flows can severally damage lung epithelial cells (EC). The degree of injury was elevated for sub-confluent monolayers in small channel heights. Under these conditions, the micromechanics of individual EC may influence the degree of cellular injury. To investigate the role of cell mechanics, we used an oscillating Optical Tweezers (OT) technique to measure the intrinsic mechanical properties of EC before and after the flow of microbubbles. Knowledge of how the EC's micromechanical properties influence cell viability may lead to the development of novel treatment therapies that enhance the EC's ability to withstand injurious hydrodynamic stresses during ventilation treatment.

  3. Regulation of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anja K; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first line of defense against invading microbial pathogens. They are important contributors to innate mucosal immunity and generate various and sophisticated anti-microbial defense mechanisms, including the formation of a tight barrier and secretion of anti-microbial substances as well as inflammatory mediators. To provide these active defense mechanisms, epithelial cells functionally express various pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors have been shown to recognize conserved microbial patterns mediating inducible activation of innate immunity. Mucosal surfaces, however, are prone to contact with pathogenic as well as non-pathogenic microbes and, therefore, immune-recognition principles have to be strictly regulated to avoid uncontrolled permanent activation. This review will focus on mechanisms by which epithelial cells regulate mucosal immune responses, thus creating an organ-specific microenvironment. This includes local adaptations in microbial recognition, regulation of local immune homeostasis, and modulation of antigen-presenting cells and adaptive immune responses. These regulatory mechanisms serve the special needs of controlled microbial recognition in mucosal compartments. PMID:18060372

  4. Intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaeghe, Catherine; Tabruyn, Sebastien P.; Oury, Cecile; Bours, Vincent . E-mail: vbours@ulg.ac.be; Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2007-05-11

    Cystic fibrosis is a common genetic disorder characterized by a severe lung inflammation and fibrosis leading to the patient's death. Enhanced angiogenesis in cystic fibrosis (CF) tissue has been suggested, probably caused by the process of inflammation, as similarly described in asthma and chronic bronchitis. The present study demonstrates an intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells. Microarray experiments showed that CF airway epithelial cells expressed several angiogenic factors such as VEGF-A, VEGF-C, bFGF, and PLGF at higher levels than control cells. These data were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and, at the protein level, by ELISA. Conditioned media of these cystic fibrosis cells were able to induce proliferation, migration and sprouting of cultured primary endothelial cells. This report describes for the first time that cystic fibrosis epithelial cells have an intrinsic angiogenic activity. Since excess of angiogenesis is correlated with more severe pulmonary disease, our results could lead to the development of new therapeutic applications.

  5. Parabronchial smooth muscle constitutes an airway epithelial stem cell niche in the mouse lung after injury.

    PubMed

    Volckaert, Thomas; Dill, Erik; Campbell, Alice; Tiozzo, Caterina; Majka, Susan; Bellusci, Saverio; De Langhe, Stijn P

    2011-11-01

    During lung development, parabronchial SMC (PSMC) progenitors in the distal mesenchyme secrete fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which acts on distal epithelial progenitors to promote their proliferation. β-catenin signaling within PSMC progenitors is essential for their maintenance, proliferation, and expression of Fgf10. Here, we report that this Wnt/Fgf10 embryonic signaling cascade is reactivated in mature PSMCs after naphthalene-induced injury to airway epithelium. Furthermore, we found that this paracrine Fgf10 action was essential for activating surviving variant Clara cells (the cells in the airway epithelium from which replacement epithelial cells originate) located at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions and adjacent to neuroendocrine bodies. After naphthalene injury, PSMCs secreted Fgf10 to activate Notch signaling and induce Snai1 expression in surviving variant Clara cells, which subsequently underwent a transient epithelial to mesenchymal transition to initiate the repair process. Epithelial Snai1 expression was important for regeneration after injury. We have therefore identified PSMCs as a stem cell niche for the variant Clara cells in the lung and established that paracrine Fgf10 signaling from the niche is critical for epithelial repair after naphthalene injury. These findings also have implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and cancer. PMID:21985786

  6. The role of airway macrophages in apoptotic cell clearance following acute and chronic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hussell, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the lung are associated with the accumulation of large quantities of immune and structural cells undergoing apoptosis, which need to be engulfed by phagocytes in a process called 'efferocytosis'. Apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung is mediated predominantly by airway macrophages, though immature dendritic cells and non-professional phagocytes, such as epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells, can also display this function. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the airways is essential for successful resolution of inflammation and the return to lung homeostasis. Disruption of this process leads to secondary necrosis of accumulating apoptotic cells, release of necrotic cell debris and subsequent uncontrolled inflammatory activation of the innate immune system by the released 'damage associated molecular patterns' (DAMPS). To control the duration of the immune response and prevent autoimmune reactions, anti-inflammatory signalling cascades are initiated in the phagocyte upon apoptotic cell uptake, mediated by a range of receptors that recognise specific phospholipids or proteins externalised on, or secreted by, the apoptotic cell. However, prolonged activation of apoptotic cell recognition receptors, such as the family of receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl and MerTK (TAM), may delay or prevent inflammatory responses to subsequent infections. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism controlling apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung in homeostasis and during inflammation, the contribution of defective efferocytosis to chronic inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis, and implications of the signals triggered by apoptotic cells in the susceptibility to pulmonary microbial infections. PMID:26957481

  7. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevent allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue-Qi; Deng, Meng-Xia; He, Jia; Zeng, Qing-Xiang; Wen, Weiping; Wong, David S H; Tse, Hung-Fat; Xu, Geng; Lian, Qizhou; Shi, Jianbo; Fu, Qing-Ling

    2012-12-01

    We previously found that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exerted immunomodulatory effects on Th2-mediated allergic rhinitis in vitro. However, their contribution to the asthma and allergic rhinitis in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we developed a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in both the upper and lower airways and evaluated the effects of the systemic administration of human iPSC-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on allergic inflammation. Our results showed that treatments with both the iPSC-MSCs and BM-MSCs before the challenge phase protected the animals from the majority of allergy-specific pathological changes. This protection included an inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus production in the lung, a reduction in eosinophil infiltration in the nose, and a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration in both the bronchoalveolar and nasal lavage fluids. In addition, treatment with iPSC-MSCs or BM-MSCs before the challenge phase resulted in reduced serum levels of Th2 immunoglobulins (e.g., IgE) and decreased levels of Th2 cytokines including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, or IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar and/or nasal lavage fluids. Similar therapeutic effects were observed when the animals were pretreated with human iPSC-MSCs before the sensitization phase. These data suggest that iPSC-MSCs may be used as an alternative strategy to adult MSCs in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:22987325

  8. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  9. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  10. Dietary Compound Kaempferol Inhibits Airway Thickening Induced by Allergic Reaction in a Bovine Serum Albumin-Induced Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daekeun; Park, Sin-Hye; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Antika, Lucia Dwi; Habibah, Nurina Umy; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by aberrant airways including epithelial thickening, goblet cell hyperplasia, and smooth muscle hypertrophy within the airway wall. The current study examined whether kaempferol inhibited mast cell degranulation and prostaglandin (PG) release leading to the development of aberrant airways, using an in vitro model of dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA)-sensitized rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) mast cells and an in vivo model of BSA-challenged asthmatic mice. Nontoxic kaempferol at 10–20 μM suppressed β-hexosaminidase release and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-mediated production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) in sensitized mast cells. Oral administration of ≤20 mg/kg kaempferol blocked bovine serum albumin (BSA) inhalation-induced epithelial cell excrescence and smooth muscle hypertrophy by attenuating the induction of COX2 and the formation of PGD2 and PGF2α, together with reducing the anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in mouse airways. Kaempferol deterred the antigen-induced mast cell activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) responsive to protein kinase Cμ (PKCμ) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the antigen-challenged activation of Syk-phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway was dampened in kaempferol-supplemented mast cells. These results demonstrated that kaempferol inhibited airway wall thickening through disturbing Syk-PLCγ signaling and PKCμ-ERK-cPLA2-COX2 signaling in antigen-exposed mast cells. Thus, kaempferol may be a potent anti-allergic compound targeting allergic asthma typical of airway hyperplasia and hypertrophy. PMID:26694364

  11. Lunasin alleviates allergic airway inflammation while increases antigen-specific Tregs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jingjing; Tung, Chun-Yu; Gardiner, Gail; Wang, Qun; Chang, Hua-Chen; Zhou, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Lunasin is a naturally occurring peptide isolated from soybeans and has been explored in cancer treatment. Lunasin inhibits NF-κB activation and thus pro-inflammatory cytokine and mediator production in macrophages. In this study we demonstrate that lunasin can effectively suppress allergic airway inflammation in two murine models of asthma. In an OVA+Alum sensitization model, intranasal lunasin treatment at the time of OVA challenges significantly reduced total cells counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and eosinophilia, peribronchiolar inflammatory infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia and airway IL-4 production. In an OVA+LPS intranasal sensitization model, lunasin treatment either at the time of sensitization or challenge has similar effects in suppress allergic airway inflammation including significantly reduced total cell and eosinophil counts in BAL fluid, inflammatory gene Fizz1 expression in the lung, and IL-4 production by OVA re-stimulated cells from mediastinal lymph nodes. We further show that intranasal instillation of OVA+lunasin significantly increases OVA-specific regulatory T cell (Treg) accumulation in the lung comparing to OVA only treatment. Taken together, our results suggest lunasin as an anti-inflammatory agent can be potentially used in asthma therapy or as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of antigen-specific Tregs and thus boost the efficacy of allergy immunotherapy. PMID:25646897

  12. Lunasin Alleviates Allergic Airway Inflammation while Increases Antigen-Specific Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jingjing; Tung, Chun-Yu; Gardiner, Gail; Wang, Qun; Chang, Hua-Chen; Zhou, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Lunasin is a naturally occurring peptide isolated from soybeans and has been explored in cancer treatment. Lunasin inhibits NF-κB activation and thus pro-inflammatory cytokine and mediator production in macrophages. In this study we demonstrate that lunasin can effectively suppress allergic airway inflammation in two murine models of asthma. In an OVA+Alum sensitization model, intranasal lunasin treatment at the time of OVA challenges significantly reduced total cells counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and eosinophilia, peribronchiolar inflammatory infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia and airway IL-4 production. In an OVA+LPS intranasal sensitization model, lunasin treatment either at the time of sensitization or challenge has similar effects in suppress allergic airway inflammation including significantly reduced total cell and eosinophil counts in BAL fluid, inflammatory gene Fizz1 expression in the lung, and IL-4 production by OVA re-stimulated cells from mediastinal lymph nodes. We further show that intranasal instillation of OVA+lunasin significantly increases OVA-specific regulatory T cell (Treg) accumulation in the lung comparing to OVA only treatment. Taken together, our results suggest lunasin as an anti-inflammatory agent can be potentially used in asthma therapy or as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of antigen-specific Tregs and thus boost the efficacy of allergy immunotherapy. PMID:25646897

  13. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Mitigates the Inhibition of Airway Epithelial Cell Repair by Neutrophil Elastase.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Luke W; Sutanto, Erika N; Ling, Kak-Ming; Looi, Kevin; Iosifidis, Thomas; Martinovich, Kelly M; Shaw, Nicole C; Buckley, Alysia G; Kicic-Starcevich, Elizabeth; Lannigan, Francis J; Knight, Darryl A; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity is associated with many destructive lung diseases and is a predictor for structural lung damage in early cystic fibrosis (CF), which suggests normal maintenance of airway epithelium is prevented by uninhibited NE. However, limited data exist on how the NE activity in airways of very young children with CF affects function of the epithelia. The aim of this study was to determine if NE activity could inhibit epithelial homeostasis and repair and whether any functional effect was reversible by antiprotease alpha-1 antitrypsin (α1AT) treatment. Viability, inflammation, apoptosis, and proliferation were assessed in healthy non-CF and CF pediatric primary airway epithelial cells (pAECnon-CF and pAECCF, respectively) during exposure to physiologically relevant NE. The effect of NE activity on pAECCF wound repair was also assessed. We report that viability after 48 hours was significantly decreased by 100 nM NE in pAECnon-CF and pAECCF owing to rapid cellular detachment that was accompanied by inflammatory cytokine release. Furthermore, both phenotypes initiated an apoptotic response to 100 nM NE, whereas ≥ 50 nM NE activity significantly inhibited the proliferative capacity of cultures. Similar concentrations of NE also significantly inhibited wound repair of pAECCF, but this effect was reversed by the addition of α1AT. Collectively, our results demonstrate free NE activity is deleterious for epithelial homeostasis and support the hypothesis that proteases in the airway contribute directly to CF structural lung disease. Our results also highlight the need to investigate antiprotease therapies in early CF disease in more detail. PMID:26221769

  14. Ozone-induced airway epithelial cell death, the neurokinin-1 receptor pathway, and the postnatal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Oslund, Karen L.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Miller, Lisa A.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Children are uniquely susceptible to ozone because airway and lung growth continue for an extensive period after birth. Early-life exposure of the rhesus monkey to repeated ozone cycles results in region-specific disrupted airway/lung growth, but the mediators and mechanisms are poorly understood. Substance P (SP), neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R); and nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) are signaling pathway components involved in ozone-induced cell death. We hypothesize that acute ozone (AO) exposure during postnatal airway development disrupts SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression and that these changes correlate with increased ozone-induced cell death. Our objectives were to 1) spatially define the normal development of the SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway in conducting airways; 2) compare how postnatal age modulates responses to AO exposure; and 3) determine how concomitant, episodic ozone exposure modifies age-specific acute responses. Male infant rhesus monkeys were assigned at age 1 mo to two age groups, 2 or 6 mo, and then to one of three exposure subgroups: filtered air (FA), FA+AO (AO: 8 h/day × 2 days), or episodic biweekly ozone exposure cycles (EAO: 8 h/day × 5 days/14-day cycle+AO). O3 = 0.5 ppm. We found that 1) ozone increases SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression in conducting airways, 2) an ozone exposure cycle (5 days/cycle) delivered early at age 2 mo resulted in an airway that was hypersensitive to AO exposure at the end of 2 mo, and 3) continued episodic exposure (11 cycles) resulted in an airway that was hyposensitive to AO exposure at 6 mo. These observations collectively associate with greater overall inflammation and epithelial cell death, particularly in early postnatal (2 mo), distal airways. PMID:25063800

  15. Distal Airway Stem Cells Render Alveoli in Vitro and During Lung Regeneration Following H1N1 Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pooja A.; Hu, Yuanyu; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hoe, Neo Boon; Wei, Tay Seok; Mu, Dakai; Sun, Yan; Joo, Lim Siew; Dagher, Rania; Zielonka, Elisabeth; Wang, De Yun; Chow, Vincent T.; Crum, Christopher P.; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The extent of lung regeneration following catastrophic damage and the potential role of adult stem cells in such a process remains obscure. Sublethal infection of mice with an H1N1 influenza virus related to that of the 1918 pandemic triggers massive airway damage followed by apparent regeneration. We show here that p63-expressing stem cells in the bronchiolar epithelium undergo rapid proliferation after infection and radiate to interbronchiolar regions of alveolar ablation. Once there, these cells assemble into discrete, Krt5+ pods and initiate expression of markers typical of alveoli. Gene expression profiles of these pods suggest that they are intermediates in the reconstitution of the alveolar-capillary network eradicated by viral infection. The dynamics of this p63-expressing stem cell in lung regeneration mirrors our parallel finding that defined pedigrees of human distal airway stem cells assemble alveoli-like structures in vitro and suggests new therapeutic avenues to acute and chronic airway disease. PMID:22036562

  16. A miRNA upregulated in asthma airway T cells promotes TH2 cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laura J.; Patel, Sana; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Choy, David F.; Brightbill, Hans D.; Ren, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Pua, Heather H.; Baumjohann, Dirk; Montoya, Misty M.; Panduro, Marisella; Remedios, Kelly A.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Fahy, John V.; Arron, Joseph R.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Ansel., Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert powerful effects on immune function by tuning networks of target genes that orchestrate cell behavior. We sought to uncover miRNAs and miRNA-regulated pathways that control the TH2 responses that drive pathogenic inflammation in asthma. Profiling miRNA expression in human airway-infiltrating T cells revealed miR-19a elevation in asthma. Modulating miR-19 activity altered TH2 cytokine production in both human and mouse T cells, and TH2 cell responses were markedly impaired in cells lacking the entire miR-17∼92 cluster. miR-19 promotes TH2 cytokine production and amplifies PI(3)K, JAK-STAT, and NF-κB signaling by direct targeting of PTEN, SOCS1, and A20. Thus, miR-19a up regulation in asthma may be an indicator and a cause of increased TH2 cytokine production in the airways. PMID:25362490

  17. Syntaxin 1A is expressed in airway epithelial cells, where it modulates CFTR Cl– currents

    PubMed Central

    Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Di, Anke; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Boyaka, Prosper N.; McGhee, Jerry R.; Zhou, Weihong; Akagawa, Kimio; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Thome, Ulrich; Engelhardt, John F.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2000-01-01

    The CFTR Cl– channel controls salt and water transport across epithelial tissues. Previously, we showed that CFTR-mediated Cl– currents in the Xenopus oocyte expression system are inhibited by syntaxin 1A, a component of the membrane trafficking machinery. This negative modulation of CFTR function can be reversed by soluble syntaxin 1A peptides and by the syntaxin 1A binding protein, Munc-18. In the present study, we determined whether syntaxin 1A is expressed in native epithelial tissues that normally express CFTR and whether it modulates CFTR currents in these tissues. Using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, we observed syntaxin 1A in native gut and airway epithelial tissues and showed that epithelial cells from these tissues express syntaxin 1A at >10-fold molar excess over CFTR. Syntaxin 1A is seen near the apical cell surfaces of human bronchial airway epithelium. Reagents that disrupt the CFTR-syntaxin 1A interaction, including soluble syntaxin 1A cytosolic domain and recombinant Munc-18, augmented cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl– currents by more than 2- to 4-fold in mouse tracheal epithelial cells and cells derived from human nasal polyps, but these reagents did not affect CaMK II–activated Cl– currents in these cells. PMID:10675364

  18. Clusterin Modulates Allergic Airway Inflammation by Attenuating CCL20-Mediated Dendritic Cell Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gyong Hwa; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Moon, Keun-Ai; Park, So Young; Park, Sunjoo; Lee, Kyoung Young; Ha, Eun Hee; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Lee, Heung Kyu; Cho, You Sook

    2016-03-01

    Recruitment and activation of dendritic cells (DCs) in the lungs are critical for Th2 responses in asthma, and CCL20 secreted from bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) is known to influence the recruitment of DCs. Because asthma is a disease that is closely associated with oxidative stress, we hypothesized that clusterin, an oxidative stress regulatory molecule, may have a role in the development of allergic airway inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine whether clusterin regulates CCL20 production from the BECs and the subsequent DC recruitment in the lungs. To verify the idea, clusterin knockout (Clu(-/-)), clusterin heterogeneous (Clu(+/-)), and wild-type mice were exposed intranasally to house dust mite (HDM) extract to induce allergic airway inflammation. We found that the total number of immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the lung was increased in Clu(-/-) and Clu(+/-) mice. Of these immune cells, inflammatory DCs (CD11b(+)CD11c(+)) and Ly6C(high) monocyte populations in the lung were significantly increased, which was accompanied by increased levels of various chemokines, including CCL20 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and increased oxidative stress markers in the lung. Moreover, HDM-stimulated human BECs with either up- or downregulated clusterin expression showed that CCL20 secretion was negatively associated with clusterin expression. Interestingly, clusterin also reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which is related to induction of CCL20 expression after HDM stimulation. Thus, the antioxidant property of clusterin is suggested to regulate the expression of CCL20 in BECs and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory DCs in the airway. PMID:26826245

  19. Bioaerosols from a Food Waste Composting Plant Affect Human Airway Epithelial Cell Remodeling Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Wei; Lee, Chung-Ru; Hung, Hsueh-Fen; Teng, Kuo-Sheng; Huang, Hsin; Chuang, Chun-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The composting procedure in food waste plants generates airborne bioaerosols that have the potential to damage human airway epithelial cells. Persistent inflammation and repair responses induce airway remodeling and damage to the respiratory system. This study elucidated the expression changes of airway remodeling genes in human lung mucoepidermoid NCI-H292 cells exposed to bioaerosols from a composting plant. Different types of microorganisms were detectable in the composting plant, using the agar culture method. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the level of Aspergillus fumigatus and the profile of remodeling genes. The real-time PCR results indicated that the amount of A. fumigatus in the composting hall was less than 102 conidia. The endotoxins in the field bioaerosols were determined using a limulus amebocyte lysate test. The endotoxin levels depended on the type of particulate matter (PM), with coarse particles (2.5–10 μm) having higher endotoxin levels than did fine particles (0.5–2.5 μm). After exposure to the conditioned medium of field bioaerosol samples, NCI-H292 cells showed increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 release and activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21WAF1/CIP1) gene expression, but not of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9. Airborne endotoxin levels were higher inside the composting hall than they were in other areas, and they were associated with PM. This suggested that airborne bioaerosols in the composting plant contained endotoxins and microorganisms besides A. fumigatus that cause the inflammatory cytokine secretion and augment the expression of remodeling genes in NCI-H292 cells. It is thus necessary to monitor potentially hazardous materials from bioaerosols in food composting plants, which could affect the health of workers. PMID:24368426

  20. Chromium(VI) stimulates Fyn to initiate innate immune gene induction in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Zubritsky, Lindsey M.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms for pathogenic metal signaling in airway injury or disease promotion are poorly understood. It is widely believed that one mechanism for pathogenic and possible carcinogenic effects of inhaled chromium (Cr(VI)) is inhibition of inducible gene transactivation. However, we recently reported that Cr(VI) inhibition of Sp1-dependent transactivation required signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-dependent expression of an inhibitory protein in airway epithelium. Thus, Cr(VI) exposures can induce genes and we hypothesized this induction resulted from Cr(VI) signaling through an innate immune-like STAT1-dependent pathway initiated by Fyn. Exposure of human airway epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells to Cr(VI) selectively transactivated STAT-responsive interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and induced ISRE-driven transactivation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), without affecting the gamma interferon-activated site (GAS)-driven IRF1 expression. Cr(VI)-induced IRF7 was absent or greatly reduced in cells that lacked STAT1, were treated with the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2, or lacked Fyn. Expressing Fyn, but not Src, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells null for Src, Yes, and Fyn restored Cr(VI)-stimulated STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and IRF7 expression. Finally, shRNA knockdown of Fyn in BEAS-2B cells prevented Cr(VI)-activated STAT1 transactivation of IRF7. These data support a novel mechanism through which Cr(VI) stimulates Fyn to initiate interferon-like signaling for STAT1-dependent gene transactivation. PMID:19994902

  1. Phosphodiesterase 4B is essential for TH2-cell function and development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Catherine Jin, S.-L.; Goya, Sho; Nakae, Susumu; Wang, Dan; Bruss, Matthew; Hou, Chiaoyin; Umetsu, Dale; Conti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling modulates functions of inflammatory cells involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are essential components of this pathway. Induction of the PDE4 isoform PDE4B is necessary for Toll-like receptor signaling in monocytes and macrophages and is associated with T cell receptor/CD3 in T cells; however, its exact physiological function in the development of allergic asthma remains undefined. Objectives We investigated the role of PDE4B in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and TH2-driven inflammatory responses. Methods Wild-type and PDE4B−/− mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin and AHR measured in response to inhaled methacholine. Airway inflammation was characterized by analyzing leukocyte infiltration and cytokine accumulation in the airways. Ovalbumin-stimulated cell proliferation and TH2 cytokine production were determined in cultured bronchial lymph node cells. Results Mice deficient in PDE4B do not develop AHR. This protective effect was associated with a significant decrease in eosinophils recruitment to the lungs and decreased TH2 cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Defects in T-cell replication, TH2 cytokine production, and dendritic cell migration were evident in cells from the airway-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, accumulation of the TH1 cytokine IFN-γ was not affected in PDE4B−/− mice. Ablation of the orthologous PDE4 gene PDE4A has no impact on airway inflammation. Conclusion By relieving a cAMP-negative constraint, PDE4B plays an essential role in TH2-cell activation and dendritic cell recruitment during airway inflammation. These findings provide proof of concept that PDE4 inhibitors with PDE4B selectivity may have efficacy in asthma treatment. PMID:21047676

  2. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, P.; Park, C. Y.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Tsuda, A.; Sager, T. M.; Molina, R. M.; Donaghey, T. C.; Alencar, A. M.; Kasahara, D. I.; Ericsson, T.; Millet, E. J.; Swenson, J.; Tschumperlin, D. J.; Butler, J. P.; Brain, J. D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Gehr, P.; Zhou, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40–100 nm and less than 44 μm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 μm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 μM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  3. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  4. Human Lung Mast Cell Products Regulate Airway Smooth Muscle CXCL10 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Alkhouri, H.; Cha, V.; Tong, K.; Moir, L. M.; Armour, C. L.; Hughes, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) produces CXCL10 which may attract CXCR3+ mast/T cells to it. Our aim was to investigate the effects of mast cell products on ASM cell CXCL10 production. ASM cells from people with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1β, TNF-α, and/or IFNγ and treated with histamine (1–100 μM) ± chlorpheniramine (H1R antagonist; 1 μM) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist; 50 μM) or tryptase (1 nM) ± leupeptin (serine protease inhibitor; 50 μM), heat-inactivated tryptase, or vehicle for 4 h or 24 h. Human lung mast cells (MC) were isolated and activated with IgE/anti-IgE and supernatants were collected after 2 h or 24 h. The supernatants were added to ASM cells for 48 h and ASM cell CXCL10 production detected using ELISA (protein) and real-time PCR (mRNA). Histamine reduced IL-1β/TNF-α-induced CXCL10 protein, but not mRNA, levels independent of H1 and H2 receptor activation, whereas tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants reduced all cytokine-induced CXCL10. Tryptase also reduced CXCL10 levels in a cell-free system. Leupeptin inhibited the effects of tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants. MC 24 h supernatants contained TNF-α and amplified IFNγ-induced ASM cell CXCL10 production. This is the first evidence that MC can regulate ASM cell CXCL10 production and its degradation. Thus MC may regulate airway myositis in asthma. PMID:24648846

  5. Prostaglandin E2 induces expression of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prostanoid with diverse actions in health and disease. In chronic respiratory diseases driven by inflammation, PGE2 has both positive and negative effects. An enhanced understanding of the receptor-mediated cellular signalling pathways induced by PGE2 may help us separate the beneficial properties from unwanted actions of this important prostaglandin. PGE2 is known to exert anti-inflammatory and bronchoprotective actions in human airways. To date however, whether PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) was unknown. We address this herein and use primary cultures of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to show that PGE2 increases MKP-1 mRNA and protein upregulation in a concentration-dependent manner. We explore the signalling pathways responsible and show that PGE2-induces CREB phosphorylation, not p38 MAPK activation, in ASM cells. Moreover, we utilize selective antagonists of EP2 (PF-04418948) and EP4 receptors (GW 627368X) to begin to identify EP-mediated functional outcomes in ASM cells in vitro. Taken together with earlier studies, our data suggest that PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MKP-1 via cAMP/CREB-mediated cellular signalling in ASM cells and demonstrates that EP2 may, in part, be involved. PMID:27108790

  6. Chronic exposure to perfluorinated compounds: Impact on airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min H.; Jha, Aruni; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Mahood, Thomas H.; Basu, Sujata; Detillieux, Karen A.; Nikoobakht, Neda; Wong, Charles S.; Loewen, Mark; Becker, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging epidemiological evidence reveals a link between lung disease and exposure to indoor pollutants such as perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). PFC exposure during critical developmental stages may increase asthma susceptibility. Thus, in a murine model, we tested the hypothesis that early life and continued exposure to two ubiquitous household PFCs, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perflurooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), can induce lung dysfunction that exacerbates allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Balb/c mice were exposed to PFOA or PFOS (4 mg/kg chow) from gestation day 2 to 12 wk of age by feeding pregnant and nursing dams, and weaned pups. Some pups were also sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). We assessed lung function and inflammatory cell and cytokine expression in the lung and examined bronchial goblet cell number. PFOA, but not PFOS, without the OVA sensitization/challenge induced AHR concomitant with a 25-fold increase of lung macrophages. PFOA exposure did not affect OVA-induced lung inflammatory cell number. In contrast, PFOS exposure inhibited OVA-induced lung inflammation, decreasing total cell number in lung lavage by 68.7%. Interferon-γ mRNA in the lung was elevated in all PFC-exposed groups. Despite these effects, neither PFOA nor PFOS affected OVA-induced AHR. Our data do not reveal PFOA or PFOS exposure as a risk factor for more severe allergic asthma-like symptoms, but PFOA alone can induce airway inflammation and alter airway function. PMID:25217661

  7. Ozonolysis products of membrane fatty acids activate eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Zhao, Q.; Zhou, S.; Santrock, J. )

    1993-12-01

    When inhaled, ozone reacts at the airway luminal surface with unsaturated fatty acids contained in the extracellular fluid and plasma membrane to form an aldehyde and hydroxyhydroperoxide. The resulting hydroxyhydroperoxide degrades in aqueous systems to yield a second aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Previously, we demonstrated that ozone can augment eicosanoid metabolism in bovine airway epithelial cells. To examine structure-activity relationships of ozone-fatty acid degradation products on eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells, 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon saturated aldehydes and hydroxyhydroperoxides were synthesized and purified. Eicosanoid metabolism was evaluated by determination of total 3H-activity release from confluent cells previously incubated with [3H]arachidonic acid and by identification of specific metabolites with high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. The major metabolites detected were prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. The 9-carbon aldehyde, nonanal, in contrast to 3- or 6-carbon aldehydes, stimulated release at concentrations > or = 100 microM, suggesting that the stimulatory effect increases with increasing chain length. When tested under identical conditions, the 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon hydroxyhydroperoxides were more potent than the corresponding aldehydes. Again, a greater effect was noted when the chain length was increased. One possible explanation for the increased potency of the hydroxyhydroperoxides over the aldehydes could be due to degradation of the hydroxyhydroperoxide into H2O2 and aldehyde. We consider this an unlikely explanation because responses varied with chain length (although each hydroxyhydroperoxide would produce an equivalent amount of H2O2) and because exposure to H2O2 alone or H2O2 plus hexanal produced a response dissimilar to 1-hydroxy-1-hexanehydroperoxide.

  8. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:25453871

  9. Administration of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor Inhibits Airway Inflammation and Remodeling in Chronic OVA-Induced Mice via VEGF Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Wangjian; Su, Mei; Huang, Mao; Cai, Jiankang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a recently discovered antiangiogenesis protein. PEDF possesses powerful anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiangiogenic, and antifibrosis properties. It has been reported that PEDF can regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. This study aimed to evaluate whether recombinant PEDF protein could attenuate allergic airway inflammation and airway remodeling via the negative regulation of VEGF using a murine model of chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Methods In an in vivo experiment, mice sensitized with OVA were chronically airway challenged with aerosolized 1% OVA solution for 8 weeks. Treated mice were given injections of recombinant PEDF protein (50 or 100 µg/kg body weight) via the tail vein. In an in vitro experiment, we investigated the effects of recombinant PEDF protein on VEGF release levels in BEAS-2B cells stimulated with IL-1β. Results Recombinant PEDF protein significantly inhibited eosinophilic airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway remodeling, including goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial collagen deposition, and airway smooth muscle hypertrophy. In addition, recombinant PEDF protein suppressed the enhanced expression of VEGF protein in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in OVA-challenged chronically allergic mice. In the in vitro experiment, VEGF expression was increased after IL-1β stimulation. Pretreatment with 50 and 100 ng/mL of recombinant PEDF protein significantly attenuated the increase in VEGF release levels in a concentration-dependent manner in BEAS-2B cells stimulated by IL-1β. Conclusions These results suggest that recombinant PEDF protein may abolish the development of characteristic features of chronic allergic asthma via VEGF suppression, providing a potential treatment option for chronic airway inflammation diseases such as asthma. PMID:26739410

  10. Inhibition of the interactions between eosinophil cationic protein and airway epithelial cells by traditional Chinese herbs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is cytotoxic to bacteria, viruses, parasites and mammalian cells. Cells are damaged via processes of pore formation, permeability alteration and membrane leaking. Some clinical studies indicate that ECP gathers in the bronchial tract of asthma sufferers, damages bronchial and airway epithelial cells, and leads to in breathing tract inflammation; therefore, prevention of the cytotoxicity caused by ECP may serve as an approach to treat airway inflammation. To achieve the purpose, reduction of the ECP-cell interactions is rational. In this work, the Chinese herbal combinative network was generated to predict and identify the functional herbs from the pools of prescriptions. It was useful to select the node herbs and to demonstrate the relative binding ability between ECP and Beas-2B cells with or withour herb treatments. Results Eighty three Chinese herbs and prescriptions were tested and five effective herbs and six prescription candidates were selected. On the basis of effective single-herbal drugs and prescriptions, a combinative network was generated. We found that a single herb, Gan-cao, served as a node connecting five prescriptions. In addition, Sheng-di-huang, Dang-guei and Mu-tong also appeared in five, four and three kinds of prescriptions, respectively. The extracts of these three herbs indeed effectively inhibited the interactions between ECP and Beas-2B cells. According to the Chinese herbal combinative network, eight of the effective herbal extracts showed inhibitory effects for ECP internalizing into Beas-2B cells. The major components of Gang-cao and Sheng-di-huang, glycyrrhizic acid and verbascose, respectively, reduced the binding affinity between ECP and cells effectively. Conclusions Since these Chinese herbs reduced the binding affinity between ECP and cells and inhibited subsequent ECP entrance into cells, they were potential for mitigating the airway inflammation symptoms. Additionally, we

  11. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells in autoimmunity, immune-mediated diseases and airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Timothy S C

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a novel class of innate-like T cells, expressing a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) and able to recognize small molecules presented on the non-polymorphic MHC-related protein 1. Their intrinsic effector-memory phenotype, enabling secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and their relative abundance in humans imply a significant potential to contribute to autoimmune processes. However, as MAIT cells were unknown until recently and specific immunological tools were unavailable, little is known of their roles in disease. Here I review observations from clinical studies and animal models of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases including the roles of MAIT cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and airways diseases. MAIT cell deficiencies are frequently observed in peripheral blood, and at sites of disease such as the airways in asthma. However, MAIT cells have a specific sensitivity to suppression by therapeutic corticosteroids that may confound many of these observations, as may the tendency of the surface marker CD161 to activation-induced down-regulation. Nonetheless, the dependence on bacteria for the development of MAIT cells suggests a potentially important protective role linking the influences of early life microbial exposures and subsequent development of autoimmunity. Conversely, MAIT cells could contribute to chronic inflammation either through TCR-independent activation, or potentially by TCR recognition of as yet undiscovered ligands. Future research will be greatly facilitated by the immunological tools that are now available, including murine genetic models and human and murine specific tetramers. PMID:26778581

  12. IL-9-mediated induction of eotaxin1/CCL11 in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi; Hamid, Qutayba; Rahman, Sahidur M; Hoeck, Jutta; Yang, Jie; Shan, Lianyu

    2004-08-15

    Recent work has shown the potential importance of IL-9 in allergic diseases. The development of transgenic mice overexpressing IL-9 has suggested a key role for this cytokine in the development of the asthmatic phenotype including airway eosinophilia. In this study, we evaluated the expression of the IL-9R and the effects of IL-9 on human ASM cells by examining the release of Th2-associated chemokines (eotaxin1/CCL11 and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)/CCL17). IL-9R alpha-chain mRNA and surface expression were detected in cultured human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In addition, primary cultured ASM cells, as well as bronchial smooth muscle cells within biopsies of asthmatics and not control subjects, revealed IL-9R protein expression. IL-9 stimulation of human ASM cells resulted in release of eotaxin1/CCL11, but had no effect on the release of TARC/CCL17, in time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in vitro chemotaxis assay demonstrated that conditioned medium from IL-9-stimulated ASM cells attracted human eosinophils. Neutralizing Abs to IL-9, but not to IL-4 or IL-13, reduced significantly IL-9-induced production of eotaxin1/CCL11 from ASM cells. Interestingly, real-time RT-PCR showed that IL-9 up-regulated eotaxin1/CCL11 mRNA expression, but had no effect on TARC/CCL17. Treatment with Act D abrogates IL-9-induced eotaxin1/CCL11 mRNA and protein release by ASM cells. Finally, transfection study using eotaxin1/CCL11 promoter luciferase construct confirmed that IL-9 induced eotaxin1/CCL11 at the transcriptional level. Taken together, these data provide new evidence demonstrating that IL-9-dependent activation of ASM cells contributes to eosinophilic inflammation observed in asthma. PMID:15294996

  13. Galangin attenuates airway remodelling by inhibiting TGF-β1-mediated ROS generation and MAPK/Akt phosphorylation in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Zha, Wang-Jian; Ma, Yuan; Chen, Fei-Fei; Zhu, Wen; Ge, Ai; Zeng, Xiao-Ning; Huang, Mao

    2015-01-01

    Galangin, a natural flavonol, has attracted much attention for its potential anti-inflammatory properties. However, its role in the regulation of airway remodelling in asthma has not been explored. The present study aimed to elucidate the effects of galangin on chronic inflammation and airway remodelling and to investigate the underlying mechanisms both in vivo and in vitro. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitised mice were administered with galangin 30 min before challenge. Our results showed that severe inflammatory responses and airway remodelling occurred in OVA-induced mice. Treatment with galangin markedly attenuated the leakage of inflammatory cells into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and decreased the level of OVA-specific IgE in serum. Galangin significantly inhibited goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition and α-SMA expression. Lowered level of TGF-β1 and suppressed expression of VEGF and MMP-9 were observed in BALF or lung tissue, implying that galangin has an optimal anti-remodelling effect in vivo. Consistently, the TGF-β1-induced proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells was reduced by galangin in vitro, which might be due to the alleviation of ROS levels and inhibition of MAPK pathway. Taken together, the present findings highlight a novel role for galangin as a promising anti-remodelling agent in asthma, which likely involves the TGF-β1-ROS-MAPK pathway. PMID:26156213

  14. Variations of chromosomes 2 and 3 gene expression profiles among pulmonary telocytes, pneumocytes, airway cells, mesenchymal stem cells and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minghuan; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Zheng, Yonghua; Li, Meiyi; Cretoiu, Sanda M; Chen, Chengshui; Chen, Luonan; Cretoiu, Dragos; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Fang, Hao; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) were identified as a distinct cellular type of the interstitial tissue and defined as cells with extremely long telopodes (Tps). Our previous data demonstrated patterns of mouse TC-specific gene profiles on chromosome 1. The present study focuses on the identification of characters and patterns of TC-specific or TC-dominated gene expression profiles in chromosome 2 and 3, the network of principle genes and potential functional association. We compared gene expression profiles of pulmonary TCs, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway basal cells, proximal airway cells, CD8+T cells from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL), and CD8+ T cells from lungs (T-LL). We identified that 26 or 80 genes of TCs in chromosome 2 and 13 or 59 genes of TCs up-or down-regulated in chromosome 3, as compared with other cells respectively. Obvious overexpression of Myl9 in chromosome 2 of TCs different from other cells, indicates that biological functions of TCs are mainly associated with tissue/organ injury and ageing, while down-expression of Pltp implies that TCs may be associated with inhibition or reduction of inflammation in the lung. Dominant overexpression of Sh3glb1, Tm4sf1 or Csf1 in chromosome 3 of TCs is mainly associated with tumour promotion in lung cancer, while most down-expression of Pde5 may be involved in the development of pulmonary fibrosis and other acute and chronic interstitial lung disease. PMID:25278030

  15. Role of Allergen Source-Derived Proteases in Sensitization via Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Protease activity is a characteristic common to many allergens. Allergen source-derived proteases interact with lung epithelial cells, which are now thought to play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Allergen source-derived proteases act on airway epithelial cells to induce disruption of the tight junctions between epithelial cells, activation of protease-activated receptor-2, and the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. These facilitate allergen delivery across epithelial layers and enhance allergenicity or directly activate the immune system through a nonallergic mechanism. Furthermore, they cleave regulatory cell surface molecules involved in allergic reactions. Thus, allergen source-derived proteases are a potentially critical factor in the development of allergic sensitization and appear to be strongly associated with heightened allergenicity. PMID:22523502

  16. Abnormal spatial diffusion of Ca2+ in F508del-CFTR airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Antigny, Fabrice; Norez, Caroline; Cantereau, Anne; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2008-01-01

    Background In airway epithelial cells, calcium mobilization can be elicited by selective autocrine and/or paracrine activation of apical or basolateral membrane heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors linked to phospholipase C (PLC) stimulation, which generates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) and induces Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores. Methods In the present study, we monitored the cytosolic Ca2+ transients using the UV light photolysis technique to uncage caged Ca2+ or caged IP3 into the cytosol of loaded airway epithelial cells of cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF origin. We compared in these cells the types of Ca2+ receptors present in the ER, and measured their Ca2+ dependent activity before and after correction of F508del-CFTR abnormal trafficking either by low temperature or by the pharmacological corrector miglustat (N-butyldeoxynojirimycin). Results We showed reduction of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) dependent-Ca2+ response following both correcting treatments compared to uncorrected cells in such a way that Ca2+ responses (CF+treatment vs wild-type cells) were normalized. This normalization of the Ca2+ rate does not affect the activity of Ca2+-dependent chloride channel in miglustat-treated CF cells. Using two inhibitors of IP3R1, we observed a decrease of the implication of IP3R1 in the Ca2+ response in CF corrected cells. We observed a similar Ca2+ mobilization between CF-KM4 cells and CFTR-cDNA transfected CF cells (CF-KM4-reverted). When we restored the F508del-CFTR trafficking in CFTR-reverted cells, the specific IP3R activity was also reduced to a similar level as in non CF cells. At the structural level, the ER morphology of CF cells was highly condensed around the nucleus while in non CF cells or corrected CF cells the ER was extended at the totality of cell. Conclusion These results suggest reversal of the IP3R dysfunction in F508del-CFTR epithelial cells by correction of

  17. IL-17A induces signal transducers and activators of transcription-6-independent airway mucous cell metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Dawn C; Boswell, Madison G; Sherrill, Taylor P; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Boyd, Kelli L; Goleniewska, Kasia; Brody, Steven L; Kolls, Jay K; Adler, Kenneth B; Peebles, R Stokes

    2013-06-01

    Mucous cell metaplasia is a hallmark of asthma, and may be mediated by signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-6 signaling. IL-17A is increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with severe asthma, and IL-17A also increases mucus production in airway epithelial cells. Asthma therapeutics are being developed that inhibit STAT6 signaling, but the role of IL-17A in inducing mucus production in the absence of STAT6 remains unknown. We hypothesized that IL-17A induces mucous cell metaplasia independent of STAT6, and we tested this hypothesis in two murine models in which increased IL-17A protein expression is evident. In the first model, ovalbumin (OVA)-specific D011.10 Th17 cells were adoptively transferred into wild-type (WT) or STAT6 knockout (KO) mice, and the mice were challenged with OVA or PBS. WT-OVA and STAT6 KO-OVA mice demonstrated increased airway IL-17A and IL-13 protein expression and mucous cell metaplasia, compared with WT-PBS or STAT6 KO-PBS mice. In the second model, WT, STAT1 KO, STAT1/STAT6 double KO (DKO), or STAT1/STAT6/IL-17 receptor A (RA) triple KO (TKO) mice were challenged with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or mock viral preparation, and the mucous cells were assessed. STAT1 KO-RSV mice demonstrated increased airway mucous cell metaplasia compared with WT-RSV mice. STAT1 KO-RSV and STAT1/STAT6 DKO-RSV mice also demonstrated increased mucous cell metaplasia, compared with STAT1/STAT6/IL17RA TKO-RSV mice. We also treated primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs) from WT and STAT6 KO mice. STAT6 KO mTECs showed increased periodic acid-Schiff staining with IL-17A but not with IL-13. Thus, asthma therapies targeting STAT6 may increase IL-17A protein expression, without preventing IL-17A-induced mucus production. PMID:23392574

  18. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (calu-3): a model of human respiratory function, structure, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the application of the human airway Calu-3 cell line as a respiratory model for studying the effects of gas concentrations, exposure time, biophysical stress, and biological agents on human airway epithelial cells. Calu-3 cells are grown to confluence at an air-liquid interface on permeable supports. To model human respiratory conditions and treatment modalities, monolayers are placed in an environmental chamber, and exposed to specific levels of oxygen or other therapeutic modalities such as positive pressure and medications to assess the effect of interventions on inflammatory mediators, immunologic proteins, and antibacterial outcomes. Monolayer integrity and permeability and cell histology and viability also measure cellular response to therapeutic interventions. Calu-3 cells exposed to graded oxygen concentrations demonstrate cell dysfunction and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Modeling positive airway pressure reveals that pressure may exert a greater injurious effect and cytokine response than oxygen. In experiments with pharmacological agents, Lucinactant is protective of Calu-3 cells compared with Beractant and control, and perfluorocarbons also protect against hyperoxia-induced airway epithelial cell injury. The Calu-3 cell preparation is a sensitive and efficient preclinical model to study human respiratory processes and diseases related to oxygen- and ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:20948883

  19. Control of T helper 2 cell function and allergic airway inflammation by PKCζ

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pilar; Villares, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Mascarenhas, Sandra; Zaballos, Angel; Leitges, Michael; Kovac, Judit; Sizing, Irene; Rennert, Paul; Márquez, Gabriel; Martínez-A, Carlos; Diaz-Meco, María T.; Moscat, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of chronic airway inflammation in which T helper (Th) 2 cells play a critical role. The molecular mechanisms controlling Th2 differentiation and function are of paramount importance in biology and immunology. PKCζ has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and NF-κB, as well as in the control of T-dependent responses, although no defects were detected in naïve T cells from PKCζ–/– mice. Here, we report that PKCζ is critical for IL-4 signaling and Th2 differentiation. Thus, PKCζ levels are increased during Th2 differentiation, but not Th1 differentiation, of CD4+ T cells, and the loss of PKCζ impairs the secretion of Th2 cytokines in vitro and in vivo, as well as the nuclear translocation and tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat6 and Jak1 activation, essential downstream targets of IL-4 signaling. Moreover, PKCζ–/– mice display dramatic inhibition of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease, strongly suggesting that PKCζ can be a therapeutic target in asthma. PMID:15987782

  20. Direct effects of interleukin-13 on epithelial cells cause airway hyperreactivity and mucus overproduction in asthma.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Douglas A; Huang, Xiaozhu; Koth, Laura L; Chang, Grace H; Dolganov, Gregory M; Zhu, Zhou; Elias, Jack A; Sheppard, Dean; Erle, David J

    2002-08-01

    Asthma is an increasingly common disease that remains poorly understood and difficult to manage. This disease is characterized by airway hyperreactivity (AHR, defined by exaggerated airflow obstruction in response to bronchoconstrictors), mucus overproduction and chronic eosinophilic inflammation. AHR and mucus overproduction are consistently linked to asthma symptoms and morbidity. Asthma is mediated by Th2 lymphocytes, which produce a limited repertoire of cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13. Although each of these cytokines has been implicated in asthma, IL-13 is now thought to be especially critical. In animal models of allergic asthma, blockade of IL-13 markedly inhibits allergen-induced AHR, mucus production and eosinophilia. Furthermore, IL-13 delivery to the airway causes all of these effects. IL-13 is thus both necessary and sufficient for experimental models of asthma. However, the IL-13-responsive cells causing these effects have not been identified. Here we show that mice lacking signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) were protected from all pulmonary effects of IL-13. Reconstitution of STAT6 only in epithelial cells was sufficient for IL-13-induced AHR and mucus production in the absence of inflammation, fibrosis or other lung pathology. These results demonstrate the importance of direct effects of IL-13 on epithelial cells in causing two central features of asthma. PMID:12091879

  1. Interactions of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia with Airway Epithelial Cells: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Carys A.; Culibrk, Luka; Moore, Margo M.; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an environmental filamentous fungus that also acts as an opportunistic pathogen able to cause a variety of symptoms, from an allergic response to a life-threatening disseminated fungal infection. The infectious agents are inhaled conidia whose first point of contact is most likely to be an airway epithelial cell (AEC). The interaction between epithelial cells and conidia is multifaceted and complex, and has implications for later steps in pathogenesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated a key role for the airway epithelium in the response to respiratory pathogens, particularly at early stages of infection; therefore, elucidating the early stages of interaction of conidia with AECs is essential to understand the establishment of infection in cohorts of at-risk patients. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the early interactions between A. fumigatus and AECs, including bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. We describe mechanisms of adhesion, internalization of conidia by AECs, the immune response of AECs, as well as the role of fungal virulence factors, and patterns of fungal gene expression characteristic of early infection. A clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in the early establishment of infection by A. fumigatus could point to novel targets for therapy and prophylaxis. PMID:27092126

  2. Pseudomonas pyocyanin increases interleukin-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Denning, G M; Wollenweber, L A; Railsback, M A; Cox, C D; Stoll, L L; Britigan, B E

    1998-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen, causes acute pneumonia in patients with hospital-acquired infections and is commonly associated with chronic lung disease in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Evidence suggests that the pathophysiological effects of P. aeruginosa are mediated in part by virulence factors secreted by the bacterium. Among these factors is pyocyanin, a redox active compound that increases intracellular oxidant stress. We find that pyocyanin increases release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by both normal and CF airway epithelial cell lines and by primary airway epithelial cells. Moreover, pyocyanin synergizes with the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and IL-1alpha. RNase protection assays indicate that increased IL-8 release is accompanied by increased levels of IL-8 mRNA. The antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine, general inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases, and specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases diminish pyocyanin-dependent increases in IL-8 release. Conversely, inhibitors of protein kinases C (PKC) and PKA have no effect. In contrast to its effects on IL-8 expression, pyocyanin inhibits cytokine-dependent expression of the monocyte/macrophage/T-cell chemokine RANTES. Increased release of IL-8, a potent neutrophil chemoattractant, in response to pyocyanin could contribute to the marked infiltration of neutrophils and subsequent neutrophil-mediated tissue damage that are observed in Pseudomonas-associated lung disease. PMID:9826354

  3. Pseudomonas Pyocyanin Increases Interleukin-8 Expression by Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Gerene M.; Wollenweber, Laura A.; Railsback, Michelle A.; Cox, Charles D.; Stoll, Lynn L.; Britigan, Bradley E.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen, causes acute pneumonia in patients with hospital-acquired infections and is commonly associated with chronic lung disease in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Evidence suggests that the pathophysiological effects of P. aeruginosa are mediated in part by virulence factors secreted by the bacterium. Among these factors is pyocyanin, a redox active compound that increases intracellular oxidant stress. We find that pyocyanin increases release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by both normal and CF airway epithelial cell lines and by primary airway epithelial cells. Moreover, pyocyanin synergizes with the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and IL-1α. RNase protection assays indicate that increased IL-8 release is accompanied by increased levels of IL-8 mRNA. The antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine, general inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases, and specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases diminish pyocyanin-dependent increases in IL-8 release. Conversely, inhibitors of protein kinases C (PKC) and PKA have no effect. In contrast to its effects on IL-8 expression, pyocyanin inhibits cytokine-dependent expression of the monocyte/macrophage/T-cell chemokine RANTES. Increased release of IL-8, a potent neutrophil chemoattractant, in response to pyocyanin could contribute to the marked infiltration of neutrophils and subsequent neutrophil-mediated tissue damage that are observed in Pseudomonas-associated lung disease. PMID:9826354

  4. Yap Tunes Airway Epithelial Size and Architecture by Regulating the Identity, Maintenance, and Self-renewal of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Fallon, Timothy R.; Saladi, Srinivas Vinod; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Villoria, Jorge; Mou, Hongmei; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Nunna, Naveen; Hariri, Lida P.; Camargo, Fernando; Ellisen, Leif W.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Our understanding of how stem cells are regulated to maintain appropriate tissue size and architecture is incomplete. We show that Yap is required for the actual maintenance of an adult mammalian stem cell. Without Yap, adult airway basal stem cells are lost through their unrestrained differentiation, resulting in the simplification of a pseudostratified epithelium into a columnar one. Conversely, Yap overexpression increases stem cell self-renewal and blocks terminal differentiation, resulting in epithelial hyperplasia and stratification. Yap overexpression in differentiated secretory cells causes them to partially reprogram and adopt a stem cell-like identity. In contrast, Yap knockdown prevents the dedifferentiation of secretory cells into stem cells. We then show that Yap functionally interacts with p63, the cardinal transcription factor associated with myriad epithelial basal stem cells. In aggregate, we show that Yap regulates all of the cardinal behaviors of airway epithelial stem cells and in so doing determines epithelial architecture. PMID:25043474

  5. The Role of Lysophosphatidic Acid on Airway Epithelial Cell Denudation in a Murine Heterotopic Tracheal Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Tando, Yukiko; Ota, Chiharu; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kamata, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kano, Kuniyuki; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic rejection is the major leading cause of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), a fibroproliferative disorder of the small airways, is the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft rejection. However, there is currently no treatment for the disease. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) participates in the progression of OB. The aim of this study was to reveal the involvement of LPA on the lesion of OB. Methods Ki16198, an antagonist specifically for LPA1 and LPA3, was daily administered into the heterotopic tracheal transplant model mice at the day of transplantation. At days 10 and 28, the allografts were isolated and evaluated histologically. The messenger RNA levels of LPAR in microdissected mouse airway regions were assessed to reveal localization of lysophosphatidic acid receptors. The human airway epithelial cell was used to evaluate the mechanism of LPA-induced suppression of cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Results The administration of Ki16198 attenuated airway epithelial cell loss in the allograft at day 10. Messenger RNAs of LPA1 and LPA3 were detected in the airway epithelial cells of the mice. Lysophosphatidic acid inhibited the attachment of human airway epithelial cells to the ECM and induced cell detachment from the ECM, which was mediated by LPA1 and Rho-kinase pathway. However, Ki16198 did not prevent obliteration of allograft at day 28. Conclusions The LPA signaling is involved in the status of epithelial cells by distinct contribution in 2 different phases of the OB lesion. This finding suggests a role of LPA in the pathogenesis of OB. PMID:27500235

  6. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of methoxyphenolic compounds on human airway cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The respiratory epithelium plays a central role in the inflammatory response in asthma and other diseases. Methoxyphenolic compounds are purported to be effective anti-inflammatory agents, but their effects on the airway epithelium have not been well characterized. Methods Human airway cells were stimulated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of 4-substituted methoxyphenols and resveratrol. The expression of various cytokines was measured by qPCR, ELISAs, and protein arrays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured with a reactive fluorescent probe (3',6'-diacetate-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein). Activation of NF-κB was measured by nuclear translocation and phosphorylation. Ribonuclear protein association with mRNA was assessed with a biotin-RNA affinity isolation assay. Results Multiple inflammatory mediators were inhibited by methoxyphenols, including: CCL2, CCL5, IL-6, IL-8, ICAM-1, MIF, CXCL1, CXCL10, and Serpin E1. IC50 values were obtained for each compound that showed significant anti-inflammatory activity: diapocynin (20.3 μM), resveratrol (42.7 μM), 2-methoxyhydroquinone (64.3 μM), apocynin (146.6 μM), and 4-amino-2-methoxyphenol (410 μM). The anti-inflammatory activity did not correlate with inhibition of reactive oxygen species production or NF-κB activation. However, methoxyphenols inhibited binding of the RNA-binding protein HuR to mRNA, indicating that they may act post-transcriptionally. Conclusions Methoxyphenols demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity in human airway cells. More potent compounds that act via similar mechanisms may have therapeutic potential as novel anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:22414048

  8. T cells are necessary for ILC2 activation in house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bobby W S; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Tindemans, Irma; Lukkes, Melanie; KleinJan, Alex; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2016-06-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways mediated by an adaptive type 2 immune response. Upon allergen exposure, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can be rapidly activated and represent an early innate source of IL-5 and IL-13. Here, we used a house dust mite (HDM)-driven asthma mouse model to study the induction of ILC2s in allergic airway inflammation. In BALF, lungs, and lymph nodes, ILC2 activation is critically dependent on prior sensitization with HDM. Importantly, T cells are required for ILC2 induction, whereby T-cell activation precedes ILC2 induction. During HDM-driven allergic airway inflammation the accumulation of ILC2s in BALF is IL-33 independent, although infiltrating ILC2s produce less cytokines in Il33(-/-) mice. Transfer of in vitro polarized OVA-specific OT-II Th2 cells alone or in combination with Th17 cells followed by OVA and HDM challenge is not sufficient to induce ILC2, despite significant eosinophilic inflammation and T-cell activation. In this asthma model, ILC2s are therefore not an early source of Th2 cytokines, but rather contribute to type 2 inflammation in which Th2 cells play a key role. Taken together, ILC2 induction in HDM-mediated allergic airway inflammation in mice critically depends on activation of T cells. PMID:27062360

  9. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E.; Rao, Savita P.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S.

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  10. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E; Rao, Savita P; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  11. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  12. Oxidative Stress Regulates CFTR Gene Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells through a Distal Antioxidant Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Leir, Shih-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) expression in human airway epithelial cells involves the recruitment of distal cis-regulatory elements, which are associated with airway-selective DNase hypersensitive sites at −44 kb and −35 kb from the gene. The −35-kb site encompasses an enhancer that is regulated by the immune mediators interferon regulatory factor 1 and 2 and by nuclear factor Y. Here we investigate the −44-kb element, which also has enhancer activity in vitro in airway epithelial cells but is inactive in intestinal epithelial cells. This site contains an antioxidant response element (ARE) that plays a critical role in its function in airway cell lines and primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The natural antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN) induces nuclear translocation of nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that regulates genes with AREs in their promoters, many of which are involved in response to injury. Under normal conditions, the −44-kb ARE is occupied by the repressor BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor (Bach1), and v-Maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog K (MafK) heterodimers. After 2 hours of SFN treatment, Nrf2 displaces these repressive factors and activates CFTR expression. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that both the ARE and an adjacent NF-κB binding site are required for activation of the –44-kb element in airway epithelial cells. Moreover, this element is functionally linked to the −35-kb enhancer in modulating CFTR expression in response to environmental stresses in the airway. PMID:25259561

  13. Bicarbonate and chloride secretion in Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Devor, D C; Singh, A K; Lambert, L C; DeLuca, A; Frizzell, R A; Bridges, R J

    1999-05-01

    Serous cells are the predominant site of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression in the airways, and they make a significant contribution to the volume, composition, and consistency of the submucosal gland secretions. We have employed the human airway serous cell line Calu-3 as a model system to investigate the mechanisms of serous cell anion secretion. Forskolin-stimulated Calu-3 cells secrete HCO-3 by a Cl-offdependent, serosal Na+-dependent, serosal bumetanide-insensitive, and serosal 4,4'-dinitrostilben-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DNDS)-sensitive, electrogenic mechanism as judged by transepithelial currents, isotopic fluxes, and the results of ion substitution, pharmacology, and pH studies. Similar studies revealed that stimulation of Calu-3 cells with 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO), an activator of basolateral membrane Ca2+-activated K+ channels, reduced HCO-3 secretion and caused the secretion of Cl- by a bumetanide-sensitive, electrogenic mechanism. Nystatin permeabilization of Calu-3 monolayers demonstrated 1-EBIO activated a charybdotoxin- and clotrimazole- inhibited basolateral membrane K+ current. Patch-clamp studies confirmed the presence of an intermediate conductance inwardly rectified K+ channel with this pharmacological profile. We propose that hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane voltage elicits a switch from HCO-3 secretion to Cl- secretion because the uptake of HCO-3 across the basolateral membrane is mediated by a 4,4 '-dinitrostilben-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DNDS)-sensitive Na+:HCO-3 cotransporter. Since the stoichiometry reported for Na+:HCO-3 cotransport is 1:2 or 1:3, hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane potential by 1-EBIO would inhibit HCO-3 entry and favor the secretion of Cl-. Therefore, differential regulation of the basolateral membrane K+ conductance by secretory agonists could provide a means of stimulating HCO-3 and Cl- secretion. In this context, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance

  14. Lipidome and Transcriptome Profiling of Pneumolysin Intoxication Identifies Networks Involved in Statin-Conferred Protection of Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Statt, Sarah; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Huang, Chih-Ting; Wu, Reen; Kao, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the leading causes of death in both adults and children worldwide. Despite the adoption of a wide variety of therapeutics, the mortality from community-acquired pneumonia has remained relatively constant. Although viral and fungal acute airway infections can result in pneumonia, bacteria are the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, with Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in nearly 50% of cases. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin or pore-forming toxin produced by Streptococcus pneumonia and has been shown to play a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis. Airway epithelium is the initial site of many bacterial contacts and its barrier and mucosal immunity functions are central to infectious lung diseases. In our studies, we have shown that the prior exposure to statins confers significant resistance of airway epithelial cells to the cytotoxicity of pneumolysin. We decided to take this study one step further, assessing changes in both the transcriptome and lipidome of human airway epithelial cells exposed to toxin, statin or both. Our current work provides the first global view in human airway epithelial cells of both the transcriptome and the lipid interactions that result in cellular protection from pneumolysin. PMID:26023727

  15. Adoptive transfer of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells induces airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in brown-Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Haczku, A; Macary, P; Huang, T J; Tsukagoshi, H; Barnes, P J; Kay, A B; Kemeny, D M; Chung, K F; Moqbel, R

    1997-06-01

    Following allergen exposure, sensitized Brown-Norway rats develop airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and eosinophilic inflammation together with an increase in activated T cells (CD25+) in the airways. We tested the hypothesis that CD4+ T cells are involved directly in the acquisition of AHR. Spleen T cells from animals that were injected intraperitoneally on three consecutive days with ovalbumin/Al(OH)3, showed a dose-dependent proliferative response in vitro to ovalbumin, but not to bovine serum albumin, as measured by [3H]thymidine uptake. For total T-cell transfer, spleen cells obtained from donor rats 4 days after sensitization were depleted of adherent cells by a nylon wool column separation. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were purified by immunomagnetic beads cell separation. Recipient naive rats were injected intravenously with 50 x 10(6) total T cells, 20 x 10(6) and 5 x 10(6) CD4+ cells, and 5 x 10(6) CD8+ cells, and were exposed to ovalbumin aerosol 24 hr afterwards. After a further 24 hr, airway responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh) was measured and provocative concentration (PC) values PC100, PC200 and PC300) (the ACh concentration needed to achieve 100, 200 and 300% increase in lung resistance above baseline) were calculated. Airway responsiveness was significantly increased in recipients of sensitized total T cells compared with recipients of cells from saline-injected donor rats (P < 0.05). There were significantly increased eosinophil major basic protein (MBP)+ cell counts/mm2 in airway submucosal tissue in the hyperreactive rats and a significant correlation was found between the number of MBP+ cells and PC100 (r = 0.75; P < 0.03) in recipients of sensitized total T cells. Purified CD4+ T cells from sensitized donors induced AHR in naive recipients (P < 0.05), while sensitized CD8+ and naive CD4+ cells failed to do so. Our data indicate that T cells may induce AHR through an eosinophilic airway inflammation and that CD4+ T cells may have a direct effect in

  16. Eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on cultured airway cells by a fosfomycin/tobramycin antibiotic combination

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gregory G.; Kenney, Thomas F.; MacLeod, David L.; Henig, Noreen R.; O’Toole, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with CF. To gain insights into effectiveness of novel anti-infective therapies, the inhibitory effects of fosfomycin, tobramycin, and a 4 : 1 (wt/wt) fosfomycin/tobramycin combination (FTI) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on cultured human CF-derived airway cells (CFBE41o-) were investigated. In preformed biofilms treated for 16 h with antibiotics, P. aeruginosa CFU per mL were reduced 4 log10 units by both FTI and tobramycin at 256 mg L−1, while fosfomycin alone had no effect. Importantly, the FTI treatment contained five times less tobramycin than the tobramycin-alone treatment. Inhibition of initial biofilm formation was achieved at 64 mg L−1 FTI and 16 mg L−1 tobramycin. Fosfomycin (1024 mg L−1) did not inhibit biofilm formation. Cytotoxicity was also determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Intriguingly, sub-inhibitory concentrations of FTI (16 mg L−1) and tobramycin (4 mg L−1) and high concentrations of fosfomycin (1024 mg L−1) prevented bacterially mediated airway cell toxicity without a corresponding reduction in CFU. Overall, it was observed that FTI and tobramycin demonstrated comparable activity on biofilm formation and disruption. Decreased administration of tobramycin upon treatment with FTI might lead to a decrease in negative side effects of aminoglycosides. PMID:23620118

  17. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca(2+) increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  18. Stochastic homeostasis in human airway epithelium is achieved by neutral competition of basal cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H; Nadarajan, Parthiban; Graham, Trevor A; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Brown, James M; Falzon, Mary; Nye, Emma; Poulsom, Richard; Lawrence, David; Wright, Nicholas A; McDonald, Stuart; Giangreco, Adam; Simons, Benjamin D; Janes, Sam M

    2013-01-01

    Lineage tracing approaches have provided new insights into the cellular mechanisms that support tissue homeostasis in mice. However, the relevance of these discoveries to human epithelial homeostasis and its alterations in disease is unknown. By developing a novel quantitative approach for the analysis of somatic mitochondrial mutations that are accumulated over time, we demonstrate that the human upper airway epithelium is maintained by an equipotent basal progenitor cell population, in which the chance loss of cells due to lineage commitment is perfectly compensated by the duplication of neighbours, leading to “neutral drift” of the clone population. Further, we show that this process is accelerated in the airways of smokers, leading to intensified clonal consolidation and providing a background for tumorigenesis. This study provides a benchmark to show how somatic mutations provide quantitative information on homeostatic growth in human tissues, and a platform to explore factors leading to dysregulation and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00966.001 PMID:24151545

  19. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  20. SNAP23 is selectively expressed in airway secretory cells and mediates baseline and stimulated mucin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhui; Azzegagh, Zoulikha; Jaramillo, Ana M.; Zhu, Yunxiang; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Flores, Jose R.; Han, Wei; Tang, Yong-jun; Tu, Jing; Alanis, Denise M.; Evans, Christopher M.; Guindani, Michele; Roche, Paul A.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Chen, Jichao; Davis, C. William; Tuvim, Michael J.; Dickey, Burton F.

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucin secretion is important pathophysiologically and as a model of polarized epithelial regulated exocytosis. We find the trafficking protein, SNAP23 (23-kDa paralogue of synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa), selectively expressed in secretory cells compared with ciliated and basal cells of airway epithelium by immunohistochemistry and FACS, suggesting that SNAP23 functions in regulated but not constitutive epithelial secretion. Heterozygous SNAP23 deletant mutant mice show spontaneous accumulation of intracellular mucin, indicating a defect in baseline secretion. However mucins are released from perfused tracheas of mutant and wild-type (WT) mice at the same rate, suggesting that increased intracellular stores balance reduced release efficiency to yield a fully compensated baseline steady state. In contrast, acute stimulated release of intracellular mucin from mutant mice is impaired whether measured by a static imaging assay 5 min after exposure to the secretagogue ATP or by kinetic analysis of mucins released from perfused tracheas during the first 10 min of ATP exposure. Together, these data indicate that increased intracellular stores cannot fully compensate for the defect in release efficiency during intense stimulation. The lungs of mutant mice develop normally and clear bacteria and instilled polystyrene beads comparable to WT mice, consistent with these functions depending on baseline secretion that is fully compensated. PMID:26182382

  1. Human Airway Primary Epithelial Cells Show Distinct Architectures on Membrane Supports Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-06-01

    To facilitate drug development for lung delivery, it is highly demanding to establish appropriate airway epithelial cell models as transport barriers to evaluate pharmacokinetic profiles of drug molecules. Besides the cancer-derived cell lines, as the primary cell model, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells have been used for drug screenings because of physiological relevance to in vivo. Therefore, to accurately interpret drug transport data in NHBE measured by different laboratories, it is important to know biophysical characteristics of NHBE grown on membranes in different culture conditions. In this study, NHBE was grown on the polyester membrane in a different medium and its transport barrier properties as well as cell architectures were fully characterized by functional assays and confocal imaging throughout the days of cultures. Moreover, NHBE cells on inserts in a different medium were subject to either of air-interfaced culture (AIC) or liquid-covered culture (LCC) condition. Cells in the AIC condition were cultivated on the membrane with medium in the basolateral side only, whereas cells with medium in apical and basolateral sides under the LCC condition. Quantitative microscopic imaging with biophysical examination revealed distinct multilayered architectures of differentiated NHBE cells, suggesting NHBE as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeting drug transport. PMID:26818810

  2. Establishment and transformation of telomerase-immortalized human small airway epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a number of causally linked genes including the novel tumor suppressor Betaig-h3 that were differentially expressed in radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells. To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line, we show here that ectopic expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells resulted in the generation of several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal. Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings. The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice. These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression. Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV/nucleon of 56Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium. These findings indicate that hTERT-immortalized cells, being diploid and chromosomal stable, should be a useful model in assessing mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis.

  3. REGULATION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN RESPONSE TO AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: FURTHER MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endp...

  4. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  5. Acellular Lung Scaffolds Direct Differentiation of Endoderm to Functional Airway Epithelial Cells: Requirement of Matrix-Bound HS Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Ermini, Leonardo; Ackerley, Cameron; Wang, Jinxia; Chin, Stephanie; Yeganeh, Behzad; Bilodeau, Mélanie; Sambi, Manpreet; Rogers, Ian; Rossant, Janet; Bear, Christine E.; Post, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Efficient differentiation of pluripotent cells to proximal and distal lung epithelial cell populations remains a challenging task. The 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold is a key component that regulates the interaction of secreted factors with cells during development by often binding to and limiting their diffusion within local gradients. Here we examined the role of the lung ECM in differentiation of pluripotent cells in vitro and demonstrate the robust inductive capacity of the native lung matrix alone. Extended culture of stem cell-derived definitive endoderm on decellularized lung scaffolds in defined, serum-free medium resulted in differentiation into mature airway epithelia, complete with ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells with morphological and functional similarities to native airways. Heparitinase I, but not chondroitinase ABC, treatment of scaffolds revealed that the differentiation achieved is dependent on heparan sulfate proteoglycans and its bound factors remaining on decellularized scaffolds. PMID:25660407

  6. Clara Cell 10-kDa Protein Gene Transfection Inhibits NF-κB Activity in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao-Bo; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Nan; Zhen, Hong-Tao; Cui, Yong-Hua; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Clara cell 10-kDa protein (CC10) is a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Induction of CC10 expression by gene transfection may possess potential therapeutic effect. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) plays a key role in the inflammatory processes of airway diseases. Method/Results To investigate potential therapeutic effect of CC10 gene transfection in controlling airway inflammation and the underlying intracellular mechanisms, in this study, we constructed CC10 plasmid and transfected it into bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B cells and CC10 knockout mice. In BEAS-2B cells, CC10's effect on interleukin (IL)-1β induced IL-8 expression was explored by means of RT-PCR and ELISA and its effect on NF-κB classical signaling pathway was studied by luciferase reporter, western blot, and immunoprecipitation assay. The effect of endogenous CC10 on IL-1β evoked IL-8 expression was studied by means of nasal explant culture. In mice, CC10's effect on IL-1β induced IL-8 and nuclear p65 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. First, we found that the CC10 gene transfer could inhibit IL-1β induced IL-8 expression in BEAS-2B cells. Furthermore, we found that CC10 repressed IL-1β induced NF-κB activation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκB-α but not IκB kinase-α/β in BEAS-2B cells. Nevertheless, we did not observe a direct interaction between CC10 and p65 subunit in BEAS-2B cells. In nasal explant culture, we found that IL-1β induced IL-8 expression was inversely correlated with CC10 levels in human sinonasal mucosa. In vivo study revealed that CC10 gene transfer could attenuate the increase of IL-8 and nuclear p65 staining in nasal epithelial cells in CC10 knockout mice evoked by IL-1β administration. Conclusion These results indicate that CC10 gene transfer may inhibit airway inflammation through suppressing the activation of NF-κB, which may provide us a new consideration in the therapy of airway

  7. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine (Cch) and to identify the MAchR subtype involved. ASMC were isolated from tracheal fragments of Sprague–Dawley rats by enzymatic digestion. Proliferation assays were performed by MTS-PMS method. Viability was confirmed by trypan blue exclusion method. Mitogens as, epidermal growth factor (EGF), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) increased ASMC proliferation (p < 0.05, n = 5). Cch alone increased ASMC proliferation at 24 and 48 hrs. However, combination of Cch with other mitogens exhibited a dual effect, synergistic proliferation effect in the presence of EGF (5 ng/mL) and 5% FBS and inhibiting the proliferation induced by 10% FBS, EGF (10 ng/mL) and TNF-α (10 ng/mL). To determine the MAChR subtype involved in these biological responses, a titration curve of selective muscarinic antagonists were performed. The Cch stimulatory and inhibitory effects on ASCM proliferation was blocked by AF-DX-116 (M2AChR selective antagonist), in greater proportion than 4-DAMP (M3AChR selective antagonist), suggesting that the modulation of muscarinic agonist-induced proliferation is M2AChR mediated responses. Thus, M2AChR can activate multiple signal transduction systems and mediate both effects on ASMC proliferation depending on the plethora and variable airway microenvironments existing in asthma and COPD. PMID:24377382

  8. Expression of the chloride channel CLC-K in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mummery, Jennifer L; Killey, Jennifer; Linsdell, Paul

    2005-12-01

    Airway submucosal gland function is severely disrupted in cystic fibrosis (CF), as a result of genetic mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an apical membrane Cl(-) channel. To identify other Cl(-) channel types that could potentially substitute for lost CFTR function in these cells, we investigated the functional and molecular expression of Cl(-) channels in Calu-3 cells, a human cell line model of the submucosal gland serous cell. Whole cell patch clamp recording from these cells identified outwardly rectified, pH- and calcium-sensitive Cl(-) currents that resemble those previously ascribed to ClC-K type chloride channels. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we identified expression of mRNA for ClC-2, ClC-3, ClC-4, ClC-5, ClC-6, ClC-7, ClC-Ka, and ClC-Kb, as well as the common ClC-K channel beta subunit barttin. Western blotting confirmed that Calu-3 cells express both ClC-K and barttin protein. Thus, Calu-3 cells express multiple members of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels that, if also expressed in native submucosal gland serous cells within the CF lung, could perhaps act to partially substitute lost CFTR function. Furthermore, this work represents the first evidence for functional ClC-K chloride channel expression within the lung. PMID:16462912

  9. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. PMID:27354786

  10. Macrolides Inhibit Fusobacterium nucleatum-Induced MUC5AC Production in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Migiyama, Yohei; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most common anaerobic bacteria in periodontitis and is responsible for several extraoral infections, including respiratory tract diseases. In this study, we examined whether F. nucleatum induces mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells. We also examined the effects of macrolides on F. nucleatum-induced mucus production compared with the effects of other antibiotics that exert anti-anaerobic activities. The production of MUC5AC, the major core protein of mucin secreted from the airway surface epithelium, in bronchial epithelial cells after stimulation with culture supernatants (Sup) of F. nucleatum was analyzed by performing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative RT-PCR. The cell-signaling pathway of F. nucleatum Sup stimulation was also analyzed by Western blotting. For inhibition studies, cells were treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin (CLDM), and metronidazole (MTZ). The F. nucleatum Sup induced NCI-H292 cells to express MUC5AC at both the protein level and the mRNA level in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Macrolides inhibited F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production, while CLDM and MTZ were less effective. F. nucleatum Sup induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this induction was suppressed by macrolides. F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production was blocked by the ERK pathway inhibitor U0126. F. nucleatum is likely to contribute to excessive mucin production, which suggests that periodontitis may correlate with the pathogenesis of chronic respiratory tract infection. Macrolides seem to reduce this mucin production and might represent an additional means of therapeutic intervention for F. nucleatum respiratory tract infections other than CLDM and MTZ. PMID:23380724

  11. p63(+)Krt5(+) distal airway stem cells are essential for lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Daniel Zheng'An; Guan, Shou Ping; Liew, Audrey-Ann; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wang, Xia; Lim, Siew Joo; Vincent, Matthew; Lessard, Mark; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2015-01-29

    Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis involve the progressive and inexorable destruction of oxygen exchange surfaces and airways, and have emerged as a leading cause of death worldwide. Mitigating therapies, aside from impractical organ transplantation, remain limited and the possibility of regenerative medicine has lacked empirical support. However, it is clinically known that patients who survive sudden, massive loss of lung tissue from necrotizing pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome often recover full pulmonary function within six months. Correspondingly, we recently demonstrated lung regeneration in mice following H1N1 influenza virus infection, and linked distal airway stem cells expressing Trp63 (p63) and keratin 5, called DASC(p63/Krt5), to this process. Here we show that pre-existing, intrinsically committed DASC(p63/Krt5) undergo a proliferative expansion in response to influenza-induced lung damage, and assemble into nascent alveoli at sites of interstitial lung inflammation. We also show that the selective ablation of DASC(p63/Krt5) in vivo prevents this regeneration, leading to pre-fibrotic lesions and deficient oxygen exchange. Finally, we demonstrate that single DASC(p63/Krt5)-derived pedigrees differentiate to type I and type II pneumocytes as well as bronchiolar secretory cells following transplantation to infected lung and also minimize the structural consequences of endogenous stem cell loss on this process. The ability to propagate these cells in culture while maintaining their intrinsic lineage commitment suggests their potential in stem cell-based therapies for acute and chronic lung diseases. PMID:25383540

  12. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions. PMID:3189886

  13. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway. PMID:24885163

  14. Regulation of high glucose-mediated mucin expression by matrix metalloproteinase-9 in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xia, Li; Nie, Daijing

    2015-04-10

    Mucus hypersecretion is the key manifestation in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) is a major component of airway mucus. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9, have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway diseases. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that high glucose (HG)-regulates MMP-9 production and MMP-9 activity through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascades pathways, leading to mucin production in human airway epithelial cells (16HBE). We show that HG increases MMP-9 production, MMP-9 activity and MUC5AC expression. These effects are prevented by small interfering RNA (siRNA) for MMP-9, indicating that HG-induced mucin production is MMP-9-dependent. HG activates MMP-9 production, MMP-9 activity and MUC5AC overproduction, which is inhibited by nPG, DMSO and DPI (inhibitors of ROS and NADPH), suggesting that HG-activated mucin synthesis is mediated by NADPH/ROS in 16HBE cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for MMP-9 activated by NADPH/ROS signaling pathways in regulating HG-induced MUC5AC expression. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the infections related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for mucin overproduction in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:25704757

  15. Differences in the expression of chromosome 1 genes between lung telocytes and other cells: mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway epithelial cells and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoru; Zheng, Minghuan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Zheng, Yonghua; Li, Meiyi; Cretoiu, Dragos; Chen, Chengshui; Chen, Luonan; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a unique type of interstitial cells with specific, extremely long prolongations named telopodes (Tps). Our previous study showed that TCs are distinct from fibroblasts (Fbs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as concerns gene expression and proteomics. The present study explores patterns of mouse TC-specific gene profiles on chromosome 1. We investigated the network of main genes and the potential functional correlations. We compared gene expression profiles of mouse pulmonary TCs, MSCs, Fbs, alveolar type II cells (ATII), airway basal cells (ABCs), proximal airway cells (PACs), CD8+ T cells from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL) and CD8+ T cells from lungs (T-LL). The functional and feature networks were identified and compared by bioinformatics tools. Our data showed that on TC chromosome 1, there are about 25% up-regulated and 70% down-regulated genes (more than onefold) as compared with the other cells respectively. Capn2, Fhl2 and Qsox1 were over-expressed in TCs compared to the other cells, indicating that biological functions of TCs are mainly associated with morphogenesis and local tissue homoeostasis. TCs seem to have important roles in the prevention of tissue inflammation and fibrogenesis development in lung inflammatory diseases and as modulators of immune cell response. In conclusion, TCs are distinct from the other cell types. PMID:24826900

  16. Thymol attenuates allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ershun; Fu, Yunhe; Wei, Zhengkai; Yu, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xichen; Yang, Zhengtao

    2014-07-01

    Thymol, a naturally occurring monocyclic phenolic compound derived from Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory property in vivo and vitro. However, the mechanism of thymol is not clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of thymol on allergic inflammation in OVA-induced mice asthma and explore its mechanism. The model of mouse asthma was established by the induction of OVA. Thymol was orally administered at a dose of 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg body weight 1h before OVA challenge. At 24h after the last challenge, mice were sacrificed, and the data were collected by various experimental methods. The results revealed that pretreatment with thymol reduced the level of OVA-specific IgE, inhibited recruitment of inflammatory cells into airway, and decreased the levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BALF. Moreover, the pathologic changes of lung tissues were obviously ameliorated and goblet cell hyperplasia was effectively inhibited by the pretreatment of thymol. In addition, thymol reduced the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and blocked the activation of NF-κB pathway. All data suggested that thymol ameliorated airway inflammation in OVA-induced mouse asthma, possibly through inhibiting NF-κB activation. These findings indicated that thymol may be used as an alternative agent for treating allergic asthma. PMID:24785965

  17. Dynamic changes in intracellular ROS levels regulate airway basal stem cell homeostasis through Nrf2-dependent Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paul, MK; Bisht, B; Darmawan, DO; Chiou, R; Ha, VL; Wallace, WD; Chon, AC; Hegab, AE; Grogan, T; Elashoff, DA; Alva-Ornelas, JA; Gomperts, BN

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Airways are exposed to myriad environmental and damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), which also have physiological roles as signaling molecules that regulate stem cell function. However, the functional significance of both steady and dynamically changing ROS levels in different stem cell populations, as well as downstream mechanisms that integrate ROS sensing into decisions regarding stem cell homeostasis, are unclear. Here, we show in mouse and human airway basal stem cells (ABSCs) that intracellular flux from low to moderate ROS levels is required for stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. Changing ROS levels activate Nrf2, which activates the Notch pathway to stimulate ABSC self-renewal as well an antioxidant program that scavenges intracellular ROS, returning overall ROS levels to a low state to maintain homeostatic balance. This redox-mediated regulation of lung stem cell function has significant implications for stem cell biology, repair of lung injuries, and diseases such as cancer. PMID:24953182

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae Is Able to Trigger Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Process in Cultured Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Laura; Mazzetta, Francesca; Martinelli, Daniela; Valente, Sabatino; Alimandi, Maurizio; Raffa, Salvatore; Santino, Iolanda

    2016-01-01

    The ability of some bacterial pathogens to activate Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition normally is a consequence of the persistence of a local chronic inflammatory response or depends on a direct interaction of the pathogens with the host epithelial cells. In this study we monitored the abilities of the K. pneumoniae to activate the expression of genes related to EMT-like processes and the occurrence of phenotypic changes in airway epithelial cells during the early steps of cell infection. We describe changes in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and increased HIF-1α mRNA expression in cells exposed to K. pneumoniae infection. We also describe the upregulation of a set of transcription factors implicated in the EMT processes, such as Twist, Snail and ZEB, indicating that the morphological changes of epithelial cells already appreciable after few hours from the K. pneumoniae infection are tightly regulated by the activation of transcriptional pathways, driving epithelial cells to EMT. These effects appear to be effectively counteracted by resveratrol, an antioxidant that is able to exert a sustained scavenging of the intracellular ROS. This is the first report indicating that strains of K. pneumoniae may promote EMT-like programs through direct interaction with epithelial cells without the involvement of inflammatory cells. PMID:26812644

  19. Immunostimulatory oligonucleotides block allergic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th2 cell activation and IgE-mediated cytokine induction

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Edith M.; Chu, Mabel; Lizcano, Jennifer O.; Chang, Bonnie; Herman, Nancy; Kell, Sariah A.; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Coffman, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A single treatment with a CpG-containing immunostimulatory DNA sequence (ISS) given before allergen challenge can inhibit T helper type 2 cell (Th2)–mediated airway responses in animal models of allergic asthma; however, the mechanism of this inhibition remains largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that airway delivery of ISS before allergen challenge in Th2-primed mice acts in two distinct ways to prevent the allergic responses to this challenge. The first is to prevent induction of cytokines from allergen-specific Th2 cells, as demonstrated by the nearly complete inhibition of Th2 cytokine production, Th2-dependent functional responses, and gene induction patterns. ISS inhibits the Th2 response by rendering lung antigen-presenting cells (APCs) unable to effectively present antigen to Th2 cells, but not to Th1 cells. This loss of APC function correlates with a reduced expression of costimulatory molecules, including programmed cell death ligand (PD-L)1, PD-L2, CD40, CD80, CD86, and inducible T cell costimulator, and of major histocompatibility complex class II on CD11c+APCs from the airways of ISS-treated mice. The second important action of ISS is inhibition of immunoglobulin E–dependent release of Th2 cytokines, especially interleukin 4, from basophils and/or mast cells in the airways of Th2-primed mice. Thus, inhibition by ISS of allergic responses can be explained by two novel mechanisms that culminate in the inhibition of the principal sources of type 2 cytokines in the airways. PMID:16314434

  20. Challenge for 3D culture technology: Application in carcinogenesis studies with human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emura, M; Aufderheide, M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major intractable diseases and we urgently need more efficient preventive and curative measures. Recent molecular studies have provided strong evidence that allows us to believe that classically well-known early airway lesions such as hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ are really precancerous lesions progressing toward cancer but not necessarily transient and reversible alteration. This suggests that adequate early control of the precancerous lesions may lead to improved prevention of lung cancer. This knowledge is encouraging in view of the imminent necessity for additional experimental systems to investigate the causal mechanisms of cancers directly in human cells and tissues. There are many questions with regard to various precancerous lesions of the airways. For example, should cells, before reaching a stage of invasive carcinoma, undergo all precancerous stages such as hyperplasia or metaplasia and dysplasia, or is there any shortcut to bypass one or more of the precancerous stages? For the study of such questions, the emerging 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture technology appears to provide an effective and valuable tool. Though a great challenge, it is expected that this in vitro technology will be rapidly and reliably improved to enable the cultures to be maintained in an in vivo-mimicking state of differentiation for much longer than a period of at best a few months, as is currently the case. With the help of a "causes recombination-Lox" (Cre-lox) technology, it has been possible to trace cells giving rise to specific lung tumor types. In this short review we have attempted to assess the future role of 3D technology in the study of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26951634

  1. Pore properties and pharmacological features of the P2X receptor channel in airway ciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Weiyuan; Korngreen, Alon; Weil, Simy; Cohen, Enbal Ben-Tal; Priel, Avi; Kuzin, Liubov; Silberberg, Shai D

    2006-01-01

    Airway ciliated cells express an ATP-gated P2X receptor channel of unknown subunit composition (P2Xcilia) which is modulated by Na+ and by long exposures to ATP. P2Xcilia was investigated by recording currents from freshly dissociated rabbit airway ciliated cells with the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. During the initial continuous exposure to extracellular ATP, P2Xcilia currents gradually increase in magnitude (priming), yet the permeability to N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG) does not change, indicating that priming does not arise from a progressive change in pore diameter. Na+, which readily permeates P2Xcilia receptor channels, was found to inhibit the channel extracellular to the electric field. The rank order of permeability to various monovalent cations is: Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NMDG+ and TEA+, with a relative permeability of 1.35, 1.0, 0.99, 0.91, 0.79, 0.19 and 0.10, respectively. The rank order for the alkali cations follows an Eisenman series XI for a high-strength field site. Ca2+ has been estimated to be 7-fold more permeant than Na+. The rise in [Ca2+]i in ciliated cells, induced by the activation of P2Xcilia, is largely inhibited by either Brilliant Blue G or KN-62, indicating that P2X7 may be a part of P2Xcilia. P2Xcilia is augmented by Zn2+ and by ivermectin, and P2X4 receptor protein is detected by immunolabelling at the basal half of the cilia, strongly suggesting that P2X4 is a component of P2Xcilia receptor channels. Taken together, these results suggest that P2Xcilia is either assembled from P2X4 and P2X7 subunits, or formed from modified P2X4 subunits. PMID:16423852

  2. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, A. M.; Gaver, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway’s walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble’s tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls’ nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble’s speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway’s cellular epithelium during airway reopening. PMID:23745044

  3. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials. PMID:26761017

  4. Therapeutic expansion of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells limits allergic airway inflammation during pulmonary fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Bianca; Piehler, Daniel; Eschke, Maria; Heyen, Laura; Protschka, Martina; Köhler, Gabriele; Alber, Gottfried

    2016-06-01

    Allergic asthma can be frequently caused and exacerbated by sensitization to ubiquitous fungal allergens associated with pulmonary mucus production, airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction, resulting in a complex disease that is often difficult to treat. Fungal infections are frequently complicated by the development of a type 2 immune response that prevents successful elimination of the fungal pathogen. Furthermore, production of type 2 cytokines triggers allergic airway inflammation. Following intranasal infection of BALB/c mice with the fungusCryptococcus neoformans, we recently described a more pronounced type 2 immune response in the absence of regulatory T (Treg) cells. To determine whether Treg cell expansion is able to suppress type 2-related fungal allergic inflammation, we increased Treg cell numbers during pulmonaryC. neoformansinfection by administration of an interleukin (IL)-2/anti-IL-2 complex. Expansion of Treg cells resulted in reduced immunoglobulin E production and decreased allergic airway inflammation including reduced production of pulmonary mucus and type 2 cytokines as well as production of immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1. From our data we conclude that Treg cells and/or their suppressive mediators represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention during allergic fungal airway disease. PMID:27001975

  5. Human Airway Epithelial Cell Responses to Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Exposure: Nanorope-Residual Body Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, Barbara J.; Warren, John B.; Kisslinger, Kim; Crosson, Kenya; Maye, Mathew M.

    2012-11-01

    This investigation examines the 'first contact responses' of in vitro human epithelial airway cells exposed to unrefined single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) [containing metal catalyst, carbon black, amorphous carbon, graphitic shells, and SWCNTs], and refined acid/peroxide cleaned and cut SWCNTs at low and high dose exposures (0.16 ug/L and 1.60 ug/L) for 2, 3 and 3.5 hours. FTIR, X-ray compositional analysis, morphological TEM analysis and UV-Vis were used to physicochemically characterize the SWCNTs in this study. Following SWCNT exposure to human lung NCI-H292 epithelial monolayers, the airway cells were prepared for light microscopy vital staining, or fixed in glutaraldehyde for SEM/TEM imaging to determine SWCNT binding, uptake, intracellular processing and organellar/SWCNT fate within the exposure period. At 2 hr exposures to both unrefined Carbolex, and refined SWCNTs (at both high and low doses), there were no increases in lung cell necrosis compared to controls. However high dose, 3 hr exposures to unrefined Carbolex material produced severe cell damage (apical and basal plasma membrane holes, decreased mitochondria, numerous intracellular vesicles containing nanomaterial and membrane fragments) and increased cell necrosis. The refined SWCNTs exposed for 3 hr at low dose produced no increase in cell death, although high dose exposure produced significant cell death. By TEM, Acid/peroxide cleaned SWCNT 3 hr exposures at high and low doses, revealed SWCNTs attachment to cell surface mucin, and SWCNT uptake into the cells during membrane recycling. Membranes and SWCNTs were seen within cytoplasmic lamellar body-type vesicles, where vesicular contents were bio-degraded, eventually forming long SWCNT-nanoropes, which were subsequently released into the cytoplasm as clusters of attached nanoropes, as the vesicle membranes fragmented. These Nanorope-Residual Bodies did not cause damage to the surrounding organelles or cytoplasm, and seemed very stabile in the

  6. MyD88 in lung resident cells governs airway inflammatory and pulmonary function responses to organic dust treatment.

    PubMed

    Poole, Jill A; Wyatt, Todd A; Romberger, Debra J; Staab, Elizabeth; Simet, Samantha; Reynolds, Stephen J; Sisson, Joseph H; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of organic dusts within agriculture environments contributes to the development and/or severity of airway diseases, including asthma and chronic bronchitis. MyD88 KO (knockout) mice are nearly completely protected against the inflammatory and bronchoconstriction effects induced by acute organic dust extract (ODE) treatments. However, the contribution of MyD88 in lung epithelial cell responses remains unclear. In the present study, we first addressed whether ODE-induced changes in epithelial cell responses were MyD88-dependent by quantitating ciliary beat frequency and cell migration following wounding by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. We demonstrate that the normative ciliary beat slowing response to ODE is delayed in MyD88 KO tracheal epithelial cells as compared to wild type (WT) control. Similarly, the normative ODE-induced slowing of cell migration in response to wound repair was aberrant in MyD88 KO cells. Next, we created MyD88 bone marrow chimera mice to investigate the relative contribution of MyD88-dependent signaling in lung resident (predominately epithelial cells) versus hematopoietic cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that ODE-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is MyD88-dependent in lung resident cells, whereas MyD88 action in hematopoietic cells is mainly responsible for ODE-induced TNF-α release. MyD88 signaling in lung resident and hematopoietic cells are necessary for ODE-induced IL-6 and neutrophil chemoattractant (CXCL1 and CXCL2) release and neutrophil influx. Collectively, these findings underscore an important role for MyD88 in lung resident cells for regulating ciliary motility, wound repair and inflammatory responses to ODE, and moreover, show that airway hyperresponsiveness appears uncoupled from airway inflammatory consequences to organic dust challenge in terms of MyD88 involvement. PMID:26376975

  7. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  8. Identification of human metapneumovirus-induced gene networks in airway epithelial cells by microarray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Sinha, M. |; Liu, T.; Hong, C.; Luxon, B.A. |; Garofalo, R.P. ||; Casola, A. ||

    2008-04-25

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. Little is known about the response to hMPV infection of airway epithelial cells, which play a pivotal role in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of airway epithelial cells infected with hMPV using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the 47,400 transcripts and variants represented on the Affimetrix GeneChip Human Genome HG-U133 plus 2 array, 1601 genes were significantly altered following hMPV infection. Altered genes were then assigned to functional categories and mapped to signaling pathways. Many up-regulated genes are involved in the initiation of pro-inflammatory and antiviral immune responses, including chemokines, cytokines, type I interferon and interferon-inducible proteins. Other important functional classes up-regulated by hMPV infection include cellular signaling, gene transcription and apoptosis. Notably, genes associated with antioxidant and membrane transport activity, several metabolic pathways and cell proliferation were down-regulated in response to hMPV infection. Real-time PCR and Western blot assays were used to confirm the expression of genes related to several of these functional groups. The overall result of this study provides novel information on host gene expression upon infection with hMPV and also serves as a foundation for future investigations of genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this important viral infection. Furthermore, it can facilitate a comparative analysis of other paramyxoviral infections to determine the transcriptional changes that are conserved versus the one that are specific to individual pathogens.

  9. TLR3 activation increases chemokine expression in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Faksh, Arij; Britt, Rodney D; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Pandya, Hitesh C; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-01-15

    Viral infections, such as respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus, adversely affect neonatal and pediatric populations, resulting in significant lung morbidity, including acute asthma exacerbation. Studies in adults have demonstrated that human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells modulate inflammation through their ability to secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The role of ASM in the developing airway during infection remains undefined. In our study, we used human fetal ASM cells as an in vitro model to examine the effect of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists on chemokine secretion. We found that fetal ASM express multiple TLRs, including TLR3 and TLR4, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus infection. Cells were treated with TLR agonists, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] (TLR3 agonist), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist), or R848 (TLR7/8 agonist), and IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) secretion were evaluated. Interestingly, poly(I:C), but neither lipopolysaccharide nor R848, increased IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 secretion. Examination of signaling pathways suggested that the poly(I:C) effects in fetal ASM involve TLR and ERK signaling, in addition to another major inflammatory pathway, NF-κB. Moreover, there are variations between fetal and adult ASM with respect to poly(I:C) effects on signaling pathways. Pharmacological inhibition suggested that ERK pathways mediate poly(I:C) effects. Overall, our data show that poly(I:C) initiates activation of proinflammatory pathways in developing ASM, which may contribute to immune responses to infection and exacerbation of asthma. PMID:26589477

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress chronic airway inflammation in the murine ovalbumin asthma model.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Tracey L; Koloze, Mary; Lennon, Donald P; Zuchowski, Brandon; Yang, Sung Eun; Caplan, Arnold I

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) introduced intravenously can have profound anti-inflammatory activity resulting in suppression of graft vs. host disease as well as regenerative events in the case of stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of these diseases. hMSCs produce bioactive factors that provide molecular cuing for: 1) immunosuppression of T cells; 2) antiscarring; 3) angiogenesis; 4) antiapoptosis; and 5) regeneration (i.e., mitotic for host-derived progenitor cells). Studies have shown that hMSCs have profound effects on the immune system and are well-tolerated and therapeutically active in immunocompetent rodent models of multiple sclerosis and stroke. Furthermore, intravenous administration of MSCs results in pulmonary localization. Asthma is a major debilitating pulmonary disease that impacts in excess of 150 million people in the world with uncontrolled asthma potentially leading to death. In addition, the socioeconomic impact of asthma-associated illnesses at the pediatric and adult level are in the millions of dollars in healthcare costs and lost days of work. hMSCs may provide a viable multiaction therapeutic for this inflammatory lung disease by secreting bioactive factors or directing cellular activity. Our studies show the effectiveness and specificity of the hMSCs on decreasing chronic airway inflammation associated with the murine ovalbumin model of asthma. In addition, the results from these studies verify the in vivo immunoeffectiveness of hMSCs in rodents and support the potential therapeutic use of hMSCs for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with chronic asthma. PMID:20817776

  11. Evaluation of airway resistance in primary small cell carcinoma of the trachea by MostGraph: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Eri; Gon, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Kentaro; Takahashi, Mai; Iida, Yuko; Hiranuma, Hisato; Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Hataoka, Tsukasa; Mizumura, Kenji; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-08-01

    The case subject was a 58-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with a chief complaint of respiratory discomfort. Wheezing could be heard in both lungs; treatment was initiated with inhaled steroids for suspected bronchial asthma. However, 1 week later, the respiratory discomfort had not improved and the wheezing sound had progressed to the neck area. Upper airway obstruction was suspected; therefore, chest computed tomography (CT) was performed, revealing tracheal stenosis caused by a tumor in the upper airway. Because of the high risk of airway obstruction, tracheotomy and tracheal tumor resection were performed. Histopathological examination of the resected tumor revealed small cell lung cancer (SCLC); the stage was determined to be clinical stage IIIB (cT4N2M0), for which chemotherapy with two cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide followed by radiation therapy were administered. Pulmonary function testing revealed no change in the forced expiratory volume in 1 sec and flow volume (FV) curve before and after tumor resection, whereas airway resistance measured by MostGraph-01 showed a marked decrease following treatment. We believe that MostGraph-01 may be useful for measuring airway resistance and evaluating a tracheal tumor, and report a case using MostGraph-01. PMID:27621904

  12. Evaluation of airway resistance in primary small cell carcinoma of the trachea by MostGraph: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Eri; Hayashi, Kentaro; Takahashi, Mai; Iida, Yuko; Hiranuma, Hisato; Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Hataoka, Tsukasa; Mizumura, Kenji; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-01-01

    The case subject was a 58-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with a chief complaint of respiratory discomfort. Wheezing could be heard in both lungs; treatment was initiated with inhaled steroids for suspected bronchial asthma. However, 1 week later, the respiratory discomfort had not improved and the wheezing sound had progressed to the neck area. Upper airway obstruction was suspected; therefore, chest computed tomography (CT) was performed, revealing tracheal stenosis caused by a tumor in the upper airway. Because of the high risk of airway obstruction, tracheotomy and tracheal tumor resection were performed. Histopathological examination of the resected tumor revealed small cell lung cancer (SCLC); the stage was determined to be clinical stage IIIB (cT4N2M0), for which chemotherapy with two cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide followed by radiation therapy were administered. Pulmonary function testing revealed no change in the forced expiratory volume in 1 sec and flow volume (FV) curve before and after tumor resection, whereas airway resistance measured by MostGraph-01 showed a marked decrease following treatment. We believe that MostGraph-01 may be useful for measuring airway resistance and evaluating a tracheal tumor, and report a case using MostGraph-01.

  13. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D.; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S.; Garrison, Carly B.; Walser, Tonya C.; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C.; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R.; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O’Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  14. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S; Garrison, Carly B; Walser, Tonya C; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O'Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N; Dubinett, Steven M; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A; Lenburg, Marc E; Spira, Avrum

    2013-11-19

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  15. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS ISOLATED FROM CONCENTRATED AIR PARTICLES-EXPOSED SPONTANEOUS HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro effects of particulate matter on airway epithelial cells isolated from concentrated air particles-exposed spontaneous hypertensive rats

    Ines Pagan, Urmila Kodavanti, Paul Evansky, Daniel L Costa and Janice A Dye. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, National...

  16. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS THROUGH A POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine carbon particles induce IL-8 expression in human airway
    epithelial cells through a post-transcritpional mechanism
    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to
    particulate matter (PM) - induced adverse health effects. IL-8 is an
    i...

  17. ZN2+-INDUCED IL-8 EXPRESSION INVOLVES AP-1, JNK, AND ERK ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter (PM) in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. IL-8 is an important proinflammatory cytokine in the human lung and is induced in human airway epithelial cells exposed to zin...