Science.gov

Sample records for airway inflammation lung

  1. Early airway infection, inflammation, and lung function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Carlin, J; Olinsky, A; Robertson, C; Grimwood, K

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the relation between lower airway infection and inflammation, respiratory symptoms, and lung function in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective study of children with CF aged younger than 3 years, diagnosed by a newborn screening programme. All were clinically stable and had testing as outpatients. Subjects underwent bronchial lavage (BL) and lung function testing by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique under general anaesthesia. BL fluid was cultured and analysed for neutrophil count, interleukin 8, and neutrophil elastase. Lung function was assessed by forced expiratory volume in 0.5, 0.75, and 1 second. Results: Thirty six children with CF were tested on 54 occasions. Lower airway infection shown by BL was associated with a 10% reduction in FEV0.5 compared with subjects without infection. No relation was identified between airway inflammation and lung function. Daily moist cough within the week before testing was reported on 20/54 occasions, but in only seven (35%) was infection detected. Independent of either infection status or airway inflammation, those with daily cough had lower lung function than those without respiratory symptoms at the time of BL (mean adjusted FEV0.5 195 ml and 236 ml respectively). Conclusions: In young children with CF, both respiratory symptoms and airway infection have independent, additive effects on lung function, unrelated to airway inflammation. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of airway obstruction in these young patients. PMID:12244003

  2. Lung sound analysis helps localize airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Terufumi; Obase, Yasushi; Nagasaka, Yukio; Nakano, Hiroshi; Ishimatsu, Akiko; Kishikawa, Reiko; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Airway inflammation can be detected by lung sound analysis (LSA) at a single point in the posterior lower lung field. We performed LSA at 7 points to examine whether the technique could identify the location of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Patients and methods Breath sounds were recorded at 7 points on the body surface of 22 asthmatic subjects. Inspiration sound pressure level (ISPL), expiration sound pressure level (ESPL), and the expiration-to-inspiration sound pressure ratio (E/I) were calculated in 6 frequency bands. The data were analyzed for potential correlation with spirometry, airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20), and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). Results The E/I data in the frequency range of 100–400 Hz (E/I low frequency [LF], E/I mid frequency [MF]) were better correlated with the spirometry, PC20, and FeNO values than were the ISPL or ESPL data. The left anterior chest and left posterior lower recording positions were associated with the best correlations (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity: r=−0.55 and r=−0.58; logPC20: r=−0.46 and r=−0.45; and FeNO: r=0.42 and r=0.46, respectively). The majority of asthmatic subjects with FeNO ≥70 ppb exhibited high E/I MF levels in all lung fields (excluding the trachea) and V50%pred <80%, suggesting inflammation throughout the airway. Asthmatic subjects with FeNO <70 ppb showed high or low E/I MF levels depending on the recording position, indicating uneven airway inflammation. Conclusion E/I LF and E/I MF are more useful LSA parameters for evaluating airway inflammation in bronchial asthma; 7-point lung sound recordings could be used to identify sites of local airway inflammation. PMID:28392708

  3. Allergic airway inflammation decreases lung bacterial burden following acute Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a neutrophil- and CCL8-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dulek, Daniel E; Newcomb, Dawn C; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Blackwell, Timothy S; Moore, Martin L; Boyd, Kelli L; Kolls, Jay K; Peebles, R Stokes

    2014-09-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity.

  4. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  5. Interleukin-1beta causes pulmonary inflammation, emphysema, and airway remodeling in the adult murine lung.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Urpo; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Tichelaar, Jay W; Bry, Kristina

    2005-04-01

    The production of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 is increased in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. To characterize the in vivo actions of IL-1 in the lung, transgenic mice were generated in which human IL-1beta was expressed in the lung epithelium with a doxycycline-inducible system controlled by the rat Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter. Induction of IL-1beta expression in the lungs of adult mice caused pulmonary inflammation characterized by neutrophil and macrophage infiltrates. IL-1beta caused distal airspace enlargement, consistent with emphysema. IL-1beta caused disruption of elastin fibers in alveolar septa and fibrosis in airway walls and in the pleura. IL-1beta increased the thickness of conducting airways, enhanced mucin production, and caused lymphocytic aggregates in the airways. Decreased immunostaining for the winged helix transcription factor FOXA2 was associated with goblet cell hyperplasia in IL-1beta-expressing mice. The production of the neutrophil attractant CXC chemokines KC (CXCL1) and MIP-2 (CXCL2), and of matrix metalloproteases MMP-9 and MMP-12, was increased by IL-1beta. Chronic production of IL-1beta in respiratory epithelial cells of adult mice causes lung inflammation, enlargement of distal airspaces, mucus metaplasia, and airway fibrosis in the adult mouse.

  6. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms.

  7. Eosinophils in the Lung – Modulating Apoptosis and Efferocytosis in Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Jennifer M.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Rossi, Adriano G.; Dransfield, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture, and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defense against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis). In terms of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways. PMID:25071763

  8. Identification of genes differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency that alter lung pathophysiology and inflammation in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Troy, Niamh M; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Kicic, Anthony; Zosky, Graeme R

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with asthma risk. Vitamin D deficiency may enhance the inflammatory response, and we have previously shown that airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness is increased in vitamin D-deficient mice. In this study, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency would exacerbate house dust mite (HDM)-induced inflammation and alterations in lung structure and function. A BALB/c mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was established by dietary manipulation. Responsiveness to methacholine, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, mucus cell metaplasia, lung and airway inflammation, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed. Gene expression patterns in mouse lung samples were profiled by RNA-Seq. HDM exposure increased inflammation and inflammatory cytokines in BAL, baseline airway resistance, tissue elastance, and ASM mass. Vitamin D deficiency enhanced the HDM-induced influx of lymphocytes into BAL, ameliorated the HDM-induced increase in ASM mass, and protected against the HDM-induced increase in baseline airway resistance. RNA-Seq identified nine genes that were differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency in the lungs of HDM-treated mice. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that protein expression of midline 1 (MID1) and adrenomedullin was differentially regulated such that they promoted inflammation, while hypoxia-inducible lipid droplet-associated, which is associated with ASM remodeling, was downregulated. Protein expression studies in human bronchial epithelial cells also showed that addition of vitamin D decreased MID1 expression. Differential regulation of these genes by vitamin D deficiency could determine lung inflammation and pathophysiology and suggest that the effect of vitamin D deficiency on HDM-induced allergic airways disease is complex.

  9. Impacts of allergic airway inflammation on lung pathology in a mouse model of influenza A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Akira; Ohara, Yuki; Takahashi, Kenta; Sato, Yuko; Ainai, Akira; Nagata, Noriyo; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus is the respiratory pathogen responsible for influenza. Infection by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus caused severe lower airway inflammation and pneumonia. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that affects the entire brachial tree, and was one of the commonest underlying medical conditions among patients hospitalized with the 2009 pandemic influenza virus infection. Although respiratory virus infections are the major causes of asthma exacerbation, the mechanism by which influenza exacerbates asthma is poorly understood. Animal models of disease comorbidity are crucial to understanding host-pathogen interactions and elucidating complex pathologies. Existing murine models of influenza virus infection in asthmatics show that asthmatic mice are highly resistant to influenza virus infection, which contradicts clinical observations in humans. Here, we developed a murine model of influenza virus/asthma comorbidity using NC/Nga mice, which are highly sensitive to allergic reactions such as atopic dermatitis and allergic airway inflammation. This model was then used to examine the impact of allergic airway inflammation on lung pathology in the 2009 pandemic influenza virus infected mice. The results showed that induction of acute allergic airway inflammation in pre-existing influenza virus infection had additive effects on exacerbation of lung pathology, which mirrors findings in human epidemiological studies. In contrast, pre-existing allergic airway inflammation protected from subsequent influenza virus infection, which was compatible with those of previous murine models of influenza virus infection in asthmatic mice. These variable outcomes of this murine model indicate that the temporal relation between allergic airway inflammation and influenza virus infection might play a critical role in asthma and influenza comorbidity. Thus, this murine model will further our understanding of how influenza virus infection affects an

  10. Lung Function, Airway Inflammation, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Exposure in Mexican Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Escamilla-Nuñez, Maria Consuelo; Schilmann, Astrid; Hernandez-Cadena, Leticia; Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Sjödin, Andreas; Del Río-Navarro, Blanca Estela; Díaz-Sanchez, David; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Sly, Peter; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with lung function and pH of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in Mexican schoolchildren. Methods A pilot study was performed in a subsample of 64 schoolchildren from Mexico City. Lung function and pH of EBC were measured and metabolites of PAHs in urine samples were determined. The association was analyzed using robust regression models. Results A 10% increase in the concentrations of 2-hydroxyfluorene was significantly negatively associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (−11.2 mL, 95% CI: −22.2 to −0.02), forced vital capacity (−11.6 mL, 95% CI: −22.9 to −0.2), and pH of EBC (−0.035, 95% CI: −0.066 to −0.005). Conclusion Biomarkers of PAHs exposure were inversely associated with lung function and decrease of ph of EBC as a marker of airway inflammation in Mexican schoolchildren. PMID:24500378

  11. Immune Response to Tissue Restricted Self-Antigens Induces Airway Inflammation and Fibrosis Following Murine Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, V.; Ramachandran, S.; Banan, B.; Bharat, A.; Wang, X.; Benshoff, N.; Kreisel, D.; Gelman, A. E.; Mohanakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses against lung-associated self-antigens (self-Ags) are hypothesized to play a role in the development of chronic lung graft rejection. We determined whether immune responses to lung self-Ags, K-alpha-1-tubulin (Kα1T) and Collagen V (Col-V) in the absence of alloimmunity, could promote airway inflammation and fibrosis. Following syngeneic murine orthotopic lung transplantation (LTx) we administered antibodies (Abs) to either Kα1T or Col-V or in combination to both of these self-Ags. As compared to recipients of isotype control Abs Kα1T Abs and/or Col-V Abs-treated recipients had marked lung graft cellular infiltration and bronchiolar fibrosis, This inflammation was also associated the accumulation of Kα1T and Col-V specific IFN-γ+ and IL-17+ T cells. Notably, the administration of Abs to Kα1T led to cellular and humoral immune responses to Col-V prior to development of fibrosis, and vice versa, indicating that epitope spreading can occur rapidly in an alloantigen independent manner. Collectively, these data support a model of chronic lung transplant rejection where the progressive loss of self-tolerance through epitope spreading promotes airway fibrosis. Strategies that target autoreactive Abs may be useful to inhibit chronic rejection of lung grafts. PMID:25220332

  12. Air Pollution, Airway Inflammation, and Lung Function in a Cohort Study of Mexico City Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Sunyer, Jordi; Hernandez-Cadena, Leticia; Escamilla-Nuñez, Maria Consuelo; Sienra-Monge, Juan Jose; Ramírez-Aguilar, Matiana; Cortez-Lugo, Marlene; Holguin, Fernando; Diaz-Sánchez, David; Olin, Anna Carin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    Background The biological mechanisms involved in inflammatory response to air pollution are not clearly understood. Objective In this study we assessed the association of short-term air pollutant exposure with inflammatory markers and lung function. Methods We studied a cohort of 158 asthmatic and 50 nonasthmatic school-age children, followed an average of 22 weeks. We conducted spirometric tests, measurements of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), interleukin-8 (IL-8) in nasal lavage, and pH of exhaled breath condensate every 15 days during follow-up. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. Results An increase of 17.5 μg/m3 in the 8-hr moving average of PM2.5 levels (interquartile range) was associated with a 1.08-ppb increase in FeNO [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01–1.16] and a 1.07-pg/mL increase in IL-8 (95% CI 0.98–1.19) in asthmatic children and a 1.16 pg/ml increase in IL-8 (95% CI, 1.00–1.36) in nonasthmatic children. The 5-day accumulated average of exposure to particulate matter < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diamter (PM2.5) was significantly inversely associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) (p = 0.048) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (p = 0.012) in asthmatic children and with FVC (p = 0.021) in nonasthmatic children. FeNO and FEV1 were inversely associated (p = 0.005) in asthmatic children. Conclusions Exposure to PM2.5 resulted in acute airway inflammation and decrease in lung function in both asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. PMID:18560490

  13. Oxidative stress and inflammation in the normal airways and blood of patients with lung cancer and COPD.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Fermoselle, Clara; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Sánchez-Font, Albert; Pijuan, Lara; Gea, Joaquim; Curull, Víctor

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with a greater risk for lung cancer (LC). Oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in LC pathophysiology. Studies conducted so far have focused solely on lung tumor parenchyma and not the airways. We explored levels of local and systemic oxidative stress and inflammation within normal bronchial epithelium and blood of patients with lung cancer (n=52), with and without COPD, and in control subjects (COPD and non-COPD, n=21). In normal bronchial epithelium specimens (bronchoscopy) and blood from patients with similar smoking history (LC-COPD and LC) and control subjects (both COPD and non-COPD), redox balance and inflammatory markers were measured (ELISA and immunoblotting). All subjects were clinically evaluated. Absence of malignant cells within the bronchial specimens was always pathologically confirmed. Bronchial levels of protein carbonylation, MDA-protein adducts, antioxidants, TNF-α, interferon-γ, TGF-β, and VEGF and blood levels of superoxide anion, oxidatively damaged DNA and proteins, TNF-α, interferon-γ, TGF-β, VEGF, and neutrophils were significantly greater in all LC patients compared to control subjects. Systemic levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, superoxide anion, and TNF-α and bronchial levels of TGF-β and TNF-α showed high sensitivity and specificity for LC among patients. Regardless of the presence of an underlying respiratory condition (COPD), protein oxidation, oxidatively damaged DNA, and inflammation were remarkably increased in the normal airways and blood of patients with LC. Furthermore, the potential predictive value for LC development of these molecular events warrants attention and should be explored in future larger longitudinal studies.

  14. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M; Fodah, Ramy A; Warawa, Jonathan M; Hoyle, Gary W

    2015-01-15

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium.

  15. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M.; Fodah, Ramy A.; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium. PMID:25398987

  16. Antigen-specific Treg regulate Th17-mediated lung neutrophilic inflammation, B cell recruitment and polymeric IgA and IgM levels in the airways

    PubMed Central

    Jaffar, Zeina; Ferrini, Maria E.; Girtsman, Teri A.; Roberts, Kevan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Th17 cells play key roles in mediating autoimmunity, inflammation and mucosal host defense against pathogens. To determine whether naturally occurring Treg (nTreg) limit Th17-mediated pulmonary inflammation, OVA-specific CD4+ Th17 cells and expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ nTreg were cotransferred into BALB/c mice that were then exposed to OVA aerosols. Th17 cells, when transferred alone, accumulated in the lungs and posterior mediastinal LN and evoked a pronounced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and neutrophilic inflammation, characterized by B cell recruitment and elevated IgA and IgM levels. Cotransfer of antigen-specific nTreg markedly reduced the Th17-induced pulmonary inflammation and associated neutrophilia, B cell influx and polymeric Ig levels in the airways, but did not inhibit AHR. Moreover, the regulation appeared restricted to the site of mucosal inflammation, since transfer of nTreg did not affect the Th17 response developing in the lung draining LN, as evidenced by unaltered levels of IL-17 production and low numbers of Foxp3+ Treg. Our findings suggest a crucial role for Th17 cells in mediating airway B cell influx and IgA response and demonstrate that antigen-specific nTreg suppress Th17-mediated lung inflammation. These results provide new insights into how Th17 responses are limited and may facilitate development of novel approaches for controlling Th17-induced inflammation. PMID:19830731

  17. X-Ray based Lung Function measurement–a sensitive technique to quantify lung function in allergic airway inflammation mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Dullin, C.; Markus, M. A.; Larsson, E.; Tromba, G.; Hülsmann, S.; Alves, F.

    2016-01-01

    In mice, along with the assessment of eosinophils, lung function measurements, most commonly carried out by plethysmography, are essential to monitor the course of allergic airway inflammation, to examine therapy efficacy and to correlate animal with patient data. To date, plethysmography techniques either use intubation and/or restraining of the mice and are thus invasive, or are limited in their sensitivity. We present a novel unrestrained lung function method based on low-dose planar cinematic x-ray imaging (X-Ray Lung Function, XLF) and demonstrate its performance in monitoring OVA induced experimental allergic airway inflammation in mice and an improved assessment of the efficacy of the common treatment dexamethasone. We further show that XLF is more sensitive than unrestrained whole body plethysmography (UWBP) and that conventional broncho-alveolar lavage and histology provide only limited information of the efficacy of a treatment when compared to XLF. Our results highlight the fact that a multi-parametric imaging approach as delivered by XLF is needed to address the combined cellular, anatomical and functional effects that occur during the course of asthma and in response to therapy. PMID:27805632

  18. X-Ray based Lung Function measurement-a sensitive technique to quantify lung function in allergic airway inflammation mouse models.

    PubMed

    Dullin, C; Markus, M A; Larsson, E; Tromba, G; Hülsmann, S; Alves, F

    2016-11-02

    In mice, along with the assessment of eosinophils, lung function measurements, most commonly carried out by plethysmography, are essential to monitor the course of allergic airway inflammation, to examine therapy efficacy and to correlate animal with patient data. To date, plethysmography techniques either use intubation and/or restraining of the mice and are thus invasive, or are limited in their sensitivity. We present a novel unrestrained lung function method based on low-dose planar cinematic x-ray imaging (X-Ray Lung Function, XLF) and demonstrate its performance in monitoring OVA induced experimental allergic airway inflammation in mice and an improved assessment of the efficacy of the common treatment dexamethasone. We further show that XLF is more sensitive than unrestrained whole body plethysmography (UWBP) and that conventional broncho-alveolar lavage and histology provide only limited information of the efficacy of a treatment when compared to XLF. Our results highlight the fact that a multi-parametric imaging approach as delivered by XLF is needed to address the combined cellular, anatomical and functional effects that occur during the course of asthma and in response to therapy.

  19. X-Ray based Lung Function measurement–a sensitive technique to quantify lung function in allergic airway inflammation mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullin, C.; Markus, M. A.; Larsson, E.; Tromba, G.; Hülsmann, S.; Alves, F.

    2016-11-01

    In mice, along with the assessment of eosinophils, lung function measurements, most commonly carried out by plethysmography, are essential to monitor the course of allergic airway inflammation, to examine therapy efficacy and to correlate animal with patient data. To date, plethysmography techniques either use intubation and/or restraining of the mice and are thus invasive, or are limited in their sensitivity. We present a novel unrestrained lung function method based on low-dose planar cinematic x-ray imaging (X-Ray Lung Function, XLF) and demonstrate its performance in monitoring OVA induced experimental allergic airway inflammation in mice and an improved assessment of the efficacy of the common treatment dexamethasone. We further show that XLF is more sensitive than unrestrained whole body plethysmography (UWBP) and that conventional broncho-alveolar lavage and histology provide only limited information of the efficacy of a treatment when compared to XLF. Our results highlight the fact that a multi-parametric imaging approach as delivered by XLF is needed to address the combined cellular, anatomical and functional effects that occur during the course of asthma and in response to therapy.

  20. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  1. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits.

  2. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  3. Air pollution, airway inflammation and lung function in Mexico City school children

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The biological mechanisms involved in inflammatory response to air pollution are not clearly understood. OBJECTIVE: In this study we assessed the association of short-term air pollutant exposure with inflammatory markers and lung function. METHODS: We studied a cohort...

  4. Maternal exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke primes the lung for induction of phosphodiesterase-4D5 isozyme and exacerbated Th2 responses: rolipram attenuates the airway hyperreactivity and muscarinic receptor expression but not lung inflammation and atopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi P; Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-Sima-Ah, Jules; Campen, Mathew; Kurup, Viswanath; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2009-08-01

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR), lung inflammation, and atopy are clinical signs of allergic asthma. Gestational exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) markedly increases the risk for childhood allergic asthma. Muscarinic receptors regulate airway smooth muscle tone, and asthmatics exhibit increased AHR to muscarinic agonists. We have previously reported that in a murine model of bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, maternal exposure to mainstream CS increases AHR after acute intratracheal administration of Aspergillus fumigatus extract. However, the mechanism by which gestational CS induces allergic asthma is unclear. We now show for the first time that, compared with controls, mice exposed prenatally to secondhand CS exhibit increased lung inflammation (predominant infiltration by eosinophils and polymorphs), atopy, and airway resistance, and produce proinflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-13, but not IL-2 or IFN-gamma). These changes, which occur only after an allergen (A. fumigatus extract) treatment, are correlated with marked up-regulated lung expression of M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptors and phosphodiesterase (PDE)4D5 isozyme. Interestingly, the PDE4-selective inhibitor rolipram attenuates the increase in AHR, muscarinic receptors, and PDE4D5, but fails to down-regulate lung inflammation, Th2 cytokines, or serum IgE levels. Thus, the fetus is extraordinarily sensitive to CS, inducing allergic asthma after postnatal exposure to allergens. Although the increased AHR might reflect increased PDE4D5 and muscarinic receptor expression, the mechanisms underlying atopy and lung inflammation are unrelated to the PDE4 activity. Thus, PDE4 inhibitors might ease AHR, but are unlikely to attenuate lung inflammation and atopy associated with childhood allergic asthma.

  5. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  6. Sensory nerves in lung and airways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Yu, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves innervating the lung and airways play an important role in regulating various cardiopulmonary functions and maintaining homeostasis under both healthy and disease conditions. Their activities conducted by both vagal and sympathetic afferents are also responsible for eliciting important defense reflexes that protect the lung and body from potential health-hazardous effects of airborne particulates and chemical irritants. This article reviews the morphology, transduction properties, reflex functions, and respiratory sensations of these receptors, focusing primarily on recent findings derived from using new technologies such as neural immunochemistry, isolated airway-nerve preparation, cultured airway neurons, patch-clamp electrophysiology, transgenic mice, and other cellular and molecular approaches. Studies of the signal transduction of mechanosensitive afferents have revealed a new concept of sensory unit and cellular mechanism of activation, and identified additional types of sensory receptors in the lung. Chemosensitive properties of these lung afferents are further characterized by the expression of specific ligand-gated ion channels on nerve terminals, ganglion origin, and responses to the action of various inflammatory cells, mediators, and cytokines during acute and chronic airway inflammation and injuries. Increasing interest and extensive investigations have been focused on uncovering the mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity of these airway afferents, and their role in the manifestation of various symptoms under pathophysiological conditions. Several important and challenging questions regarding these sensory nerves are discussed. Searching for these answers will be a critical step in developing the translational research and effective treatments of airway diseases.

  7. Production of interleukin (IL)-33 in the lungs during multiple antigen challenge-induced airway inflammation in mice, and its modulation by a glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Nabe, Takeshi; Wakamori, Hiroki; Yano, Chihiro; Nishiguchi, Ayumi; Yuasa, Rino; Kido, Hitomi; Tomiyama, Yusaku; Tomoda, Ayumi; Kida, Haruka; Takiguchi, Anna; Matsuda, Masaya; Ishihara, Keiichi; Akiba, Satoshi; Ohya, Susumu; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Shin

    2015-06-15

    Although interleukin (IL)-33 is a candidate aggravator of asthma, the cellular sources of IL-33 in the lungs during the progression of antigen-induced airway inflammation remain unclear. Furthermore, it has not been determined whether the antigen-induced production of IL-33 can be pharmacologically modulated in vivo. In this study, we examined the production of IL-33 in the lungs of sensitized mice during multiple intratracheal challenges with the antigen, ovalbumin. The 1st challenge clearly induced the IL-33 production in the lungs, and it was enhanced by the 2nd-4th challenges. IL-33 mRNA transcription was also induced after these challenges. An immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the cellular sources of IL-33 after the 1st challenge were mainly bronchial epithelial cells, while those after the 3rd challenge were not only the epithelial cells, but also inflammatory cells that infiltrated the lungs. Flow cytometric analyses indicated that approximately 20% and 10% of the IL-33-producing cells in the lungs were M2 macrophages and conventional dendritic cells, respectively. A systemic treatment with dexamethasone before the 1st challenge potently suppressed the IL-33 production. When dexamethasone was administered before the respective challenges, production of the IL-33 protein and the infiltration of IL-33-producing M2 macrophages and dendritic cells into the lungs in the 3rd challenge were also suppressed. In conclusion, the cellular sources of IL-33 in the lungs were dynamically altered during multiple challenges: not only bronchial epithelial cells, but also the M2 macrophages and dendritic cells that infiltrated the lungs produced IL-33. The production of IL-33 was susceptible to the glucocorticoid treatment.

  8. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  9. Glutathione redox regulates airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoko; Hisada, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Yasuo; Ono, Akihiro; Murata, Yukie; Hamuro, Junji; Mori, Masatomo; Dobashi, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer. We have shown that glutathione redox status, which is the balance between intracellular reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, in antigen-presenting cells (APC) regulates the helper T cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance due to the production of IL-12. Bronchial asthma is a typical Th2 disease. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines are characteristic of asthma and trigger off an inflammation. Accordingly, we studied the effects of the intracellular glutathione redox status on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergen-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We used gamma-Glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, to elevate the intracellular GSH level and GSH/GSSG ratio of mice. In vitro, gamma-GCE pretreatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced IL-12(p70) production induced by LPS. In the mouse asthma model, intraperitoneal injection of gamma-GCE elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio of lung tissue and reduced AHR. gamma-GCE reduced levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and the chemokines eotaxin and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas it enhanced the production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma. Histologically, gamma-GCE suppressed eosinophils infiltration. Interestingly, we also found that gamma-GCE directly inhibited chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis without affecting eotaxin receptor chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) expressions. Taken together, these findings suggest that changing glutathione redox balance, increase in GSH level, and the GSH/GSSG ratio by gamma-GCE, ameliorate bronchial asthma by altering the Th1/Th2 imbalance through IL-12 production from APC and suppressing chemokine production and eosinophil migration itself.

  10. Early pulmonary inflammation and lung damage in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer progressive airway inflammation, infection and lung damage. Airway inflammation and infection are present from early in life, often before children are symptomatic. CF gene mutations cause changes in the CF transmembrane regulator protein that result in an aberrant airway microenvironment including airway surface liquid (ASL) dehydration, reduced ASL acidity, altered airway mucin and a dysregulated inflammatory response. This review discusses how an altered microenvironment drives CF lung disease before overt airway infection, the response of the CF airway to early infection, and methods to prevent inflammation and early lung disease.

  11. Role of Chitinase 3-Like-1 in Interleukin-18-Induced Pulmonary Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Inflammation; Alveolar Destruction; and Airway Fibrosis in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Jong; Yoon, Chang Min; Nam, Milang; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Je-Min; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1), which is also called YKL-40 in humans and BRP-39 in mice, is the prototypic chitinase-like protein. Recent studies have highlighted its impressive ability to regulate the nature of tissue inflammation and the magnitude of tissue injury and fibroproliferative repair. This can be appreciated in studies that highlight its induction after cigarette smoke exposure, during which it inhibits alveolar destruction and the genesis of pulmonary emphysema. IL-18 is also known to be induced and activated by cigarette smoke, and, in murine models, the IL-18 pathway has been shown to be necessary and sufficient to generate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-like inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue destruction. However, the relationship between Chi3l1 and IL-18 has not been defined. To address this issue we characterized the expression of Chi3l1/BRP-39 in control and lung-targeted IL-18 transgenic mice. We also characterized the effects of transgenic IL-18 in mice with wild-type and null Chi3l1 loci. The former studies demonstrated that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1/BRP-39 and that this stimulation is mediated via IFN-γ-, IL-13-, and IL-17A-dependent mechanisms. The latter studies demonstrated that, in the absence of Chi3l1/BRP-39, IL-18 induced type 2 and type 17 inflammation and fibrotic airway remodeling were significantly ameliorated, whereas type 1 inflammation, emphysematous alveolar destruction, and the expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte perforin, granzyme, and retinoic acid early transcript 1 expression were enhanced. These studies demonstrate that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1 and that Chi3l1 is an important mediator of IL-18-induced inflammatory, fibrotic, alveolar remodeling, and cytotoxic responses.

  12. Distal airway dysfunction identifies pulmonary inflammation in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Kenneth I.; Pradhan, Deepak R.; Goldring, Roberta M.; Oppenheimer, Beno W.; Rom, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking induced inflammation leads to distal airway destruction. However, the relationship between distal airway dysfunction and inflammation remains unclear, particularly in smokers prior to the development of airway obstruction. Seven normal controls and 16 smokers without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were studied. Respiratory function was assessed using the forced oscillation technique (FOT). Abnormal FOT was defined as elevated resistance at 5 Hz (R5). Parameters reflecting distal lung function included frequency dependence of resistance (R5–20) and dynamic elastance (X5). Inflammation was quantified in concentrated bronchoalveolar lavage utilising cell count differential and cytokines expressed as concentration per mL epithelial lining fluid. All control subjects and seven smokers had normal R5. Nine smokers had elevated R5 with abnormal R5–20 and X5, indicating distal lung dysfunction. The presence of abnormal FOT was associated with two-fold higher lymphocyte and neutrophil counts (p<0.025) and with higher interleukin (IL)-8, eotaxin and fractalkine levels (p<0.01). Reactivity of R5–20 and X5 correlated with levels of IL-8, eotaxin, fractalkine, IL-12p70 and transforming growth factor-α (r>0.47, p<0.01). Distal airway dysfunction in smokers without COPD identifies the presence of distal lung inflammation that parallel reported observations in established COPD. These findings were not evident on routine pulmonary function testing and may allow the identification of smokers at risk of progression to COPD. PMID:27995132

  13. Distal airway dysfunction identifies pulmonary inflammation in asymptomatic smokers.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kenneth I; Pradhan, Deepak R; Goldring, Roberta M; Oppenheimer, Beno W; Rom, William N; Segal, Leopoldo N

    2016-10-01

    Smoking induced inflammation leads to distal airway destruction. However, the relationship between distal airway dysfunction and inflammation remains unclear, particularly in smokers prior to the development of airway obstruction. Seven normal controls and 16 smokers without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were studied. Respiratory function was assessed using the forced oscillation technique (FOT). Abnormal FOT was defined as elevated resistance at 5 Hz (R5). Parameters reflecting distal lung function included frequency dependence of resistance (R5-20) and dynamic elastance (X5). Inflammation was quantified in concentrated bronchoalveolar lavage utilising cell count differential and cytokines expressed as concentration per mL epithelial lining fluid. All control subjects and seven smokers had normal R5. Nine smokers had elevated R5 with abnormal R5-20 and X5, indicating distal lung dysfunction. The presence of abnormal FOT was associated with two-fold higher lymphocyte and neutrophil counts (p<0.025) and with higher interleukin (IL)-8, eotaxin and fractalkine levels (p<0.01). Reactivity of R5-20 and X5 correlated with levels of IL-8, eotaxin, fractalkine, IL-12p70 and transforming growth factor-α (r>0.47, p<0.01). Distal airway dysfunction in smokers without COPD identifies the presence of distal lung inflammation that parallel reported observations in established COPD. These findings were not evident on routine pulmonary function testing and may allow the identification of smokers at risk of progression to COPD.

  14. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  15. Corticosteroids and cromolyn sodium as modulators of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    McFadden, E R

    1988-07-01

    Heightened airway reactivity is a cardinal feature of asthma and correlates with many clinical features of the illness, such as the acute response to bronchodilator drugs, the magnitude of diurnal fluctuations in lung function, and the amount of therapy required to control symptoms. Data have accumulated indicating that a reduction in airway reactivity can decrease asthma morbidity, and many advocate treating asthmatic patients prophylactically to prevent acute exacerbations from developing, rather than responding to them after they have occurred. This approach is particularly effective if it is used when the airways are being exposed to stimuli to which they are sensitive. A number of drugs have been purported to reduce airway reactivity, but the most convincing evidence supports the effects of cromolyn and inhaled and oral steroids. Although each type of drug has its own advantages and disadvantages and different modes of action, the common denominator is believed to be a reduction in the state of airway inflammation.

  16. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ting; Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xue; Pang, Caishuang; Zhang, Junlong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Tao; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) participate in inflammation and tissue remolding in various diseases, but their roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate if PAI-1 and suPAR were involved in systemic inflammation and small airway obstruction (SAO) in COPD. Methods Demographic and clinical characteristics, spirometry examination, and blood samples were obtained from 84 COPD patients and 51 healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of PAI-1, suPAR, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected with Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay. Differences between groups were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or chi-square test. Pearson’s partial correlation test (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette status, and passive smoke exposure) and multivariable linear analysis were used to explore the relationships between circulating PAI-1 and indicators of COPD. Results First, we found that serum PAI-1 levels but not suPAR levels were significantly increased in COPD patients compared with healthy volunteers (125.56±51.74 ng/mL versus 102.98±36.62 ng/mL, P=0.007). Then, the correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), FEV1/Pre (justified r=−0.308, P<0.001; justified r=−0.295, P=0.001, respectively) and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=−0.289, P=0.001; justified r=−0.273, P=0.002, respectively), but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001), the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively). Besides, multivariable

  17. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  18. Syk Regulates Neutrophilic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness in a Chronic Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen; Scott, Jeremy A.; Chow, Chung-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR), reversible airway obstruction, and airway inflammation and remodeling. We previously showed that Syk modulates methacholine-induced airways contractility in naïve mice and in mice with allergic airways inflammation. We hypothesize that Syk plays a role in the pathogenesis of AHR; this was evaluated in a chronic 8-week mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airways inflammation. Methods We used the Sykflox/flox//rosa26CreERT2 conditional Syk knock-out mice to assess the role of Syk prior to HDM exposure, and treated HDM-sensitized mice with the Syk inhibitor, GSK143, to evaluate its role in established allergic airways inflammation. Respiratory mechanics and methacholine (MCh)-responsiveness were assessed using the flexiVent® system. Lungs underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to isolate inflammatory cells or were frozen for determination of gene expression in tissues. Results MCh-induced AHR was observed following HDM sensitization in the Syk-intact (Sykflox/flox) and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. MCh responsiveness was reduced to control levels in HDM-sensitized Sykdel/del mice and in BALB/c and Sykflox/flox mice treated with GSK143. Both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice mounted appropriate immune responses to HDM, with HDM-specific IgE levels that were comparable to Sykflox/flox and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. HDM-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice, due primarily to decreased neutrophil recruitment. Gene expression analysis of lung tissues revealed that HDM-induced expression of IL-17 and CXCL-1 was significantly attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice. Conclusion Syk inhibitors may play a role in the management of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:28107345

  19. The Lung Microbiome and Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated relationships between the composition of the airway microbiota (mixed-species communities of microbes that exist in the respiratory tract) and critical features of immune response and pulmonary function. These studies provide evidence that airway inflammatory status and capacity for repair are coassociated with specific taxonomic features of the airway microbiome. Although directionality has yet to be established, the fact that microbes are known drivers of inflammation and tissue damage suggests that in the context of chronic inflammatory airway disease, the composition and, more importantly, the function, of the pulmonary microbiome represent critical factors in defining airway disease outcomes.

  20. The extract of Cordyceps sinensis inhibited airway inflammation by blocking NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ya-Ling; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2012-06-01

    Aiming the extract of Cordyceps sinensis significantly inhibits airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and the infiltration of eosinophils in the airway of rats and may be related to the modulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th2 cells functions. The mechanisms of C. sinensis involved in modulation of suppression inflammation are not yet determined. In this study, the mechanism involved in the extract of C. sinensis-C.S.3-modulated suppression of inflammation was investigated in vivo and in vitro systems. The results showed that C.S.3 reduced airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice. Furthermore, we found C.S.3 could decrease extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway to suppress activity of nuclear factor-κB in lung cells and cultured airway smooth muscle cells. Conclusion C.S.3 may provide clinical applications for asthma in the future.

  1. Cutting edge: STAT6 signaling in eosinophils is necessary for development of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Kindra; LaMarche, Nelson M; Islam, Nasif; Wood, Amie; Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2015-03-15

    Eosinophils are critical cellular mediators in allergic asthma and inflammation; however, the signals that regulate their functions are unclear. The transcription factor STAT6 regulates Th2 cytokine responses, acting downstream of IL-4 and IL-13. We showed previously that eosinophil-derived IL-13 plays an important role in the recruitment of T cells to the lung and the subsequent development of allergic asthma. However, whether eosinophils respond to Th2 signals to control allergic airway inflammation is unclear. In this report, we show that STAT6(-/-) eosinophils are unable to induce the development of allergic lung inflammation, including recruitment of CD4(+) T cells, mucus production, and development of airways hyperresponsiveness. This is likely due to the reduced migration of STAT6(-/-) eosinophils to the lung and in response to eotaxin. These data indicate that, like Th cells, eosinophils need to respond to Th2 cytokines via STAT6 during the development of allergic airway inflammation.

  2. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4+ or CD8+ cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3DTR mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma. PMID:27633092

  3. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-09-16

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4(+) or CD8(+) cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3(DTR) mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma.

  4. Airway inflammation in aluminium potroom asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sjaheim, T; Halstensen, T; Lund, M; Bjortuft, O; Drablos, P; Malterud, D; Kongerud, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine whether asthma induced by exposure to aluminium potroom emissions (potroom asthma) is associated with inflammatory changes in the airways. Methods: Bronchial biopsy specimens from 20 asthmatic workers (8 non-smokers and 12 smokers), 15 healthy workers (8 non-smokers and 7 smokers), and 10 non-exposed controls (all non-smokers) were analysed. Immunohistofluorescent staining was performed to identify mucosal total leucocytes (CD45+ leucocytes), neutrophils, and mast cells. Results: Median RBM thickness was significantly increased in both asthmatic workers (8.2 µm) and healthy workers (7.4 µm) compared to non-exposed controls (6.7 µm). Non-smoking asthmatic workers had significantly increased median density of lamina propria CD45+ leucocytes (1519 cells/mm2v 660 and 887 cells/mm2) and eosinophils (27 cells/mm2v 10 and 3 cells/mm2) and significantly increased concentrations of exhaled NO (18.1 ppb v 6.5 and 5.1 ppb) compared to non-smoking healthy workers and non-exposed controls. Leucocyte counts and exhaled NO concentrations varied with smoking habits and fewer leucocytes were observed in asthmatic smokers than in non-smokers Asthmatic smokers had significantly increased numbers of eosinophils in lamina propria compared to non-exposed controls (10 v 3 cells/mm2). Both eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic phenotypes of asthma were recognised in the potroom workers and signs of airway inflammation were also observed in healthy workers. Conclusions: Airway inflammation is a central feature of potroom asthma and exposure to potroom emissions induces pathological alterations similar to those described in other types of asthma. Cigarette smoking seems to affect the underlying mechanisms involved in asthma, as the cellular composition of airway mucosa appears different in asthmatic smokers and non-smokers. PMID:15317920

  5. Integrated Innate Mechanisms Involved in Airway Allergic Inflammation to the Serine Protease Subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Florsheim, Esther; Yu, Shuang; Bragatto, Ivan; Faustino, Lucas; Gomes, Eliane; Ramos, Rodrigo N.; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are recognized environmental allergens, but little is known about the mechanisms responsible for sensing enzyme activity and initiating the development of allergic inflammation. Because usage of the serine protease subtilisin in the detergent industry resulted in an outbreak of occupational asthma in workers, we sought to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation to subtilisin and to determine the immunological mechanisms involved in type 2 responses. By using a mouse model of allergic airway disease, we have defined here that subcutaneous or intranasal sensitization followed by airway challenge to subtilisin induces prototypic allergic lung inflammation, characterized by airway eosinophilia, type 2 cytokines release, mucus production, high levels of serum IgE, and airway reactivity. These allergic responses were dependent on subtilisin protease activity, protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, IL-33 receptor ST2, and MyD88 signaling. Also, subtilisin stimulated the expression of the pro-allergic cytokines IL-1α, IL-33, TSLP, and the growth factor amphiregulin in a human bronchial epithelial cell line. Notably, acute administration of subtilisin into the airways increased lung IL-5-producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells, which required PAR-2 expression. Finally, subtilisin activity acted as a Th2 adjuvant to an unrelated airborne antigen promoting allergic inflammation to inhaled OVA. Therefore, we established a murine model of occupational asthma to a serine protease and characterized the main molecular pathways involved in allergic sensitization to subtilisin that potentially contribute to initiate allergic airway disease. PMID:25876764

  6. Cyclooxygenase-1 overexpression decreases Basal airway responsiveness but not allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Carey, Michelle A; Bradbury, J Alyce; Graves, Joan P; Lih, Fred B; Moorman, Michael P; Morgan, Daniel L; DeGraff, Laura M; Zhao, Yun; Foley, Julie F; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2006-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibition or genetic disruption of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or COX-2 exacerbates the inflammatory and functional responses of the lung to environmentally relevant stimuli. To further examine the contribution of COX-derived eicosanoids to basal lung function and to allergic lung inflammation, transgenic (Tr) mice were generated in which overexpression of human COX-1 was targeted to airway epithelium. Although no differences in basal respiratory or lung mechanical parameters were observed, COX-1 Tr mice had increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid PGE(2) content compared with wild-type littermates (23.0 +/- 3.6 vs 8.4 +/- 1.4 pg/ml; p < 0.05) and exhibited decreased airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine. In an OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation model, comparable up-regulation of COX-2 protein was observed in the lungs of allergic wild-type and COX-1 Tr mice. Furthermore, no genotype differences were observed in allergic mice in total cell number, eosinophil content (70 vs 76% of total cells, respectively), and inflammatory cytokine content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, or in airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (p > 0.05). To eliminate the presumed confounding effects of COX-2 up-regulation, COX-1 Tr mice were bred into a COX-2 null background. In these mice, the presence of the COX-1 transgene did not alter allergen-induced inflammation but significantly attenuated allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, coincident with reduced airway leukotriene levels. Collectively, these data indicate that COX-1 overexpression attenuates airway responsiveness under basal conditions but does not influence allergic airway inflammation.

  7. Intradermal cytosine-phosphate-guanosine treatment reduces lung inflammation but induces IFN-γ-mediated airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of natural rubber latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Haapakoski, Rita; Karisola, Piia; Fyhrquist, Nanna; Savinko, Terhi; Wolff, Henrik; Turjanmaa, Kristiina; Palosuo, Timo; Reunala, Timo; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2011-05-01

    Asthma and other allergic diseases are continuously increasing, causing considerable economic and sociologic burden to society. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that lack of microbial T helper (Th) 1-like stimulation during early childhood leads to increased Th2-driven allergic disorders later in life. Immunostimulatory cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG)-oligodeoxynucleotide motifs are candidate molecules for immunotherapeutic studies, as they have been shown to shift the Th2 response toward the Th1 direction and reduce allergic symptoms. Using natural rubber latex (NRL)-induced murine model of asthma, we demonstrated that intradermal CpG administration with allergen reduced pulmonary eosinophilia, mucus production, and Th2-type cytokines, but unexpectedly induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to inhaled methacholine, one of the hallmarks of asthma. We found that induction in AHR was dependent on STAT4, but independent of STAT6 signaling. CpG treatment increased production of IFN-γ in the airways and shifted the ratio of CD4(+):CD8(+) T cells toward CD8(+) dominance. By blocking soluble IFN-γ with neutralizing antibody, AHR diminished and the CD4(+):CD8(+) ratio returned to CD4(+) dominance. These results indicate that increased production of IFN-γ in the lungs may lead to severe side effects, such as enhancement of bronchial hyperreactivity to inhaled allergen. This finding should be taken into consideration when planning prophylaxis treatment of asthma with intradermal CpG injections.

  8. CpG in combination with an inhibitor of Notch signaling suppresses FI-RSV-enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation through inhibiting Th17 memory responses and promoting tissue resident memory cells in lungs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Hongyong; Hai, Yan; Yin, Wei; Li, Wenjian; Zheng, Boyang; Du, Xiaomin; Li, Na; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Deng, Yuqing; Zeng, Ruihong; Wei, Lin

    2017-03-08

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of childhood hospitalizations. The formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccine enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) has been an obstacle to the development of a safe and effective killed RSV vaccine. Agonists of Toll-like receptor (TLR) have been shown to regulate immune responses induced by FI-RSV. Notch signaling plays critical roles during the differentiation and effector function phases of innate and adaptive immune responses. Cross-talk between TLR and Notch signaling pathways results in fine tuning of TLR-triggered innate inflammatory responses. We evaluated the impact of TLR and Notch signaling on ERD in a murine model by administering CpG, an agonist of TLR9, in combination with L685,458, an inhibitor of Notch signaling during FI-RSV immunization. Activation with CpG or deficiency of MyD88-dependent TLR signaling did not alleviate airway inflammation in FI-RSV-immunized mice. Activation or inhibition of Notch signaling with Dll4 or L685,458 did not suppress FI-RSV enhanced airway inflammation either. However, the CpG together with L685,458 markedly inhibited FI-RSV-enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness, weight loss, and lung inflammation. Interestingly, CpG+L685,458 completely inhibited FI-RSV associated Th17, and Th17-associated proinflammatory chemokine responses in lungs following RSV challenge, but not Th1 or Th2, memory responses. In addition, FI-RSV+CpG+L685,458 promoted protective CD8(+) lung tissue-resident memory cells (TRM). These results indicate that activation of TLR signaling combined with inhibition of Notch signaling prevent FI-RSV ERD, and the mechanism appears to involve suppressing proinflammatory Th17 memory responses and promoting protective TRM in lungs.IMPORTANCE RSV is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. The FI-RSV enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) is a major impediment to the development of a safe and effective killed RSV vaccine. Using

  9. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  10. Gut dysbiosis promotes M2 macrophage polarization and allergic airway inflammation via fungi-induced PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Gi; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Totsuka, Naoya; Weinberg, Jason B; Núñez, Gabriel; Shibuya, Akira

    2014-01-15

    Although imbalances in gut microbiota composition, or "dysbiosis," are associated with many diseases, the effects of gut dysbiosis on host systemic physiology are less well characterized. We report that gut dysbiosis induced by antibiotic (Abx) treatment promotes allergic airway inflammation by shifting macrophage polarization in the lung toward the alternatively activated M2 phenotype. Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages derived from Abx-treated mice was sufficient to increase allergic airway inflammation. Abx treatment resulted in the overgrowth of a commensal fungal Candida species in the gut and increased plasma concentrations of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂), which induced M2 macrophage polarization in the lung. Suppression of PGE₂ synthesis by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and celecoxib suppressed M2 macrophage polarization and decreased allergic airway inflammatory cell infiltration in Abx-treated mice. Thus, Abx treatment can cause overgrowth of particular fungal species in the gut and promote M2 macrophage activation at distant sites to influence systemic responses including allergic inflammation.

  11. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease.

  12. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  13. Inflammation Promotes Airway Epithelial ATP Release via Calcium-Dependent Vesicular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Seiko F.; Ribeiro, Carla M. P.; Sesma, Juliana I.; Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Abdullah, Lubna H.; van Heusden, Catharina; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.

    2013-01-01

    ATP in airway surface liquid (ASL) controls mucociliary clearance functions via the activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. However, abnormally elevated ATP levels have been reported in inflamed airways, suggesting that excessive ATP in ASL contributes to airway inflammation. Despite these observations, little is known about the mechanisms of ATP accumulation in the ASL covering inflamed airways. In this study, links between cystic fibrosis (CF)–associated airway inflammation and airway epithelial ATP release were investigated. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells isolated from CF lungs exhibited enhanced IL-8 secretion after 6 to 11 days, but not 28 to 35 days, in culture, compared with normal HBE cells. Hypotonic cell swelling–promoted ATP release was increased in 6- to 11-day-old CF HBE cells compared with non-CF HBE cells, but returned to normal values after 28 to 35 days in culture. The exposure of non-CF HBE cells to airway secretions isolated from CF lungs, namely, sterile supernatants of mucopurulent material (SMM), also caused enhanced IL-8 secretion and increased ATP release. The SMM-induced increase in ATP release was sensitive to Ca2+ chelation and vesicle trafficking/exocytosis inhibitors, but not to pannexin inhibition. Transcript levels of the vesicular nucleotide transporter, but not pannexin 1, were up-regulated after SMM exposure. SMM-treated cultures displayed increased basal mucin secretion, but mucin secretion was not enhanced in response to hypotonic challenge after the exposure of cells to either vehicle or SMM. We propose that CF airway inflammation up-regulates the capacity of airway epithelia to release ATP via Ca2+-dependent vesicular mechanisms not associated with mucin granule secretion. PMID:23763446

  14. Inflammation promotes airway epithelial ATP release via calcium-dependent vesicular pathways.

    PubMed

    Okada, Seiko F; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Sesma, Juliana I; Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Abdullah, Lubna H; van Heusden, Catharina; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-11-01

    ATP in airway surface liquid (ASL) controls mucociliary clearance functions via the activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. However, abnormally elevated ATP levels have been reported in inflamed airways, suggesting that excessive ATP in ASL contributes to airway inflammation. Despite these observations, little is known about the mechanisms of ATP accumulation in the ASL covering inflamed airways. In this study, links between cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated airway inflammation and airway epithelial ATP release were investigated. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells isolated from CF lungs exhibited enhanced IL-8 secretion after 6 to 11 days, but not 28 to 35 days, in culture, compared with normal HBE cells. Hypotonic cell swelling-promoted ATP release was increased in 6- to 11-day-old CF HBE cells compared with non-CF HBE cells, but returned to normal values after 28 to 35 days in culture. The exposure of non-CF HBE cells to airway secretions isolated from CF lungs, namely, sterile supernatants of mucopurulent material (SMM), also caused enhanced IL-8 secretion and increased ATP release. The SMM-induced increase in ATP release was sensitive to Ca(2+) chelation and vesicle trafficking/exocytosis inhibitors, but not to pannexin inhibition. Transcript levels of the vesicular nucleotide transporter, but not pannexin 1, were up-regulated after SMM exposure. SMM-treated cultures displayed increased basal mucin secretion, but mucin secretion was not enhanced in response to hypotonic challenge after the exposure of cells to either vehicle or SMM. We propose that CF airway inflammation up-regulates the capacity of airway epithelia to release ATP via Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular mechanisms not associated with mucin granule secretion.

  15. Hypoxia Potentiates Allergen Induction of HIF-1α, Chemokines, Airway Inflammation, TGF-β1, and Airway Remodeling in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwang Je; Cho, Jae Youn; Rosenthal, Peter; Alexander, Laura E. Crotty; Nizet, Victor; Broide, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Whether hypoxia contributes to airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma is unknown. In this study we used mice exposed to a hypoxic environment during allergen challenge (simulating hypoxia during an asthma exacerbation) to investigate the contribution of hypoxia to airway inflammation and remodeling. Although neither hypoxia alone, nor OVA allergen alone, induced significant neutrophil influx into the lung, the combination of OVA and hypoxia induced a synergistic 27 fold increase in peribronchial neutrophils, enhanced expression of HIF-1α and one of its target genes, the CXC-family neutrophil chemokine KC. The combination of hypoxia and OVA allergen increased eotaxin-1, peribronchial eosinophils, lung TGB-β1 expression, and indices of airway remodeling (fibrosis and smooth muscle) compared to either stimulus alone. As hypoxia is present in >90% of severe asthma exacerbations, these findings underscore the potential of hypoxia to potentiate the airway inflammatory response, remodeling, and accelerate the decline of lung function in asthma exacerbations. PMID:23499929

  16. Mechanisms of inflammation-mediated airway smooth muscle plasticity and airways remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Amrani, Yassine

    2003-09-16

    Recent evidence points to progressive structural change in the airway wall, driven by chronic local inflammation, as a fundamental component for development of irreversible airway hyperresponsiveness. Acute and chronic inflammation is orchestrated by cytokines from recruited inflammatory cells, airway myofibroblasts and myocytes. Airway myocytes exhibit functional plasticity in their capacity for contraction, proliferation, and synthesis of matrix protein and cytokines. This confers a principal role in driving different components of the airway remodeling process, and mediating constrictor hyperresponsiveness. Functional plasticity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by an array of environmental cues, including cytokines, which mediate their effects through receptors and a number of intracellular signaling pathways. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured airway myocytes, few have identified how intracellular signaling pathways modulate or induce these cellular responses. This review summarizes current understanding of these concepts and presents a model for the effects of inflammatory mediators on functional plasticity of ASM in asthma.

  17. Temporal Changes in Glutaredoxin 1 and Protein S-Glutathionylation in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Kanako; Nagai, Katsura; Suzuki, Masaru; Inomata, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, involving oxidative stress. Upon oxidative stress, glutathione covalently binds to protein thiols to protect them against irreversible oxidation. This posttranslational modification, known as protein S-glutathionylation, can be reversed by glutaredoxin 1 (Glrx1) under physiological condition. Glrx1 is known to increase in the lung tissues of a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. However, the temporal relationship between levels of Glrx1, protein S-glutathionylation, and glutathione in the lungs with allergic airway inflammation is not clearly understood. Methods BALB/c mice received 3 aerosol challenges with ovalbumin (OVA) following sensitization to OVA. They were sacrificed at 6, 24, 48, or 72 h, or 8 days (5 mice per group), and the levels of Glrx1, protein S-glutathionylation, glutathione, and 25 cytokines/chemokines were evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and/or lung tissue. Results Levels of Glrx1 in BALF were significantly elevated in the OVA 6 h (final challenge) group compared to those in the control, with concurrent increases in protein S-glutathionylation levels in the lungs, as well as total glutathione (reduced and oxidized) and oxidized glutathione in BALF. Protein S-glutathionylation levels were attenuated at 24 h, with significant increases in Glrx1 levels in lung tissues at 48 and 72 h. Glrx1 in alveolar macrophages was induced after 6 h. Glrx1 levels concomitantly increased with Th2/NF-κB-related cytokines and chemokines in BALF. Conclusions The temporal relationships of Glrx1 with protein S-glutathionylation, glutathione, and cytokines/chemokines were observed as dynamic changes in lungs with allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that Glrx1 and protein–SSG redox status may play important roles in the development of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25874776

  18. Silymarin attenuates airway inflammation induced by cigarette smoke in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Diandian; Xu, Dan; Wang, Tao; Shen, Yongchun; Guo, Shujin; Zhang, Xue; Guo, Lingli; Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Lian; Wen, Fuqiang

    2015-04-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS), which increases inflammation and oxidative stress, is a major risk factor for the development of COPD. In this study, we investigated the effects of silymarin, a polyphenolic flavonoid isolated from the seeds and fruits of milk thistle, on CS-induced airway inflammation and oxidative stress in mice and the possible mechanisms. BALB/c mice were exposed to CS for 2 h twice daily, 6 days per week for 4 weeks. Silymarin (25, 50 mg/kg·day) was administered intraperitoneally 1 h before CS exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was acquired for cell counting and the detection of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Lung tissue was collected for histological examination, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. The phosphorylation of ERK and p38 was evaluated by Western blotting. Pretreatment with silymarin significantly attenuated CS-induced thickening of the airway epithelium, peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, and lumen obstruction. The numbers of total cells, macrophages, and neutrophils, along with the MPO activity (a marker of neutrophil accumulation) in BALF, were remarkably decreased by silymarin in CS-exposed mice (all p<0.05). In addition, silymarin pretreatment dampened the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 in BALF. High-dose silymarin (50 mg/kg·day) administration also prevented CS-induced elevation in MDA levels and decrease in SOD activities (p<0.05). Furthermore, the CS-induced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 was also attenuated by silymarin (p<0.05). These results suggest that silymarin attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke. The anti-inflammatory effect might partly act through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway.

  19. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  20. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 promotes house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xianglan; Gao, Meixia; Dai, Cuilian; Meyer, Katharine S; Chen, Jichun; Keeran, Karen J; Nugent, Gayle Z; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Dagur, Pradeep K; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J

    2013-12-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition protein (Pglyrp) 1 is a pattern-recognition protein that mediates antibacterial host defense. Because we had previously shown that Pglyrp1 expression is increased in the lungs of house dust mite (HDM)-challenged mice, we hypothesized that it might modulate the pathogenesis of asthma. Wild-type and Pglyrp1(-/-) mice on a BALB/c background received intranasal HDM or saline, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice showed decreases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophils and lymphocytes, serum IgE, and mucous cell metaplasia, whereas airway hyperresponsiveness was not changed when compared with wild-type mice. T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines were reduced in the lungs of HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice, which reflected a decreased number of CD4(+) Th2 cells. There was also a reduction in C-C chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenates from HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, secretion of CCL17, CCL22, and CCL24 by alveolar macrophages from HDM-challenged Pglyrp1(-/-) mice was markedly reduced. As both inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells express Pglyrp1, bone marrow transplantation was performed to generate chimeric mice and assess which cell type promotes HDM-induced airway inflammation. Chimeric mice lacking Pglyrp1 on hematopoietic cells, not structural cells, showed a reduction in HDM-induced eosinophilic and lymphocytic airway inflammation. We conclude that Pglyrp1 expressed by hematopoietic cells, such as alveolar macrophages, mediates HDM-induced airway inflammation by up-regulating the production of C-C chemokines that recruit eosinophils and Th2 cells to the lung. This identifies a new family of innate immune response proteins that promotes HDM-induced airway inflammation in asthma.

  1. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  2. Klotho expression is reduced in COPD airway epithelial cells: effects on inflammation and oxidant injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Jingying; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Wiegman, Coen H; Barnes, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is associated with sustained inflammation, excessive injury, and accelerated lung aging. Human Klotho (KL) is an anti-aging protein that protects cells against inflammation and damage. In the present study, we quantified KL expression in the lungs of COPD patients and in an ozone-induced mouse model of COPD, and investigated the mechanisms that control KL expression and function in the airways. KL distribution and levels in human and mouse airways were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The effect of CSE (cigarette smoke extract) on KL expression was detected in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the effect of KL on CSE-mediated inflammation and hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular injury/apoptosis was determined using siRNAs. KL expression was decreased in the lungs of smokers and further reduced in patients with COPD. Similarly, 6 weeks of exposure to ozone decreased KL levels in airway epithelial cells. CSE and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) decreased KL expression and release from airway epithelial cells, which was associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, KL depletion increased cell sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage. These effects involved the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathways. Reduced KL expression in COPD airway epithelial cells was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with the accelerated lung aging in COPD development.

  3. Klotho expression is reduced in COPD airway epithelial cells: effects on inflammation and oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Jingying; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Wiegman, Coen H.; Barnes, Peter J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Huang, Mao

    2015-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is associated with sustained inflammation, excessive injury, and accelerated lung aging. Human Klotho (KL) is an anti-aging protein that protects cells against inflammation and damage. In the present study, we quantified KL expression in the lungs of COPD patients and in an ozone-induced mouse model of COPD, and investigated the mechanisms that control KL expression and function in the airways. KL distribution and levels in human and mouse airways were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The effect of CSE (cigarette smoke extract) on KL expression was detected in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the effect of KL on CSE-mediated inflammation and hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular injury/apoptosis was determined using siRNAs. KL expression was decreased in the lungs of smokers and further reduced in patients with COPD. Similarly, 6 weeks of exposure to ozone decreased KL levels in airway epithelial cells. CSE and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) decreased KL expression and release from airway epithelial cells, which was associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, KL depletion increased cell sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage. These effects involved the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathways. Reduced KL expression in COPD airway epithelial cells was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with the accelerated lung aging in COPD development. PMID:26201096

  4. NOX ENZYMES IN ALLERGIC AIRWAY INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Chronic airway diseases such as asthma are linked to oxidative environmental factors and are commonly associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, it is commonly assumed that oxidative stress is an important contributing factor to asthma disease pathogenesis and that antioxidant strategies may be useful in treatment of asthma. A primary source of ROS production in biological systems is NADPH oxidase (NOX), originally associated primarily with inflammatory cells but currently widely appreciated as an important enzyme system in many cell types, which a wide array of functional properties ranging from antimicrobial host defense to immune regulation and cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Given the complex nature of asthma disease pathology, with the involvement of many lung cell types that all express NOX homologs, it is not surprising that the contributions of NOX-derived ROS to various aspects of asthma development and progression are highly diverse and multifactorial. It is the purpose of the present review to summarize the current knowledge with respect to the functional aspects of NOX enzymes in various pulmonary cell types, and to discuss their potential importance in asthma pathogenesis. PMID:21397663

  5. The usefulness of biomarkers of airway inflammation in managing asthma.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sarita U; Long, Aidan A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of managing asthma is to maintain disease control. Current approaches to assessment of control do not include measurement of airway inflammation. This study was designed to assess the usefulness of biomarkers of airway inflammation in guiding asthma management decisions. A literature review was performed. Bronchial biopsy is a direct measure of airway inflammation but not practical for routine use. Enumeration of sputum eosinophils is very useful in guiding changes in controller medication to decrease asthma exacerbations, whereas measurement of exhaled nitric oxide has not proven to be useful in this regard. Serial measurement of airway hyperreactivity as a guide to asthma management yields inconclusive results. Use of indirect stimuli for bronchial challenge offers both practical and theoretical advantages in the assessment of airway hyperreactivity. Data on the analysis of exhaled breath condensate have not yet been studied adequately in guiding management decisions. Enumeration of sputum cell counts appears to be the most useful biomarker of airway inflammation in guiding asthma management decisions. Combined approaches using simple methods of measuring airway hyperreactivity and obtaining sputum samples hold promise for the future, particularly if rapid analysis of cellular products in sputum can be developed.

  6. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    The field of nanotechnology is continually advancing, and increasing amounts of consumer goods are being produced using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The health risks of occupational and/or consumer exposure to ENMs are not completely understood, although significant research indicates that pulmonary exposure to nanomaterials induces toxic effects in the lungs of exposed animals. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a specific category of ENMs and consist of sheets of graphene rolled into cylinders that are multiple layers thick in order to strengthen their rigidity. MWCNTs have a fiber-like shape, similar to that of asbestos, which allows for a high aspect ratio and makes them difficult to clear from the lung. Studies with rodent models have demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to ENMs, in particular MWCNTs, results in acute lung inflammation and the subsequent development of chronic fibrosis, suggesting a potential human health risk to individuals involved in the manufacturing of products utilizing these nanomaterials. Induction of IL-1beta secretion via activation of the inflammasome is a prime mechanism of MWCNT-induced inflammation. The inflammasome is a multi-protein scaffold found in a variety of cell types that forms in response to a variety of immune signals, including particulates. Sensitization with allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), increases levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in mice and in humans, and there is particular cause for concern in cases of MWCNT exposure in individuals with pre-existing allergic airway disease, such as asthma. MWCNT exposure exacerbates airway inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of pre-existing allergic asthma, suggesting that individuals suffering from asthma are more susceptible to the toxic pulmonary effects of MWCNT exposure. Asthma is an exceptionally prominent human disease, and therefore the goal of this research was to better understand how pre-existing allergic airway

  7. The Diagnosis and Management of Airway Complications Following Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Amit K; Folch, Erik; Khandhar, Sandeep J; Channick, Colleen L; Santacruz, Jose F; Mehta, Atul C; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-03-05

    Airway complications following lung transplantation result in considerable morbidity and are associated with a mortality of 2-4 percent. The incidence of lethal and non-lethal airway complications has decreased since the early experiences with double- and single-lung transplantation. The most common risk factor associated with post-lung transplant airway complications is anastomotic ischemia. Airway complications include development of exophytic granulation tissue, bronchial stenosis, bronchomalacia, airway fistula, endobronchial infection, and anastomotic dehiscence. The broadening array of bronchoscopic therapies has enhanced treatment options for lung transplant recipients with airway complications. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical manifestations, and treatments of airway complications following lung transplantation, and provides our expert opinion where evidence is lacking.

  8. New insights into the relationship between airway inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, A J; Brightling, C E; Green, R; Woltmann, G; Bradding, P; Pavord, I D

    2002-08-01

    Asthma is a condition characterized by variable airflow obstruction, airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation which is usually, but not invariably, eosinophilic. Current thoughts on the pathogenesis of asthma are focused on the idea that it is caused by an inappropriate response of the specific immune system to harmless antigens, particularly allergens such as cat dander and house dust mite, that result in Th2-mediated chronic inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and asthma is complex, with no good correlation between the severity of inflammation, at least as measured by the number of eosinophils, and the severity of asthma. In addition, there are a number of conditions, such as eosinophilic bronchitis and allergic rhinitis, in which there is a Th2-mediated inflammatory response, but no asthma, as measured by variable airflow obstruction or AHR. Bronchoconstriction can also occur without obvious airway inflammation, and neutrophilic inflammation can in some cases be associated with asthma. When we compared the immunopathology of eosinophilic bronchitis and asthma, the only difference we observed was that, in asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) was infiltrated by mast cells, suggesting that airway obstruction and AHR are due to an ASM mast cell myositis. This observation emphasizes that the features that characterize asthma, as opposed to bronchitis, are due to abnormalities in smooth muscle responsiveness, which could be intrinsic or acquired, and that inflammation is only relevant in that it leads to these abnormalities. It also emphasizes the importance of micro-localization as an organizing principle in physiological responses to airway inflammation. Thus, if inflammation is localized to the epithelium and lamina propria, then the symptoms of bronchitis (cough and mucus hypersecretion) result, and it is only if the ASM is involved -- for reasons that remain to be established -- that asthma occurs.

  9. Sputum Leucine-Rich Alpha-2 Glycoprotein as a Marker of Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Serada, Satoshi; Hattori, Noboru; Nomura, Shintaro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Yokoyama, Akihito; Naka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways, but an ideal biomarker that accurately reflects ongoing airway inflammation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of sputum leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein (LRG) as a new biomarker for airway inflammation in asthma. Methods We obtained induced sputum samples from patients with asthma (N = 64) and healthy volunteers (N = 22) and measured LRG concentration by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model mice were used to investigate the mechanism of LRG production during airway inflammation. The LRG concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from mice were determined by ELISA and mouse lung sections were stained with anti-LRG antibody and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent. Results Sputum LRG concentrations were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.00686). Consistent with patients’ data, BALF LRG levels in asthma model mice were significantly higher than in control mice (p = 0.00013). Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from asthma model mice revealed that LRG was intensely expressed in a subpopulation of bronchial epithelial cells, which corresponded with PAS-positive mucus producing cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that sputum LRG is a promising biomarker of local inflammation in asthma. PMID:27611322

  10. Protective effect of soybean oil- or fish oil-rich diets on allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Xavier, Roberta Araujo; de Barros, Karina Vieira; de Andrade, Iracema Senna; Palomino, Zaira; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Flor Silveira, Vera Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Background The increased prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in westernized societies has been associated with increased intake of diets rich in n-6 fatty acids (FAs) and poor in n-3 FAs. This study aimed to analyze the prophylactic effects of treatment with a soybean oil-rich diet (rich in n-6) or fish oil (rich in n-3) in an allergic airway inflammation model on lung inflammation score, leukocyte migration, T-helper cell (Th)-2 (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-5) and Th1 (interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α) cytokines, lipoxin A4, nitric oxide, bradykinin, and corticosterone levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or lungs. Methods Male Wistar rats fed with soybean oil- or fish oil-rich diet or standard rat chow were sensitized twice with ovalbumin–alumen and challenged twice with ovalbumin aerosol. The BAL and lungs were examined 24 hours later. Results Both diets, rich in n-6 or n-3 FAs, impaired the allergic lung inflammation and reduced leukocyte migration, eosinophil and neutrophil percentages, and IL-4/IL-5/bradykinin levels in BAL and/or lungs, as well as increased the nitric oxide levels in BAL. The soybean oil-rich diet additionally increased the levels of lipoxin A4 and corticosterone in the lungs. Conclusion Data presented demonstrated that the n-6 FA-rich diet had protective effect upon allergic airway inflammation and was as anti-inflammatory as the n-3 FA-rich diet, although through different mechanisms, suggesting that both diets could be considered as complementary therapy or a prophylactic alternative for allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27274303

  11. The antidiabetic agent glibenclamide protects airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Zhang, Shufang; Cai, Zhijian; Hu, Xinlei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Wang, Yong; Li, Na; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-04-01

    Glibenclamide has a newly discovered role in inflammation regulation besides its antidiabetic effect. As an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, glibenclamide antagonizes the relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle. This indicates that glibenclamide might attenuate airway inflammation while aggravate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthmatics. Clinically, many diabetics with asthma are prescribed with glibenclamide to control blood glucose. However, whether glibenclamide could exert any effects on asthmatic inflammation remains unknown. Using an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse model of asthma, we evaluated the effects of glibenclamide on the AHR and inflammation. Interestingly, glibenclamide reduced all the cardinal features of asthma in OVA-challenged mice, including AHR, airway inflammation, and T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines. Glibenclamide also downregulated OVA-induced expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (p-STAT6) in the lung. In addition, increased sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) expression in the lung was observed after the OVA challenge. These findings suggest that the classic sulfonylurea glibenclamide plays an important protective role in the development of asthma, which not only provides the evidence for the safety of prescribed glibenclamide in diabetics combined with asthma but also indicates a possible new therapeutic for asthma via targeting glibenclamide-related pathways.

  12. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  13. Protease inhibitor reduces airway response and underlying inflammation in cockroach allergen-induced murine model.

    PubMed

    Saw, Sanjay; Arora, Naveen

    2015-04-01

    Protease(s) enhances airway inflammation and allergic cascade. In the present study, effect of a serine protease inhibitor was evaluated in mouse model of airway disease. Mice were sensitized with cockroach extract (CE) or Per a 10 and treated with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) 1 h before or after challenge to measure airway response. Mice were euthanized to collect bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), blood, and lung to evaluate inflammation. AEBSF treatment significantly reduced the AHR in allergen-challenged mice in dose-dependent manner (p≤ 0.01). IgE (p≤0.05) and Th2 cytokines (p≤0.05) were significantly reduced in treated mice. AEBSF treatment lowered total cell (p≤0.05), eosinophil (p≤0.05), and neutrophil (p≤0.05) in BALF and lung tissue. Oxidative stress parameters were impaired on treatment in allergen-challenged mice (p≤0.05). AEBSF had therapeutic effect in allergen-induced airway resistance and underling inflammation and had potential for combination or as add-on therapy for respiratory diseases.

  14. Galangin Abrogates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation via Negative Regulation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Zha, Wang-Jian; Qian, Yan; Shen, Yi; Du, Qiang; Chen, Fei-Fei; Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Xiao; Huang, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been associated with the development of asthma. Galangin, the active pharmacological ingredient from Alpinia galanga, is reported to have a variety of anti-inflammatory properties in vitro via negative regulation of NF-κB. This study aimed to investigate whether galangin can abrogate ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway inflammation by negative regulation of NF-κB. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with OVA developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Galangin dose dependently inhibited OVA-induced increases in total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and interleukin-(IL-) 4, IL-5, and IL-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced serum level of OVA-specific IgE. Galangin also attenuated AHR, reduced eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia, and reduced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) levels in lung tissue. Additionally, galangin blocked inhibitor of κB degradation, phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and p65 nuclear translocation from lung tissues of OVA-sensitized mice. Similarly, in normal human airway smooth muscle cells, galangin blocked tumor necrosis factor-α induced p65 nuclear translocation and expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, eotaxin, CXCL10, and VCAM-1. These results suggest that galangin can attenuate ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  15. Metformin reduces airway inflammation and remodeling via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Sun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Moon, Keun-Ai; Kim, Tae-Bum; Lee, Ki-Young; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2012-12-15

    Recent reports have suggested that metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-tissue remodeling properties. We investigated the potential effect of metformin on airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma. The effect of metformin treatment on airway inflammation and pivotal characteristics of airway remodeling were examined in a murine model of chronic asthma generated by repetitive challenges with ovalbumin and fungal-associated allergenic protease. To investigate the underlying mechanism of metformin, oxidative stress levels and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were assessed. To further elucidate the role of AMPK, we examined the effect of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR) as a specific activator of AMPK and employed AMPKα1-deficient mice as an asthma model. The role of metformin and AMPK in tissue fibrosis was evaluated using a bleomycin-induced acute lung injury model and in vitro experiments with cultured fibroblasts. Metformin suppressed eosinophilic inflammation and significantly reduced peribronchial fibrosis, smooth muscle layer thickness, and mucin secretion. Enhanced AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress in lungs was found in metformin-treated asthmatic mice. Similar results were observed in the AICAR-treated group. In addition, the enhanced airway inflammation and fibrosis in heterozygous AMPKα1-deficient mice were induced by both allergen and bleomycin challenges. Fibronectin and collagen expression was diminished by metformin through AMPKα1 activation in cultured fibroblasts. Therefore metformin reduced both airway inflammation and remodeling at least partially through the induction of AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress. These data provide insight into the beneficial role of metformin as a novel therapeutic drug for chronic asthma.

  16. Early treatment of chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation with corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasson, Sofia; Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) is an industrial gas that is highly toxic and irritating when inhaled causing tissue damage and an acute inflammatory response in the airways followed by a long-term airway dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early anti-inflammatory treatment can protect against the delayed symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed by nose-only inhalation using 200 ppm Cl{sub 2} during 15 min. Assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage, occurrence of lung edema and lung fibrosis were analyzed 24 h or 14 days post-exposure. A single dose of the corticosteroid dexamethasone (10 or 100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1, 3, 6, or 12 h following Cl{sub 2} exposure. High-dose of dexamethasone reduced the acute inflammation if administered within 6 h after exposure but treated animals still displayed a significant lung injury. The effect of dexamethasone administered within 1 h was dose-dependent; high-dose significantly reduced acute airway inflammation (100 mg/kg) but not treatment with the relatively low-dose (10 mg/kg). Both doses reduced AHR 14 days later, while lung fibrosis measured as collagen deposition was not significantly reduced. The results point out that the acute inflammation in the lungs due to Cl{sub 2} exposure only partly is associated with the long-term AHR. We hypothesize that additional pathogenic mechanisms apart from the inflammatory reactions contribute to the development of long-term airway dysfunction. By using this mouse model, we have validated early administration of corticosteroids in terms of efficacy to prevent acute lung injury and delayed symptoms induced by Cl{sub 2} exposure. - Highlights: • Inhalation of Cl{sub 2} may lead to a long-standing airway hyperresponsiveness. • The symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice are similar to those described for RADS in humans. • Corticosteroids prevent delayed symptoms such as AHR in

  17. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  18. CCR9 Is a Key Regulator of Early Phases of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    López-Pacheco, C.; Soldevila, G.; Du Pont, G.; Hernández-Pando, R.

    2016-01-01

    Airway inflammation is the most common hallmark of allergic asthma. Chemokine receptors involved in leukocyte recruitment are closely related to the pathology in asthma. CCR9 has been described as a homeostatic and inflammatory chemokine receptor, but its role and that of its ligand CCL25 during lung inflammation remain unknown. To investigate the role of CCR9 as a modulator of airway inflammation, we established an OVA-induced allergic inflammation model in CCR9-deficient mice. Here, we report the expression of CCR9 and CCL25 as early as 6 hours post-OVA challenge in eosinophils and T-lymphocytes. Moreover, in challenged CCR9-deficient mice, cell recruitment was impaired at peribronchial and perivenular levels. OVA-administration in CCR9-deficient mice leads to a less inflammatory cell recruitment, which modifies the expression of IL-10, CCL11, and CCL25 at 24 hours after OVA challenge. In contrast, the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 was not affected in CCR9-deficient mice compared to WT mice. These results demonstrate for the first time that CCR9 and CCL25 expressions are induced in the early stages of airway inflammation and they have an important role modulating eosinophils and lymphocytes recruitment at the first stages of inflammatory process, suggesting that they might be a potential target to regulate inflammation in asthma. PMID:27795621

  19. Chronic treatment in vivo with β-adrenoceptor agonists induces dysfunction of airway β2-adrenoceptors and exacerbates lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rui; Degan, Simone; Theriot, Barbara S; Fischer, Bernard M; Strachan, Ryan T; Liang, Jiurong; Pierce, Richard A; Sunday, Mary E; Noble, Paul W; Kraft, Monica; Brody, Arnold R; Walker, Julia KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhalation of a β-adrenoceptor agonist (β-agonist) is first-line asthma therapy, used for both prophylaxis against, and acute relief of, bronchoconstriction. However, repeated clinical use of β-agonists leads to impaired bronchoprotection and, in some cases, adverse patient outcomes. Mechanisms underlying this β2-adrenoceptor dysfunction are not well understood, due largely to the lack of a comprehensive animal model and the uncertainty as to whether or not bronchorelaxation in mice is mediated by β2-adrenoceptors. Thus, we aimed to develop a mouse model that demonstrated functional β-agonist-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitization in the context of allergic inflammatory airway disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We combined chronic allergen exposure with repeated β-agonist inhalation in allergen-treated BALB/C mice and examined the contribution of β2-adrenoceptors to albuterol-induced bronchoprotection using FVB/NJ mice with genetic deletion of β2-adrenoceptors (KO). Associated inflammatory changes – cytokines (ELISA), cells in bronchoalevolar lavage and airway remodelling (histology) and β2-adrenoceptor density (radioligand binding) – were also measured. KEY RESULTS β2-Adrenoceptors mediated albuterol-induced bronchoprotection in mice. Chronic treatment with albuterol induced loss of bronchoprotection, associated with exacerbation of the inflammatory components of the asthma phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This animal model reproduced salient features of human asthma and linked loss of bronchoprotection with airway pathobiology. Accordingly, the model offers an advanced tool for understanding the mechanisms of the effects of chronic β- agonist treatment on β-adrenoceptor function in asthma. Such information may guide the clinical use of β-agonists and provide insight into development of novel β-adrenoceptor ligands for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22013997

  20. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities.

  1. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  2. Ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade.

    PubMed

    Che, Luanqing; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Zhou, Hongbin; Xia, Lixia; Tian, Baoping; Zhao, Yun; Liu, Juan; Wu, Yinfang; Wu, Yanping; Du, Jie; Li, Wen; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Shen, Huahao

    2016-01-07

    Ozone is a common environmental air pollutant leading to respiratory illness. The mechanisms regulating ozone-induced airway inflammation remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that ozone-triggered inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1 production regulate neutrophilic airway inflammation through IL-17A. Pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation was induced by extended (72 h) low-dose (0.7 ppm) exposure to ozone. IL-1 receptor 1 (Il1r1)(-/-), Il17a(-/-) mice and the caspase-1 inhibitor acetyl-YVAD-chloromethylketone (Ac-YVAD-cmk) were used for in vivo studies. Cellular inflammation and protein levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF), cytokines, and IL-17A-producing γδT-cells, as well as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release, and inflammasome activation in lung macrophages were analyzed. Ozone-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation, accompanied an increased production of IL-1β, IL-18, IL-17A, Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and BALF protein in the lung. Ozone-induced IL-17A production was predominantly in γδT-cells, and Il17a-knockout mice exhibited reduced airway inflammation. Lung macrophages from ozone-exposed mice exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial ROS, enhanced cytosolic mtDNA, increased caspase-1 activation, and higher production of IL-1β. Il1r1-knockout mice or treatment with Ac-YVAD-cmk decreased the IL-17A production and subsequent airway inflammation. Taken together, we demonstrate that ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade.

  3. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma.

  4. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  5. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  6. The combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppresses airway inflammation in a murine model for chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Seil; Vos, Arjan P; Morgan, Mary E; Garssen, Johan; Georgiou, Niki A; Boon, Louis; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the use of interventions that target the intestinal microbiota as a treatment approach for asthma. This study is aimed at exploring the therapeutic effects of long-term treatment with a combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides on airway inflammation and remodeling. A murine ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma model was used. Pulmonary airway inflammation; mRNA expression of pattern recognition receptors, Th-specific cytokines and transcription factors in lung tissue; expression of Foxp3 in blood Th cells; in vitro T cell activation; mast cell degranulation; and airway remodeling were examined. The combination of B. breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppressed pulmonary airway inflammation; reduced T cell activation and mast cell degranulation; modulated expression of pattern recognition receptors, cytokines and transcription factors; and reduced airway remodeling. The treatment induced regulatory T cell responses, as shown by increased Il10 and Foxp3 transcription in lung tissue, and augmented Foxp3 protein expression in blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. This specific combination of beneficial bacteria with non-digestible oligosaccharides has strong anti-inflammatory properties, possibly via the induction of a regulatory T cell response, resulting in reduced airway remodeling and, therefore, may be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammation in allergic asthma.

  7. Interleukin 12 inhibits antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and Th2 cytokine expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia, and may be mediated by T helper (Th) lymphocytes expressing a Th2 cytokine pattern. Interleukin (IL) 12 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines and their associated responses, including eosinophilia, serum immunoglobulin E, and mucosal mastocytosis. We have previously shown in a murine model that antigen- induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia are CD4+ T cell dependent. We used this model to determine the ability of IL-12 to prevent antigen-induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophils, and lung Th2 cytokine expression. Sensitized A/J mice developed airway hyperresponsiveness and increased numbers of BAL eosinophils and other inflammatory cells after single or repeated intratracheal challenges with sheep red blood cell antigen. Pulmonary mRNA and protein levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 were increased after antigen challenge. Administration of IL-12 (1 microgram/d x 5 d) at the time of a single antigen challenge abolished the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia and promoted an increase in interferon (IFN) gamma and decreases in IL-4 and IL-5 expression. The effects of IL-12 were partially dependent on IFN-gamma, because concurrent treatment with IL-12 and anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody partially reversed the inhibition of airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia by IL-12. Treatment of mice with IL-12 at the time of a second antigen challenge also prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and significantly reduced numbers of BAL inflammatory cells, reflecting the ability of IL-12 to inhibit responses associated with ongoing antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation. These data show that antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation can be blocked by IL-12, which suppresses Th2 cytokine expression. Local administration of IL-12 may provide a novel

  8. GS143, an I{kappa}B ubiquitination inhibitor, inhibits allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Koichi; Wakashin, Hidefumi; Oki, Mie; Kagami, Shin-ichiro; Suto, Akira; Ikeda, Kei; Watanabe, Norihiko; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-26

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation with intense eosinophil infiltration and mucus hyper-production, in which antigen-specific Th2 cells play critical roles. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway has been demonstrated to be essential for the production of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the airways in murine asthma models. In the present study, we examined the effect of GS143, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of I{kappa}B ubiquitination, on antigen-induced airway inflammation and Th2 cytokine production in mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 prior to antigen challenge suppressed antigen-induced NF-{kappa}B activation in the lung of sensitized mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 also inhibited antigen-induced eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment into the airways as well as the expression of Th2 cytokines and eotaxin in the airways. Moreover, GS143 inhibited antigen-induced differentiation of Th2 cells but not of Th1 cells in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that I{kappa}B ubiquitination inhibitor may have therapeutic potential against asthma.

  9. Acetyl salicylic acid inhibits Th17 airway inflammation via blockade of IL-6 and IL-17 positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-Geun; Kang, Chil Sung; Choi, Jun-Pyo; Choi, Dong Sic; Choi, Hyun Il; Choi, Yong Wook; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Yoo, Joo-Yeon; Jang, Myoung Ho; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2013-01-18

    T-helper (Th)17 cell responses are important for the development of neutrophilic inflammatory disease. Recently, we found that acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) inhibited Th17 airway inflammation in an asthma mouse model induced by sensitization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-containing allergens. To investigate the mechanism(s) of the inhibitory effect of ASA on the development of Th17 airway inflammation, a neutrophilic asthma mouse model was generated by intranasal sensitization with LPS plus ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with OVA alone. Immunologic parameters and airway inflammation were evaluated 6 and 48 h after the last OVA challenge. ASA inhibited the production of interleukin (IL)-17 from lung T cells as well as in vitro Th17 polarization induced by IL-6. Additionally, ASA, but not salicylic acid, suppressed Th17 airway inflammation, which was associated with decreased expression of acetyl-STAT3 (downstream signaling of IL-6) in the lung. Moreover, the production of IL-6 from inflammatory cells, induced by IL-17, was abolished by treatment with ASA, whereas that induced by LPS was not. Altogether, ASA, likely via its acetyl moiety, inhibits Th17 airway inflammation by blockade of IL-6 and IL-17 positive feedback.

  10. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  11. Divers' lung function: small airways disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Kambestad, B; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary function was measured in 152 professional saturation divers and in a matched control group of 106 subjects. Static lung volumes, dynamic lung volumes and flows, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), transfer volume per unit alveolar volume (KCO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured and compared with reference values from recent Scandinavian studies, British submariners, and the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommended reference values. Diving exposure was assessed as years of diving experience, total number of days in saturation and depth, and as the product of days in saturation and mean depth. Divers had significantly lower values for forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, FEF50%, FEF75%, T1CO, and KCO compared with the controls and a significantly higher CV. There was a positive correlation between diving exposure and CV, whereas the other variables had negative correlations with diving exposure. Values for the control group were not different from the predictive values of Scandinavian reference studies or British submariners, although the ECCS standard predicted significantly lower values for the lung function variables both in divers and the control group. The pattern of the differences in lung function variables between the divers and controls is consistent with small airways dysfunction and with the transient changes in lung function found immediately after a single saturation dive. The association between reduced pulmonary function and previous diving exposure further indicates the presence of cumulative long term effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:2393630

  12. Regulation of eosinophilia and allergic airway inflammation by the glycan-binding protein galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Greenberg, Yana G; Rao, Amrita; Bastan, Idil; Blidner, Ada G; Rao, Savita P; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Sriramarao, P

    2016-08-16

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a glycan-binding protein with broad antiinflammatory activities, functions as a proresolving mediator in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. However, its role in allergic airway inflammation has not yet been elucidated. We evaluated the effects of Gal-1 on eosinophil function and its role in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Allergen exposure resulted in airway recruitment of Gal-1-expressing inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, as well as increased Gal-1 in extracellular spaces in the lungs. In vitro, extracellular Gal-1 exerted divergent effects on eosinophils that were N-glycan- and dose-dependent. At concentrations ≤0.25 µM, Gal-1 increased eosinophil adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, caused redistribution of integrin CD49d to the periphery and cell clustering, but inhibited ERK(1/2) activation and eotaxin-1-induced migration. Exposure to concentrations ≥1 µM resulted in ERK(1/2)-dependent apoptosis and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. At lower concentrations, Gal-1 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d, CD18, CD11a, CD11b, L-selectin) or of the chemokine receptor CCR3, but decreased CD49d and CCR3 was observed in eosinophils treated with higher concentrations of this lectin. In vivo, allergen-challenged Gal-1-deficient mice exhibited increased recruitment of eosinophils and CD3(+) T lymphocytes in the airways as well as elevated peripheral blood and bone marrow eosinophils relative to corresponding WT mice. Further, these mice had an increased propensity to develop airway hyperresponsiveness and displayed significantly elevated levels of TNF-α in lung tissue. This study suggests that Gal-1 can limit eosinophil recruitment to allergic airways and suppresses airway inflammation by inhibiting cell migration and promoting eosinophil apoptosis.

  13. Regulation of eosinophilia and allergic airway inflammation by the glycan-binding protein galectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Greenberg, Yana G.; Rao, Amrita; Bastan, Idil; Blidner, Ada G.; Rao, Savita P.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sriramarao, P.

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a glycan-binding protein with broad antiinflammatory activities, functions as a proresolving mediator in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. However, its role in allergic airway inflammation has not yet been elucidated. We evaluated the effects of Gal-1 on eosinophil function and its role in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Allergen exposure resulted in airway recruitment of Gal-1–expressing inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, as well as increased Gal-1 in extracellular spaces in the lungs. In vitro, extracellular Gal-1 exerted divergent effects on eosinophils that were N-glycan– and dose-dependent. At concentrations ≤0.25 µM, Gal-1 increased eosinophil adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, caused redistribution of integrin CD49d to the periphery and cell clustering, but inhibited ERK(1/2) activation and eotaxin-1–induced migration. Exposure to concentrations ≥1 µM resulted in ERK(1/2)-dependent apoptosis and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. At lower concentrations, Gal-1 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d, CD18, CD11a, CD11b, L-selectin) or of the chemokine receptor CCR3, but decreased CD49d and CCR3 was observed in eosinophils treated with higher concentrations of this lectin. In vivo, allergen-challenged Gal-1–deficient mice exhibited increased recruitment of eosinophils and CD3+ T lymphocytes in the airways as well as elevated peripheral blood and bone marrow eosinophils relative to corresponding WT mice. Further, these mice had an increased propensity to develop airway hyperresponsiveness and displayed significantly elevated levels of TNF-α in lung tissue. This study suggests that Gal-1 can limit eosinophil recruitment to allergic airways and suppresses airway inflammation by inhibiting cell migration and promoting eosinophil apoptosis. PMID:27457925

  14. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

  15. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  16. Sesamin attenuates allergic airway inflammation through the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangchang; Piao, Hongmei; Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Zhewu; Zhao, Liguang; Yan, Guanghai

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the role of sesamin, the most abundant lignan in sesame seed oil, on the regulation of allergic airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. A BALB/c mouse model with allergic asthma was used to evaluate the effects of sesamin on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine protein expression in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to examine histological changes. Moreover, western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of proteins in tissues. Prior to administering sesamin, the mice developed the following pathophysiological features of asthma: An increase in the number of inflammatory cells, increased levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, decreased levels of interferon-γ in BAL fluids and lung tissues, increased immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the serum and an increased activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Following treatment with sesamin, the mice had evidently reduced peribronchiolar inflammation and airway inflammatory cell recruitment, inhibited production of several cytokines in BAL fluids and lung tissues, and decreased IgE levels. Following inhalation of ovalbumin, the administration of sesamin also inhibited the activation of NF-κB. In addition, sesamin administration reduced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The present study demonstrates that sesamin decreases the activation of NF-κB in order to attenuate allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma, possibly via the regulation of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. These observations provide an important molecular mechanism for the potential use of sesamin in preventing and/or treating asthma, as well as other airway inflammatory disorders.

  17. Sesamin attenuates allergic airway inflammation through the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangchang; Piao, Hongmei; Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Zhewu; Zhao, Liguang; Yan, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the role of sesamin, the most abundant lignan in sesame seed oil, on the regulation of allergic airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. A BALB/c mouse model with allergic asthma was used to evaluate the effects of sesamin on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine protein expression in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to examine histological changes. Moreover, western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of proteins in tissues. Prior to administering sesamin, the mice developed the following pathophysiological features of asthma: An increase in the number of inflammatory cells, increased levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, decreased levels of interferon-γ in BAL fluids and lung tissues, increased immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the serum and an increased activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Following treatment with sesamin, the mice had evidently reduced peribronchiolar inflammation and airway inflammatory cell recruitment, inhibited production of several cytokines in BAL fluids and lung tissues, and decreased IgE levels. Following inhalation of ovalbumin, the administration of sesamin also inhibited the activation of NF-κB. In addition, sesamin administration reduced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The present study demonstrates that sesamin decreases the activation of NF-κB in order to attenuate allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma, possibly via the regulation of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. These observations provide an important molecular mechanism for the potential use of sesamin in preventing and/or treating asthma, as well as other airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:28105144

  18. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  19. The potential role of natural agents in treatment of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Velamuri, Suryakanta; Badmaev, Vladimir; Lan, Charlie; Hanania, Nicola

    2007-12-01

    Obstructive airway diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis present with dyspnea and variety of other symptoms. Physiologically, they are characterized by maximal expiratory flow limitation and pathologically, by inflammation of the airways and the lung parenchyma. Inflammation plays a major role in the gradual worsening of the lung function resulting in worsening symptoms. For many years, scientists focused their efforts in identifying various pathways involved in the chronic inflammation present in these diseases. Further, studies are underway to identify various molecular targets in these pathways for the purpose of developing novel therapeutic agents. Natural agents have been used for thousands of years in various cultures for the treatment of several medical conditions and have mostly proven to be safe. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies show potential anti-inflammatory role for some of the existing natural agents. This review provides an overview of the literature related to the anti-inflammatory effects of some of the natural agents which have potential value in the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  20. Trigonella foenum-graecum alleviates airway inflammation of allergic asthma in ovalbumin-induced mouse model.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chun Hua; Bui, Thi Tho; Song, Chang Ho; Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Chai, Ok Hee

    2017-01-22

    Trigonella foenum-graecum, a member oldest medicinal plant in the fabaceae (legumes) family, is used as a herb, spice, and vegetable, and known for its olfactory, laxative, and galactogogue effects. However, the inhibitory effect of Trigonella foenum-graecum on allergic inflammatory response remains unclear, therefore, we investigated the precise role of Trigonella foenum-graecum in the allergic asthma and revealed the effects of Trigonella foenum-graecum in regulating airway inflammation and its possible mechanism. Allergic asthma was initiated in BALB/c mice by sensitized with OVA emulsified in aluminum on days 1 and 14, then aerosol challenged with OVA on days 27, 28 and 29. Some mice were administered Trigonella foenum-graecum by oral gavage before challenge. Then mice were evaluated for the presence of airway inflammation, production of allergen-specific cytokine response and lung pathology. Trigonella foenum-graecum significantly ameliorated the number of inflammatory cells in BALF and alleviated lung inflammation. It also reduced the collagen deposition and goblet cells. Meanwhile, Trigonella foenum-graecum treatment evidently decreased the high expression of Th2 cytokines and increased the Th1 cytokines in BALF and lung homogenates. Trigonella foenum-graecum showed a significant inhibition of serum IgE and anti-OVA IgG1. In this study, our data suggest that Trigonella foenum-graecum has a significant anti-inflammatory effect and it may prove to be an efficacious therapeutic regent on allergic asthma.

  1. NK cells contribute to persistent airway inflammation and AHR during the later stage of RSV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaoru; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Keting; Li, Wei; Tang, Wei; Chen, Sisi; Zang, Na; Ren, Luo; Deng, Yu; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Lijia; Fu, Zhou; Liu, Enmei

    2016-10-01

    RSV can lead to persistent airway inflammation and AHR and is intimately associated with childhood recurrent wheezing and asthma, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. There are high numbers of NK cells in the lung, which not only play important roles in the acute stage of RSV infection, but also are pivotal in regulating the pathogenesis of asthma. Therefore, in this study, we assumed that NK cells might contribute to persistent airway disease during the later stage of RSV infection. Mice were killed at serial time points after RSV infection to collect samples. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted, lung histopathology was examined, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured by whole-body plethysmography. Cytokines were detected by ELISA, and NK cells were determined by flow cytometry. Rabbit anti-mouse asialo-GM-1 antibodies and resveratrol were used to deplete or suppress NK cells. Inflammatory cells in BALF, lung tissue damage and AHR were persistent for 60 days post-RSV infection. Type 2 cytokines and NK cells were significantly increased during the later stage of infection. When NK cells were decreased by the antibodies or resveratrol, type 2 cytokines, the persistent airway inflammation and AHR were all markedly reduced. NK cells can contribute to the RSV-associated persistent airway inflammation and AHR at least partially by promoting type 2 cytokines. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of NK cells may provide a novel approach to alleviating the recurrent wheezing subsequent to RSV infection.

  2. Sinomenine attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in a mouse model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    BAO, HAI-RONG; LIU, XIAO-JU; LI, YUN-LIN; MEN, XIANG; ZENG, XIAO-LI

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease that involves airway inflammation and remodeling. Sinomenine (SIN) has been demonstrated to have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of SIN on airway inflammation and remodeling in an asthma mouse model and observe the effects of SIN on the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) pathway and oxidative stress. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized by repetitive ovalbumin (OVA) challenge for 6 weeks in order to develop a mouse model of asthma. OVA-sensitized animals received SIN (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (2 mg/kg). A blank control group received saline only. The area of smooth muscle and collagen, levels of mucus secretion and inflammatory cell infiltration were evaluated 24 h subsequent to the final OVA challenge. mRNA and protein levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistology, respectively. The indicators of oxidative stress were detected by spectrophotometry. SIN significantly reduced allergen-induced increases in smooth muscle thickness, mucous gland hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition and eosinophilic inflammation. The levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in the lungs of mice treated with SIN. Additionally, the total antioxidant capacity was increased in lungs following treatment with SIN. The malondialdehyde content and myeloperoxidase activities in the lungs from OVA-sensitized mice were significantly inhibited by SIN. In conclusion, SIN may inhibit airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma mouse models, and may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of asthma. PMID:26820806

  3. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S.; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A.; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Koponen, Ismo K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay. PMID:27323801

  4. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Koponen, Ismo K

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay.

  5. TLR2-dependent amelioration of allergic airway inflammation by parasitic nematode type II MIF in mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, M K; Park, M K; Kang, S A; Park, S K; Lyu, J H; Kim, D-H; Park, H-K; Yu, H S

    2015-04-01

    In our previous studies, the recombinant type II macrophage migration inhibitory factor homologue (rAs-MIF) secreted from Anisakis simplex suppressed experimental inflammation mouse model through IL-10 production and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T-cell recruitment. Also, TLR2 gene expression was significantly increased following rAs-MIF treatment. To know the relation between TLR2 and amelioration mechanisms of rAs-MIF, we induced allergic airway inflammation by ovalbumin and alum with or without rAs-MIF under TLR2 blocking systems [anti-TLR2-specific antibody (α-mTLR2 Ab) treatment and using TLR2 knockout mice]. As a result, the amelioration effects of rAs-MIF in allergic airway inflammation model (diminished inflammation and Th2 response in the lung, increased IL-10 secretion, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T-cell recruitment) were diminished under two of the TLR2 blocking model. The expression of TLR2 on the surface of lung epithelial cell was significantly elevated by rAs-MIF treatment or Pam3CSK (TLR2-specific agonist) treatment, but they might have some competition effect on the elevation of TLR2 expression. In addition, the elevation of IL-10 gene expression by rAs-MIF treatment was significantly inhibited by α-mTLR2 Ab or Pam3CSK pretreatment. In conclusion, anti-inflammatory effects of the rAs-MIF on OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation might be closely related to TLR2.

  6. Role of Sphingolipids in the Pathobiology of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ghidoni, Riccardo; Caretti, Anna; Signorelli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid bioactivities in the respiratory airways and the roles of the proteins that handle them have been extensively investigated. Gas or inhaled particles or microorganisms come into contact with mucus components, epithelial cells, blood barrier, and immune surveillance within the airways. Lung structure and functionality rely on a complex interplay of polar and hydrophobic structures forming the surfactant layer and governing external-internal exchanges, such as glycerol-phospholipids sphingolipids and proteins. Sphingolipids act as important signaling mediators involved in the control of cell survival and stress response, as well as secreted molecules endowed with inflammation-regulatory activities. Most successful respiratory infection and injuries evolve in the alveolar compartment, the critical lung functional unit involved in gas exchange. Sphingolipid altered metabolism in this compartment is closely related to inflammatory reaction and ceramide increase, in particular, favors the switch to pathological hyperinflammation. This short review explores a few mechanisms underlying sphingolipid involvement in the healthy lung (surfactant production and endothelial barrier maintenance) and in a selection of lung pathologies in which the impact of sphingolipid synthesis and metabolism is most apparent, such as acute lung injury, or chronic pathologies such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26770018

  7. G Protein βγ-subunit signaling mediates airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Hu, Aihua; Grunstein, Judith S; McDonough, Joseph; Kreiger, Portia A; Josephson, Maureen B; Choi, John K; Grunstein, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    Since the Gβγ subunit of Gi protein has been importantly implicated in regulating immune and inflammatory responses, this study investigated the potential role and mechanism of action of Gβγ signaling in regulating the induction of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a rabbit model of allergic asthma. Relative to non-sensitized animals, OVA-sensitized rabbits challenged with inhaled OVA exhibited AHR, lung inflammation, elevated BAL levels of IL-13, and increased airway phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) activity. These proasthmatic responses were suppressed by pretreatment with an inhaled membrane-permeable anti-Gβγ blocking peptide, similar to the suppressive effect of glucocorticoid pretreatment. Extended mechanistic studies demonstrated that: 1) corresponding proasthmatic changes in contractility exhibited in isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) sensitized with serum from OVA-sensitized+challenged rabbits or IL-13 were also Gβγ-dependent and mediated by MAPK-upregulated PDE4 activity; and 2) the latter was attributed to Gβγ-induced direct stimulation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src, resulting in downstream activation of ERK1/2 and its consequent transcriptional upregulation of PDE4. Collectively, these data are the first to identify that a mechanism involving Gβγ-induced direct activation of c-Src, leading to ERK1/2-mediated upregulation of PDE4 activity, plays a decisive role in regulating the induction of AHR and inflammation in a rabbit model of allergic airway disease.

  8. Attenuation of allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma by silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Keun Hwa; Jang, Sunhyae; Park, Ji Won; Cha, Hye Rim; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Ju Ock; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Choong Sik; Kim, Joo Pyung; Jung, Sung Soo

    2010-01-01

    The use of silver in the past demonstrated the certain antimicrobial activity, though this has been replaced by other treatments. However, nanotechnology has provided a way of producing pure silver nanoparticles, and it shows cytoprotective activities and possible pro-healing properties. But, the mechanism of silver nanoparticles remains unknown. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of silver nanoparticles on bronchial inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled female C57BL/6 mice to evaluate the roles of silver nanoparticles and the related molecular mechanisms in allergic airway disease. In this study with an OVA-induced murine model of allergic airway disease, we found that the increased inflammatory cells, airway hyperresponsiveness, increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and the increased NF-κB levels in lungs after OVA inhalation were significantly reduced by the administration of silver nanoparticles. In addition, we have also found that the increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after OVA inhalation were decreased by the administration of silver nanoparticles. These results indicate that silver nanoparticles may attenuate antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. And antioxidant effect of silver nanoparticles could be one of the molecular bases in the murine model of asthma. These findings may provide a potential molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles in preventing or treating asthma. PMID:20957173

  9. Anti-inflammatory modulation of chronic airway inflammation in the murine house dust mite model.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Kristina; Hincks, Jennifer S; Walsh, Roddy; Wetterstrand, E M Caroline; Fidock, Mark D; Sreckovic, Sasha; Lamb, David J; Douglas, Garry J; Yeadon, Michael; Perros-Huguet, Christelle; Evans, Steven M

    2008-08-01

    Asthma affects 300 million people worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Disease relevant animal models of asthma are required for benchmarking of novel therapeutic mechanisms in comparison to established clinical approaches. We demonstrate that chronic exposure of mice to house dust mite (HDM) extract results in allergic airway inflammation, that can be significantly attenuated by therapeutic intervention with phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition and corticosteroid treatment. Female BALB/c mice were administered intranasally with HDM (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) extract daily for five weeks, and therapeutic intervention with anti-inflammatory treatment (dexamethasone 1 mg/kg subcutaneous once daily, prednisolone 10mg/kg orally twice daily, fluticasone 3, 10 and 30 microg intranasally twice daily, roflumilast 10 mg/kg orally twice daily and intranasally 10 and 30 microg twice daily) was initiated after three weeks of exposure. Chronic HDM extract exposure resulted in significant airway inflammation, demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage cell infiltration and lung tissue inflammatory gene expression by TaqMan low density array. Chronic steroid treatment significantly inhibited these parameters. In addition, roflumilast caused a significant reduction in airway inflammatory cell infiltration. We have demonstrated that chronic HDM-induced allergic inflammation can be significantly ameliorated by steroid treatment, and that phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition modulates inflammatory cell infiltration. Therefore, the murine HDM model may be a useful tool for evaluating new targets for the treatment of asthma.

  10. Pycnogenol Ameliorates Asthmatic Airway Inflammation and Inhibits the Function of Goblet Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoe; Han, Bo; Chen, Xing; Wu, Qiaoling; Wang, Lijun; Li, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) is utilized in the treatment of various diseases ranging from chronic inflammation to circulatory diseases, but its efficacy and functional mechanism in pediatric asthma continue to remain obscure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and molecular mechanism of PYC on regulation of asthmatic airway inflammation. We found that PYC with tail intravenous injection of 50 mg/kg or intragastric administration of 100 mg/kg all reduced ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway injury. Pharmacokinetics of PYC was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography assay, indicating that PYC was quickly absorbed into the blood after intragastric administration, and PYC metabolism was later improved gradually with increase of time after PYC administration. PYC has a higher bioavailability of 71.96%, and it was more easily absorbed by the body. PYC inhibited the number of total inflammatory cells and levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of OVA-induced mice. PYC inhibited IL-13 secretion from the Th2 cells, thereby causing a reduction in expression of the signaling molecules in JAK/STAT6 pathway in airway epithelial cells. STAT6 silence suppressed IL-13-increased acetylcholine level. STAT6 overexpression promoted expression of goblet cell metaplasia-associated molecules (FOXA3, SPDEF, and Muc5ac). PYC suppressed OVA-induced expression of FOXA3, SPDEF, and Muc5ac in lung. Our findings indicate that PYC has a higher bioavailability and it prevents emergence of OVA-induced airway injury and airway inflammation in mice by inhibiting IL-13/JAK/STAT6 pathway and blocking release of acetylcholine to reduce goblet cell metaplasia.

  11. Smoking-induced CXCL14 expression in the human airway epithelium links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Sackrowitz, Rachel; Fukui, Tomoya; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ion Wa; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    CXCL14, a recently described epithelial cytokine, plays putative multiple roles in inflammation and carcinogenesis. In the context that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are both smoking-related disorders associated with airway epithelial disorder and inflammation, we hypothesized that the airway epithelium responds to cigarette smoking with altered CXCL14 gene expression, contributing to the disease-relevant phenotype. Using genome-wide microarrays with subsequent immunohistochemical analysis, the data demonstrate that the expression of CXCL14 is up-regulated in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers and further increased in COPD smokers, especially within hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions, in association with multiple genes relevant to epithelial structural integrity and cancer. In vitro experiments revealed that the expression of CXCL14 is induced in the differentiated airway epithelium by cigarette smoke extract, and that epidermal growth factor mediates CXCL14 up-regulation in the airway epithelium through its effects on the basal stem/progenitor cell population. Analyses of two independent lung cancer cohorts revealed a dramatic up-regulation of CXCL14 expression in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. High expression of the COPD-associated CXCL14-correlating cluster of genes was linked in lung adenocarcinoma with poor survival. These data suggest that the smoking-induced expression of CXCL14 in the airway epithelium represents a novel potential molecular link between smoking-associated airway epithelial injury, COPD, and lung cancer.

  12. Phloretin Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Asthmatic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Chung; Fang, Li-Wen; Liou, Chian-Jiun

    2017-01-01

    Phloretin (PT), isolated from the apple tree, was previously demonstrated to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages and anti-adiposity effects in adipocytes. Inflammatory immune cells generate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for stimulated severe airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether PT could reduce oxidative stress, airway inflammation, and eosinophil infiltration in asthmatic mice, and ameliorate oxidative and inflammatory responses in tracheal epithelial cells. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma symptoms. Mice were randomly assigned to the five experimental groups: normal controls; OVA-induced asthmatic mice; and OVA-induced mice injected intraperitoneally with one of the three PT doses (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg). In addition, we treated inflammatory human tracheal epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells) with PT to assess oxidative responses and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We found that PT significantly reduced goblet cell hyperplasia and eosinophil infiltration, which decreased AHR, inflammation, and oxidative responses in the lungs of OVA-sensitized mice. PT also decreased malondialdehyde levels in the lung and reduced Th2 cytokine production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Furthermore, PT reduced ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and eotaxin production in BEAS-2B cells. PT also suppressed monocyte cell adherence to inflammatory BEAS-2B cells. These findings suggested that PT alleviated pathological changes, inflammation, and oxidative stress by inhibiting Th2 cytokine production in asthmatic mice. PT showed therapeutic potential for ameliorating asthma symptoms in the future. PMID:28243240

  13. Potential Masking of Airway Eosinophilic Inflammation by Combination Therapy in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Jae; Jeung, Yun-Jin; Lee, Jin-Young; Oh, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-acting β2 agonists (LABA) may mask ongoing bronchial inflammation, leaving asthmatic patients at greater risk of severe complications. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of combination therapy using low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) plus LABA on airway inflammation in asthma to the effect of medium-dose ICS alone. Methods Twenty-four patients with asthma not controlled by low-dose (400 µg per day) budesonide alone were enrolled in this prospective crossover study. Patients were randomized into 2 treatment phases: one receiving medium-dose (800 µg per day) budesonide (ICS phase), and the other receiving a combination therapy of low-dose budesonide/formoterol (360 µg/9 µg per day) delivered by a single inhaler (LABA phase). Each treatment phase lasted for 6 week, after which patients were crossed over. Asthma symptoms, lung function, and airway inflammation were compared between the 2 phases. Results Twenty-three patients completed the study; adequate sputum samples were collected from 17 patients. Asthma symptoms and lung function remained similar between the 2 phases. However, the mean sputum eosinophil percentage was higher in the LABA phase than in the ICS phase (5.07±3.82% vs. 1.02±1.70%; P<0.01). Sputum eosinophilia (≥3%) was more frequently observed in the LABA phase than in the ICS phase (six vs. two). Conclusion Addition of LABA may mask airway eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatic patients whose symptoms are not controlled with low-dose ICS. PMID:24587956

  14. IL1RL1 asthma risk variants regulate airway type 2 inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Erin D.; Palandra, Joe; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Ringel, Lando; Rios, Cydney L.; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E.; Sharp, Louis Z.; Everman, Jamie L.; MacLeod, Hannah J.; Lee, Jae W.; Mason, Robert J.; Matthay, Michael A.; Sheldon, Richard T.; Peters, Michael C.; Nocka, Karl H.; Fahy, John V.; Seibold, Max A.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of asthma have identified genetic variants in the IL1RL1 gene, but the molecular mechanisms conferring risk are unknown. IL1RL1 encodes the ST2 receptor (ST2L) for IL-33 and an inhibitory decoy receptor (sST2). IL-33 promotes type 2 inflammation, which is present in some but not all asthmatics. We find that two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL1RL1 — rs1420101 and rs11685480 — are strongly associated with plasma sST2 levels, though neither is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in whole blood. Rather, rs1420101 and rs11685480 mark eQTLs in airway epithelial cells and distal lung parenchyma, respectively. We find that the genetically determined plasma sST2 reservoir, derived from the lung, neutralizes IL-33 activity, and these eQTL SNPs additively increase the risk of airway type 2 inflammation among asthmatics. These risk variants define a population of asthmatics at risk of IL-33–driven type 2 inflammation. PMID:27699235

  15. Preventive Intra Oral Treatment of Sea Cucumber Ameliorate OVA-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-In; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Kang, Seok-Jung; Lee, Jeong-Yeol; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    Sea cucumber extracts have potent biological effects, including anti-viral, anti-cancer, antibacterial, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammation effects. To understand their anti-asthma effects, we induced allergic airway inflammation in mice after 7 oral administrations of the extract. The hyper-responsiveness value in mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum-induced asthma after oral injection of sea cucumber extracts was significantly lower than that in the OVA-alum-induced asthma group. In addition, the number of eosinophils in the lungs of asthma-induced mice pre-treated with sea cucumber extract was significantly decreased compared to that of PBS pre-treated mice. Additionally, CD4[Formula: see text]CD25[Formula: see text]Foxp3[Formula: see text]T (regulatory T; Treg) cells significantly increased in mesenteric lymph nodes after 7 administrations of the extract. These results suggest that sea cucumber extract can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation via Treg cell activation and recruitment to the lung.

  16. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  17. Regulation of IL-4 Receptor Signaling by STUB1 in Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qin; Sha, Youbao; Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Bonilla, Diana; Jyothula, Soma S. S. K.; Pandit, Lavannya; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: IL-4Rα, the common receptor component for IL-4 and IL-13, plays a critical role in IL-4– and IL-13–mediated signaling pathways that regulate airway inflammation and remodeling. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying IL-4Rα turnover and its signal termination remain elusive. Objectives: To evaluate the role of STUB1 (STIP1 homology and U-Box containing protein 1) in regulating IL-4R signaling in airway inflammation. Methods: The roles of STUB1 in IL-4Rα degradation and its signaling were investigated by immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. The involvement of STUB1 in airway inflammation was determined in vivo by measuring lung inflammatory cells infiltration, mucus production, serum lgE levels, and alveolar macrophage M2 activation in STUB1−/− mice. STUB1 expression was evaluated in airway epithelium of patients with asthma and lung tissues of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Measurements and Main Results: STUB1 interacted with IL-4Rα and targeted it for ubiquitination-mediated proteasomal degradation, terminating IL-4 or IL-13 signaling. STUB1 knockout cells showed increased levels of IL-4Rα and sustained STAT6 activation, whereas STUB1 overexpression reduced IL-4Rα levels. Mice deficient in STUB1 had spontaneous airway inflammation, alternative M2 activation of alveolar macrophage, and increased serum IgE. STUB1 levels were increased in airways of subjects with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting that up-regulation of STUB1 might be an important feedback mechanism to dampen IL-4R signaling in airway inflammation. Conclusions: Our study identified a previously uncharacterized role for STUB1 in regulating IL-4R signaling, which might provide a new strategy for attenuating airway inflammation. PMID:24251647

  18. Loss-of-function of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase reversibly increases the severity of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aich, Jyotirmoi; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ahmad, Tanveer; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2012-06-06

    Inositol polyphosphate phosphatases regulate the magnitude of phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling output. Although inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase is known to regulate phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling, little is known regarding its role in asthma pathogenesis. Here we show that modulation of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase alters the severity of asthma. Allergic airway inflammation in mice led to calpain-mediated degradation of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase. In allergic airway inflammation models, preventing inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase degradation by inhibiting calpain activity, or overexpression of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase in mouse lungs, led to attenuation of the asthma phenotype. Conversely, knockdown of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase severely aggravated the allergic airway inflammation and the asthma phenotype. Interestingly, inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase knockdown in lungs of naive mice led to spontaneous airway hyper-responsiveness, suggesting that inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase could be vital in maintaining the lung homeostasis. We suggest that inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase has an important role in modulating inflammatory response in asthma, and thus, uncover a new understanding of the complex interplay between inositol signalling and asthma, which could provide alternative strategies in asthma management.

  19. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  20. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  1. New Role of Adult Lung c-kit+ Cells in a Mouse Model of Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cappetta, Donato; Urbanek, Konrad; Esposito, Grazia; Matteis, Maria; Sgambato, Manuela; Tartaglione, Gioia; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction in asthma. Emerging evidence points to the involvement of c-kit+ cells in lung homeostasis, although their potential role in asthma is unknown. Our aim was to isolate c-kit+ cells from normal mouse lungs and to test whether these cells can interfere with hallmarks of asthma in an animal model. Adult mouse GFP-tagged c-kit+ cells, intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, positively affected airway remodeling and improved airway function. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of cell-treated animals, a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and in IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 release, along with an increase of IL-10, was observed. In MSC-treated mice, the macrophage polarization to M2-like subset may explain, at least in part, the increment in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. After in vitro stimulation of c-kit+ cells with proinflammatory cytokines, the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and TGFβ were upregulated. These data, together with the increased apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo, indicate that c-kit+ cells downregulate immune response in asthma by influencing local environment, possibly by cell-to-cell contact combined to paracrine action. In conclusion, intratracheally administered c-kit+ cells reduce inflammation, positively modulate airway remodeling, and improve function. These data document previously unrecognized properties of c-kit+ cells, able to impede pathophysiological features of experimental airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:28090152

  2. CRTH2 antagonism significantly ameliorates airway hyperreactivity and downregulates inflammation-induced genes in a mouse model of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Nicholas W; Berlin, Aaron A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Sásik, Roman; Sprague, L James; Ly, Tai Wei; Hardiman, Gary; Boehme, Stefen A; Bacon, Kevin B

    2008-11-01

    Prostaglandin D(2), the ligand for the G protein-coupled receptors DP1 and CRTH2, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the allergic response in diseases such as asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. This prostanoid also fulfills a number of physiological, anti-inflammatory roles through its receptor DP1. We investigated the role of PGD(2) and CRTH2 in allergic pulmonary inflammation by using a highly potent and specific antagonist of CRTH2. Administration of this antagonist ameliorated inflammation caused by either acute or subchronic sensitization using the cockroach egg antigen. Gene expression and ELISA analysis revealed that there was reduced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA or protein produced, as well as a wide array of genes associated with the Th2-type proinflammatory response. Importantly, the CRTH2 antagonist reduced antigen-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a antibody levels as well as decreased mucus deposition and leukocyte infiltration in the large airways. Collectively, these findings suggest that the PGD(2)-CRTH2 activation axis has a pivotal role in mediating the inflammation and the underlying immune response in a T cell-driven model of allergic airway inflammation.

  3. Reduced Lung Function in a Chronic Asthma Model Is Associated with Prolonged Inflammation, but Independent of Peribronchial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula; Doths, Sandra; Stroet, Anke; Schwarze, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background In asthma, mechanisms contributing to chronicity remain to be determined. Recent models of sensitisation with prolonged airway allergen challenges reproduce typical features of chronic asthma. However, the interplay between inflammation, structural changes and lung function is poorly understood. This study was performed to delineate functional, structural and immunological airway changes after cessation of long term challenges to elucidate factors contributing to the development of prolonged lung function changes. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice sensitised systemically were consecutively challenged intranasally with ovalbumin for two or eight weeks. After the end of challenges, lung function, airway inflammation, features of airway remodelling, local T-cell cytokines and systemic ovalbumin-specific antibodies were monitored. Long term challenges resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness lasting 2 weeks and reduced baseline lung function for 6 weeks after their cessation. In contrast, these changes resolved within one week after short term challenges. Prolonged transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)1 production and marked peribronchial fibrosis were only induced by long term challenges. Importantly, fibrosis became apparent only after the onset of lung function changes and outlasted them. Further, long term challenges led to prolonged and intense airway inflammation with marked lymphocytosis, but moderate eosinophilia, sustained IL-5 production and ovalbumin-specific IgG2a antibodies, the latter suggesting a Th1 component to the immune response. In contrast, following short term challenges airway inflammation was dominated by eosinophils and associated with a strong, but transient IL-13 response. Conclusions Prolonged lung function changes after long term allergen challenges seem to develop and resolve independently of the persistent peribronchial fibrosis. They are more closely associated with intense airway inflammation, marked lymphocytosis

  4. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib reduces lung inflammation and remodelling in experimental allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, AL; Magalhães, RF; Branco, VC; Silva, JD; Cruz, FF; Marques, PS; Ferreira, TPT; Morales, MM; Martins, MA; Olsen, PC

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Asthma is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Despite recent advances in understanding of its pathophysiology, asthma remains a major public health problem, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this context, we sought to ascertain whether treatment with the TK inhibitor dasatinib might repair inflammatory and remodelling processes, thus improving lung function, in a murine model of asthma. Experimental Approach Animals were sensitized and subsequently challenged, with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline. Twenty‐four hours after the last challenge, animals were treated with dasatinib, dexamethasone, or saline, every 12 h for 7 consecutive days. Twenty‐four hours after the last treatment, the animals were killed, and data were collected. Lung structure and remodelling were evaluated by morphometric analysis, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy of lung sections. Inflammation was assessed by cytometric analysis and ELISA, and lung function was evaluated by invasive whole‐body plethysmography. Key Results In OVA mice, dasatinib, and dexamethasone led to significant reductions in airway hyperresponsiveness. Dasatinib was also able to attenuate alveolar collapse, contraction index, and collagen fibre deposition, as well as increasing elastic fibre content, in OVA mice. Concerning the inflammatory process, dasatinib reduced inflammatory cell influx to the airway and lung‐draining mediastinal lymph nodes, without inducing the thymic atrophy promoted by dexamethasone. Conclusions and Implications In this model of allergic asthma, dasatinib effectively blunted the inflammatory and remodelling processes in asthmatic lungs, enhancing airway repair and thus improving lung mechanics. PMID:26989986

  5. Association between lung function and airway wall density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Tedrow, John; Park, Sang C.; Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Drescher, John M.; Gur, David; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2009-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) examination is often used to quantify the relation between lung function and airway remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this preliminary study, we examined the association between lung function and airway wall computed attenuation ("density") in 200 COPD screening subjects. Percent predicted FVC (FVC%), percent predicted FEV1 (FEV1%), and the ratio of FEV1 to FVC as a percentage (FEV1/FVC%) were measured post-bronchodilator. The apical bronchus of the right upper lobe was manually selected from CT examinations for evaluation. Total airway area, lumen area, wall area, lumen perimeter and wall area as fraction of the total airway area were computed. Mean HU (meanHU) and maximum HU (maxHU) values were computed across pixels assigned membership in the wall and with a HU value greater than -550. The Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) between FVC%, FEV1%, and FEV1/FVC% and meanHU were -0.221 (p = 0.002), -0.175 (p = 0.014), and -0.110 (p = 0.123), respectively. The PCCs for maxHU were only significant for FVC%. The correlations between lung function and the airway morphometry parameters were slightly stronger compared to airway wall density. MeanHU was significantly correlated with wall area (PCC = 0.720), airway area (0.498) and wall area percent (0.611). This preliminary work demonstrates that airway wall density is associated with lung function. Although the correlations in our study were weaker than a recent study, airway wall density initially appears to be an important parameter in quantitative CT analysis of COPD.

  6. What does airway resistance tell us about lung function?

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, David A

    2012-01-01

    Spirometry is considered the primary method to detect the air flow limitation associated with obstructive lung disease. However, air flow limitation is the end-result of many factors that contribute to obstructive lung disease. One of these factors is increased airway resistance. Airway resistance is traditionally measured by relating air flow and driving pressure using body plethysmography, thus deriving airway resistance (R(aw)), specific airway resistance (sR(aw)), and specific airway conductance (sG(aw)). Other methods to measure airway resistance include the forced oscillation technique (FOT), which allows calculation of respiratory system resistance (R(RS)) and reactance (X(RS)), and the interrupter technique, which allows calculation of interrupter resistance (R(int)). An advantage of these other methods is that they may be easier to perform than spirometry, making them particularly suited to patients who cannot perform spirometry, such as young children, patients with neuromuscular disorders, or patients on mechanical ventilation. Since spirometry also requires a deep inhalation, which can alter airway resistance, these alternative methods may provide more sensitive measures of airway resistance. Furthermore, the FOT provides unique information about lung mechanics that is not available from analysis using spirometry, body plethysmography, or the interrupter technique. However, it is unclear whether any of these measures of airway resistance contribute clinically important information to the traditional measures derived from spirometry (FEV(1), FVC, and FEV(1)/FVC). The purpose of this paper is to review the physiology and methodology of these measures of airway resistance, and then focus on their clinical utility in relation to each other and to spirometry.

  7. Small airways involvement in coal mine dust lung disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Joshua; Stansbury, Robert C; Petsonk, Edward L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation of coal mine dust results in a spectrum of symptoms, dysfunction, and pathological changes in the respiratory tract that collectively have been labeled coal mine dust lung disease. Recent reports from periodic health surveillance among underground and surface coal miners in the United States have demonstrated an increasing prevalence and severity of dust diseases, and have also documented that some miners experience rapid disease progression. The coal macule is an inflammatory lesion associated with deposited dust, and occurs in the region of the most distal conducting airways and proximal respiratory bronchioles. Inflammatory changes in the small airways have long been recognized as the signature lung pathology among coal miners. Human and laboratory studies have suggested oxidant injury, and increased recruitment and activity of macrophages play important roles in dust-induced lung injury. However, the functional importance of the small airway changes was debated for many years. We reviewed published literature that documents a pervasive occurrence of both physiologic and structural abnormalities in small airways among coal miners and other workers exposed to airborne particulates. There is increasing evidence supporting an important association of abnormalities in the small peripheral airways with the development of respiratory symptoms, deficits in spirometry values, and accelerated declines in ventilatory lung function. Pathologic changes associated with mineral dust deposition in the small airways may be of particular importance in contemporary miners with rapidly progressive respiratory impairment.

  8. Oroxylin A Inhibits Allergic Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin (OVA)-Induced Asthma Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, De-Gang; Diao, Bao-Zhong; Zhou, Wen; Feng, Jia-Long

    2016-04-01

    Oroxylin A, a natural flavonoid isolated from the medicinal herb Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of oroxylin A on allergic inflammation in OVA-induced asthma murine model. BABL/c mice were sensitized and airway-challenged with OVA to induce asthma. Oroxylin A (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 1 h before the OVA treatment on day 21 to 23. The results showed that oroxylin A attenuated OVA-induced lung histopathologic changes, airway hyperresponsiveness, and the number of inflammatory cells. Oroxylin A also inhibited the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE in BALF. Furthermore, oroxylin A significantly inhibited OVA-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, these results suggested that oroxylin A inhibited airway inflammation in OVA-induced asthma murine model by inhibiting NF-κB activation. These results suggested that oroxylin A was a potential therapeutic drug for treating allergic asthma.

  9. Parasitic Nematode-Induced CD4+Foxp3+T Cells Can Ameliorate Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Park, Sang Kyun; Jang, Min Seong; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Background The recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T (Treg) cells is one of the most important mechanisms by which parasites down-regulate the immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the effects of Treg cells from Trichinella spiralis-infected mice and uninfected mice on experimental allergic airway inflammation in order to understand the functions of parasite-induced Treg cells. After four weeks of T. spiralis infection, we isolated Foxp3-GFP-expressing cells from transgenic mice using a cell sorter. We injected CD4+Foxp3+ cells from T. spiralis-infected [Inf(+)Foxp3+] or uninfected [Inf(-)Foxp3+] mice into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice before the induction of inflammation or during inflammation. Inflammation was induced by ovalbumin (OVA)-alum sensitization and OVA challenge. The concentrations of the Th2-related cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and the levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 in the serum were lower in mice that received intravenous application of Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells [IV(inf):+(+) group] than in control mice. Some features of allergic airway inflammation were ameliorated by the intravenous application of Inf(-)Foxp3+ cells [IV(inf):+(-) group], but the effects were less distinct than those observed in the IV(inf):+(+) group. We found that Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells migrated to inflammation sites in the lung and expressed higher levels of Treg-cell homing receptors (CCR5 and CCR9) and activation markers (Klrg1, Capg, GARP, Gzmb, OX40) than did Inf(-)Foxp3+ cells. Conclusion/Significance T. spiralis infection promotes the proliferation and functional activation of Treg cells. Parasite-induced Treg cells migrate to the inflammation site and suppress immune responses more effectively than non-parasite-induced Treg cells. The adoptive transfer of Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells is an effective method for the treatment and prevention of allergic airway diseases in mice and is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment

  10. Effect of a mucoactive compound (CO 1408) on airway hyperreactivity and inflammation induced by passive cigarette smoke exposure in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, A; Daffonchio, L; Brandolini, L; Zuccari, G

    1994-04-01

    Environmental exposure to tobacco smoke contributes to the onset of several lung diseases, e.g. chronic bronchitis and asthma, including an increase in airway reactivity. We have investigated the effect of a new mucoactive compound, CO 1408, on airway hyperreactivity and lung inflammation induced in guinea-pigs by passive cigarette smoke exposure. Animals were exposed to cigarette smoke in a Plexi-glass box, three times a day for four days. Airway reactivity to histamine was assessed ex-vivo in lung parenchymal strips. As a measure of lung inflammation, the number of leucocytes was evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and histological sections. Passive smoke exposure potentiated histamine-induced contraction in lung parenchymal strips, a phenomenon associated with an increase in proinflammatory cells in the BAL fluids and enhanced eosinophil infiltration into parenchymal tissues. Pretreatment with oral CO 1408 at 400 mg.kg-1 but not 100 mg.kg-1, completely prevented the cigarette smoke-induced airway hyperreactivity. 400 mg.kg-1 CO 1408 also inhibited the increase in cell numbers in the BAL fluids, but not eosinophil recruitment in parenchymal tissues. The present data indicate the ability of CO 1408 to modulate smoke-induced airway hyperreactivity and, to some extent, lung inflammation, an effect which might be of value in the therapy of obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  11. Role of IRE1α/XBP-1 in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carla M. P.; Lubamba, Bob A.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pulmonary disease is characterized by chronic airway infection and inflammation. The infectious and inflamed CF airway environment impacts on the innate defense of airway epithelia and airway macrophages. The CF airway milieu induces an adaptation in these cells characterized by increased basal inflammation and a robust inflammatory response to inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have indicated that these responses depend on activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). This review discusses the contribution of airway epithelia and airway macrophages to CF airway inflammatory responses and specifically highlights the functional importance of the UPR pathway mediated by IRE1/XBP-1 in these processes. These findings suggest that targeting the IRE1/XBP-1 UPR pathway may be a therapeutic strategy for CF airway disease. PMID:28075361

  12. Baicalein Reduces Airway Injury in Allergen and IL-13 Induced Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ahmad, Tanveer; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Leishangthem, Geeta Devi; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram; Sharma, Surendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Baicalein, a bioflavone present in the dry roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, is known to reduce eotaxin production in human fibroblasts. However, there are no reports of its anti-asthma activity or its effect on airway injury. Methodology/Principal Findings In a standard experimental asthma model, male Balb/c mice that were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA), treated with baicalein (10 mg/kg, ip) or a vehicle control, either during (preventive use) or after OVA challenge (therapeutic use). In an alternate model, baicalein was administered to male Balb/c mice which were given either IL-4 or IL-13 intranasally. Features of asthma were determined by estimating airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), histopathological changes and biochemical assays of key inflammatory molecules. Airway injury was determined with apoptotic assays, transmission electron microscopy and assessing key mitochondrial functions. Baicalein treatment reduced AHR and inflammation in both experimental models. TGF-β1, sub-epithelial fibrosis and goblet cell metaplasia, were also reduced. Furthermore, baicalein treatment significantly reduced 12/15-LOX activity, features of mitochondrial dysfunctions, and apoptosis of bronchial epithelia. Conclusion/Significance Our findings demonstrate that baicalein can attenuate important features of asthma, possibly through the reduction of airway injury and restoration of mitochondrial function. PMID:23646158

  13. PM2.5-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Keiki; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okuda, Tomoaki; Oka, Akira; Kubo, Masayuki; Eguchi, Eri; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2017-03-01

    The allergic inflammatory effects of particulate matter (PM) 2.5, collected with the cyclone system in Yokohama city in Japan, were investigated in NC/Nga mice, which are hypersensitive to mite allergens. PM2.5 with alum was injected intraperitoneally for sensitization. Five days later, 200 μg of PM2.5 in 25 μL of saline was administered to mice intranasally five times for further sensitization. On the 11th day, PM2.5 was administered as a challenge. On the 12th day, mice were examined for airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell count, mRNA expression of Th1 , Th2 cytokines, and metallothioneins in lung tissue, and histopathology. PM2.5 increased AHR, total cell numbers including eosinophils in BALF, and mRNA levels of IL-5, IL-22, eotaxin, eotaxin 2, and metallothionein 3. In PM2.5-induced lungs, inflammation was observed around the bronchus. These results demonstrate that PM2.5 alone, collected with the cyclone system in Yokohama city in Japan, induces asthma-like airway inflammation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1047-1054, 2017.

  14. Inhibition of airway inflammation and remodeling by sitagliptin in murine chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nader, Manar A

    2015-12-01

    In this study the role of sitagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor, DPP-4, and dexamethasone in ameliorating inflammation and remodeling of chronic asthma in a mouse model were investigated. Mice sensitized to ovalbumin were chronically challenged with aerosolized antigen for 3days a week continued for 8weeks. During this period animals were treated with sitagliptin or dexamethasone daily. Assessment of inflammatory cell, oxidative markers, total nitrate/nitrite (NOx), interleukin (IL)-13, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and/or lung tissue were done. Also histopathological and immuno-histochemical analysis for lung was carried out. Compared with vehicle alone, treatment with sitagliptin or dexamethasone significantly reduced accumulation of eosinophils and chronic inflammatory cells, subepithelial collagenization, and thickening of the airway epithelium. Also both drug reduced goblet cell hyperplasia, oxidative stress, TGF-β1, IL-13 and epithelial cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for nuclear factor κ-B (NFκ-B). These data indicate that sitagliptin like dexamethasone may play a beneficial role reducing airway inflammation and remodeling in chronic murine model of asthma.

  15. Lung injury, inflammation and Akt signaling following inhalation of particulate hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G.; Gigley, Jason P.; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D.

    2009-02-15

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0-24 h) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-{alpha} levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii infection blocks the development of allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, I; Giovannoni, M; Batalla, E; Martin, V; Frank, F M; Piazzon, I; Goldman, A

    2009-02-01

    There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofaecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. Infection with T. gondii induces a strong cell-mediated immunity with a highly polarized T helper type 1 (Th1) response in early stages of infection. Using a well-known murine model of allergic lung inflammation, we sought to investigate whether T. gondii infection could modulate the susceptibility to develop respiratory allergies. Both acute and chronic infection with T. gondii before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished allergic inflammation, as shown by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, mononuclear and eosinophil cell infiltration around airways and vessels and goblet cell hyperplasia. Low allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG1 and high levels of allergen-specific IgG2a serum antibodies were detected. A decreased interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 production by lymph node cells was observed, while no antigen-specific interferon-gamma increase was detected. Higher levels of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 were found in BAL from infected mice. These results show that both acute and chronic parasite infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Our results support the hypothesis that T. gondii infection contributes to protection against allergy in humans.

  17. Type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Blanca Estela; Furuya, María Elena Yuriko; Martínez-Muñiz, Irma; Vargas, Mario H; Flores-Salgado, Rosalinda

    2013-01-01

    A seven-month-old girl, born prematurely (birth weight 1000 g) from a twin pregnancy, was admitted to hospital due to recurrent pneumonia and atelectasis. She experienced cough and respiratory distress during feeding. The right hemithorax was smaller than the left, with diminished breath sounds and dullness. Chest x-rays revealed decreased lung volume and multiple radiolucent images in the right lung, as well as overdistention of the left lung. An esophagogram revealed three bronchial branches arising from the lower one-third of the esophagus, corresponding to the right lung and ending in a cul-de-sac. A diagnosis of esophageal lung was established. On bronchography, the right lung was absent and the trachea only continued into the left main bronchus. Echocardiography and angiotomography revealed agenesis of the pulmonary artery right branch. The surgical finding was an esophageal right lung, which was removed; the histopathological diagnosis was type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung. PMID:23762890

  18. Differential cellular responses in healthy mice and in mice with established airway inflammation when exposed to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Åsa; Bergström, Ulrika; Ågren, Lina; Österlund, Lars; Sandström, Thomas; Bucht, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory and immunological responses in airways and lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), following lung exposure to iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles (NPs). The responses to the hematite NPs were evaluated in both healthy non-sensitized mice, and in sensitized mice with an established allergic airway disease. The mice were exposed intratracheally to either hematite NPs or to vehicle (PBS) and the cellular responses were evaluated on days 1, 2, and 7, post-exposure. Exposure to hematite NPs increased the numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the airways of non-sensitized mice on days 1 and 2 post-exposure; at these time points the number of lymphocytes was also elevated in the LDLNs. In contrast, exposing sensitized mice to hematite NPs induced a rapid and unspecific cellular reduction in the alveolar space on day 1 post-exposure; a similar decrease of lymphocytes was also observed in the LDLN. The results indicate that cells in the airways and in the LDLN of individuals with established airway inflammation undergo cell death when exposed to hematite NPs. A possible explanation for this toxic response is the extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pro-oxidative environment of inflamed airways. This study demonstrates how sensitized and non-sensitized mice respond differently to hematite NP exposure, and it highlights the importance of including individuals with respiratory disorders when evaluating health effects of inhaled nanomaterials.

  19. Relationships between Mucosal Antibodies, Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) Infection and Airway Inflammation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephen; Thomas, Steve; Leung, Stephanie; Cox, Karen; Pascal, Thierry G.; Ostridge, Kristoffer; Welch, Lindsay; Tuck, Andrew C.; Clarke, Stuart C.; Gorringe, Andrew; Wilkinson, Tom M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a key pathogen in COPD, being associated with airway inflammation and risk of exacerbation. Why some patients are susceptible to colonisation is not understood. We hypothesised that this susceptibility may be due to a deficiency in mucosal humoral immunity. The aim of our study (NCT01701869) was to quantify the amount and specificity of antibodies against NTHi in the lungs and the associated risk of infection and inflammation in health and COPD. Phlebotomy, sputum induction and bronchoscopy were performed on 24 mild-to-moderate COPD patients and 8 age and smoking-matched controls. BAL (Bronchoalveolar lavage) total IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgM and IgA concentrations were significantly increased in COPD patients compared to controls. NTHi was detected in the lungs of 7 of the COPD patients (NTHi+ve—29%) and these patients had a higher median number of previous exacerbations than NTHi-ve patients as well as evidence of increased systemic inflammation. When comparing NTHi+ve versus NTHi-ve patients we observed a decrease in the amount of both total IgG1 (p = 0.0068) and NTHi-specific IgG1 (p = 0.0433) in the BAL of NTHi+ve patients, but no differences in total IgA or IgM. We observed no evidence of decreased IgG1 in the serum of NTHi+ve patients, suggesting this phenomenon is restricted to the airway. Furthermore, the NTHi+ve patients had significantly greater levels of IL-1β (p = 0.0003), in BAL than NTHi-ve COPD patients.This study indicates that the presence of NTHi is associated with reduced levels and function of IgG1 in the airway of NTHi-colonised COPD patients. This decrease in total and NTHI-specific IgG1 was associated with greater systemic and airway inflammation and a history of more frequent exacerbations and may explain the susceptibility of some COPD patients to the impacts of NTHi. PMID:27898728

  20. Relationships between Mucosal Antibodies, Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) Infection and Airway Inflammation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Staples, Karl J; Taylor, Stephen; Thomas, Steve; Leung, Stephanie; Cox, Karen; Pascal, Thierry G; Ostridge, Kristoffer; Welch, Lindsay; Tuck, Andrew C; Clarke, Stuart C; Gorringe, Andrew; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2016-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a key pathogen in COPD, being associated with airway inflammation and risk of exacerbation. Why some patients are susceptible to colonisation is not understood. We hypothesised that this susceptibility may be due to a deficiency in mucosal humoral immunity. The aim of our study (NCT01701869) was to quantify the amount and specificity of antibodies against NTHi in the lungs and the associated risk of infection and inflammation in health and COPD. Phlebotomy, sputum induction and bronchoscopy were performed on 24 mild-to-moderate COPD patients and 8 age and smoking-matched controls. BAL (Bronchoalveolar lavage) total IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgM and IgA concentrations were significantly increased in COPD patients compared to controls. NTHi was detected in the lungs of 7 of the COPD patients (NTHi+ve-29%) and these patients had a higher median number of previous exacerbations than NTHi-ve patients as well as evidence of increased systemic inflammation. When comparing NTHi+ve versus NTHi-ve patients we observed a decrease in the amount of both total IgG1 (p = 0.0068) and NTHi-specific IgG1 (p = 0.0433) in the BAL of NTHi+ve patients, but no differences in total IgA or IgM. We observed no evidence of decreased IgG1 in the serum of NTHi+ve patients, suggesting this phenomenon is restricted to the airway. Furthermore, the NTHi+ve patients had significantly greater levels of IL-1β (p = 0.0003), in BAL than NTHi-ve COPD patients.This study indicates that the presence of NTHi is associated with reduced levels and function of IgG1 in the airway of NTHi-colonised COPD patients. This decrease in total and NTHI-specific IgG1 was associated with greater systemic and airway inflammation and a history of more frequent exacerbations and may explain the susceptibility of some COPD patients to the impacts of NTHi.

  1. Validation of the conceptual anatomical model of the lung airway.

    PubMed

    Fleming, John S; Sauret, Veronique; Conway, Joy H; Martonen, Ted B

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual anatomical model of the lung airway considers each lung volume divided into ten concentric shells. It specifies the volume of each airway generation in each shell, using Weibel morphometry. This study updates and validates the model and evaluates the errors obtained when using it to estimate inhaled aerosol deposition per generation from spatial imaging data. A comparison of different airway models describing the volume per generation, including data from CT images of a lung cast and a human subject, was performed. A revised version of the conceptual model was created, using the average volume per generation from these data. The new model was applied to derive the aerosol deposition per generation from 24 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. Analysis errors were assessed by applying the same calculations but using airway models based on the minimum and maximum volumes per generation. The mean shell position of each generation in the average model was not significantly different from either CT model. However there were differences between the volumes per generation of the different models. The root mean square differences between bronchial airways deposition fraction (generations 2-8) obtained from the maximum and minimum models compared to the new average model was 0.66 percentage points (14%). For the conducting airways deposition fraction (generations 2-15) this was 1.66 percentage points (12%). The conceptual model is consistent with CT measurements of airway geometry. The errors resulting from using a generic airway model to interpret 3D radionuclide image data have been defined.

  2. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resolve Airway Inflammation, Hyperreactivity, and Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, leading to progressive airway remodeling and a concomitant decline in lung function. The management of OA remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Thus, establishing effective therapies might overcome the natural history of the disease. We evaluated the ability of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), either unmodified or engineered to secrete the IL-33 decoy receptor sST2, to attenuate the inflammatory and respiratory symptoms in a previously validated mouse model of OA to ammonium persulfate (AP). Twenty-four hours after a dermal AP sensitization and intranasal challenge regimen, the animals received intravenously 1×106 cells (either hASCs or hASCs overexpressing sST2) or saline and were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 days after treatment. The infused hASCs induced an anti-inflammatory and restorative program upon reaching the AP-injured, asthmatic lungs, leading to early reduction of neutrophilic inflammation and total IgE production, preserved alveolar architecture with nearly absent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, negligible smooth muscle hyperplasia/hypertrophy in the peribronchiolar areas, and baseline airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Local sST2 overexpression barely increased the substantial efficacy displayed by unmodified hASCs. Thus, hASCs may represent a viable multiaction therapeutic capable to adequately respond to the AP-injured lung environment by resolving inflammation, tissue remodeling, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness typical of OA. PMID:24798370

  3. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Ge, Ai; Zhu, Wen; Liu, Ya-Nan; Ji, Ning-Fei; Zha, Wang-Jian; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Zeng, Xiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were abolished by

  4. A geranyl acetophenone targeting cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis prevents allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Norazren; Jambari, Nuzul Nurahya; Zareen, Seema; Akhtar, Mohamad Nadeem; Shaari, Khozirah; Zamri-Saad, Mohamad; Tham, Chau Ling; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Israf, Daud Ahmad

    2012-03-01

    Asthma is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. The current use of corticosteroids in the management of asthma has recently raised issues regarding safety and lack of responsiveness in 5–10% of asthmatic individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a non-steroidal small molecule that has cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) inhibitory activity, upon attenuation of allergic lung inflammation in an acute murine model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and treated with several intraperitoneal doses (100, 20, 2 and 0.2 mg/kg) of 2,4,6,-trihydroxy-3-geranylacetophenone (tHGA). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, blood and lung samples were obtained and respiratory function was measured. OVA sensitization increased pulmonary inflammation and pulmonary allergic inflammation was significantly reduced at doses of 100, 20 and 2 mg/kg with no effect at the lowest dose of 0.2 mg/kg. The beneficial effects in the lung were associated with reduced eosinophilic infiltration and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines and cysLTs. Peripheral blood reduction of total IgE was also a prominent feature. Treatment with tHGA significantly attenuated altered airway hyperresponsiveness as measured by the enhanced pause (Penh) response to incremental doses of methacholine. These data demonstrate that tHGA, a synthetic non-steroidal small molecule, can prevent acute allergic inflammation. This proof of concept opens further avenues of research and development of tHGA as an additional option to the current armamentarium of anti-asthma therapeutics. -- Highlights: ► Safer and effective anti-asthmatic drugs are in great demand. ► tHGA is a new 5-LO/cysLT inhibitor that inhibits allergic asthma in mice. ► tHGA is a natural compound that can be synthesized. ► Doses as low as 2 mg/kg alleviate lung pathology in experimental asthma. ► tHGA is a potential drug lead for the treatment of allergic asthma.

  5. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  6. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  7. Prevention of airway inflammation with topical cream containing imiquimod and small interfering RNA for natriuretic peptide receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Weidong; Mohapatra, Subhra; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Li, Xu; Lockey, Richard F; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2008-01-01

    Background Asthma is a complex disease, characterized by reversible airway obstruction, hyperresponsiveness and chronic inflammation. Principle pharmacologic treatments for asthma include bronchodilating beta2-agonists and anti-inflammatory glucocorticosteroids; but these agents do not target the main cause of the disease, the generation of pathogenic Th2 cells. We previously reported reduction in allergic inflammation in mice deficient in the ANP receptor NPRA. Here we determined whether siRNA for natriuretic peptide receptor A (siNPRA) protected against asthma when administered transdermally. Methods Imiquimod cream mixed with chitosan nanoparticles containing either siRNA green indicator (siGLO) or siNPRA was applied to the skin of mice. Delivery of siGLO was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The anti-inflammatory activity of transdermal siNPRA was tested in OVA-sensitized mice by measuring airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, lung histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results SiGLO appearing in the lung proved the feasibility of transdermal delivery. In a mouse asthma model, BALB/c mice treated with imiquimod cream containing siNPRA chitosan nanoparticles showed significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, lung histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in lung homogenates compared to controls. Conclusion These results demonstrate that topical cream containing imiquimod and siNPRA nanoparticles exerts an anti-inflammatory effect and may provide a new and simple therapy for asthma. PMID:18279512

  8. AMPK agonists ameliorate sodium and fluid transport and inflammation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Michael M; King, J Darwin; Oyster, Nicholas M; Fitch, Adam C; Magill, Amy; Baty, Catherine J; Watkins, Simon C; Kolls, Jay K; Pilewski, Joseph M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2010-06-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits both the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and may inhibit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in epithelia. Here we have tested in primary polarized CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells the effects of AMPK activators, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR), on various parameters that contribute to CF lung disease: ENaC-dependent short-circuit currents (I(sc)), airway surface liquid (ASL) height, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. AMPK activation after overnight treatment with either metformin (2-5 mM) or AICAR (1 mM) substantially inhibited ENaC-dependent I(sc) in both CF and non-CF airway cultures. Live-cell confocal images acquired 60 minutes after apical addition of Texas Red-dextran-containing fluid revealed significantly greater ASL heights after AICAR and metformin treatment relative to controls, suggesting that AMPK-dependent ENaC inhibition slows apical fluid reabsorption. Both metformin and AICAR decreased secretion of various proinflammatory cytokines, both with and without prior LPS stimulation. Finally, prolonged exposure to more physiologically relevant concentrations of metformin (0.03-1 mM) inhibited ENaC currents and decreased proinflammatory cytokine levels in CF HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that novel therapies to activate AMPK in the CF airway may be beneficial by blunting excessive sodium and ASL absorption and by reducing excessive airway inflammation, which are major contributors to CF lung disease.

  9. AMPK Agonists Ameliorate Sodium and Fluid Transport and Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Myerburg, Michael M.; King, J Darwin; Oyster, Nicholas M.; Fitch, Adam C.; Magill, Amy; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Kolls, Jay K.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Hallows, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits both the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel and epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), and may inhibit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in epithelia. Here we have tested in primary polarized CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells the effects of AMPK activators, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-riboside (AICAR), on various parameters that contribute to CF lung disease: ENaC-dependent short-circuit currents (Isc), airway surface liquid (ASL) height, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. AMPK activation after overnight treatment with either metformin (2–5 mM) or AICAR (1 mM) substantially inhibited ENaC-dependent Isc in both CF and non-CF airway cultures. Live-cell confocal images acquired 60 minutes after apical addition of Texas Red–dextran-containing fluid revealed significantly greater ASL heights after AICAR and metformin treatment relative to controls, suggesting that AMPK-dependent ENaC inhibition slows apical fluid reabsorption. Both metformin and AICAR decreased secretion of various proinflammatory cytokines, both with and without prior LPS stimulation. Finally, prolonged exposure to more physiologically relevant concentrations of metformin (0.03–1 mM) inhibited ENaC currents and decreased proinflammatory cytokine levels in CF HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that novel therapies to activate AMPK in the CF airway may be beneficial by blunting excessive sodium and ASL absorption and by reducing excessive airway inflammation, which are major contributors to CF lung disease. PMID:19617399

  10. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Kenneth R.; Pedersen, Brent S.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Modulates Airway Inflammation and Remodelling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Taillé, Camille; Rouvel-Tallec, Anny; Stoica, Maria; Danel, Claire; Dehoux, Monique; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Pretolani, Marina; Aubier, Michel; d’Ortho, Marie-Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is frequently observed in severe asthma but the causal link between the 2 diseases remains hypothetical. The role of OSA-related systemic and airway neutrophilic inflammation in asthma bronchial inflammation or remodelling has been rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to compare hallmarks of inflammation in induced sputum and features of airway remodelling in bronchial biopsies from adult patients with severe asthma with and without OSA. Materials and Methods An overnight polygraphy was performed in 55 patients referred for difficult-to-treat asthma, who complained of nocturnal respiratory symptoms, poor sleep quality or fatigue. We compared sputum analysis, reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, smooth muscle area, vascular density and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchial biopsies. Results In total, 27/55 patients (49%) had OSA diagnosed by overnight polygraphy. Despite a moderate increase in apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; 14.2±1.6 event/h [5–35]), the proportion of sputum neutrophils was higher and that of macrophages lower in OSA than non-OSA patients, with higher levels of interleukin 8 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. The RBM was significantly thinner in OSA than non-OSA patients (5.8±0.4 vs. 7.8±0.4 μm, p<0.05). RBM thickness and OSA severity assessed by the AHI were negatively correlated (rho = -0.65, p<0.05). OSA and non-OSA patients did not differ in age, sex, BMI, lung function, asthma control findings or treatment. Conclusion Mild OSA in patients with severe asthma is associated with increased proportion of neutrophils in sputum and changes in airway remodelling. PMID:26934051

  12. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  13. Effects of continuous negative airway pressure-related lung deflation on upper airway collapsibility.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Marc, I

    1993-09-01

    Continuous negative airway pressure (CNAP) causes a decrease in lung volume, which is known to increase upper airway resistance by itself. We studied how this lung volume change could modify upper airway collapsibility with five normal awake subjects. In a first trial, pressure in a nasal mask (Pm) was progressively decreased in 3- to 5-cmH2O steps (CNAP). In a second trial, changes in lung volumes resulting from CNAP were prevented by applying simultaneously an equivalent level of negative extrathoracic pressure into a poncho-type respirator [isovolumetric CNAP (CNAPisovol)]. For each trial, we examined the relationship between the maximal inspiratory airflow of each flow-limited inspiratory cycle and the corresponding Pm by least-squares linear regression analysis and determined the critical pressure. We also determined the Pm threshold corresponding to the first Pm value below which flow limitation occurred. Flow limitation was observed in each subject with CNAP but in only two subjects with CNAPisovol. In these two subjects, the Pm threshold values were -20 and -9 cmH2O with CNAP and -39 and -16 cmH2O with CNAPisovol, respectively. Critical pressures for the same two subjects were -161 and -96 cmH2O with CNAP and -202 and -197 cmH2O with CNAPisovol, respectively. We conclude that CNAP-induced decreases in lung volume increase upper airway collapsibility.

  14. Role of neutralizing anti-murine interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody on chronic ozone-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Fei, Xia; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Li, Feng; Bao, Wu-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to ozone has led to airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness, which potential mechanisms relate to ozone-induced oxidative stress. IL-17 is a growing target for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the inhibitory effects of anti-murine interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody (IL-17mAb) on adverse effects of ozone which are noted above. After C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone (2.5ppm; 3h) for 12 times over 6 weeks, IL-17mAb, PBS was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1h after ozone or air exposure for 6 weeks and mice were studied 24h after final exposure, monitoring bronchial responsiveness, airway inflammatory cells, lung histology, levels of neutrophil-related chemokine and proinflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum, the expression of IL-17A mRNA and protein, glucocorticoid receptors (GR), and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in lung tissues. The administration of IL-17mAb reduced the ozone-induced increases in total cells, especially neutrophils; decreased levels of cytokines, including IL-8 in BAL fluid, IL-8 and IL-17A in serum; mitigated the severity of airway hyperresponsiveness; attenuated lung inflammation scores and histologic analysis confirmed the suppression of lung inflammation, compared with the administration of a control PBS. Exposure to ozone results in increases in IL-17A production rate, mRNA and protein levels of IL-17A and the protein level of GR. These effects were halted and reversed by IL-17mAb treatment. Furthermore, IL-17mAb also reduced the phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Therefore, we conclude that IL-17mAb may be a useful therapy in ozone-related diseases, including COPD.

  15. Hesperidin suppresses ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse allergic asthma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dajun; Ci, Xinxin; Chu, Xiao; Wei, Miaomiao; Hua, Shucheng; Deng, Xuming

    2012-02-01

    Hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside comprised of the flavanone hesperetin and the disaccharide rutinose, is a plentiful and inexpensive by-product of citrus cultivation. It has been reported to exert a wide range of pharmacological effects that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study, we attempt to determine whether hesperidin inhibits inflammatory mediators in the mouse allergic asthma model. Mice were sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) to induce chronic airway inflammation and airway remodeling. The administration of hesperidin significantly decreased the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared with the OVA-induced group of mice. In addition, hesperidin reduced OVA-specific IgE levels in serum. Hesperidin markedly alleviated the OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled methacholine. Based on lung histopathological studies using hematoxylin and eosin and alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff staining, hesperidin inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion compared with the OVA-induced group of mice. These findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of hesperidin in terms of its effects in a murine model of asthma.

  16. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  17. DA-9601, Artemisia asiatica herbal extract, ameliorates airway inflammation of allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Yun Song; Lee, Bong Ki; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Ro, Jai Youl

    2006-08-31

    We previously reported that DA-9601, ethanol herbal extract of Artemisia asiatica, inhibited histamine and leukotriene releases in guinea pig lung mast cells activated with specific antigen/antibody reaction. This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of DA-9601 on the OVA-induced airway inflammation in allergic asthma mouse model. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA. DA-9601 was administered orally 1 h before every local OVA-challenge. OVA-specific serum IgE was measured by ELISA, recruitment of inflammatory cells in BAL fluids and lung tissues by Diff-Quik and H&E staining, respectively, the expressions of CD40, CD40L and VCAM-1 by immunohistochemistry, goblet cell hyperplasia by PAS staining, activities of MMPs by gelatin zymography, expressions of mRNA and proteins of cytokines by RT-PCR and ELISA, activities of MAP kinases by western blot, and activity of NF-KappaB by EMSA. DA-9601 reduced IgE level, recruitment of inflammatory cells into the BAL fluid and lung tissues, expressions of CD40, CD40L and VCAM-1 molecules, goblet cell hyperplasia, MMPs activity, expressions of mRNA and productions of various cytokines, activities of MAP kinases and NK-KappaB increased from OVA-challenged mice. These data suggest that DA-9601 may be developed as a clinical therapeutic agent in allergic diseases due to suppressing the airway allergic inflammation via regulation of various cellular molecules expressed by MAP kinases/NF-KappaB pathway.

  18. Effects of experimental asthma on inflammation and lung mechanics in sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Feroah, Thom R; Nandedkar, Sandhya D; Holzhauer, Sandra L; Hutchins, William; Schulte, Marie L; Strunk, Robert C; Debaun, Michael R; Hillery, Cheryl A

    2012-03-01

    Experimental asthma increases eosinophil and collagen deposition in the lungs of sickle cell disease (SCD) mice to a greater extent than in control mice. However, the effects of asthma on inflammation and airway physiology remain unclear. To determine effects of asthma on pulmonary inflammation and airway mechanics in SCD mice, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was used to generate chimeric SCD and hemoglobin A mice. Experimental asthma was induced by sensitizing mice with ovalbumin (OVA). Airway mechanics were assessed using forced oscillation techniques. Mouse lungs were examined histologically and physiologically. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factors in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined by multiplex. IgE was quantified by ELISA. LDH was quantified using a colorimetric enzymatic assay. At baseline (nonsensitized), chimeric SCD mice developed hemolytic anemia with sickled red blood cells, mild leukocytosis, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor and IL-13 compared with chimeric hemoglobin A mice. Experimental asthma increased perialveolar eosinophils, plasma IgE, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in chimeric hemoglobin A and SCD mice. IFN-γ levels were reduced in both groups. IL-5 was preferentially increased in chimeric SCD mice but not in hemoglobin A mice. Positive end-expiratory pressures and methacholine studies revealed that chimeric SCD mice had greater resistance in large and small airways compared with hemoglobin A mice at baseline and after OVA sensitization. SCD alone induces a baseline lung pathology that increases large and small airway resistance and primes the lungs to increased inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness after OVA sensitization.

  19. Dectin-2 promotes house dust mite-induced T helper type 2 and type 17 cell differentiation and allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Norimoto, Ayako; Hirose, Koichi; Iwata, Arifumi; Tamachi, Tomohiro; Yokota, Masaya; Takahashi, Kentaro; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    The fact that sensitization against fungi is closely related to the severity of asthma suggests that immune systems recognizing fungi are involved in the pathogenesis of severe asthma. Recently, Dectin-2 (gene symbol, Clec4n), a C-type lectin receptor, has been shown to function as not only a major pattern-recognition receptor for fungi, but also a receptor for some components of house dust mite (HDM) extract, a major allergen for asthma. However, the roles of Dectin-2 in the induction of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation remain largely unknown. Our objective was to determine the roles of Dectin-2 in HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. We examined the roles of Dectin-2 in the induction of HDM-induced T helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cell differentiation and subsequent allergic airway inflammation by using Clec4n-deficient (Clec4n(-/-)) mice. We also investigated Dectin-2-expressing cells in the lung and their roles in HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Clec4n(-/-) mice showed significantly attenuated HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation and decreased Th2 and Th17 cell differentiation. Dectin-2 mRNA, together with Dectin-3 and Fc receptor-γ mRNAs, was expressed in CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs), but not in CD4(+) T cells or epithelial cells in the lung. CD11b(+) DCs isolated from Clec4n(-/-) mice expressed lower amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and costimulatory molecules, which could lead to Th2 and Th17 cell differentiation than those from wild-type mice. HDM-pulsed Clec4n(-/-) DCs were less efficient for the induction of allergic airway inflammation than HDM-pulsed wild-type DCs. In conclusion, Dectin-2 expressed on CD11b(+) DCs promotes HDM-induced Th2 and Th17 cell differentiation and allergic airway inflammation.

  20. Aquaporin-3 potentiates allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Kohei; Oga, Toru; Honda, Tetsuya; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Ma, Xiaojun; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Uno, Kazuko; Fuchikami, Jun-Ichi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Taguchi, Yoshio; Verkman, Alan S; Narumiya, Shuh; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-05-11

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a small transmembrane water/glycerol channel that may facilitate the membrane uptake of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we report that AQP3 potentiates ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma by mediating both chemokine production from alveolar macrophages and T cell trafficking. AQP3 deficient (AQP3(-/-)) mice exhibited significantly reduced airway inflammation compared to wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer experiments showed reduced airway eosinophilic inflammation in mice receiving OVA-sensitized splenocytes from AQP3(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice after OVA challenge, consistently with fewer CD4(+) T cells from AQP3(-/-) mice migrating to the lung than from wild-type mice. Additionally, in vivo and vitro experiments indicated that AQP3 induced the production of some chemokines such as CCL24 and CCL22 through regulating the amount of cellular H2O2 in M2 polarized alveolar macrophages. These results imply a critical role of AQP3 in asthma, and AQP3 may be a novel therapeutic target.

  1. Aquaporin-3 potentiates allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Kohei; Oga, Toru; Honda, Tetsuya; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Ma, Xiaojun; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Uno, Kazuko; Fuchikami, Jun-ichi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Taguchi, Yoshio; Verkman, Alan S.; Narumiya, Shuh; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a small transmembrane water/glycerol channel that may facilitate the membrane uptake of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we report that AQP3 potentiates ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma by mediating both chemokine production from alveolar macrophages and T cell trafficking. AQP3 deficient (AQP3−/−) mice exhibited significantly reduced airway inflammation compared to wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer experiments showed reduced airway eosinophilic inflammation in mice receiving OVA-sensitized splenocytes from AQP3−/− mice compared with wild-type mice after OVA challenge, consistently with fewer CD4+ T cells from AQP3−/− mice migrating to the lung than from wild-type mice. Additionally, in vivo and vitro experiments indicated that AQP3 induced the production of some chemokines such as CCL24 and CCL22 through regulating the amount of cellular H2O2 in M2 polarized alveolar macrophages. These results imply a critical role of AQP3 in asthma, and AQP3 may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27165276

  2. Toxoplasma gondii infection induces suppression in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Ignacio M; Chiurazzi, Romina; Sánchez, Vanesa R; Argenziano, Mariana A; Soto, Ariadna; Picchio, Mariano S; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory disorder characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with inflammatory cells driven mostly by activation of Th2-lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in Western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. We previously showed that both acute and chronic parasite T. gondii infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Based on the high levels of IFN-γ along with the reduction of Th2 phenotype, we hypothesized that the protective effect might be related to the strong Th1 immune response elicited against the parasite. However, other mechanisms could also be implicated. The possibility that regulatory T cells inhibit allergic diseases has received growing support from both animal and human studies. Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in T. gondii induced protection against allergy. Our results show for the first time that thoracic lymph node cells from mice sensitized during chronic T. gondii infection have suppressor activity. Suppression was detected both in vitro, on allergen specific T cell proliferation and in vivo, on allergic lung inflammation after adoptive transference from infected/sensitized mice to previously sensitized animals. This ability was found to be contact-independent and correlated with high levels of TGF-β and CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii Infection Induces Suppression in a Mouse Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fenoy, Ignacio M.; Chiurazzi, Romina; Sánchez, Vanesa R.; Argenziano, Mariana A.; Soto, Ariadna; Picchio, Mariano S.; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory disorder characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with inflammatory cells driven mostly by activation of Th2-lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in Western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. We previously showed that both acute and chronic parasite T. gondii infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Based on the high levels of IFN-γ along with the reduction of Th2 phenotype, we hypothesized that the protective effect might be related to the strong Th1 immune response elicited against the parasite. However, other mechanisms could also be implicated. The possibility that regulatory T cells inhibit allergic diseases has received growing support from both animal and human studies. Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in T. gondii induced protection against allergy. Our results show for the first time that thoracic lymph node cells from mice sensitized during chronic T. gondii infection have suppressor activity. Suppression was detected both in vitro, on allergen specific T cell proliferation and in vivo, on allergic lung inflammation after adoptive transference from infected/sensitized mice to previously sensitized animals. This ability was found to be contact- independent and correlated with high levels of TGF-β and CD4+FoxP3+ cells. PMID:22952678

  4. Involvement of PTEN in airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yong-Geun; Song, Chang H; Yi, Ho K; Hwang, Pyoung H; Kim, Jong-Suk; Lee, Kyung S; Lee, Yong C

    2003-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is part of a complex signaling system that affects a variety of important cell functions. PTEN blocks the action of PI3K by dephosphorylating the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. We have used a mouse model for asthma to determine the effect of PI3K inhibitors and PTEN on allergen-induced bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K activity increased significantly after allergen challenge. PTEN protein expression and PTEN activity were decreased in OVA-induced asthma. Immunoreactive PTEN localized in epithelial layers around the bronchioles in control mice. However, this immunoreactive PTEN dramatically disappeared in allergen-induced asthmatic lungs. The increased IL-4, IL-5, and eosinophil cationic protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after OVA inhalation were significantly reduced by the intratracheal administration of PI3K inhibitors or adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA (AdPTEN). Intratracheal administration of PI3K inhibitors or AdPTEN remarkably reduced bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. These findings indicate that PTEN may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the asthma phenotype.

  5. Epithelial barrier function: at the frontline of asthma immunology and allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Georas, Steve N.; Rezaee, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells form a barrier to the outside world, and are at the frontline of mucosal immunity. Epithelial apical junctional complexes are multi-protein subunits that promote cell-cell adhesion and barrier integrity. Recent studies in the skin and GI tract suggest that disruption of cell-cell junctions is required to initiate epithelial immune responses, but how this applies to mucosal immunity in the lung is not clear. Increasing evidence indicates that defective epithelial barrier function is a feature of airway inflammation in asthma. One challenge in this area is that barrier function and junctional integrity are difficult to study in the intact lung, but innovative approaches should provide new knowledge in this area in the near future. In this article, we review the structure and function of epithelial apical junctional complexes, emphasizing how regulation of the epithelial barrier impacts innate and adaptive immunity. We discuss why defective epithelial barrier function may be linked to Th2 polarization in asthma, and propose a rheostat model of barrier dysfunction that implicates the size of inhaled allergen particles as an important factor influencing adaptive immunity. PMID:25085341

  6. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  7. Upper airway and systemic inflammation in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Eugenio; Marin, Jose M; Carrizo, Santiago J; Osuna, Carlos S; González, Ricardo; Marin-Oto, Marta; Forner, Marta; Vicente, Paul; Cubero, Pablo; Gil, Ana V; Soler, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with pharyngeal inflammation, but the coexistence of systemic inflammation is controversial. This study investigated whether local and systemic inflammatory biomarkers are related in patients with OSA. An uncontrolled extension to the study assessed the response to effective treatment.We recruited 89 patients with OSA (apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥5 events·h(-1)), 28 snorers and 26 healthy controls. Pharyngeal lavage (PHAL) and plasma samples were collected at baseline and after a 1-year follow-up. Inflammatory cells were evaluated by flow cytometry; interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-α were evaluated by immunoassay.In PHAL, CD4(+) T-cells, IL-6 and IL-8 were higher in OSA patients than in snorers or healthy controls (p<0.05). The AHI correlated with CD4(+), IL-6 and IL-8 in PHAL (all p-values <0.05). There were no differences in the inflammatory biomarkers in plasma between the study groups and no relationship between plasma and PHAL biomarkers. Biomarkers decreased significantly in PHAL but not in plasma after 1 year of therapy with continuous positive airway pressure or surgery.In patients with OSA, increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers were found in PHAL, which were reduced with effective treatment. No simultaneous increase in plasma inflammatory biomarkers was found.

  8. Circulating, but not local lung, IL-5 is required for the development of antigen-induced airways eosinophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Palmer, K; Lŏtvall, J; Milan, S; Lei, X F; Matthaei, K I; Gauldie, J; Inman, M D; Jordana, M; Xing, Z

    1998-01-01

    IL-5 is induced locally in the lung and systemically in the circulation during allergic airways eosinophilic inflammation both in humans and experimental animals. However, the precise role of local and systemic IL-5 in the development of allergic airways eosinophilia remains to be elucidated. In our current study, we demonstrate that compared with their IL-5(+/+) counterparts, IL-5(-/-) mice lacked an IL-5 response both in the lung and peripheral blood, yet they released similar amounts of IL-4, eotaxin, and MIP-1alpha in the lung after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge. At cellular levels, these mice failed to develop peripheral blood and airways eosinophilia while the responses of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages remained similar to those in IL-5(+/+) mice. To dissect the relative role of local and systemic IL-5 in this model, we constructed a gene transfer vector expressing murine IL-5. Intramuscular IL-5 gene transfer to OVA-sensitized IL-5(-/-) mice led to raised levels of IL-5 compartmentalized to the circulation and completely reconstituted airways eosinophilia upon OVA challenge, which was associated with reconstitution of eosinophilia in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Significant airways eosinophilia was observed for at least 7 d in these mice. In contrast, intranasal IL-5 gene transfer, when rendered to give rise to a significant but compartmentalized level of transgene protein IL-5 in the lung, was unable to reconstitute airways eosinophilia in OVA-sensitized IL-5(-/-) mice upon OVA-challenge, which was associated with a lack of eosinophilic responses in bone marrow and peripheral blood. Our findings thus provide unequivocal evidence that circulating but not local lung IL-5 is critically required for the development of allergic airways eosinophilia. These findings also provide the rationale for developing strategies to target circulating IL-5 and/or its receptors in bone marrow to effectively control asthmatic airways

  9. Monitoring asthma in childhood: lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Alexander; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Sly, Peter D; Baraldi, Eugenio; Piacentini, Giorgio; Pavord, Ian; Lex, Christiane; Saglani, Sejal

    2015-06-01

    This review focuses on the methods available for measuring reversible airways obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation as hallmarks of asthma, and their role in monitoring children with asthma. Persistent bronchial obstruction may occur in asymptomatic children and is considered a risk factor for severe asthma episodes and is associated with poor asthma outcome. Annual measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s using office based spirometry is considered useful. Other lung function measurements including the assessment of BHR may be reserved for children with possible exercise limitations, poor symptom perception and those not responding to their current treatment or with atypical asthma symptoms, and performed on a higher specialty level. To date, for most methods of measuring lung function there are no proper randomised controlled or large longitudinal studies available to establish their role in asthma management in children. Noninvasive biomarkers for monitoring inflammation in children are available, for example the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide fraction, and the assessment of induced sputum cytology or inflammatory mediators in the exhaled breath condensate. However, their role and usefulness in routine clinical practice to monitor and guide therapy remains unclear, and therefore, their use should be reserved for selected cases.

  10. Targeting airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis in children: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Tacjana

    2011-06-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis (CF) pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Anti-inflammatory drugs for CF lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease progression. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possess anti-inflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and protease inhibitors have a limited impact on the disease. Adverse effects limit therapy with oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising anti-inflammatory therapy available for patients with CF. Pharmacologic therapy with anti-inflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred. To optimize anti-inflammatory therapy, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of action of these agents in the CF lung, to determine which of these agents would provide the most benefit to patients with CF, and to determine which therapies should be initiated at what age or stage of lung disease.

  11. Novel insights into the aetiology and pathophysiology of increased airway inflammation during COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Maria; Siafakas, Nikolaos M

    2006-05-22

    Airway inflammation increases during acute exacerbations of COPD. Extrinsic factors, such as airway infections, increased air pollution, and intrinsic factors, such as increased oxidative stress and altered immunity may contribute to this increase. The evidence for this and the potential mechanisms by which various aetiological agents increase inflammation during COPD exacerbations is reviewed. The pathophysiologic consequences of increased airway inflammation during COPD exacerbations are also discussed. This review aims to establish a cause and effect relationship between etiological factors of increased airway inflammation and COPD exacerbations based on recently published data. Although it can be speculated that reducing inflammation may prevent and/or treat COPD exacerbations, the existing anti-inflammatory treatments are modestly effective.

  12. Allergic airway inflammation induces a pro-secretory epithelial ion transport phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, P; Dai, L; Schatterny, J; Hirtz, S; Duerr, J; Mall, M A

    2010-12-01

    The airway epithelium is a central effector tissue in allergic inflammation and T-helper cell (Th) type 2-driven epithelial responses, such as mucus hypersecretion contribute to airflow obstruction in allergic airway disease. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Th2 cytokines also act as potent modulators of epithelial ion transport and fluid secretion, but the in vivo effect of allergic inflammation on airway ion transport remains unknown. We, therefore, induced allergic inflammation by intratracheal instillation of Aspergillus fumigatus extract or interleukin-13 in mice and determined effects on ion transport in native tracheal and bronchial tissues. We demonstrate that allergic inflammation enhanced basal Cl(-) secretion in both airway regions and inhibited epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-mediated Na(+) absorption and increased Ca²(+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in bronchi. Allergen-induced alterations in bronchial ion transport were associated with reduced transcript levels of α-, β- and γENaC, and were largely abrogated in signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)6(-/-) mice. Our studies demonstrate that Th2-dependent airway inflammation produced a pro-secretory ion transport phenotype in vivo, which was largely Stat6-dependent. These results suggest that Th2-mediated fluid secretion may improve airway surface hydration and clearance of mucus that is hypersecreted in allergic airway diseases such as asthma, and identify epithelial Stat6 signalling as a potential therapeutic target to promote mucus hydration and airway clearance.

  13. Intra-amniotic LPS and antenatal betamethasone: inflammation and maturation in preterm lamb lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, Elke; Collins, Jennifer J. P.; Kramer, Boris W.; Ofman, Gaston; Nitsos, Ilias; Pillow, J. Jane; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Gavilanes, Antonio W. D.; Nowacki, Relana; Ikegami, Machiko; Jobe, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    The proinflammatory stimulus of chorioamnionitis is commonly associated with preterm delivery. Women at risk of preterm delivery receive antenatal glucocorticoids to functionally mature the fetal lung. However, the effects of the combined exposures of chorioamnionitis and antenatal glucocorticoids on the fetus are poorly understood. Time-mated ewes with singleton fetuses received an intra-amniotic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either preceding or following maternal intramuscular betamethasone 7 or 14 days before delivery, and the fetuses were delivered at 120 days gestational age (GA) (term = 150 days GA). Gestation matched controls received intra-amniotic and maternal intramuscular saline. Compared with saline controls, intra-amniotic LPS increased inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage and myeloperoxidase, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 mRNA, PU.1, CD3, and Foxp3-positive cells in the fetal lung. LPS-induced lung maturation measured as increased airway surfactant and improved lung gas volumes. Intra-amniotic LPS-induced inflammation persisted until 14 days after exposure. Betamethasone treatment alone induced modest lung maturation but, when administered before intra-amniotic LPS, suppressed lung inflammation. Interestingly, betamethasone treatment after LPS did not counteract inflammation but enhanced lung maturation. We conclude that the order of exposures of intra-amniotic LPS or maternal betamethasone had large effects on fetal lung inflammation and maturation. PMID:22160306

  14. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Asma; Dolovich, Myrna B.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations. PMID:27845721

  15. Protective Roles for RGS2 in a Mouse Model of House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    George, Tresa; Bell, Matthew; Chakraborty, Mainak; Siderovski, David P.; Giembycz, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    The GTPase-accelerating protein, regulator of G-protein signalling 2 (RGS2) reduces signalling from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that signal via Gαq. In humans, RGS2 expression is up-regulated by inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) such that synergy is produced in combination. This may contribute to the superior clinical efficacy of ICS/LABA therapy in asthma relative to ICS alone. In a murine model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced airways inflammation, three weeks of intranasal HDM (25 μg, 3×/week) reduced lung function and induced granulocytic airways inflammation. Compared to wild type animals, Rgs2-/- mice showed airways hyperresponsiveness (increased airways resistance and reduced compliance). While HDM increased pulmonary inflammation observed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, there was no difference between wild type and Rgs2-/- animals. HDM-induced mucus hypersecretion was also unaffected by RGS2 deficiency. However, inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Rgs2-/- animals were significantly increased (57%) compared to wild type animals and this correlated with increased granulocyte (neutrophil and eosinophil) numbers. Likewise, cytokine and chemokine (IL4, IL17, IL5, LIF, IL6, CSF3, CXCLl, CXCL10 and CXCL11) release was increased by HDM exposure. Compared to wild type, Rgs2-/- animals showed a trend towards increased expression for many cytokines/chemokines, with CCL3, CCL11, CXCL9 and CXCL10 being significantly enhanced. As RGS2 expression was unaffected by HDM exposure, these data indicate that RGS2 exerts tonic bronchoprotection in HDM-induced airways inflammation. Modest anti-inflammatory and anti-remodelling roles for RGS2 are also suggested. If translatable to humans, therapies that maximize RGS2 expression may prove advantageous. PMID:28107494

  16. Protective effect of curcumin on acute airway inflammation of allergic asthma in mice through Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lei; Zhang, Weixi; Nie, Ying; Yu, Gang; Liu, Liu; Lin, Li; Wen, Shunhang; Zhu, Lili; Li, Changchong

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, a natural product derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has been found to have anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antifibrosis effects. It has been reported that curcumin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice through inhibiting NF-κB and its downstream transcription factor GATA3. It also has been proved the antineoplastic effect of curcumin through down-regulating Notch1 receptor and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on acute allergic asthma and its underlying mechanisms. 36 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (normal, asthma, asthma+budesonide and asthma+curcumin groups). BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) and lung tissues were analyzed for airway inflammation and the expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, Notch4 and the downstream transcription factor GATA3. Our findings showed that the levels of Notch1 and Notch2 receptors were up-regulated in asthma group, accompanied by the increased expression of GATA3. But the expression of Notch2 receptor was lower than Notch1 receptor. Curcumin pretreatment improved the airway inflammatory cells infiltration and reversed the increasing levels of Notch1/2 receptors and GATA3. Notch3 receptor was not expressed in all of the four groups. Notch4 receptor protein and mRNA expression level in the four groups had no significant differences. The results of the present study suggested that Notch1 and Notch2 receptor, major Notch1 receptor, played an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and the inhibition of Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway by curcumin can prevent the development and deterioration of the allergic airway inflammation. This may be a possible therapeutic option of allergic asthma.

  17. Periostin - A Novel Systemic Biomarker for Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Emprm, Viswanathan; Rajanandh, MG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic airway inflammation and remodelling are fundamental features of asthma. The molecular phenotypes in asthma are Th2 high and Th2 low. Serum periostin is a biomarker which aid in understanding Th2 high eosinophilic asthma. Aim The present study aimed to identify whether or not serum periostin is a systemic biomarker for eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics. Materials and Methods The study was designed as a prospective, case control study. Patients who presented with consistent symptoms of asthma and confirmed by spirometry with reversibility were the cases. The controls were healthy subjects who had no history of lung disease with normal lung function. The sputum and blood samples were collected from both the groups. Sputum eosinophils, Absolute Eosinophil Counts (AEC) and serum periostin levels were compared between the groups. Results The study comprised of 101 participants in which 30 were controls and 71 were cases. In the study group, mean post FEV1 was 64.45. There was a positive correlation of sputum eosinophils with severity of obstruction. The ROC curve analysis showed the cut-off value of 24.556 for serum periostin with the p-value of <0.001. As the severity of obstruction increased, the serum periostin levels were also found to be increased. Serum periostin had a sensitivity and specificity of 97.18% and 86.67% with a diagnostic accuracy of 94.06%. Conclusion Serum periostin appears to be a more sensitive tool for detection of airflow limitation in asthmatic patients with a Th2 high eosinophilic phenotype when compared to AEC and sputum eosinophils. PMID:27054127

  18. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure of the airways to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Desouza, Ivani A. . E-mail: ivanidesouza@fcm.unicamp.br; Franco-Penteado, Carla F.; Camargo, Enilton A.; Lima, Carmen S.P.; Teixeira, Simone A.; Muscara, Marcelo N.; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2006-11-15

    Staphylocococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that produces several enterotoxins, which are responsible for most part of pathological conditions associated to staphylococcal infections, including lung inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the underlying inflammatory mechanisms involved in leukocyte recruitment in rats exposed to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and intratracheally injected with either SEB or sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 0.4 ml). Airways exposition to SEB (7.5-250 ng/trachea) caused a dose- and time-dependent neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid, the maximal effects of which were observed at 4 h post-SEB exposure (250 ng/trachea). Eosinophils were virtually absent in BAL fluid, whereas mononuclear cell counts increased only at 24 h post-SEB. Significant elevations of granulocytes in bone marrow (mature and immature forms) and peripheral blood have also been detected. In BAL fluid, marked elevations in the levels of lipid mediators (LTB{sub 4} and PGE{sub 2}) and cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-10) were observed after SEB instillation. The SEB-induced neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid was reduced by pretreatment with dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (3 mg/kg), the selective iNOS inhibitor compound 1400 W (5 mg/kg) and the lipoxygenase inhibitor AA-861 (200 {mu}g/kg). In separate experiments carried out with rat isolated peripheral neutrophils, SEB failed to induce neutrophil adhesion to serum-coated plates and chemotaxis. In conclusion, rat airways exposition to SEB causes a neutrophil-dependent lung inflammation at 4 h as result of the release of proinflammatory (NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4}, TNF-{alpha}, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10)

  19. Deposition of charged particles on lung airways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Xiong, J Q; Fang, C P; Li, W

    1998-05-01

    The effect of a single electric charge on the efficiency with which ultrafine particles deposit in human airways has been investigated. When inhaled short-lived radon progeny are attached to electrically neutral particles their deposition efficiency is controlled by diffusion. But most ambient particles carry one, or a few, charges. We measured and compared the deposition (DE) of singly charged, charge-neutralized, and zero-charge 20-nm and 125-nm particles in hollow-cast models of human airways. These particle sizes were selected because they are about where modal peaks occur for the activity of the short-lived radon progeny in indoor air. For singly charged 20-nm particles deposition (+/- standard error) in the casts was 3.4 +/- 0.3 times that for charge neutralized aerosols and 5.3 +/- 0.3 times the amount deposited for zero-charged particles. Corresponding ratios for the 125-nm particles were 2.3 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.7. Since most ambient particles are charged this effect must be considered when models are used to predict dose from inhaled ultrafine particles.

  20. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3+ iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3+ Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  1. Airway inflammation in COPD after long-term withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Lisette I Z; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Lapperre, Thérèse S; Timens, Wim; Kerstjens, Huib A M; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; Vonk, Judith M; Sont, Jacob K; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Postma, Dirkje S; Sterk, Peter J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2017-01-01

    Long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) might attenuate lung function decline and decrease airway inflammation in a subset of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and discontinuing ICS treatment could result in further lung function decline. We hypothesised that airway inflammation increases after ICS withdrawal following long-term ICS treatment in COPD.In the GLUCOLD-1 study (GL1), 114 patients with moderate-severe COPD were randomised to 6-month or 30-month treatment with fluticasone propionate (500 µg twice daily), 30-month treatment with fluticasone/salmeterol (500/50 µg twice daily) or placebo. During the 5-year follow-up study (GL2), patients were followed prospectively while being treated by their physician. Bronchial biopsies and induced sputum were collected at baseline, at 30 months (end of GL1) and at 7.5 years (end of GL2) to assess inflammatory cell counts. Data were analysed using linear mixed-effects models.In patients using ICS during GL1 and using ICS 0-50% of the time during GL2 (n=61/85), there were significant increases in GL2 bronchial CD3(+) (fold change per year calculated as GL2 minus GL1 2.68, 95% CI 1.87-3.84), CD4(+) (1.91, 95% CI 1.33-2.75) and CD8(+) cells (1.71, 95% CI 1.15-2.53), and mast cells (1.91, 95% CI 1.36-2.68). The sputum total cell counts increased significantly in GL2 (1.90, 95% CI 1.42-2.54), as did counts of macrophages (2.10, 95% CI 1.55-2.86), neutrophils (1.92, 95% CI 1.39-2.65) and lymphocytes (2.01, 95% CI 1.46-2.78).ICS discontinuation increases airway inflammation in patients with moderate-severe COPD, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of ICS in COPD are not maintained after ICS discontinuation.

  2. Bromodomain and Extra Terminal (BET) Inhibitor Suppresses Macrophage-Driven Steroid-Resistant Exacerbations of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hiep; Maltby, Steven; Eyers, Fiona; Foster, Paul S.; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma are linked to significant decline in lung function and are often poorly controlled by corticosteroid treatment. Clinical investigations indicate that viral and bacterial infections play crucial roles in the onset of steroid-resistant inflammation and airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that are hallmark features of exacerbations. We have previously shown that interferon γ (IFNγ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cooperatively activate pulmonary macrophages and induce steroid-resistant airway inflammation and AHR in mouse models. Furthermore, we have established a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced exacerbation of asthma, which exhibits macrophage-dependent, steroid-resistant lung disease. Emerging evidence has demonstrated a key role for bromo- and extra-terminal (BET) proteins in the regulation of inflammatory gene expression in macrophages. We hypothesised that BET proteins may be involved in the regulation of AHR and airway inflammation in our steroid-resistant exacerbation models. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the effects of a BET inhibitor (I-BET-762) on the development of steroid-resistant AHR and airway inflammation in two mouse models. I-BET-762 administration decreased macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the airways, and suppressed key inflammatory cytokines in both models. I-BET treatment also suppressed key inflammatory cytokines linked to the development of steroid-resistant inflammation such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), keratinocyte-derived protein chemokine (KC), IFNγ, and interleukin 27 (IL-27). Attenuation of inflammation was associated with suppression of AHR. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that BET proteins play an important role in the regulation of steroid-resistant exacerbations of airway inflammation and AHR. BET proteins may be potential targets for the development of future therapies to treat steroid-resistant inflammatory components

  3. Suplatast tosilate ameliorates airway hyperreactivity and inflammation through inhibition of the GATA‑3/IL‑5 signaling pathway in asthmatic rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yupin; Li, Yun; Liu, Dan; Zhong, Lili

    2013-07-01

    Airway hyperreactivity and inflammation are important factors in the aggravation of lung function. Suplatast tosilate (IPD) is a novel and unique anti‑asthma clinical compound. However, the mechanisms of IPD action in the inhibition of asthma remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA‑3)/interleukin (IL)‑5 signaling pathway in IPD‑induced inhibition of asthma. Sprague‑Dawley rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection with ovalbumin (OVA) to establish an animal model of asthma. IPD was administered continuously (C‑IPD) or at a later stage (L‑IPD). Budesonide (BUD) was used as a positive control. Airway resistance and the expression of genes at the mRNA and protein levels were measured. Morphological changes in lung tissue and the percentage of eosinophils (EOS) in peripheral blood were observed and correlation analysis was performed. The results revealed that sensitization by OVA significantly increased airway resistance and the percentage of EOS in peripheral blood and induced significant inflammatory changes in lung tissue, as demonstrated by thick epithelium, goblet cell hyperplasia and submucosal cell infiltration. In addition, sensitization by OVA was found to markedly upregulate IL‑5 mRNA and protein expression. Airway resistance was found to positively correlate with the expression of IL‑5 in the rat lung tissues. Sensitization by OVA was also observed to markedly enhance GATA‑3 protein expression and GATA‑3 levels were found to positively correlate with airway resistance and IL‑5 levels. Similar to the effect of BUD, treatment with C‑IPD or L‑IPD was found to significantly attenuate OVA‑induced increases in airway resistance and the percentage of EOS in peripheral blood. Notably, treatment with C‑IPD or L‑IPD markedly reduced the OVA-induced expression of IL‑5 and GATA‑3. In the present study, IPD intervention was demonstrated to ameliorate airway

  4. Early cystic fibrosis lung disease: Role of airway surface dehydration and lessons from preventive rehydration therapies in mice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Graeber, Simon Y; Stahl, Mirjam; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease starts in the first months of life and remains one of the most common fatal hereditary diseases. Early therapeutic interventions may provide an opportunity to prevent irreversible lung damage and improve outcome. Airway surface dehydration is a key disease mechanism in CF, however, its role in the in vivo pathogenesis and as therapeutic target in early lung disease remains poorly understood. Mice with airway-specific overexpression of the epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC-Tg) recapitulate airway surface dehydration and phenocopy CF lung disease. Recent studies in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration produces early mucus plugging in the absence of mucus hypersecretion, which triggers airway inflammation, promotes bacterial infection and causes early mortality. Preventive rehydration therapy with hypertonic saline or amiloride effectively reduced mucus plugging and mortality in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice. These results support clinical testing of preventive/early rehydration strategies in infants and young children with CF.

  5. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  6. Cockroach protease allergen induces allergic airway inflammation via epithelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sagar L.; Agrawal, Komal; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Protease allergens are known to enhance allergic inflammation but their exact role in initiation of allergic reactions at mucosal surfaces still remains elusive. This study was aimed at deciphering the role of serine protease activity of Per a 10, a major cockroach allergen in initiation of allergic inflammation at mucosal surfaces. We demonstrate that Per a 10 increases epithelial permeability by disruption of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, and enhances the migration of Monocyte derived dendritic cell precursors towards epithelial layer as exhibited by trans-well studies. Per a 10 exposure also leads to secretion of IL-33, TSLP and intracellular Ca2+ dependent increase in ATP levels. Further, in vivo experiments revealed that Per a 10 administration in mice elevated allergic inflammatory parameters along with high levels of IL-33, TSLP, IL-1α and uric acid in the mice lungs. We next demonstrated that Per a 10 cleaves CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified B cells and CD25 (IL-2 receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified T cells in an activity dependent manner, which might favour Th2 responses. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 plays a significant role in initiation of allergic airway inflammation at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:28198394

  7. Targeted expression of IL-11 in the murine airway causes lymphocytic inflammation, bronchial remodeling, and airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W; Geba, G P; Zheng, T; Ray, P; Homer, R J; Kuhn, C; Flavell, R A; Elias, J A

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-11 is a pleotropic cytokine produced by lung stromal cells in response to respiratory viruses, cytokines, and histamine. To further define its potential effector functions, the Clara cell 10-kD protein promoter was used to express IL-11 and the airways of the resulting transgene mice were characterized. In contrast to transgene (-) littermates, the airways of IL-11 transgene (+) animals manifest nodular peribronchiolar mononuclear cell infiltrates and impressive airways remodeling with subepithelial fibrosis. The inflammatory foci contained large numbers of B220(+) and MHC Class II(+) cells and lesser numbers of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) cells. The fibrotic response contained increased amounts of types III and I collagen, increased numbers of alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin-containing cells and a spectrum of stromal elements including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells. Physiologic evaluation also demonstrated that 2-mo-old transgene (+) mice had increased airways resistance and non-specific airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine when compared with their transgene (-) littermates. These studies demonstrate that the targeted expression of IL-11 in the mouse airway causes a B and T cell-predominant inflammatory response, airway remodeling with increased types III and I collagen, the local accumulation of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and myocytes, and obstructive physiologic dysregulation. IL-11 may play an important role in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses in viral and/or nonviral human airway disorders. PMID:8981933

  8. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kieran A; Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Lambert, Allison A; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI) to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We demonstrate that HIV can enter airway

  9. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Lambert, Allison A.; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M. Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M.

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI) to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We demonstrate that HIV can enter airway

  10. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4 during Pneumococcal Pneumonia Reduces Inflammation and Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Luciana P; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vago, Juliana P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Galvão, Izabela; David, Bruna A; Rachid, Milene A; Silva, Patrícia M R; Russo, Remo C; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-07-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The inflammatory response to bacteria is necessary to control infection, but it may also contribute to tissue damage. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, such as rolipram (ROL), effectively reduce inflammation. Here, we examined the impact of ROL in a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model. Mice were infected intranasally with 10(5)-10(6) CFU of Streptococcus pneumoniae, treated with ROL in a prophylactic or therapeutic schedule in combination, or not, with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Inflammation and bacteria counts were assessed, and ex vivo phagocytosis assays were performed. ROL treatment during S. pneumoniae infection decreased neutrophil recruitment into lungs and airways and reduced lung injury. Prophylactic ROL treatment also decreased cytokine levels in the airways. Although modulation of inflammation by ROL ameliorated pneumonia, bacteria burden was not reduced. On the other hand, antibiotic therapy reduced bacteria without reducing neutrophil infiltration, cytokine level, or lung injury. Combined ROL and ceftriaxone treatment decreased lethality rates and was more efficient in reducing inflammation, by increasing proresolving protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) expression, and bacterial burden by enhancing phagocytosis. Lack of AnxA1 increased inflammation and lethality induced by pneumococcal infection. These data show that immunomodulatory effects of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors are useful during severe pneumococcal pneumonia and suggest their potential benefit as adjunctive therapy during infectious diseases.

  11. The Field of Tissue Injury in the Lung and Airway

    PubMed Central

    Steiling, Katrina; Ryan, John; Brody, Jerome S.; Spira, Avrum

    2009-01-01

    The concept of field cancerization was first introduced over six decades ago in the setting of oral cancer. Later, field cancerization involving histologic and molecular changes of neoplasms and adjacent tissue began to be characterized in smokers with or without lung cancer. Investigators also described a diffuse, non-neoplastic field of molecular injury throughout the respiratory tract that is attributable to cigarette smoking and susceptibility to smoking-induced lung disease. The potential molecular origins of field cancerization and the field of injury following cigarette smoke exposure in lung and airway epithelia are critical to understanding the impact of the field of injury on clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:19138985

  12. HemoHIM, a herbal preparation, alleviates airway inflammation caused by cigarette smoke and lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Na-Rae; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Lee, In-Chul; Ryu, Jung-Min; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2017-01-01

    HemoHIM, herbal preparation has designed for immune system recovery. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of HemoHIM on cigarette smoke (CS) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mouse model. To induce COPD, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CS for 1 h per day (eight cigarettes per day) for 4 weeks and intranasally received LPS on day 26. HemoHIM was administrated to mice at a dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg 1h before CS exposure. HemoHIM reduced the inflammatory cell count and levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) induced by CS+LPS exposure. HemoHIM decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration in the airway and inhibited the expression of iNOS and MMP-9 and phosphorylation of Erk in lung tissue exposed to CS+LPS. In summary, our results indicate that HemoHIM inhibited a reduction in the lung inflammatory response on CS and LPS induced lung inflammation via the Erk pathway. Therefore, we suggest that HemoHIM has the potential to treat pulmonary inflammatory disease such as COPD.

  13. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  14. Long-term exposure to diesel exhaust enhances antigen-induced eosinophilic inflammation and epithelial damage in the murine airway.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, T; Takano, H; Miyabara, Y; Sagai, M

    1998-07-01

    The histopathologic changes in the murine airway induced by long-term exposure to diesel exhaust (DE), ovalbumin (OA), or both were investigated. The relationship between the histopathologic appearances in the airway and immunoglobulin production or local cytokine levels in the lungs was also studied. ICR mice were exposed to clean air or DE at a soot concentrations of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 for 34 weeks. Fifteen weeks after exposure to DE, mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with 10 micrograms of OA and challenged by an aerosol of 1% OA six times at 3-week intervals during the last 18 weeks of the exposure. DE exposure caused a dose-dependent increase of nonciliated cell proliferation and epithelial cell hypertrophy in the airway, but showed no effect on goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium and eosinophil recruitment in the submucosa of the airway. OA treatment induced very slight changes in goblet cell proliferation and eosinophil recruitment. The combination of OA and DE exposure produced dose-dependent increases of goblet cells and eosinophils, in addition to further increases of the typical changes induced by DE. OA treatment induced OA-specific IgG1 and IgE production in plasma, whereas the adjuvant effects of DE exposure on immunoglobulin production were not observed. Inhalation of DE led to increased levels of IL-5 protein in the lung at a soot concentration of 1.0 and 3.0 mg/m3 with OA, although these increases did not reach statistical significance. We conclude that the combination of antigen and chronic exposure to DE produces increased eosinophilic inflammation, and cell damage to the epithelium may depend on the degree of eosinophilic inflammation in the airway.

  15. The therapeutic effects of tuberostemonine against cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Beak, Hyunjung; Park, Soojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Jaehoon; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Jinju; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-03-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is mainly caused by cigarette smoking and is characterized by the destruction of lung parenchyma, structural alterations of the small airways, and systemic inflammation. Tuberostemonine (TS) is an alkaloid-type phytochemical from Stemona tuberosa. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of TS in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced mouse model of acute lung inflammation. The mice were whole-body exposed to CS or fresh air for 7 days. TS was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 1h before exposure to CS. To test the effects of TS, the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were counted. Furthermore, we measured the levels of several chemokines, such as GCP-2, MIP-3α, MCP-1 and KC, in the lung tissue. The cellular profiles and histopathological analysis demonstrated that the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells significantly decreased in the TS-treated groups compared with the CS-exposure group. The TS treatment significantly ameliorated the airway epithelial thickness induced by CS exposure and caused a significant decrement in the production of chemokines in the lung. These results suggest that TS has anti-inflammatory effects against CS-induced acute lung inflammation.

  16. Noninvasive determination of ozone distribution in the human lung airways

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shuchieh.

    1991-01-01

    The response of lung epithelium to ozone exposure depends on cell sensitivity as well as on delivered dose. Because lung damage by ozone is site-specific, it was the main objective of this study to develop and utilize a bolus-response method for the noninvasive determination of longitudinal ozone distribution in the human lung. Ozone transport in a rigid single-pathway anatomic model of the lung was simulated numerically by the method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements to predict the data that would be obtained in human subjects. The simulation results provided evidence supporting the safety of the bolus-response technique. A bolus-response inhalation system including a fast-responding chemiluminescent O[sub 3] analyzer and a small-scale O[sub 3] bolus generator was specifically developed for this project. Measurements of ozone absorption were carried out on nine healthy male subjects at a constant inspiratory and expiratory flow of 250 m[ell]/sec as well as elevated respiratory flows ranging from 150 to 1,000 m[ell]/sec. By evaluating the mathematical moments of the inspired bolus and expired response data, the fraction of inhaled ozone that was absorbed was computed in the first 200 m[ell] of the human lung. The resulting data indicated that under quiet breathing conditions, the fraction of inhaled O[sub 3] absorbed by the upper airways is roughly 50%. By increasing the respired flow from 150 to 1,000 m[ell]/sec, the fraction of ozone absorbed into upper airways decreased from 65 to 15%. Virtually all of the remaining O[sub 3] was absorbed in the lower airways.

  17. Facilitation of Allergic Sensitization and Allergic Airway Inflammation by Pollen-Induced Innate Neutrophil Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Koa; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Brasier, Allan R; Kurosky, Alexander; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment is a hallmark of rapid innate immune responses. Exposure of airways of naive mice to pollens rapidly induces neutrophil recruitment. The innate mechanisms that regulate pollen-induced neutrophil recruitment and the contribution of this neutrophilic response to subsequent induction of allergic sensitization and inflammation need to be elucidated. Here we show that ragweed pollen extract (RWPE) challenge in naive mice induces C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL) chemokine synthesis, which stimulates chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2)-dependent recruitment of neutrophils into the airways. Deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) abolishes CXCL chemokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment induced by a single RWPE challenge and inhibits induction of allergic sensitization and airway inflammation after repeated exposures to RWPE. Forced induction of CXCL chemokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in mice lacking TLR4 also reconstitutes the ability of multiple challenges of RWPE to induce allergic airway inflammation. Blocking RWPE-induced neutrophil recruitment in wild-type mice by administration of a CXCR2 inhibitor inhibits the ability of repeated exposures to RWPE to stimulate allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Administration of neutrophils derived from naive donor mice into the airways of Tlr4 knockout recipient mice after each repeated RWPE challenge reconstitutes allergic sensitization and inflammation in these mice. Together these observations indicate that pollen-induced recruitment of neutrophils is TLR4 and CXCR2 dependent and that recruitment of neutrophils is a critical rate-limiting event that stimulates induction of allergic sensitization and airway inflammation. Inhibiting pollen-induced recruitment of neutrophils, such as by administration of CXCR2 antagonists, may be a novel strategy to prevent initiation of pollen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

  18. Enrichment of lung microbiome with supraglottic taxa is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lung microbiome of healthy individuals frequently harbors oral organisms. Despite evidence that microaspiration is commonly associated with smoking-related lung diseases, the effects of lung microbiome enrichment with upper airway taxa on inflammation has not been studied. We hypothesize that the presence of oral microorganisms in the lung microbiome is associated with enhanced pulmonary inflammation. To test this, we sampled bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from the lower airways of 29 asymptomatic subjects (nine never-smokers, 14 former-smokers, and six current-smokers). We quantified, amplified, and sequenced 16S rRNA genes from BAL samples by qPCR and 454 sequencing. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), BAL lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Results BAL had lower total 16S than supraglottic samples and higher than saline background. Bacterial communities in the lower airway clustered in two distinct groups that we designated as pneumotypes. The rRNA gene concentration and microbial community of the first pneumotype was similar to that of the saline background. The second pneumotype had higher rRNA gene concentration and higher relative abundance of supraglottic-characteristic taxa (SCT), such as Veillonella and Prevotella, and we called it pneumotypeSCT. Smoking had no effect on pneumotype allocation, α, or β diversity. PneumotypeSCT was associated with higher BAL lymphocyte-count (P= 0.007), BAL neutrophil-count (P= 0.034), and eNO (P= 0.022). Conclusion A pneumotype with high relative abundance of supraglottic-characteristic taxa is associated with enhanced subclinical lung inflammation. PMID:24450871

  19. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Zychowski, Katherine E; Lucas, Selita N; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-08-15

    Ozone (O3)-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O3 can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O3-induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O3 pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O3 exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O2) or hypoxia (10.0% O2), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1ppm O3 or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O3 exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O3 exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O3 exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O3-induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability.

  20. p63(+)Krt5(+) distal airway stem cells are essential for lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Daniel Zheng'An; Guan, Shou Ping; Liew, Audrey-Ann; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wang, Xia; Lim, Siew Joo; Vincent, Matthew; Lessard, Mark; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2015-01-29

    Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis involve the progressive and inexorable destruction of oxygen exchange surfaces and airways, and have emerged as a leading cause of death worldwide. Mitigating therapies, aside from impractical organ transplantation, remain limited and the possibility of regenerative medicine has lacked empirical support. However, it is clinically known that patients who survive sudden, massive loss of lung tissue from necrotizing pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome often recover full pulmonary function within six months. Correspondingly, we recently demonstrated lung regeneration in mice following H1N1 influenza virus infection, and linked distal airway stem cells expressing Trp63 (p63) and keratin 5, called DASC(p63/Krt5), to this process. Here we show that pre-existing, intrinsically committed DASC(p63/Krt5) undergo a proliferative expansion in response to influenza-induced lung damage, and assemble into nascent alveoli at sites of interstitial lung inflammation. We also show that the selective ablation of DASC(p63/Krt5) in vivo prevents this regeneration, leading to pre-fibrotic lesions and deficient oxygen exchange. Finally, we demonstrate that single DASC(p63/Krt5)-derived pedigrees differentiate to type I and type II pneumocytes as well as bronchiolar secretory cells following transplantation to infected lung and also minimize the structural consequences of endogenous stem cell loss on this process. The ability to propagate these cells in culture while maintaining their intrinsic lineage commitment suggests their potential in stem cell-based therapies for acute and chronic lung diseases.

  1. Vanishing Bronchus After Lung Transplantation: The Role of Sequential Airway Dilatations

    PubMed Central

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Inaty, Hanine; Machuzak, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Airway complications after lung transplant play an important role in patient survival. Early recognition and treatment of these complications are necessary to help ensure that patients who receive lung transplants have good outcomes. Case Report: A 61-year-old female with a history of pulmonary venous occlusive disease presented to our hospital for a double-lung transplant. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe primary graft dysfunction. Airway examination showed significant mucosal ischemia distal to the anastomosis bilaterally with diffuse narrowing of all distal bronchial segments. Repeat bronchoscopies with debridement of necrotic material and balloon dilatation of stenotic airways were performed to maintain airway patency. Conclusion: Post–lung transplant airway necrosis and stenosis mandate early identification and treatment. Repetitive bronchoscopies with sequential balloon dilatations are mandatory to prevent future airway stenosis and airway vanishing. PMID:28331451

  2. Tanreqing Injection Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Airway Inflammation through MAPK/NF-κB Signaling Pathways in Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Hong-li; Cai, Lin-li; Yan, Min; Dong, Shou-jin; Mao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tanreqing injection (TRQ) is a commonly used herbal patent medicine for treating inflammatory airway diseases in view of its outstanding anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we explored the signaling pathways involved in contributions of TRQ to LPS-induced airway inflammation in rats. Methods/Design. Adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats randomly divided into different groups received intratracheal instillation of LPS and/or intraperitoneal injection of TRQ. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF) and lung samples were collected at 24 h, 48 h, and 96 h after TRQ administration. Protein and mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, Interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and IL-8 in BALF and lung homogenate were observed by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Lung sections were stained for p38 MAPK and NF-κB detection by immunohistochemistry. Phospho-p38 MAPK, phosphor-extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, phospho-SAPK/JNK, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-IKKα/β, and phospho-IκB-α were measured by western blot analysis. Results. The results showed that TRQ significantly counteracted LPS-stimulated release of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, attenuated cells influx in BALF, mitigated mucus hypersecretion, suppressed phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, IκB-α, ΙKKα/β, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK, and inhibited p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 expression in rat lungs. Conclusions. Results of the current research indicate that TRQ possesses potent exhibitory effects in LPS-induced airway inflammation by, at least partially, suppressing the MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathways, in a general dose-dependent manner. PMID:27366191

  3. Inhibitory effects of l-theanine on airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jin, Sun Woo; Choi, Jae Ho; Choi, Chul Yung; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Se Jong; Kim, Yongan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2017-01-01

    l-theanine, a water-soluble amino acid isolated from green tea (Camellia sinensis), has anti-inflammatory activity, antioxidative properties, and hepatoprotective effects. However, the anti-allergic effect of l-theanine and its underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of l-theanine on asthmatic responses, particularly airway inflammation and oxidative stress modulation in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of asthma. Treatment with l-theanine dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Histological studies revealed that l-theanine significantly inhibited OVA-induced mucus production and inflammatory cell infiltration in the respiratory tract and blood vessels. l-theanine administration also significantly decreased the production of IgE, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interferon-gamma in BALF. The lung weight decreased with l-theanine administration. l-theanine also markedly attenuated the OVA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and matrix metalloprotease-9 in BALF. Moreover, l-theanine reduced the TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in A549 cells. Together, these results suggest that l-theanine alleviates airway inflammation in asthma, which likely occurs via the oxidative stress-responsive NF-κB pathway, highlighting its potential as a useful therapeutic agent for asthma management.

  4. Pattern of airway inflammation and its determinants in children with acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Norzila, M Z; Fakes, K; Simpson, J; Henry, R L

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sputum cell counts and clinical variables in children with an acute exacerbation of asthma. Sputum was successfully obtained from 37 of 42 children presenting to the Emergency Department with acute asthma, using ultrasonically nebulized normal saline (n = 19) or spontaneous expectoration (n = 18). Sputum portions were selected and dispersed, and total and differential cell counts were performed. Sputum supernatant was assessed for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), interleukin (IL)-5, and IL-8. The exacerbations were of 3 inflammatory cell patterns: eosinophilic (n = 16 or 43% of total), combined eosinophilic/neutrophilic (E/N; n = 13.3 or 35% of total), or noneosinophilic (n = 8 or 22% of total). IL-5 was highest in eosinophilic exacerbations. Combined E/N exacerbations had increased mast cells (77%) and higher sputum ECP levels than eosinophilic exacerbations: 2,146 ng/mL vs. 666 ng/mL (P = 0.04). The speed of onset of the exacerbation was not related to the inflammatory cell profile. Logistic regression identified maintenance asthma treatment (odds ratio (OR), 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-26.8) and lung function during the acute episode (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.7-93) as significantly associated with the intensity of sputum eosinophilia. Eosinophils were lowest in children who received maintenance treatment with oral corticosteroids compared to those with no background asthma preventer therapy (P = 0.001). In conclusion, we identified three distinct patterns of airway inflammation in children with acute asthma; they included increased eosinophils, combined eosinophilic-neutrophilic infiltration, and a noneosinophilic pattern. Eosinophil degranulation was greatest with the combined eosinophilic/neutrophilic pattern of airway inflammation. Sputum eosinophils were associated with clinical severity, and background asthma therapy, but not with outcome, nor with speed of onset of exacerbations. These

  5. Inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on ozone-induced airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyu; Li, Feng; Wiegman, Coen H; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yan; Gong, Jicheng; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The goal of this study was to examine whether these adverse effects of ozone could be prevented or reversed by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a reducing agent. The H2S donor sodium (NaHS) (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1 hour before and after 3-hour ozone (2.5 ppm) or air exposure, and the mice were studied 24 hours later. Preventive and therapeutic treatment with NaHS reduced the ozone-induced increases in the total cells, including neutrophils and macrophages; this treatment also reduced levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid; inhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness; and attenuated ozone-induced increases in total malondialdehyde in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the lung. Ozone exposure led to decreases in the H2S production rate and in mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine-β-synthetase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the lung. These effects were prevented and reversed by NaHS treatment. Furthermore, NaHS prevented and reversed the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27. H2S may have preventive and therapeutic value in the treatment of airway diseases that have an oxidative stress basis.

  6. Role of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and sensory neuropeptides in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyperreactivity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Elekes, Krisztián; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Németh, József; Sándor, Katalin; Pozsgai, Gábor; Kereskai, László; Börzsei, Rita; Pintér, Erika; Szabó, Arpád; Szolcsányi, János

    2007-06-07

    Substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from capsaicin-sensitive afferents induce neurogenic inflammation via NK(1), NK(2) and CGRP1 receptor activation. This study examines the role of capsaicin-sensitive fibres and sensory neuropeptides in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyperreactivity with functional, morphological and biochemical techniques in mice. Carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction was measured with whole body plethysmography 24 h after intranasal lipopolysaccharide administration. SP and CGRP were determined with radioimmunoassay, myeloperoxidase activity with spectrophotometry, interleukin-1beta with ELISA and histopathological changes with semiquantitative scoring from lung samples. Treatments with resiniferatoxin for selective destruction of capsaicin-sensitive afferents, NK(1) antagonist SR 140333, NK(2) antagonist SR 48968, their combination, or CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37) were performed. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased lung SP and CGRP concentrations, which was prevented by resiniferatoxin pretreatment. Resiniferatoxin-desensitization markedly enhanced inflammation, but decreased bronchoconstriction. CGRP(8-37) or combination of SR 140333 and SR 48968 diminished neutrophil accumulation, MPO levels and IL-1beta production, airway hyperresponsiveness was inhibited only by SR 48968. This is the first evidence that capsaicin-sensitive afferents exert a protective role in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation, but contribute to increased bronchoconstriction. Activation of CGRP1 receptors or NK(1)+NK(2) receptors participate in granulocyte accumulation, but NK(2) receptors play predominant role in enhanced airway resistance.

  7. Epicutaneous antigen exposure induces a Th17 response that drives airway inflammation after inhalation challenge

    PubMed Central

    He, Rui; Oyoshi, Michiko K.; Jin, Haoli; Geha, Raif S.

    2007-01-01

    IL-17 has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases, but the conditions of antigen exposure that drive the generation of Th17 responses have not been well defined. Epicutaneous (EC) immunization of mice with ovalbumin (OVA), which causes allergic skin inflammation with many characteristics of the skin lesions of atopic dermatitis, was found to also drive IL-17 expression in the skin. EC, but not i.p., immunization of mice with OVA drove the generation of IL-17-producing T cells in draining lymph nodes and spleen and increased serum IL-17 levels. OVA inhalation by EC-sensitized mice induced IL-17 and CXCL2 expression and neutrophil influx in the lung along with bronchial hyperreactivity, which were reversed by IL-17 blockade. Dendritic cells trafficking from skin to lymph nodes expressed more IL-23 and induced more IL-17 secretion by naïve T cells than splenic dendritic cells. This was inhibited by neutralizing IL-23 in vitro and by intradermal injection of anti-TGFβ neutralizing antibody in vivo. Our findings suggest that initial cutaneous exposure to antigens in patients with atopic dermatitis may selectively induce the production of IL-17, which, in turn, drives inflammation of their airways. PMID:17893340

  8. EDU pretreatment decreases polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration into rat lung airways.

    PubMed

    Bassett, D J; Elbon, C L; Ishii, Y; Yang, H; Otterbein, L; Boswell, G A; Kerr, J S

    1994-07-01

    Pretreatment with the heterocyclic compound EDU (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolindinyl)ethyl]-N'-phenylurea) has previously been shown to reduce polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration into the airways of ozone-exposed rats. The present study further examined the effects of 1 and 2 days EDU pretreatment on rat lung inflammatory responses by determining PMN infiltration in response to intratracheal instillation with the chemoattractant formyl-norleucine-leucine-phenylalanine (fNLP). Maximal recovery of PMNs by bronchoalveolar lavage was observed 4 hr after fNLP instillation with no alteration in the numbers of recoverable macrophages and lymphocytes. Although 1-day pretreatment with EDU did not affect PMN recovery from fNLP-instilled rat lungs, 2 days of EDU pretreatment prevented PMN infiltration as indicated by PMN recoveries that were similar to those obtained from saline-instilled lungs. Measurements of lung-marginated and interstitial pools of inflammatory cells using collagenase tissue digestion demonstrated no effect of 2 days EDU pretreatment. Although 2 days EDU pretreatment alone did not alter blood PMN content, lung permeability, and the lavage recoveries of inflammatory cells, blood PMN responses to chemotactic stimuli in vitro were impaired. In addition, EDU was shown to directly inhibit PMN chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation in vitro. These data demonstrated that EDU acts by interfering with PMN activation and migration rather than by decreasing PMN availability. EDU, by modulating the inflammatory response, represents a useful compound for preventing PMN-associated amplification of acute lung injuries.

  9. Inflammation in the development of lung cancer: epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A

    2008-04-01

    The lung is a site for repeated or chronic inflammatory insults. Epidemiologic research has provided evidence to support the hypothesis that tissue damage caused by inflammation can initiate or promote the development of lung cancer, possibly in conjunction with tobacco use. For example, some studies suggest an increased risk of lung cancer among persons with lung infections, such as tuberculosis, bacterial pneumonia, or inflammatory lung diseases. Elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammation marker, are associated with heightened lung cancer risk. Recent studies also demonstrate increased lung cancer risk among immunosuppressed individuals infected with HIV. Other research indicates an association between genetic polymorphisms in the inflammation pathway, which might modulate the inflammatory response and lung cancer risk.

  10. High-fat diet promotes lung fibrosis and attenuates airway eosinophilia after exposure to cockroach allergen in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Greenberg, Yana; Hosseinkhani, M Reza; Long, Eric K; Bahaie, Nooshin S; Rao, Amrita; Ha, Sung Gil; Rao, Savita P; Bernlohr, David A; Sriramarao, P

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma but the mechanistic basis for this association is not well understood. In the current study, the impact of obesity on lung inflammatory responses after allergen exposure was investigated. C57BL/6 mice maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal diet (ND) after weaning were sensitized and challenged with cockroach allergen (CRA). Airway inflammation was assessed based on inflammatory cell recruitment, measurement of lung Th1-Th2 cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and other proinflammatory mediators as well as airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CRA-challenged mice fed a HFD exhibited significantly decreased allergen-induced airway eosinophilia along with reduced lung IL-5, IL-13, LTC4, CCL11, and CCL2 levels as well as reduced mucus secretion and smooth muscle mass compared to ND fed mice. However, allergen-challenged HFD fed mice demonstrated significantly increased PAI-1 and reduced PGE2 levels in the lung relative to corresponding ND fed mice. Interestingly, saline-exposed HFD fed mice demonstrated elevated baseline levels of TGF-β1, arginase-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and lung collagen expression associated with decreased lung function compared to corresponding ND fed mice. These studies indicate that a HFD inhibits airway eosinophilia while altering levels of PAI-1 and PGE2 in response to CRA in mice. Further, a HFD can lead to the development of lung fibrosis even in the absence of allergen exposure which could be due to innate elevated levels of specific profibrotic factors, potentially affecting lung function during asthma.

  11. AIRWAY IDENTIFICATION WITHIN PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES USING COMPUTER MODELS OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quantification of inhaled aerosols could be improved if a more comprehensive assessment of their spatial distribution patterns among lung airways were obtained. A common technique for quantifying particle deposition in human lungs is with planar gamma scintigraphy. However, t...

  12. Effects of an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise on postprandial lipemia and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ariel M; Kurti, Stephanie P; Smith, Joshua R; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Harms, Craig A

    2016-03-01

    A high-fat meal (HFM) induces an increase in blood lipids (postprandial lipemia; PPL), systemic inflammation, and acute airway inflammation. While acute exercise has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and lipid-lowering effects, it is unknown whether exercise prior to an HFM will translate to reduced airway inflammation post-HFM. Our purpose was to determine the effects of an acute bout of exercise on airway inflammation post-HFM and to identify whether any protective effect of exercise on airway inflammation was associated with a reduction in PPL or systemic inflammation. In a randomized cross-over study, 12 healthy, 18- to 29-year-old men (age, 23.0 ± 3.2 years; height, 178.9 ± 5.5 cm; weight, 78.5 ± 11.7 kg) consumed an HFM (1 g fat/1 kg body weight) 12 h following exercise (EX; 60 min at 60% maximal oxygen uptake) or without exercise (CON). Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO; measure of airway inflammation), triglycerides (TG), and inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor-necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6) were measured while fasted at 2 h and 4 h post-HFM. FENO increased over time (2 h: CON, p = 0.001; EX, p = 0.002, but not by condition (p = 0.991). TG significantly increased 2 and 4 h post-HFM (p < 0.001), but was not significant between conditions (p = 0.256). Inflammatory markers did not significantly increase by time or condition (p > 0.05). There were no relationships between FENO and TG or systemic inflammatory markers for any time point or condition (p > 0.05). In summary, an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise performed 12 h prior to an HFM did not change postprandial airway inflammation or lipemia in healthy, 18- to 29-year-old men.

  13. Impact of a Met(11)Thr single nucleotide polymorphism of surfactant protein D on allergic airway inflammation in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Bahlmann, Olaf; Viereck, Janika; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Hoymann, Heinz Gerd; Madsen, Jens; Thum, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    The surfactant-associated proteins SP-A and D are pattern recognition molecules with collectin structure. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) exchanging a methionine (Met) for a threonine (Thr) in the amino-terminal SP-D domain influences the oligomeric structure and function of the protein. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of mice transgenic for the human SP-D Met(11)Thr SNP to allergic airway inflammation and consequences for microRNA (miRNA, miR) expression. Mice expressing either human Met or Thr SP-D were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) in an acute model of allergic asthma. The influence of the SP-D polymorphism on the allergic airway inflammation was evaluated by lung function measurement, pulmonary inflammation parameters, morphological analysis and miRNA expression. Airway hyperresponsiveness, allergic inflammation, and mucus metaplasia were not significantly different between mice expressing one or the other allelic variant of SP-D. OVA sensitization and challenge led to significant airway hyperresponsiveness in wildtype mice and significantly lower eosinophil numbers and interleukin 5 levels in Thr SP-D mice. OVA challenge induced an upregulation of miR-21 and 155 in Thr SP-D mice and a downregulation of miR-21 in Met SP-D mice. Our results show that murine expression of human polymorphic SP-D variants does not significantly influence the severity of allergic airway inflammation. MiR-21 and 155 are differentially regulated in transgenic mice in response to allergic inflammation. Further studies are required to elucidate the impact of this SNP on inflammatory conditions of the lung.

  14. Interleukin-17 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Intervention in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Daniel; Taylor, Patricia; Fletcher, Dave; van Heeckeren, Rolf; Eastman, Jean; van Heeckeren, Anna; Davis, Pamela; Chmiel, James F.; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by an excessive neutrophilic inflammatory response within the airway as a result of defective cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR) expression and function. Interleukin-17A induces airway neutrophilia and mucin production associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, which is associated with the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. The objectives of this study were to use the preclinical murine model of cystic fibrosis lung infection and inflammation to investigate the role of IL-17 in CF lung pathophysiology and explore therapeutic intervention with a focus on IL-17. Cftr-deficient mice (CF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) infected with P. aeruginosa had robust IL-17 production early in the infection associated with a persistent elevated inflammatory response. Intratracheal administration of IL-17 provoked a neutrophilic response in the airways of WT and CF animals which was similar to that observed with P. aeruginosa infection. The neutralization of IL-17 prior to infection significantly improved the outcomes in the CF mice, suggesting that IL-17 may be a therapeutic target. We demonstrate in this report that the pathophysiological contribution of IL-17 may be due to the induction of chemokines from the epithelium which is augmented by a deficiency of Cftr and ongoing inflammation. These studies demonstrate the in vivo contribution of IL-17 in cystic fibrosis lung disease and the therapeutic validity of attenuating IL-17 activity in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27271746

  15. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-02-15

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. In this study, we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intratracheally an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Compared to adenovirus serotype 5 containing an empty vector lacking a transgene control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant, and MIP-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before intratracheal LPS challenge diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and HDM-triggered allergic lung inflammation.

  16. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) protein inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D.; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. Here we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intracheally (i.t.) an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Compared to Ad-EV control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, KC, and MIP-2. BALF from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before i.t. LPS challenge diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and house dust mite-triggered allergic lung inflammation. PMID:25576596

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-inflammatory Effects of a Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicine "Shoseiryuto (Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang)" on Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takayuki; Nakao, Marino; Shimizu, Yuliko; Kodera, Yoshio; Oh-Ishi, Masamichi; Maeda, Tadakazu; Yamada, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    Effects of a Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicine "shoseiryuto (SST, xiao-qing-long-tang in Chinese)", which has been used for the treatment of allergic bronchial asthma clinically, were examined on ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized allergic airway inflammation model (i.e., bronchial asthma) in a mouse. When SST was orally administered at 0.5 g kg(-1) day(-1) from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, SST reduced the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils and the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody titer in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 7 days after the OVA inhalation. SST also reduced the airway hyperreactivity at 6 days after the OVA inhalation. Proteomic analysis with the agarose two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that the expression of spectrin α2 was reduced in the lung tissue of OVA-sensitized mice and SST recovered the expression. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of lung tissue also confirmed this result. When prednisolone was orally administered at 3 mg kg(-1) day(-1) from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils in BAL fluids and airway hyperreactivity were reduced in the OVA-sensitized mice. However, prednisolone did not reduce the OVA-specific IgE antibody titer in BAL fluids and did not recover the expression of spectrin α2 in lung tissue. These results suggest that at least a part of action mechanism of SST against OVA-sensitized allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model is different from that of prednisolone.

  18. Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Containing Dexamethasone as a Novel Therapy in Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Lee, Joyce; Luo, Juntao; Franzi, Lisa M.; Zeki, Amir A.; Lam, Kit S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocarriers can deliver a wide variety of drugs, target them to sites of interest, and protect them from degradation and inactivation by the body. They have the capacity to improve drug action and decrease undesirable systemic effects. We have previously developed a well-defined non-toxic PEG-dendritic block telodendrimer for successful delivery of chemotherapeutics agents and, in these studies, we apply this technology for therapeutic development in asthma. In these proof-of-concept experiments, we hypothesized that dexamethasone contained in self-assembling nanoparticles (Dex-NP) and delivered systemically would target the lung and decrease allergic lung inflammation and airways hyper-responsiveness to a greater degree than equivalent doses of dexamethasone (Dex) alone. We found that ovalbumin (Ova)-exposed mice treated with Dex-NP had significantly fewer total cells (2.78±0.44×105 (n = 18) vs. 5.98±1.3×105 (n = 13), P<0.05) and eosinophils (1.09±0.28×105 (n = 18) vs. 2.94±0.6×105 (n = 12), p<0.05) in the lung lavage than Ova-exposed mice alone. Also, lower levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-4 (3.43±1.2 (n = 11) vs. 8.56±2.1 (n = 8) pg/ml, p<0.05) and MCP-1 (13.1±3.6 (n = 8) vs. 28.8±8.7 (n = 10) pg/ml, p<0.05) were found in lungs of the Dex-NP compared to control, and they were not lower in the Dex alone group. In addition, respiratory system resistance was lower in the Dex-NP compared to the other Ova-exposed groups suggesting a better therapeutic effect on airways hyperresponsiveness. Taken together, these findings from early-stage drug development studies suggest that the encapsulation and protection of anti-inflammatory agents such as corticosteroids in nanoparticle formulations can improve efficacy. Further development of novel drugs in nanoparticles is warranted to explore potential treatments for chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PMID:24204939

  19. LINKING LUNG AIRWAY STRUCTURE TO PULMONARY FUNCTION VIA COMPOSITE BRIDGE REGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Seetharaman, Indu; Jiao, Feiran; Lin, Ching-Long; Chan, Kung-Sik

    2017-01-01

    The human lung airway is a complex inverted tree-like structure. Detailed airway measurements can be extracted from MDCT-scanned lung images, such as segmental wall thickness, airway diameter, parent-child branch angles, etc. The wealth of lung airway data provides a unique opportunity for advancing our understanding of the fundamental structure-function relationships within the lung. An important problem is to construct and identify important lung airway features in normal subjects and connect these to standardized pulmonary function test results such as FEV1%. Among other things, the problem is complicated by the fact that a particular airway feature may be an important (relevant) predictor only when it pertains to segments of certain generations. Thus, the key is an efficient, consistent method for simultaneously conducting group selection (lung airway feature types) and within-group variable selection (airway generations), i.e., bi-level selection. Here we streamline a comprehensive procedure to process the lung airway data via imputation, normalization, transformation and groupwise principal component analysis, and then adopt a new composite penalized regression approach for conducting bi-level feature selection. As a prototype of composite penalization, the proposed composite bridge regression method is shown to admit an efficient algorithm, enjoy bi-level oracle properties, and outperform several existing methods. We analyze the MDCT lung image data from a cohort of 132 subjects with normal lung function. Our results show that, lung function in terms of FEV1% is promoted by having a less dense and more homogeneous lung comprising an airway whose segments enjoy more heterogeneity in wall thicknesses, larger mean diameters, lumen areas and branch angles. These data hold the potential of defining more accurately the “normal” subject population with borderline atypical lung functions that are clearly influenced by many genetic and environmental factors. PMID

  20. Regulation of airway inflammation and remodeling in asthmatic mice by TLR3/TRIF signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Hao-Ying; Chen, Jian-Chang; Zhao, Jing

    2017-03-23

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of Toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3)/TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) signal pathway on the airway inflammation and remodeling in asthmatic mice. C57BL/6 and TLR3(-/-) mice were randomly divided into three groups (10 mice per group), including Control group (mice inhaled phosphate buffer saline (PBS)), Asthma group (mice inhaled ovalbumin (OVA)) and polyriboinosinic-ribocytidylic acid (poly (I: C)) group (asthmatic mice were injected intraperitoneally with TLR3 agonist poly (I: C)). Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, Wright-Giemsa staining, Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Immunohistochemistry, Hydroxyproline assay, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess for the indices of airway inflammation and remodeling. In terms of WT mice, all asthma groups with or without the addition of poly (I: C) showed exaggerated inflammation and remodeling in the airways as compared to Control group, which were more seriously in poly (I: C) group than Asthma group. Furthermore, we observed the significant inhibition of airway inflammation and remodeling in the TLR3(-/-) mice in both Asthma no matter with or without addition of poly (I: C) than the WT mice. TLR3 knockout could obviously relieve the airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma through inhibiting TLR3/TRIF signaling pathway.

  1. Nose-only water-pipe smoking effects on airway resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Raza, Haider; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; John, Annie; Yasin, Javed; Hameed, Rasheed S; Adeghate, Ernest; Ali, Badreldin H

    2013-11-01

    Water-pipe smoking (WPS) is a common practice in the Middle East and is now gaining popularity in Europe and the United States. However, there is a limited number of studies on the respiratory effects of WPS. More specifically, the underlying pulmonary pathophysiological mechanisms related to WPS exposure are not understood. Presently, we assessed the respiratory effects of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS generated by commercially available honey flavored "moasel" tobacco. The duration of the session was 30 min/day and 5 days/wk for 1 mo. Control mice were exposed to air only. Here, we measured in BALB/c mice the airway resistance using forced-oscillation technique. Lung inflammation was assessed histopathologically and by biochemical analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and oxidative stress was evaluated biochemically by measuring lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and several antioxidant enzymes. Pulmonary inflammation assessment showed an increase in neutrophil and lymphocyte numbers. Likewise, airway resistance was significantly increased in the WPS group compared with controls. Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 concentrations were significantly increased in BAL fluid. Lipid peroxidation in lung tissue was significantly increased whereas the level and activity of antioxidants including reduced glutathione, glutathione S transferase, and superoxide dismutase were all significantly decreased following WPS exposure, indicating the occurrence of oxidative stress. Moreover, carboxyhemoglobin levels were significantly increased in the WPS group. We conclude that 1-mo nose-only exposure to WPS significantly increased airway resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the limited clinical studies that reported the detrimental respiratory effects of WPS.

  2. BIIL 284 reduces neutrophils numbers but increases P. aeruginosa bacteraemia and inflammation in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Gerd; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Paroni, Moira; Aktürk, Firdevs-Fatma; Cigana, Cristina; Schmidt, Annika; Gilpin, Deirdre; Heyder, Susanne; Born, Torsten; Smaczny, Christina; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Wagner, Thomas O. F.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Bilton, Diana; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Pier, Gerald B.; Konstan, Michael W.; Ulrich, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Background A clinical study to investigate the leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-receptor antagonist BIIL 284 in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was prematurely terminated due to a significantly increased risk of adverse pulmonary events. We aimed to establish the effect of BIIL284 in models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, thereby contributing to a better understanding of what could have led to adverse pulmonary events in CF patients. Methods P. aeruginosa DNA in the blood of CF patients during and after acute pulmonary exacerbations and in stable patients with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB) and healthy individuals was assessed by PCR. The effect of BIIL 284 treatment was tested in an agar beads murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. Bacterial count and inflammation were evaluated in lung and other organs. Result Most CF patients (98%) and all patients with NCFB and healthy individuals had negative P. aeruginosa DNA in their blood. Similarly, the P. aeruginosa-infected mice showed bacterial counts in the lung but not blood or spleen. BIIL 284 treatment decreased pulmonary neutrophils and increased P. aeruginosa numbers in mouse lungs leading to significantly higher bacteremia rates and lung inflammation compared to placebo treated animals. Conclusions Decreased airway neutrophils induced lung proliferation and severe bacteraemia in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection. These data suggest that caution should be taken when administering anti-inflammatory compounds to patients with bacterial infections. PMID:24183915

  3. Ozone-induced airway epithelial cell death, the neurokinin-1 receptor pathway, and the postnatal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Oslund, Karen L.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Miller, Lisa A.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Children are uniquely susceptible to ozone because airway and lung growth continue for an extensive period after birth. Early-life exposure of the rhesus monkey to repeated ozone cycles results in region-specific disrupted airway/lung growth, but the mediators and mechanisms are poorly understood. Substance P (SP), neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R); and nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) are signaling pathway components involved in ozone-induced cell death. We hypothesize that acute ozone (AO) exposure during postnatal airway development disrupts SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression and that these changes correlate with increased ozone-induced cell death. Our objectives were to 1) spatially define the normal development of the SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway in conducting airways; 2) compare how postnatal age modulates responses to AO exposure; and 3) determine how concomitant, episodic ozone exposure modifies age-specific acute responses. Male infant rhesus monkeys were assigned at age 1 mo to two age groups, 2 or 6 mo, and then to one of three exposure subgroups: filtered air (FA), FA+AO (AO: 8 h/day × 2 days), or episodic biweekly ozone exposure cycles (EAO: 8 h/day × 5 days/14-day cycle+AO). O3 = 0.5 ppm. We found that 1) ozone increases SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression in conducting airways, 2) an ozone exposure cycle (5 days/cycle) delivered early at age 2 mo resulted in an airway that was hypersensitive to AO exposure at the end of 2 mo, and 3) continued episodic exposure (11 cycles) resulted in an airway that was hyposensitive to AO exposure at 6 mo. These observations collectively associate with greater overall inflammation and epithelial cell death, particularly in early postnatal (2 mo), distal airways. PMID:25063800

  4. Upregulation and activation of eosinophil integrins in blood and airway after segmental lung antigen challenge1

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Mats W.; Kelly, Elizabeth A. B.; Busse, William W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that there are clinically relevant differences in eosinophil integrin expression and activation in patients with asthma. To evaluate this, surface densities and activation states of integrins on eosinophils in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of 19 asthmatic subjects were studied before and 48 h after segmental Ag challenge. At 48 h, there was increased expression of αD and the N29 epitope of activated β1 integrins on blood eosinophils and of αM, β2, and the mAb24 epitope of activated β2 integrins on airway eosinophils. Changes correlated with the late-phase fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after whole-lung inhalation of the Ag that was subsequently used in segmental challenge and were greater in subjects defined as dual responders. Increased surface densities of αM and β2 and activation of β2 on airway eosinophils correlated with the concentration of IL-5 in BAL fluid. Activation of β1 and β2 on airway eosinophils correlated with eosinophil percentage in BAL. Thus, eosinophils respond to an allergic stimulus by activation of integrins in a sequence that likely promotes eosinophilic inflammation of the airway. Before challenge, β1 and β2 integrins of circulating eosinophils are in low-activation conformations, and αDβ2 surface expression is low. After Ag challenge, circulating eosinophils adopt a phenotype with activated β1 integrins and upregulated αDβ2, changes that are predicted to facilitate eosinophil arrest on VCAM-1 in bronchial vessels. Finally, eosinophils present in IL-5-rich airway fluid have a hyperadhesive phenotype associated with increased surface expression of αMβ2 and activation of β2 integrins. PMID:18490765

  5. Attenuation of airway inflammation by simvastatin and the implications for asthma treatment: is the jury still out?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing-Nan; Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Yang, Eun-Mi; Lee, Seung-Ihm; Park, Hae-Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies have explained the immunomodulatory effects of statins, the exact mechanisms and the therapeutic significance of these molecules remain to be elucidated. This study not only evaluated the therapeutic potential and inhibitory mechanism of simvastatin in an ovalbumin (OVA)-specific asthma model in mice but also sought to clarify the future directions indicated by previous studies through a thorough review of the literature. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA and then administered three OVA challenges. On each challenge day, 40 mg kg−1 simvastatin was injected before the challenge. The airway responsiveness, inflammatory cell composition, and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed after the final challenge, and the T cell composition and adhesion molecule expression in lung homogenates were determined. The administration of simvastatin decreased the airway responsiveness, the number of airway inflammatory cells, and the interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations in BAL fluid compared with vehicle-treated mice (P<0.05). Histologically, the number of inflammatory cells and mucus-containing goblet cells in lung tissues also decreased in the simvastatin-treated mice. Flow cytometry showed that simvastatin treatment significantly reduced the percentage of pulmonary CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio (P<0.05). Simvastatin treatment also decreased the expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 proteins, as measured in homogenized lung tissues (P<0.05) and human epithelial cells. The reduction in the T cell influx as a result of the decreased expression of cell adhesion molecules is one of the mechanisms by which simvastatin attenuates airway responsiveness and allergic inflammation. Rigorous review of the literature together with our findings suggested that simvastatin should be further developed as a potential therapeutic strategy for allergic asthma. PMID

  6. The Ethanol Extract of Osmanthus fragrans Flowers Reduces Oxidative Stress and Allergic Airway Inflammation in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Ya; Huang, Fu-Long; Shi, Li-Shian; Ka, Shuk-Man; Wang, Jing-Yao; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Tsung-Jen; Ye, Yi-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The Osmanthus fragrans flower, a popular herb in Eastern countries, contains several antioxidant compounds. Ben Cao Gang Mu, traditional Chinese medical literature, describes the usefulness of these flowers for phlegm and stasis reduction, arrest of dysentery with blood in the bowel, and stomachache and diarrhea treatment. However, modern evidence regarding the therapeutic efficacy of these flowers is limited. This study was aimed at assessing the antioxidative effects of the ethanol extract of O. fragrans flowers (OFE) in vivo and evaluating its antioxidant maintenance and therapeutic effect on an allergic airway inflammation in mice. After OFE's oral administration to mice, the values obtained in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay as well as the glutathione concentration in the lungs and spleens of mice increased while thiobarbituric acid reactive substances decreased significantly, indicating OFE's significant in vivo antioxidant activity. OFE was also therapeutically efficacious in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation. Orally administered OFE suppressed ovalbumin-specific IgE production and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung. Moreover, the antioxidative state of the mice improved. Thus, our findings confirm the ability of the O. fragrans flowers to reduce phlegm and suggest that OFE may be useful as an antiallergic agent.

  7. [Effects of carbocisteine on airway inflammation and related events in SO2-exposed rats].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Okamura, T; Masumoto, Y; Tachiiri, T; Momo, K

    2001-01-01

    Airway inflammation leads to secretion of abnormal mucous glycoprotein and ciliary injury. To investigate the possible usefulness of carbocisteine against airway inflammation and events related to it, we conducted a study in SO2-exposed rats of the effects of carbocisteine and ambroxol, as an active control drug, on components of mucous glycoprotein (fucose, sialic acid and protein) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); on infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells in BALF; on tracheal and bronchial-ciliary lesions; and on cAMP levels in tracheal and alveolar tissues. Carbocisteine inhibited or improved all SO2-induced changes tested, and dosages of 125 and 250 mg/kg b.i.d. reduced fucose, sialic acid and protein contents, inflammatory cells (as markers of inflammation), free radicals, and elastase activity in BALF, and suppressed the development of ciliary lesions of the tracheal and bronchial mucosa, while ambroxol (10 mg/kg b.i.d.) showed no such effects. In addition, carbocisteine improved cAMP levels in the tracheal and alveolar tissues. These results indicate that carbocisteine is able to prevent the development of inflammation-related respiratory disease in this rat model, and that this remission of airway inflammation may be associated with carbocisteine-induced normalization of cAMP levels in tracheal and alveolar tissues as well as with its mucoregulant and anti-inflammatory effects. In conclusion, carbocisteine has a unique mucoregulant action and inhibits SO2-induced airway inflammation in a manner different from that of ambroxol.

  8. Glyphosate-rich air samples induce IL-33, TSLP and generate IL-13 dependent airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Khodoun, Marat; Kettleson, Eric M; McKnight, Christopher; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin

    2014-11-05

    Several low weight molecules have often been implicated in the induction of occupational asthma. Glyphosate, a small molecule herbicide, is widely used in the world. There is a controversy regarding a role of glyphosate in developing asthma and rhinitis among farmers, the mechanism of which is unexplored. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of glyphosate induced pulmonary pathology by utilizing murine models and real environmental samples. C57BL/6, TLR4-/-, and IL-13-/- mice inhaled extracts of glyphosate-rich air samples collected on farms during spraying of herbicides or inhaled different doses of glyphosate and ovalbumin. The cellular response, humoral response, and lung function of exposed mice were evaluated. Exposure to glyphosate-rich air samples as well as glyphosate alone to the lungs increased: eosinophil and neutrophil counts, mast cell degranulation, and production of IL-33, TSLP, IL-13, and IL-5. In contrast, in vivo systemic IL-4 production was not increased. Co-administration of ovalbumin with glyphosate did not substantially change the inflammatory immune response. However, IL-13-deficiency resulted in diminished inflammatory response but did not have a significant effect on airway resistance upon methacholine challenge after 7 or 21 days of glyphosate exposure. Glyphosate-rich farm air samples as well as glyphosate alone were found to induce pulmonary IL-13-dependent inflammation and promote Th2 type cytokines, but not IL-4 for glyphosate alone. This study, for the first time, provides evidence for the mechanism of glyphosate-induced occupational lung disease.

  9. Natural Killer Receptor 1 Dampens the Development of Allergic Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Elhaik Goldman, Shirin; Moshkovits, Itay; Shemesh, Avishai; Filiba, Ayelet; Tsirulsky, Yevgeny; Vronov, Elena; Shagan, Marilou; Apte, Ron N.; Benharroch, D aniel; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Dagan, Ron; Munitz, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The function of NCR1 was studied in a model of experimental asthma, classified as a type 1 hypersensitivity reaction, in mice. IgE levels were significantly increased in the serum of OVA immunized NCR1 deficient (NCR1gfp/gfp) mice in comparison to OVA immunized wild type (NCR1+/+) and adjuvant immunized mice. Histological analysis of OVA immunized NCR1gfp/gfp mice revealed no preservation of the lung structure and overwhelming peribronchial and perivascular granulocytes together with mononuclear cells infiltration. OVA immunized NCR+/+ mice demonstrated preserved lung structure and peribronchial and perivascular immune cell infiltration to a lower extent than that in NCR1gfp/gfp mice. Adjuvant immunized mice demonstrated lung structure preservation and no immune cell infiltration. OVA immunization caused an increase in PAS production independently of NCR1 presence. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) revealed NCR1 dependent decreased percentages of eosinophils and increased percentages of lymphocytes and macrophages following OVA immunization. In the OVA immunized NCR1gfp/gfp mice the protein levels of eosinophils’ (CCL24) and Th2 CD4+ T-cells’ chemoattractants (CCL17, and CCL24) in the BAL are increased in comparison with OVA immunized NCR+/+ mice. In the presence of NCR1, OVA immunization caused an increase in NK cells numbers and decreased NCR1 ligand expression on CD11c+GR1+ cells and decreased NCR1 mRNA expression in the BAL. OVA immunization resulted in significantly increased IL-13, IL-4 and CCL17 mRNA expression in NCR1+/+ and NCR1gfp/gfp mice. IL-17 and TNFα expression increased only in OVA-immunized NCR1+/+mice. IL-6 mRNA increased only in OVA immunized NCR1gfp/gfp mice. Collectively, it is demonstrated that NCR1 dampens allergic eosinophilic airway inflammation. PMID:27580126

  10. Endotoxin-induced nitric oxide production rescues airway growth and maturation in atrophic fetal rat lung explants

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, C.; Cherry, J.I.; Land, F.M.; Land, S.C. . E-mail: s.c.land@dundee.ac.uk

    2006-10-13

    Inflammation induces premature maturation of the fetal lung but the signals causing this effect remain unclear. We determined if nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 {mu}g ml{sup -1}), participated in this process. Fetal rat lung airway surface complexity rose 2.5-fold over 96 h in response to LPS and was associated with increased iNOS protein expression and activity. iNOS inhibition by N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine-2HCl (L-NIL) abolished this and induced airway atrophy similar to untreated explants. Surfactant protein-C (SP-C) expression was also induced by LPS and abolished by L-NIL. As TGF{beta} suppresses iNOS activity, we determined if feedback regulation modulated NO-dependent maturation. LPS induced TGF{beta}1 release and SMAD4 nuclear translocation 96 h after treatment. Treatment of explants with a blocking antibody against TGF{beta}1 sustained NO production and airway morphogenesis whereas recombinant TGF{beta}1 antagonized these effects. Feedback regulation of NO synthesis by TGF{beta} may, thus, modulate airway branching and maturation of the fetal lung.

  11. Notch Ligand DLL4 Alleviates Allergic Airway Inflammation via Induction of a Homeostatic Regulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Chen, Yi-Lien; Lien, Chia-I; Liu, Wei-Liang; Hsu, Li-Chung; Yagita, Hideo; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2017-01-01

    Notch is a pleiotropic signaling family that has been implicated in pathogenesis of allergic airway diseases; however, the distinct function of individual Notch ligands remains elusive. We investigated whether Notch ligands, Jagged1 and DLL4, exert differential effects in OVA-induced allergic asthma. We found that whilst Jagged1 inhibition mitigated Th2-dominated airway inflammation, blockage of DLL4 aggravated the Th2-mediated asthma phenotypes. Additionally, Jagged1 signaling blockage enhanced IL-17 production and neutrophilic airway infiltration. In vitro, exogenous Jagged1 induced Th2-skewed responses, whereas augmented DLL4 signaling displayed a dual role by promoting expansion of both Tregs and Th17. In vivo, DLL4 blockage impaired Treg differentiation which plausibly resulted in exaggerated asthma phenotypes. On the contrary, administration of DLL4-expressing antigen-presenting cells promoted endogenous Treg expansion and ameliorated the allergic responses. Therefore, whilst Jagged1 induces Th2-skewed inflammation, DLL4 elicits an essential self-regulatory mechanism via Treg-mediated pathway that counterbalances Jagged1-induced Th2 responses and facilitates resolution of the airway inflammation to restore homeostasis. These findings uncover a disparate function of Jagged1 and DLL4 in allergic airway diseases, hinting feasibility of Notch ligand-specific targeting in therapy of allergic airway diseases. PMID:28262821

  12. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  13. Chrysin alleviates allergic inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Jiang, Mingzi; Zhang, Yunshi; Liu, Xing; Du, Qiang; Feng, Ganzhu

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder and progresses mainly due to airway remodeling. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess multiple biologic activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-proliferation. The present study aimed to investigate whether chrysin could relieve allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma and the mechanism involved. The female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) successfully developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation and remodeling. The experimental data showed that chrysin could alleviate OVA-induced AHR. Chrysin could also reduce OVA-induced increases in the number of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, interleukin (IL) -4, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total IgE in serum. The decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) level in BALF was also upregulated by chrysin. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) around bronchioles were suppressed by chrysin. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) could be decreased by chrysin, which are associated with airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. These results indicate the promising therapeutic effect of chrysin on chronic asthma, especially the progression of airway remodeling.

  14. Endocrine disruptors found in food contaminants enhance allergic sensitization through an oxidative stress that promotes the development of allergic airway inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Takuma; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Wang, Linan; Murata, Mariko; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa

    2013-11-15

    In the past few decades, there has been a significant increase in incidence of allergic diseases. The hygiene hypothesis may provide some clues to explain this rising trend, but it may also be attributable to other environmental factors that exert a proallergic adjuvant effects. However, there is limited information on the risks of developing allergic asthma and related diseases through the ingestion of environmental chemicals found in food contaminants. In the present study, we have shown that oral administration of tributyltin, used as a model environmental chemical, induced oxidative-stress status in the bronchial lymph node, mesenteric lymph node and spleen, but not in the lung, where the initial step of allergic asthma pathogenesis takes place. Mice exposed to tributyltin exhibited heightened Th2 immunity to the allergen with more severe airway inflammation. Tributyltin also induced Treg cells apoptosis preferentially over non-Treg cells. All these effects of tributyltin exposure were canceled by the administration of glutathione monoethyl ester. Meanwhile, tributyltin did not affect airway inflammation of mice transferred with allergen-specific Th2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that tributyltin exerts its pathological effect during the sensitization phase through oxidative stress that enhances the development of allergic diseases. The current study dissects the pathogenic role of oxidative stress induced by oral exposure to an environmental chemical during the sensitization phase of allergic airway inflammation and would be important for developing therapeutics for prevention of allergic diseases. - Highlights: • Oral exposure to TBT exacerbates airway inflammation. • TBT induces oxidative stress in secondary lymphoid organs, but not in the lung. • TBT preferentially induces regulatory T cell apoptosis over non-Treg cells. • TBT does not enhance pre-existing airway inflammation in sensitized mice. • Chemicals in food contaminants

  15. Evaluation of allergic lung inflammation by computed tomography in a rat model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jobse, B N; Johnson, J R; Farncombe, T H; Labiris, R; Walker, T D; Goncharova, S; Jordana, M

    2009-06-01

    The ability of micro-computed tomography (CT) to noninvasively evaluate allergic pulmonary inflammation in an experimental model was investigated. In addition, two image segmentation methods and the value of respiratory gating were investigated in the context of this model. Brown Norway rats were exposed to one of four doses of house dust mite (HDM) extract (0, 0.15, 15 or 150 microg) delivered intratracheally every 24 h for 10 days. CT scanning was performed at baseline and after several longitudinal HDM exposures. Both thoracic- and lung-segmentation methods yielded similar results when standardisation practices were employed. While tissue histology correlated well with CT images, cell counts from bronchoalveolar lavage depicted greater inflammation than did density measures from CT images. Evidence from representative CT slices and transaxial density distribution indicated that inflammation was primarily associated with major airways and extended into the periphery from these focal points. Respiratory gating demonstrated that images of the inspiratory state provided greater contrast of inflammatory processes. Lastly, decreases in tidal volumes indicated significant mechanical respiratory changes in animals exposed to both 15 and 150 microg. In summary, CT image segmentation can extract pertinent data on in vivo allergic airway/lung inflammation. Furthermore, respiratory gating provides additional contrast and insight into these quantification practices.

  16. Airway Fibrinogenolysis and the Initiation of Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Mak, Garbo; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Knight, J. Morgan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The past 15 years of allergic disease research have produced extraordinary improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of airway allergic diseases such as asthma. Whereas it was previously viewed as largely an immunoglobulin E-mediated process, the gradual recognition that T cells, especially Type 2 T helper (Th2) cells and Th17 cells, play a major role in asthma and related afflictions has inspired clinical trials targeting cytokine-based inflammatory pathways that show great promise. What has yet to be clarified about the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory disorders, however, are the fundamental initiating factors, both exogenous and endogenous, that drive and sustain B- and T-cell responses that underlie the expression of chronic disease. Here we review how proteinases derived from diverse sources drive allergic responses. A central discovery supporting the proteinase hypothesis of allergic disease pathophysiology is the role played by airway fibrinogen, which in part appears to serve as a sensor of unregulated proteinase activity and which, when cleaved, both participates in a novel allergic signaling pathway through Toll-like receptor 4 and forms fibrin clots that contribute to airway obstruction. Unresolved at present is the ultimate source of airway allergenic proteinases. From among many potential candidates, perhaps the most intriguing is the possibility such enzymes derive from airway fungi. Together, these new findings expand both our knowledge of allergic disease pathophysiology and options for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25525732

  17. Non-invasive assessment of airway inflammation in ship-engine workers.

    PubMed

    Barreto, M; Villa, M P; Corradi, M; Barberi, S; Monaco, G; Martella, S; Bohmerova, Z; Sabatino, G; Ronchetti, R

    2006-01-01

    Smoking is harmful for respiratory function. In young to middle-aged men the damage is insidious and difficult to demonstrate. The respiratory impairment could increase under specific stressful conditions in the professional environment. On the hypothesis that exhaled markers are useful for assessing airway susceptibility to inhaled irritants, we measured exhaled markers and lung function in smoking and non-smoking engine-driver military coastguards before and after a patrol at sea. Eighteen men, mean age 39 yrs (range 23-58 yrs), 8 smokers, underwent spirometry, exhaled and nasal nitric oxide (eNO, nNO), exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for measures of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), proteins (Prots), 8-isoprostanes (8-IsoPs), nitrite (NO2-) and nitrosothiols (RS-NOs) at baseline and after an 8-hour patrol navigation on board small, high-speed diesel-powered ships. At baseline, the smokers showed higher middle flows and CO levels, lower eNO and nNO than non-smokers, but similar levels of EBC markers; geometric means (95% confidence interval), CO: 23.6 (14.5 to 38.3) vs. 3.5 (2.5 to 5.3) ppm; eNO: 7.9 (4.8 to 12.9) vs. 26.7 (15.7 to 45.5) ppb, p=0.000. After navigation, Prots, 8-IsoPs and RS-NOs (but not lung function variables or other markers) significantly increased only in smokers; baseline vs post-navigation RS-NOs: 0.27 (0.11 to 0.65) vs. 1.30 (0.58 to 2.89) micromol, p=0.012. The respiratory consequences of a stressing environment in engine-driver military coastguards who actively smoke are better assessed by measuring EBC markers than by eNO, nNO or lung function. By increasing airway inflammation from oxidative-stress, tobacco smoking appears to interact with other chemical or physical factors elicited during sea navigation. Precisely what these factors are deserves further investigation.

  18. Antiinflammatory effects of bromodomain and extraterminal domain inhibition in cystic fibrosis lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kong; Campfield, Brian T.; Wenzel, Sally E.; McAleer, Jeremy P.; Kreindler, James L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Gopal, Radha; Wang, Ting; Chen, Wei; Eddens, Taylor; Quinn, Kathleen M.; Myerburg, Mike M.; Horne, William T.; Lora, Jose M.; Albrecht, Brian K.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2016-01-01

    Significant morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) results from chronic lung inflammation, most commonly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Recent data suggest that IL-17 contributes to pathological inflammation in the setting of abnormal mucosal immunity, and type 17 immunity–driven inflammatory responses may represent a target to block aberrant inflammation in CF. Indeed, transcriptomic analysis of the airway epithelium from CF patients undergoing clinical bronchoscopy revealed upregulation of IL-17 downstream signature genes, implicating a substantial contribution of IL-17–mediated immunity in CF lungs. Bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) chromatin modulators can regulate T cell responses, specifically Th17-mediated inflammation, by mechanisms that include bromodomain-dependent inhibition of acetylated histones at the IL17 locus. Here, we show that, in vitro, BET inhibition potently suppressed Th17 cell responses in explanted CF tissue and inhibited IL-17–driven chemokine production in human bronchial epithelial cells. In an acute P. aeruginosa lung infection murine model, BET inhibition decreased inflammation, without exacerbating infection, suggesting that BET inhibition may be a potential therapeutic target in patients with CF. PMID:27517095

  19. Moracin M inhibits airway inflammation by interrupting the JNK/c-Jun and NF-κB pathways in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Sang Kook; Moon, Bong Soo; Lee, Chan Woo; Mandava, Suresh; Samala, Mallesham; Lee, Jongkook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2016-07-15

    The therapeutic effectiveness of moracins as 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives against airway inflammation was examined. Moracin M, O, and R were isolated from the root barks of Morus alba, and they inhibited interleukin (IL)-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) at 101-00μM. Among them, moracin M showed the strongest inhibitory effect (IC50=8.1μM). Downregulation of IL-6 expression by moracin M was mediated by interrupting the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun pathway. Moracin derivatives inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-catalyzed NO production from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated alveolar macrophages (MH-S) at 50-100μM. In particular, moracin M inhibited NO production by downregulating iNOS. When orally administered, moracin M (20-60mg/kg) showed comparable inhibitory action with dexamethasone (30mg/kg) against LPS-induced lung inflammation, acute lung injury, in mice with that of dexamethasone (30mg/kg). The action mechanism included interfering with the activation of nuclear transcription factor-κB in inflamed lungs. Therefore, it is concluded that moracin M inhibited airway inflammation in vitro and in vivo, and it has therapeutic potential for treating lung inflammatory disorders.

  20. Airway segmentation and analysis for the study of mouse models of lung disease using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaechevarria, X.; Pérez-Martín, D.; Ceresa, M.; de Biurrun, G.; Blanco, D.; Montuenga, L. M.; van Ginneken, B.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.

    2009-11-01

    Animal models of lung disease are gaining importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms of diseases such as emphysema and lung cancer. Micro-CT allows in vivo imaging of these models, thus permitting the study of the progression of the disease or the effect of therapeutic drugs in longitudinal studies. Automated analysis of micro-CT images can be helpful to understand the physiology of diseased lungs, especially when combined with measurements of respiratory system input impedance. In this work, we present a fast and robust murine airway segmentation and reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is based on a propagating fast marching wavefront that, as it grows, divides the tree into segments. We devised a number of specific rules to guarantee that the front propagates only inside the airways and to avoid leaking into the parenchyma. The algorithm was tested on normal mice, a mouse model of chronic inflammation and a mouse model of emphysema. A comparison with manual segmentations of two independent observers shows that the specificity and sensitivity values of our method are comparable to the inter-observer variability, and radius measurements of the mainstem bronchi reveal significant differences between healthy and diseased mice. Combining measurements of the automatically segmented airways with the parameters of the constant phase model provides extra information on how disease affects lung function.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma.

  2. Herbal Formula, PM014, Attenuates Lung Inflammation in a Murine Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojung; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soojin; Jang, Young Pyo; Jung, Sungki; Jung, Heejae; Bae, Hyunsu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by airway obstruction, leads to, as the two major forms of COPD, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of herbal formula, PM014, in a murine model of COPD. Balb/c mice were treated once with each herb extract in PM014 or PM014 mixture via an oral injection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or elastase/LPS were administrated to the mice to induce a disease that resembles COPD. PM014 treatment significantly attenuated the increased accumulation of immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) compared to control mice. In addition, the TNF-α and IL-6 levels in BALF were decreased in the PM014 mice. Furthermore, histological analysis demonstrated that PM014 attenuated the hazardous effects of lung inflammation. These data suggest that PM014 exerts beneficial effects against forms of COPD such as lung inflammation. PMID:22778777

  3. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  4. Systemic and airway inflammation and the presence of emphysema in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Mazioti, Argyro; Kiropoulos, Theodoros; Tsilioni, Irini; Koutsokera, Angela; Tanou, Kalliopi; Nikoulis, Dimitrios J; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Zakynthinos, Epameinondas; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HRCT-confirmed emphysema on biomarkers evaluating airway and systemic inflammation in COPD patients. Forty-nine consecutive male COPD outpatients with stable COPD were divided in two groups according to the presence or absence of emphysema on HRCT. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests, plus assessment of exercise capacity, body composition and quality of life. Biomarkers were measured in serum (CRP, interleukin-6, TNF-alpha, leptin, adiponectin, osteocalcin, insulin growth factor-1, and systemic oxidative stress), in plasma (fibrinogen and VEGF) and in whole blood (B-type natriuretic peptide). TNF-alpha, 8-isoprostane and pH were additionally measured in exhaled breath condensate. Patients with emphysema had more severe lung function impairment, lower body-mass index and fat-free mass index, and poorer quality of life. Additionally, they presented increased systemic oxidative stress and plasma fibrinogen and lower BNP compared to patients without emphysema. After proper adjustment for disease severity, all differences remained with the exceptions of body-mass index, fat-free mass index and BNP. COPD patients with HRCT-confirmed emphysema present increased systemic oxidative stress and fibrinogen, suggesting that they may be more prone to the systemic consequences of COPD compared to patients without emphysema.

  5. Systemic inflammation and lung function: A longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, Robert J.; Gray, Andrew R.; Sears, Malcolm R.; Poulton, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired lung function in healthy adults as well as in patients with lung disease. The mechanism for this association is unknown and it is unclear if systemic inflammation leads to impaired lung function or if poor lung function leads to inflammation. We explored the temporal associations between blood C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and white blood cells, and lung function in young adults. Methods Spirometry, plethysmography, and diffusion capacity were measured in a population-based cohort at ages 32 and 38 years. High-sensitivity CRP, fibrinogen, and white blood cells were measured at the same ages. Results Higher levels of CRP and, to a lesser extent, fibrinogen were associated with lower lung volumes in cross-sectional analyses at both ages 32 and 38 years. Higher CRP and fibrinogen at age 32 were associated with higher FEV1 and FEV1/FVC at age 38, but not other measures of lung function. Lower lung volumes (total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) but not airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC) at age 32 were associated with higher CRP at age 38. Associations between age 32 lung function and fibrinogen at follow-up were weaker, but consistent. There were no longitudinal associations between white blood cells and lung function. Conclusions We found no evidence that systemic inflammation causes a decline in lung function. However, lower lung volumes were associated with higher CRP and fibrinogen at follow-up indicating that pulmonary restriction may be a risk factor for systemic inflammation. The mechanism for this association remains unclear. PMID:26733230

  6. High resolution lung airway cast segmentation with proper topology suitable for computational fluid dynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Carson, James P; Einstein, Daniel R; Minard, Kevin R; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Wallis, Christopher D; Corley, Richard A

    2010-10-01

    Developing detailed lung airway models is an important step towards understanding the respiratory system. While modern imaging and airway casting approaches have dramatically improved the potential detail of such models, challenges have arisen in image processing as the demand for greater detail pushes the image processing approaches to their limits. Airway segmentations with proper topology have neither loops nor invalid voxel-to-voxel connections. Here we describe a new technique for segmenting airways with proper topology and apply the approach to an image volume generated by magnetic resonance imaging of a silicone cast created from an excised monkey lung.

  7. Aerosolized polymerized type I collagen reduces airway inflammation and remodelling in a guinea pig model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Alvarez, Paola; Sánchez-Guerrero, Edgar; Martínez-Cordero, Erasmo; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Campos, María G; Cetina, Lucely; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2010-04-01

    Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone (Collagen-PVP) has been demonstrated to elicit immunomodulatory properties in different chronic inflammatory diseases. Nevertheless, its effects on asthma are still unknown. We have evaluated whether collagen-PVP could modulate airway inflammation and remodelling in a guinea pig model of allergic asthma. Sensitized guinea pigs were challenged with the allergen (ovalbumin) six times (at 10-day intervals). From the third challenge on, animals were treated every 5 days with saline aerosols containing 0.16, 0.33, or 0.66 mg/ml of collagen-PVP (n = 5, respectively). Some guinea pigs, sensitized and challenged with saline as well as treated with 0 or 0.66 mg/ml collagen-PVP, were included in the study as control (n = 7) and sham groups (n = 5), respectively. From the first challenge on, ovalbumin induced a transient airway obstruction, measured by barometric plethysmography, which was not modified by collagen-PVP treatments. After the last allergen challenge, guinea pigs were anesthetized to obtain bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and the left lung caudal lobe. As expected, BAL cell count from allergen-challenged guinea pigs showed abundant neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as numerous tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-expressing granulocytes and macrophages in airway wall (determined by immunohistochemical assay). Neutrophilia and TNF-alpha-expressing leukocytes, from collagen-PVP treated animals, diminished from 0.16 mg/ml, and eosinophilia from 0.66 mg/ml of collagen-PVP doses. Histological changes induced by allergen challenges include thickening of connective tissue below airway epithelium and vascular wall widening of airway adjacent vessels; these changes were reduced by collagen-PVP treatment. Collagen-PVP seems to have anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties in this guinea pig asthma model.

  8. Autophagy is essential for ultrafine particle-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Ping-Li; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhou-Yang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhu, Chen; Cao, Chao; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Bei-Bei; Cormier, Stephania A; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Environmental ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is capable of inducing airway injury, while the detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate pivotal roles of autophagy in regulation of inflammation and mucus hyperproduction induced by PM containing environmentally persistent free radicals in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. PM was endocytosed by HBE cells and simultaneously triggered autophagosomes, which then engulfed the invading particles to form amphisomes and subsequent autolysosomes. Genetic blockage of autophagy markedly reduced PM-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, e.g. IL8 and IL6, and MUC5AC in HBE cells. Mice with impaired autophagy due to knockdown of autophagy-related gene Becn1 or Lc3b displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Interference of the autophagic flux by lysosomal inhibition resulted in accumulated autophagosomes/amphisomes, and intriguingly, this process significantly aggravated the IL8 production through NFKB1, and markedly attenuated MUC5AC expression via activator protein 1. These data indicate that autophagy is required for PM-induced airway epithelial injury, and that inhibition of autophagy exerts therapeutic benefits for PM-induced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, although they are differentially orchestrated by the autophagic flux.

  9. The Effects of Maternal Exposure to Bisphenol A on Allergic Lung Inflammation into Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, B. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high–production volume chemical classified as an environmental estrogen and used primarily in the plastics industry. BPA’s increased usage correlates with rising BPA levels in people and a corresponding increase in the incidence of asthma. Due to limited studies, the contribution of maternal BPA exposure to allergic asthma pathogenesis is unclear. Using two established mouse models of allergic asthma, we examined whether developmental exposure to BPA alters hallmarks of allergic lung inflammation in adult offspring. Pregnant C57BL/6 dams were gavaged with 0, 0.5, 5, 50, or 500 μg BPA/kg/day from gestational day 6 until postnatal day 21. To induce allergic inflammation, adult offspring were mucosally sensitized with inhaled ovalbumin containing low-dose lipopolysaccharide or ip sensitized using ovalbumin with alum followed by ovalbumin aerosol challenge. In the mucosal sensitization model, female offspring that were maternally exposed to ≥ 50 μg BPA/kg/day displayed enhanced airway lymphocytic and lung inflammation, compared with offspring of control dams. Peritoneally sensitized, female offspring exposed to ≤ 50 μg BPA/kg/day presented dampened lung eosinophilia, compared with vehicle controls. Male offspring did not exhibit these differences in either sensitization model. Our data demonstrate that maternal exposure to BPA has subtle and qualitatively different effects on allergic inflammation, which are critically dependent upon route of allergen sensitization and sex. However, these subtle, yet persistent changes due to developmental exposure to BPA did not lead to significant differences in overall airway responsiveness, suggesting that early life exposure to BPA does not exacerbate allergic inflammation into adulthood. PMID:22821851

  10. The acute airway inflammation induced by PM2.5 exposure and the treatment of essential oils in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hetong; Song, Laiyu; Ju, Wenhui; Wang, Xuguang; Dong, Lu; Zhang, Yining; Ya, Ping; Yang, Chun; Li, Fasheng

    2017-01-01

    PM2.5 is the main particulate air pollutant whose aerodynamic diameter is less than 2.5 micron. The inflammation of various respiratory diseases are associated with PM2.5 inhalation. Pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β generated from effected cells usually plays a crucial role in many kinds of lung inflammatory reactions. The exacerbation of Th immune responses are identified in some PM2.5 related diseases. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of PM2.5-induced acute lung inflammation, we exposed Balb/c mice to PM2.5 intratracheally and established a mice model. Acute lung inflammation and increased IL-1β expression was observed after PM2.5 instillation. Regulatory factors of IL-1β (TLR4/MyD88 signaling pathway and NLRP3 inflammasome) participated in this lung inflammatory response as well. Treatment with compound essential oils (CEOs) substantially attenuated PM2.5-induced acute lung inflammation. The decreased IL-1β and Th immune responses after CEOs treatment were significant. PM2.5 may increase the secretion of IL-1β through TLR4/MyD88 and NLRP3 pathway resulting in murine airway inflammation. CEOs could attenuate the lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β and Th immune responses in this model. This study describes a potentially important mechanism of PM2.5-induced acute lung inflammation and that may bring about novel therapies for the inflammatory diseases associated with PM2.5 inhalation. PMID:28276511

  11. Role of neutrophilic inflammation in ozone-induced epithelial alterations in the nasal airways of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hye Youn

    Ozone is a principal oxidant air pollutant in photochemical smog. Epithelial cells lining the centriacinar region of lung and the proximal aspects of nasal passage are primary target sites for ozone-induced injury in laboratory animals. Acute exposure of rats to high ambient concentrations of ozone (e.g., 0.5 ppm) results in neutrophilic inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) in the nasal transitional epithelium (NTE) lining the proximal nasal airways. The principal purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of pre-metaplastic cellular responses, especially neutrophilic inflammation, in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced MCM in rat NTE. For this purpose, three specific hypotheses-based whole-animal inhalation studies were conducted. Male F344/N rats were exposed in whole-body inhalation chambers to 0 (filtered air) or 0.5 ppm ozone for 1-3 days (8 h/day). Histochemical, immunochemical, molecular and morphometric techniques were used to investigate the ozone-induced cellular and molecular events in the NTE. Two in vitro studies were also conducted to examine the effects of ozone-inducible cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF- a, and interleukin-6; IL-6) on mucin gene (rMuc-5AC) expression. Ozone induced a rapid increase of rMuc-5AC mRNA in nasal tissues within hours after the start of exposure. It preceded the appearance of MCM, and persisted with MCM. Ozone-induced neutrophilic inflammation accompanied the mucin gene upregulation, but was resolved when MCM first appeared in the NTE. Antibody-mediated depletion of circulating neutrophils attenuated ozone-induced MCM, although it did not affect the ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin mRNA upregulation. In another study, it was found that preexisting neutrophilic rhinitis induced by endotoxin augmented the ozone-induced MCM. However, pre-existing rhinitis did not alter the severity of ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin gene upregulation

  12. Pathway Reconstruction of Airway Remodeling in Chronic Lung Diseases: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Ali; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohamad-Reza; Moeini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a pathophysiologic process at the clinical, cellular, and molecular level relating to chronic obstructive airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and mustard lung. These diseases are associated with the dysregulation of multiple molecular pathways in the airway cells. Little progress has so far been made in discovering the molecular causes of complex disease in a holistic systems manner. Therefore, pathway and network reconstruction is an essential part of a systems biology approach to solve this challenging problem. In this paper, multiple data sources were used to construct the molecular process of airway remodeling pathway in mustard lung as a model of airway disease. We first compiled a master list of genes that change with airway remodeling in the mustard lung disease and then reconstructed the pathway by generating and merging the protein-protein interaction and the gene regulatory networks. Experimental observations and literature mining were used to identify and validate the master list. The outcome of this paper can provide valuable information about closely related chronic obstructive airway diseases which are of great importance for biologists and their future research. Reconstructing the airway remodeling interactome provides a starting point and reference for the future experimental study of mustard lung, and further analysis and development of these maps will be critical to understanding airway diseases in patients. PMID:24978043

  13. Short Palate, Lung, and Nasal Epithelial Clone–1 Is a Tightly Regulated Airway Sensor in Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Clemente J.; Liu, Qing; Curran, David R.; Patham, Bhargavi; Dela Cruz, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelial clone–1 (SPLUNC1) is a protein abundantly expressed by the respiratory epithelium of the proximal lower respiratory tract, a site of great environmental exposure. Previous studies showed that SPLUNC1 exerts antimicrobial effects, regulates airway surface liquid and mucociliary clearance, and suppresses allergic airway inflammation. We studied SPLUNC1 to gain insights into its role in host defense. In the lower respiratory tract, concentrations of SPLUNC1 are high under basal conditions. In models of pneumonia caused by common respiratory pathogens, and in Th1-induced and Th2-induced airway inflammation, SPLUNC1 secretion is markedly reduced. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns and IFN-γ act directly on airway epithelial cells to inhibit SPLUNC1 mRNA expression. Thus, SPLUNC1 is quickly suppressed during infection, in response to an insult on the epithelial surface. These experiments highlight the finely tuned fluctuations of SPLUNC1 in response to exposures in the respiratory tract, and suggest that the loss of SPLUNC1 is a crucial feature of host defense across air-breathing animal species. PMID:23470624

  14. Soluble Fibre Meal Challenge Reduces Airway Inflammation and Expression of GPR43 and GPR41 in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Halnes, Isabel; Baines, Katherine J.; Berthon, Bronwyn S.; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley K.; Gibson, Peter G.; Wood, Lisa G.

    2017-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced following the fermentation of soluble fibre by gut bacteria. In animal models, both dietary fibre and SCFAs have demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects via the activation of free fatty acid receptors, such as G protein-coupled receptor 41 and 43 (GPR41 and GPR43). This pilot study examined the acute effect of a single dose of soluble fibre on airway inflammation—including changes in gene expression of free fatty acid receptors—in asthma. Adults with stable asthma consumed a soluble fibre meal (n = 17) containing 3.5 g inulin and probiotics, or a control meal (n = 12) of simple carbohydrates. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) was measured and induced sputum was collected at 0 and 4 h for differential cell counts, measurement of interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein concentration, and GPR41 and GPR43 gene expression. At 4 h after meal consumption, airway inflammation biomarkers, including sputum total cell count, neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes, sputum IL-8, and eNO significantly decreased compared to baseline in the soluble fibre group only. This corresponded with upregulated GPR41 and GPR43 sputum gene expression and improved lung function in the soluble fibre group alone. Soluble fibre has acute anti-inflammatory effects in asthmatic airways. Long-term effects of soluble fibre as an anti-inflammatory therapy in asthma warrants further investigation. PMID:28075383

  15. Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation induced by toluene diisocyanate in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.; McDonald, D.M.; Distefano, S.; Scypinski, L.

    1985-11-01

    The authors examined the changes in airway responsiveness to increasing doses of an acetylcholine aerosol in anesthetized and ventilated guinea pigs 2, 6, or 24 h after exposure to 2 ppm toluene diisocyanate (TDI) or 2 h after exposure to air or 1 ppm TDI. The concentration of acetylcholine calculated to cause a 200% increase in RL was significantly lower for animals studied at 2 h (0.68%) or at 6 h (0.77%), but not at 24 h (2.39%), after TDI than for air animals (3.07%). The increase in airway responsiveness in the TDI-exposed animals was associated with histologic changes in the trachea and intrapulmonary airways. Exposure to 2 ppm TDI caused a patchy loss of cilia, shedding of epithelial cells into the airway lumen, and an influx of inflammatory cells into the trachea and other airways. In the lamina propria of the trachea, the concentration of extravascular polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was 13- to 26-fold greater in animals studied 2 or 6 h after exposure to 2 ppm TDI or at 2 h after 1 ppm TDI than in animals exposed to air. The concentration of PMN in the epithelium was significantly increased only in animals examined 2 h after 2 ppm TDI. These results indicate that a single exposure to TDI can cause an increase in airway responsiveness that is associated with epithelial injury and acute airway inflammation.

  16. A novel anti-IL4Rα nanoparticle efficiently controls lung inflammation during asthma

    PubMed Central

    Halwani, Rabih; Sultana Shaik, Asma; Ratemi, Elaref; Afzal, Sibtain; Kenana, Rosan; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Al Faraj, Achraf

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and the harmful side effects accompanying the prolonged corticosteroid treatment of chronic pulmonary diseases prompted the development of more specific anti-inflammatory approaches. Several strategies aiming to block IL4Rα, the receptor for a key pro-inflammatory pathway, were investigated. However, their efficiency was limited, mostly due to the systemic or subcutaneous route of administrations. In this paper, we examined the ability of an intranasal treatment with biocompatible nanoparticles targeting IL4Rα to control lung inflammation in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice. OVA-sensitized mice were treated with anti-IL4Rα-conjugated nanoparticles. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined using a cytokine array assay. The effects of nanoparticle treatment on the activation of lung inflammatory cells and their ability to proliferate and produce cytokines were determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Lung inflammation was also monitored using immunohistochemical staining. Treatment with the anti-IL4Rα nanoparticles significantly decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and release in BALF and airway lung tissue in mice. The numbers of lung tissue lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils were also decreased. Interestingly, anti-IL4Rα nanoparticles deactivated CD4 and CD8 T cells in lung tissue and inhibited their ability to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines to a significantly lower level than the treatment with free anti-IL4Rα. Moreover, they induced a sustained low level of lung inflammation for 1 week following the last instillation compared with the treatment with free anti-IL4Rα antibodies. Together, this data suggested that the enhanced tissue penetrability and sustainability of these nanoparticles improved the strength and durability of the immunosuppressive effects of anti-IL4Rα. PMID:27713399

  17. Colonization of CF patients' upper airways with S. aureus contributes more decisively to upper airway inflammation than P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Janhsen, Wibke Katharina; Arnold, Christin; Hentschel, Julia; Lehmann, Thomas; Pfister, Wolfgang; Baier, Michael; Böer, Klas; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Mainz, Jochen Georg

    2016-10-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients' airways, inflammatory processes decisively contribute to remodeling and pulmonary destruction. The aims of this study were to compare upper airway (UAW) inflammation in the context of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in a longitudinal setting, and to examine further factors influencing UAW inflammation. Therefore, we analyzed soluble inflammatory mediators in noninvasively obtained nasal lavage (NL) of CF patients together with microbiology, medication, and relevant clinical parameters. NL, applying 10 mL of isotonic saline per nostril, was serially performed in 74 CF patients (326 samples). Concentrations of the inflammatory mediators' interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and its anti-protease TIMP-1 were quantified by bead-based multiplexed assay, neutrophil elastase (NE) via ELISA. Culture-based microbiology of the upper and lower airways (LAW), as well as serological and clinical findings, were compiled. Our results indicate that UAW colonization with S. aureus significantly impacts the concentration of all measured inflammatory mediators in NL fluid except TIMP-1, whereas these effects were not significant for P. aeruginosa. Patients with S. aureus colonization of both the UAW and LAW showed significantly increased concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP-9, and slightly elevated concentrations of NE in NL fluid compared to non-colonized patients. This work elaborates a survey on S. aureus' virulence factors that may contribute to this underestimated pathology. Serial assessment of epithelial lining fluid by NL reveals that colonization of the UAW with S. aureus contributes more to CF airway inflammatory processes than hitherto expected.

  18. Adalimumab ameliorates OVA-induced airway inflammation in mice: Role of CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) regulatory T-cells.

    PubMed

    Elsakkar, Mohamed G; Sharaki, Olla A; Abdallah, Dina M; Mostafa, Dalia K; Shekondali, Fadia T

    2016-09-05

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory heterogeneous disorder initiated by a dysregulated immune response which drives disease development in susceptible individuals. Though T helper 2 (TH2) biased responses are usually linked to eosinophilic asthma, other Th cell subsets induce neutrophilic airway inflammation which provokes the most severe asthmatic phenotypes. A growing evidence highlights the role of T regulatory (Treg) cells in damping abnormal Th responses and thus inhibiting allergy and asthma. Therefore, strategies to induce or augment Treg cells hold promise for treatment and prevention of allergic airway inflammation. Recently, the link between Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Treg has been uncovered, and TNF-α antagonists are increasingly used in many autoimmune diseases. Yet, their benefits in allergic airway inflammation is not clarified. We investigated the effect of Adalimumab, a TNF-α antagonist, on Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation in CD1 mice and explored its impact on Treg cells. Our results showed that Adalimumab treatment attenuated the OVA-induced increase in serum IgE, TH2 and TH1 derived inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IFN-γ, respectively) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, suppressed recruitment of inflammatory cells in BAL fluid and lung, and inhibited BAL fluid neutrophilia. It also ameliorated goblet cell metaplasia and bronchial fibrosis. Splenocytes flow cytometry revealed increased percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) Treg cells by Adalimumab that was associated with increase in their suppressive activity as shown by elevated BAL fluid IL-10. We conclude that the beneficial effects of Adalimumab in this CD1 neutrophilic model of allergic airway inflammation are attributed to augmentation of Treg cell number and activity.

  19. Multiscale multimodal fusion of histological and MRI volumes for characterization of lung inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Wang, Haibo; Golden, Thea; Gow, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Mouse lung models facilitate the investigation of conditions such as chronic inflammation which are associated with common lung diseases. The multi-scale manifestation of lung inflammation prompted us to use multi-scale imaging - both in vivo, ex vivo MRI along with ex vivo histology, for its study in a new quantitative way. Some imaging modalities, such as MRI, are non-invasive and capture macroscopic features of the pathology, while others, e.g. ex vivo histology, depict detailed structures. Registering such multi-modal data to the same spatial coordinates will allow the construction of a comprehensive 3D model to enable the multi-scale study of diseases. Moreover, it may facilitate the identification and definition of quantitative of in vivo imaging signatures for diseases and pathologic processes. We introduce a quantitative, image analytic framework to integrate in vivo MR images of the entire mouse with ex vivo histology of the lung alone, using lung ex vivo MRI as conduit to facilitate their co-registration. In our framework, we first align the MR images by registering the in vivo and ex vivo MRI of the lung using an interactive rigid registration approach. Then we reconstruct the 3D volume of the ex vivo histological specimen by efficient group wise registration of the 2D slices. The resulting 3D histologic volume is subsequently registered to the MRI volumes by interactive rigid registration, directly to the ex vivo MRI, and implicitly to in vivo MRI. Qualitative evaluation of the registration framework was performed by comparing airway tree structures in ex vivo MRI and ex vivo histology where airways are visible and may be annotated. We present a use case for evaluation of our co-registration framework in the context of studying chronic inammation in a diseased mouse.

  20. Role of GSTM1 in Resistance for Lung Inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung inflammation resulting from oxidant/antioxidant imbalance is a common feature of many lung diseases. In particular, the role of enzymes regulated by the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor has recently received increased attention. Among these antioxidant gene...

  1. Adoptive transfer of dendritic cells isolated from helminth-infected mice enhanced T regulatory cell responses in airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-Y; Li, L-Y; Yang, X-Z; Li, J; Zhong, G; Wang, J; Li, L-J; Ji, B; Wu, Z-Q; Liu, H; Yang, X; Liu, P-M

    2011-10-01

    Our and others' previous studies have shown that Schistosoma japonicum (SJ) infection can inhibit allergic reactions. Moreover, we found that adoptive transfer of dendritic cells (DCs) from inhibited mice showed a similar inhibitory effect on allergy, suggesting a critical role of DCs in SJ-infected mediated inhibition of allergy. In this study, we further examined the mechanism by which DCs contribute to inhibition of allergy. Our results showed that DCs from SJ-infected mice (SJDCs) produced significantly higher levels of IL-10 compared to those from naive control mice (NDCs). Adoptive transfer of SJDCs, unlike NDCs, significantly increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and CD4+CD25+IL-10+ T cells regulatory T-cell responses in vivo. This was correlated with significantly reduced production of IL-4 and IL-5 by CD4+ T cells, eotaxin in lung tissues and reduced airway allergic inflammation in the SJDC recipients following allergen sensitization and challenge. These data suggest that helminth infection may induce tolerogenic DCs that can inhibit the development of airway allergic inflammation through enhancing T regulatory cell responses.

  2. Macrophage/epithelial cell CCL2 contributes to rhinovirus-induced hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dina; Hong, Jun Young; Bowman, Emily R; Chung, Yutein; Nagarkar, Deepti R; McHenry, Christina L; Goldsmith, Adam M; Bentley, J Kelley; Lewis, Toby C; Hershenson, Marc B

    2013-02-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections lead to exacerbations of lower airways disease in asthmatic patients but not in healthy individuals. However, underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. We hypothesized that the Th2-driven allergic environment enhances HRV-induced CC chemokine production, leading to asthma exacerbations. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged mice inoculated with HRV showed significant increases in the expression of lung CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2/monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, CCL4/macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, CCL7/MCP-3, CCL19/MIP-3β, and CCL20/MIP3α compared with mice treated with OVA alone. Inhibition of CCL2 with neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated HRV-induced airways inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in OVA-treated mice. Immunohistochemical stains showed colocalization of CCL2 with HRV in epithelial cells and CD68-positive macrophages, and flow cytometry showed increased CCL2(+), CD11b(+) cells in the lungs of OVA-treated, HRV-infected mice. Compared with lung macrophages from naïve mice, macrophages from OVA-exposed mice expressed significantly more CCL2 in response to HRV infection ex vivo. Pretreatment of mouse lung macrophages and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells with interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 increased HRV-induced CCL2 expression, and mouse lung macrophages from IL-4 receptor knockout mice showed reduced CCL2 expression in response to HRV, suggesting that exposure to these Th2 cytokines plays a role in the altered HRV response. Finally, bronchoalveolar macrophages from children with asthma elaborated more CCL2 upon ex vivo exposure to HRV than cells from nonasthmatic patients. We conclude that CCL2 production by epithelial cells and macrophages contributes to HRV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic airways disease and may play a role in HRV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  3. Nonhematopoietic NADPH oxidase regulation of lung eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness in experimentally induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Earwood, Julie; Bansal, Shelly; Jansen, Michael; Babcock, George; Garvy, Beth; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Cook-Mills, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia is one of the most consistent hallmarks of asthma. Infiltration of eosinophils into the lung in experimental asthma is dependent on the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on endothelial cells. Ligation of VCAM-1 activates endothelial cell NADPH oxidase, which is required for VCAM-1-dependent leukocyte migration in vitro. To examine whether endothelial-derived NADPH oxidase modulates eosinophil recruitment in vivo, mice deficient in NADPH oxidase (CYBB mice) were irradiated and received wild-type hematopoietic cells to generate chimeric CYBB mice. In response to ovalbumin (OVA) challenge, the chimeric CYBB mice had increased numbers of eosinophils bound to the endothelium as well as reduced eosinophilia in the lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage. This occurred independent of changes in VCAM-1 expression, cytokine/chemokine levels (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IFNγ, or eotaxin), or numbers of T cells, neutrophils, or mononuclear cells in the lavage fluids or lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Importantly, the OVA-challenged chimeric CYBB mice had reduced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The AHR in OVA-challenged chimeric CYBB mice was restored by bypassing the endothelium with intratracheal administration of eosinophils. These data suggest that VCAM-1 induction of NADPH oxidase in the endothelium is necessary for the eosinophil recruitment during allergic inflammation. Moreover, these studies provide a basis for targeting VCAM-1-dependent signaling pathways in asthma therapies. PMID:17293377

  4. Intranasal administration of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides reduces lower airway inflammation in a murine model of combined allergic rhinitis and asthma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Tian-Tuo; Chen, Zhuang-Gui; Ye, Jin; Liu, Hui; Zou, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Yan-Hong; Yang, Hai-Ling

    2015-09-01

    Given the relationship between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma, it can be hypothesized that reducing upper airway inflammation by targeting oligodeoxynucleotides with CpG motifs (CpG-ODN) specifically to the upper airway via intranasal administration in a small volume (10 μL) might improve lower airway (asthma) outcomes. The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of 10 μL of intranasal versus intradermal administration of CpG-ODN in suppressing lower airway inflammation and methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) in mice subjected to ovalbumin (OVA)-induced combined allergic rhinitis and asthma syndrome (CARAS). OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice were subjected to upper-airway intranasal OVA exposure three times per week for 3 weeks. Then, CpG-ODN was administered to a subset of these mice 1h after intranasal OVA exposure, followed by five days of OVA aerosol challenges, thereby targeting OVA to the lower airways. Immunologic variables and nasal symptoms were evaluated. The results showed that the CARAS mice exhibited significant increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and splenocytes Th2-associated cytokine production, OVA-specific serum IgE, and AHR, as well as nose and lung pathologies. Intranasal administration of CpG-ODN significantly reduced Th2-associated cytokine production, the percentage of eosinophils in the BALF, the IL-4 and IL-5 concentrations in the supernatants of cultured OVA-challenged splenic lymphocytes, the serum OVA-specific IgE levels, the peribronchial inflammation score in the lungs, and the severity of nose pathology and nasal symptoms. However, intradermal administration of CpG-ODN did not significantly reduce the aforementioned parameters. In conclusion, intranasal treatment with CpG-ODN attenuated AR and significantly alleviated lower airway inflammation and AHR in the CARAS model. CpG-ODN therapy was more effective when administered intranasally than when administered intradermally. The current

  5. IL-25 promotes Th2 immunity responses in airway inflammation of asthmatic mice via activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hongjia, Li; Caiqing, Zhang; Degan, Lu; Fen, Liu; Chao, Wang; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Allergic asthma occurs as a consequence of inappropriate immunologic inflammation to allergens and characterized by Th2 adaptive immune response. Recent studies indicated that interleukin (IL)-25, a member of the IL-17 cytokine family, had been implicated in inducing Th2 cell-dependent inflammation in airway epithelium and IL-25-deficient mice exhibit impaired Th2 immunity responses; however, how these cytokines influence innate immune responses remains poorly understood. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge to induce the murine asthmatic model and confirmed by histological analysis of lung tissues and serum levels of total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-E. The expression of IL-25 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and the dendritic cells (DCs) activation was detected by levels of CD80 and CD86 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by flow cytometry. The mice sensitized and challenged with OVA showed high expression of IL-25 in both mRNA and protein levels in lungs. We detected the expression of CD80 and CD86 in BALF was also increased. A tight correlation between IL-25 mRNA and other Th2 cells producing cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BALF was identified. Furthermore, when the asthmatic mice were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, the inflammatory cells infiltration and the inflammatory cytokines secretion were significantly decreased. In this study, we show that IL-25 promoted the accumulation of co-stimulatory molecules of CD80 and CD86 on DCs and then induced the differentiation of prime naive CD4(+) T cells to become proinflammatory Th2 cells and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in OVA-induced airway inflammation. The ability of IL-25 to promote the activation and differentiation of DCs population was identified as a link between the IL-17 cytokine family and the innate immune response and suggested a previously unrecognized innate immune pathway that promotes Th2

  6. Chemical compositions and properties of Schinus areira L. essential oil on airway inflammation and cardiovascular system of mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, María C; Rossetti, Víctor; Grondona, Ezequiel; Lo Presti, Silvina; Paglini, Patricia M; Rivero, Virginia; Zunino, María P; Ponce, Andrés A

    2012-07-01

    The main purpose was to investigate the effects of essential plant-oil of Schinus areira L. on hemodynamic functions in rabbits, as well as myocardial contractile strength and airways inflammation associated to bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. This study shows the important properties of the essential oil (EO) of S. areira studied and these actions on lung with significant inhibition associated to LPS, all of which was assessed in mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and evidenced by stability of the percentage of alveolar macrophages, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and tumor necrosis factor-α concentration, and without pathway modifications in conjugated dienes activity. Clinical status (morbidity or mortality), macroscopic morphology and lung/body weight index were unaffected by the administration of the EO S. areira. Furthermore, the ex vivo analysis of isolated hearts demonstrated the negative inotropic action of the EO of S. areira in a mice model, and in rabbits changes in the hemodynamic parameters, such as a reduction of systolic blood pressure. We conclude that EO S. areira could be responsible for modifications on the cardiovascular and/or airway parameters.

  7. Repeated hyperventilation causes peripheral airways inflammation, hyperreactivity, and impaired bronchodilation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Freed, A N

    2001-09-01

    Winter athletes have an increased incidence of asthma, suggesting that repetitive hyperventilation with cold air may predispose individuals to airways disease. We used a canine model of exercise-induced hyperpnea to examine the effects of repeated hyperventilation with cool, dry air (i.e., dry air challenge [DAC]) on peripheral airway resistance (Rp), reactivity, and inflammation. Specific bronchi were exposed to a single DAC on five consecutive days. Rp and Delta Rp to aerosolized histamine, intravenous histamine, or hypocapnia were measured daily. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained on the fifth day. Rp increased from 0.70 +/- 0.08 to 1.13 +/- 0.22 cm H(2)O/ml/s (n = 25) 24 h after the first DAC, rose to 1.49 +/- 0.24 cm H(2)O/ml/s by Day 3, and remained elevated throughout the remainder of the protocol. Repeated DAC increased reactivity to hypocapnia and intravenous histamine. Intravenous salbutamol failed to reduce Rp as effectively in challenged airways (111% of Day 1 baseline) as in naive airways (54% of baseline). Repeated DAC caused increased BALF neutrophils, eosinophils, and sulfidopeptide leukotrienes. We conclude that repeated DAC causes peripheral airways inflammation, obstruction, hyperreactivity, and impaired beta-agonist-induced relaxation. This suggests that other mechanisms in addition to increased smooth muscle tone may contribute to the development of repetitive hyperventilation-induced bronchial obstruction and hyperreactivity.

  8. Dendritic cell-nerve clusters are sites of T cell proliferation in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Veres, Tibor Z; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell-T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell-cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell-T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa.

  9. Effect of choline chloride in allergen-induced mouse model of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A K; Gaur, S N; Arora, N; Singh, B P

    2007-10-01

    The incidence of asthma has increased the world over, and current therapies for the disease suffer from potential side-effects. This has created an opportunity to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Here, the anti-inflammatory activity of choline was investigated in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. Choline (1 mg.kg(-1)) was administered via oral gavage or intranasally before and after ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in sensitised mice. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine was measured in the mice by whole-body plethysmography. Type-2 T-helper cell cytokine and leukotriene levels were estimated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and spleen culture supernatant by ELISA. Eosinophil peroxidase activity was also determined in the BALF supernatant. Choline treatment in sensitised mice before OVA challenge via oral/intranasal routes significantly inhibited eosinophilic airway inflammation and eosinophil peroxidase activity. It also reduced immunoglobulin E and G1 production and inhibited the release of type-2 T-helper cell cytokines and leukotrienes. However, the development of AHR was prevented effectively by intranasal choline treatment. Most importantly, choline treatment after OVA challenge by both routes could reverse established asthmatic conditions in mice by inhibiting AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation and other inflammatory parameters. This study provides a new therapeutic approach for controlling as well as preventing asthma exacerbations.

  10. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33.

    PubMed

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-08-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m(3)) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m(3)) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10.

  11. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m3) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m3) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10. PMID:24730559

  12. DEPOSITION DISTRICUTION AMONG THE PARALLEL PATHWAYS IN THE HUMAN LUNG CONDUCTING AIRWAY STRUCTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEPOSITION DISTRIBUTION AMONG THE PARALLEL PATHWAYS IN THE HUMAN LUNG CONDUCTING AIRWAY STRUCTURE. Chong S. Kim*, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab. RTP, NC 27711; Z. Zhang and C. Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North C...

  13. [Therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat on air inflammation and high airway resistance in a murine asthma model].

    PubMed

    Su, X M; Ren, Y; Kong, L F; Kang, J

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of givinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), on the development of chronic asthma with airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods: BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control group, asthma group, dexamethasone group and givinostat group (n=12 per group). AHR was assessed. Total cell numbers and differential counts, interleukin-4(IL-4), interleukin-5(IL-5) and interferon-γ (IFNγ) levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured in the above 4 groups. The pathology of lung tissue was evaluated. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and Western blot were used to detect α smooth muscle actin(α-SMA) and transforming growth factor-β1(TGFβ1). Results: Compared with the asthma only group, givinostat treatment relieved airway resistance (2.96±1.01 vs 6.50±0.79, P<0.05). Total inflammatory cells [(33.04±5.62)×10(4)/ml vs (98.04±9.27)×10(4)/ml, P<0.01], eosinophil cells [(9.17±2.33)×10(4)/ml vs(37.64±6.98)×10(4)/ml, P<0.01], IL-4 [(10.12±2.98)ng/ml vs (16.88±2.78)ng/ml, P<0.05] and IL-5 [(27.09±3.62)ng/ml vs (37.86±7.34)ng/ml, P<0.05] levels were all reduced in givinostat group, while IFNγ [(91.86±23.73)pg/ml vs (60.49±11.88)pg/ml, P>0.05] was enhanced in BALF. Inflammatory cell infiltration around the airway was reduced, with decreased inflammatory cell score[(1.60±0.69)points vs (3.40±0.68) points, P<0.01] and inflammatory cell number (111.65±31.41 vs 601.25±186.85, P<0.01). The goblet cell metaplasia [(26.36±2.33)% vs (57.21±11.56)%] and collagen deposition area [(52.77±7.58)μm(2)/μm vs (111.81±12.40)μm(2)/μm] were obviously reduced (P<0.01). The expressions of α-SMA and TGFβ1 in the lung tissue were both significantly decreased (P<0.01). Conclusion: Givinostat treatment can reduce airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness in chronic asthma. Its effect is comparable to that of glucocorticoid

  14. Inflammation and lung maturation from stretch injury in preterm fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Noah H; Polglase, Graeme R; Pillow, J Jane; Saito, Masatoshi; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H

    2011-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a risk factor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants. Fifteen minutes of high tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation induces inflammatory cytokine expression in small airways and lung parenchyma within 3 h. Our objective was to describe the temporal progression of cytokine and maturation responses to lung injury in fetal sheep exposed to a defined 15-min stretch injury. After maternal anesthesia and hysterotomy, 129-day gestation fetal lambs (n = 7-8/group) had the head and chest exteriorized. Each fetus was intubated, and airway fluid was gently removed. While placental support was maintained, the fetus received ventilation with an escalating V(T) to 15 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) for 15 min using heated, humidified 100% nitrogen. The fetus was then returned to the uterus for 1, 6, or 24 h. Control lambs received a PEEP of 2 cmH(2)O for 15 min. Tissue samples from the lung and systemic organs were evaluated. Stretch injury increased the early response gene Egr-1 and increased expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines within 1 h. The injury induced granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA and matured monocytes to alveolar macrophages by 24 h. The mRNA for the surfactant proteins A, B, and C increased in the lungs by 24 h. The airway epithelium demonstrated dynamic changes in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) over time. Serum cortisol levels did not increase, and induction of systemic inflammation was minimal. We conclude that a brief period of high V(T) ventilation causes a proinflammatory cascade, a maturation of lung monocytic cells, and an induction of surfactant protein mRNA.

  15. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor agonist suppresses airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma through IL-10.

    PubMed

    Itoga, Masamichi; Konno, Yasunori; Moritoki, Yuki; Saito, Yukiko; Ito, Wataru; Tamaki, Mami; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yuta; Chihara, Junichi; Takeda, Masahide; Ueki, Shigeharu; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen influences the disease severity and sexual dimorphism in asthma, which is caused by complex mechanisms. Besides classical nuclear estrogen receptors (ERαβ), G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was recently established as an estrogen receptor on the cell membrane. Although GPER is associated with immunoregulatory functions of estrogen, the pathophysiological role of GPER in allergic inflammatory lung disease has not been examined. We investigated the effect of GPER-specific agonist G-1 in asthmatic mice. GPER expression in asthmatic lung was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining. OVA-sensitized BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with G-1 by daily subcutaneous injections during an airway challenge phase, followed by histological and biochemical examination. Strikingly, administration of G-1 attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, accumulation of inflammatory cells, and levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in BAL fluid. G-1 treatment also decreased serum levels of anti-OVA IgE antibodies. The frequency of splenic Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing GPER+CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in G-1-treated mice. Additionally, splenocytes isolated from G-1-treated mice showed greater IL-10 production. G-1-induced amelioration of airway inflammation and IgE production were abolished in IL-10-deficient mice. Taken together, these results indicate that extended GPER activation negatively regulates the acute asthmatic condition by altering the IL-10-producing lymphocyte population. The current results have potential importance for understanding the mechanistic aspects of function of estrogen in allergic inflammatory response.

  16. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Airway Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tichanon, Promsrisuk; Sopida, Santamit; Orapin, Pasurivong; Watchara, Boonsawat; Banjamas, Intarapoka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Airway inflammation and oxidative stress may be linked in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. We determined the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in reducing fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in OSA patients. Methods. Thirteen patients with OSA and 13 normal controls were recruited. FeNO and MDA levels were measured in the controls and in OSA patients before and after three months of CPAP therapy. Results. FeNO and MDA levels were higher in the patients compared to the age and gender matched controls (FeNO: 25.9 ± 5.0 versus 17.5 ± 5.9 ppb, P < 0.001; MDA: 14.6 ± 7.8 versus 2.1 ± 0.3 μmol/L, P < 0.001). FeNO and MDA levels were lower post-CPAP compared to pre-CPAP (FeNO: 25.9 ± 5.0 versus 17.0 ± 2.3 ppb, P < 0.001; MDA: 14.6 ± 7.8 versus 10.0 ± 6.4 μmol/L, P < 0.01). Apnea-hypopnea index (15.9 ± 6.6 versus 4.1 ± 2.1/h, P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (P < 0.01) decreased following CPAP treatment. Daytime mean SpO2 (P < 0.05) increased. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that CPAP therapy yields clinical benefits by reducing upper airway inflammation and oxidative stress in OSA patients. PMID:27445526

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system. PMID:25179236

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system.

  19. The effects of cigarette smoke on airway inflammation in asthma and COPD: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Asad; Serdarevic, Dzelal; Hanania, Nicola A

    2012-03-01

    Asthma and COPD are two chronic inflammatory disorders of the airway characterized by airflow limitation. While many similarities exist between these two diseases, they are pathologically distinct due to the involvement of different inflammatory cells; predominantly neutrophils, CD8 lymphocytes in COPD and eosinophils and CD4 lymphocytes in asthma. Cigarette smoking is associated with accelerated decline of lung function, increased mortality, and worsening of symptoms in both asthma and COPD. Furthermore, exposure to cigarette smoke can alter the inflammatory mechanisms in asthma to become similar to that seen in COPD with increasing CD8 cells and neutrophils and may therefore alter the response to therapy. Cigarette smoke exposure has been associated with a poor response to inhaled corticosteroids which are recommended as first line anti-inflammatory medications in asthma and as an add-on therapy in patients with severe COPD with history of exacerbations. While the main proposed mechanism for this altered response is the reduction of the histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) enzyme system, other possible mechanisms include the overexpression of GR-β, activation of p38 MAPK pathway and increased production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-2, 4, 8, TNF-α and NF-Kß. Few clinical trials suggest that leukotriene modifiers may be an alternative to corticosteroids in smokers with asthma but there are currently no drugs which effectively reduce the progression of inflammation in smokers with COPD. However, several HDAC2 enhancers including low dose theophylline and other potential anti-inflammatory therapies including PDE4 inhibitors and p38 MAPK inhibitors are being evaluated.

  20. Pulmonary epithelial CCR3 promotes LPS-induced lung inflammation by mediating release of IL-8.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Dong, Chunling; Wang, Guifang; Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 from pulmonary epithelial cells has been suggested to play an important role in the airway inflammation, although the mechanism remains unclear. We envisioned a possibility that pulmonary epithelial CCR3 could be involved in secretion and regulation of IL-8 and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung inflammation. Human bronchial epithelial cell line NCI-H292 and alveolar type II epithelial cell line A549 were used to test role of CCR3 in production of IL-8 at cellular level. In vivo studies were performed on C57/BL6 mice instilled intratracheally with LPS in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). The activity of a CCR3-specific inhibitor (SB-328437) was measured in both in vitro and in vivo systems. We found that expression of CCR3 in NCI-H292 and A549 cells were increased by 23% and 16%, respectively, 24 h after the challenge with LPS. LPS increased the expression of CCR3 in NCI-H292 and A549 cells in a time-dependent manner, which was inhibited significantly by SB-328437. SB-328437 also diminished neutrophil recruitment in alveolar airspaces and improved LPS-induced ALI and production of IL-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results suggest that pulmonary epithelial CCR3 be involved in progression of LPS-induced lung inflammation by mediating release of IL-8. CCR3 in pulmonary epithelia may be an attractive target for development of therapies for ALI.

  1. Novel Approach to Inhibit Asthma-Mediated Lung Inflammation Using Anti-CD147 Intervention1

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, William M.; Damsker, Jesse M.; Falahati, Rustom; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; Kelly-Welch, Ann; Keegan, Achsah D.; Vanpouille, Christophe; Lee, James J.; Dent, Lindsay A.; Leitenberg, David; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular cyclophilins have been well described as chemotactic factors for various leukocyte subsets. This chemotactic capacity is dependent upon interaction of cyclophilins with the cell surface signaling receptor CD147. Elevated levels of extracellular cyclophilins have been documented in several inflammatory diseases. We propose that extracellular cyclophilins, via interaction with CD147, may contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes from the periphery into tissues during inflammatory responses. In this study, we examined whether extracellular cyclophilin-CD147 interactions might influence leukocyte recruitment in the inflammatory disease allergic asthma. Using a mouse model of asthmatic inflammation, we show that 1) extracellular cyclophilins are elevated in the airways of asthmatic mice; 2) mouse eosinophils and CD4+ T cells express CD147, which is up-regulated on CD4+ T cells upon activation; 3) cyclophilins induce CD147-dependent chemotaxis of activated CD4+ T cells in vitro; 4) in vivo treatment with anti-CD147 mAb significantly reduces (by up to 50%) the accumulation of eosinophils and effector/memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, as well as Ag-specific Th2 cytokine secretion, in lung tissues; and 5) anti-CD147 treatment significantly reduces airway epithelial mucin production and bronchial hyperreactivity to methacholine challenge. These findings provide a novel mechanism whereby asthmatic lung inflammation may be reduced by targeting cyclophilin-CD147 interactions. PMID:16982929

  2. Diet-induced obesity causes innate airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhances ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Theman, Todd A; Lu, Frank L; Terry, Raya D; Williams, Erin S; Shore, Stephanie A

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported that genetically obese mice exhibit innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and enhanced ozone (O(3))-induced pulmonary inflammation. Such genetic deficiencies in mice are rare in humans, and they may not be representative of human obesity. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary phenotype of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), which more closely mimics the cause of human obesity. Therefore, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were reared from the time of weaning until at least 30 wk of age on diets in which either 10 or 60% of the calories are derived from fat in the form of lard. Body mass was approximately 40% greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Baseline airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine, measured by forced oscillation, was greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. We also examined lung permeability and inflammation after exposure to room air or O(3) (2 parts/million for 3 h), an asthma trigger. Four hours after the exposure ended, O(3)-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, interleukin-6, KC, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, and eotaxin were greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Innate AHR and augmented responses to O(3) were not observed in mice raised from weaning until 20-22 wk of age on a 60% fat diet. These results indicate that mice with DIO exhibit innate AHR and enhanced O(3)-induced pulmonary inflammation, similar to genetically obese mice. However, mice with DIO must remain obese for an extended period of time before this pulmonary phenotype is observed.

  3. Wood smoke enhances cigarette smoke-induced inflammation by inducing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Awji, Elias G; Chand, Hitendra; Bruse, Shannon; Smith, Kevin R; Colby, Jennifer K; Mebratu, Yohannes; Levy, Bruce D; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Our previous studies showed that cigarette smokers who are exposed to wood smoke (WS) are at an increased risk for chronic bronchitis and reduced lung function. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms for WS-induced adverse effects. We studied the effect of WS exposure using four cohorts of mice. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed for 4 or 12 weeks to filtered air, to 10 mg/m(3) WS for 2 h/d, to 250 mg/m(3) cigarette smoke (CS) for 6 h/d, or to CS followed by WS (CW). Inflammation was absent in the filtered air and WS groups, but enhanced by twofold in the bronchoalveolar lavage of the CW compared with CS group as measured by neutrophil numbers and levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant, keratinocyte-derived chemokine. The levels of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin, lipoxin A4, were reduced by threefold along with cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES)-1 in airway epithelial cells and PGE2 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage of CW compared with CS mice. We replicated, in primary human airway epithelial cells, the changes observed in mice. Immunoprecipitations showed that WS blocked the interaction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) with AHR nuclear transporter to reduce expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 by increasing expression of AHR repressor (AHRR). Collectively, these studies show that exposure to low concentrations of WS enhanced CS-induced inflammation by inducing AHRR expression to suppress AHR, COX-2, and mPGES-1 expression, and levels of PGE2 and lipoxin A4. Therefore, AHRR is a potential therapeutic target for WS-associated exacerbations of CS-induced inflammation.

  4. Type I Interferons as Regulators of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Spyridon; Paulsen, Michelle; Johansson, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Immune responses to lung infections must be tightly regulated in order to permit pathogen eradication while maintaining organ function. Exuberant or dysregulated inflammation can impair gas exchange and underlies many instances of lung disease. An important driver of inflammation in the lung is the interferon (IFN) response. Type I IFNs are antiviral cytokines that induce a large range of proteins that impair viral replication in infected cells. This cell-intrinsic action plays a crucial role in protecting the lungs from spread of respiratory viruses. However, type I IFNs have also recently been found to be central to the initiation of lung inflammatory responses, by inducing recruitment and activation of immune cells. This helps control virus burden but can cause detrimental immunopathology and contribute to disease severity. Furthermore, there is now increasing evidence that type I IFNs are not only induced after viral infections but also after infection with bacteria and fungi. The pro-inflammatory function of type I IFNs in the lung opens up the possibility of immune modulation directed against this antiviral cytokine family. In this review, the initiation and signaling of type I IFNs as well as their role in driving and maintaining lung inflammation will be discussed. PMID:28344581

  5. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2016-10-20

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS.

  6. Effect of the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on allergic lung inflammation induced by repeated house dust mite administration in mice.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Johannes D; Berkhout, Lea C; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Yang, Jack; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Meijers, Joost C M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-10-15

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways; asthma patients are hampered by recurrent symptoms of dyspnoea and wheezing caused by bronchial obstruction. Most asthma patients suffer from chronic allergic lung inflammation triggered by allergens such as house dust mite (HDM). Coagulation activation in the pulmonary compartment is currently recognized as a feature of allergic lung inflammation, and data suggest that coagulation proteases further drive inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we tested whether treatment with the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran attenuates allergic lung inflammation in a recently developed HDM-based murine asthma model. Mice were fed dabigatran (10 mg/g) or placebo chow during a 3-wk HDM airway exposure model. Dabigatran treatment caused systemic thrombin inhibitory activity corresponding with dabigatran levels reported in human trials. Surprisingly, dabigatran did not lead to inhibition of HDM-evoked coagulation activation in the lung as measured by levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer. Repeated HDM administration caused an influx of eosinophils and neutrophils into the lungs, mucus production in the airways, and a T helper 2 response, as reflected by a rise in bronchoalveolar IL-4 and IL-5 levels and a systemic rise in IgE and HDM-IgG1. Dabigatran modestly improved HDM-induced lung pathology (P < 0.05) and decreased IL-4 levels (P < 0.01), without influencing other HDM-induced responses. Considering the limited effects of dabigatran in spite of adequate plasma levels, these results argue against clinical evaluation of dabigatran in patients with asthma.

  7. hMSCs suppress neutrophil-dominant airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Gyong Hwa; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Lee, Kyoung Young; Ha, Eun Hee; Moon, Keun-Ai; Kim, Seong Who; Oh, Wonil; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2017-01-01

    Although chronic eosinophilic inflammation is a common feature in patients with asthma, some patients have neutrophil-dominant inflammation, which is known to be associated with severe asthma.Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have shown promise in treating various refractory immunological diseases. Thus, hMSCs may represent an alternative therapeutic option for asthma patients with neutrophil-dominant inflammation, in whom current treatments are ineffective. BALB/c mice exposed to ovalbumin and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) to induce neutrophilic airway inflammation were systemically treated with hMSCs to examine whether the hMSCs can modulate neutrophilic airway inflammation. In addition, cytokine production was evaluated in co-cultures of hMSCs with either anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from asthmatic patients or cells of the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B to assess the response to hMSC treatment. The total number of immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) showed a dramatic decrease in hMSC-treated asthmatic mice, and, in particular, neutrophilic infiltration was significantly attenuated. This phenomenon was accompanied by reduced CXCL15 production in the BALF. BEAS-2B cells co-cultured with hMSCs showed reduced secretion of IL-8. Moreover, decreased secretion of IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-γ was observed when human PBMCs were cultured with hMSCs, whereas IL-10 production was greatly enhanced. Our data imply that hMSCs may have a role in reducing neutrophilic airway inflammation by downregulating neutrophil chemokine production and modulating T-cell responses. PMID:28127050

  8. Erdosteine enhances mucociliary clearance in rats with and without airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hosoe, H; Kaise, T; Ohmori, K

    1998-10-01

    Erdosteine is a new homocysteine-derived expectorant and has been reported to have many mucolytic effects. In this report, we studied the activities of erdosteine on mucociliary clearance in normal and airway-inflammation-induced rats. In normal rats, erdosteine at doses of 100-600 mg/kg significantly promoted mucociliary clearance. However, erdosteine did not change the concentrations of mucopolysaccharides in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the LPS-instillated rats, the mucociliary clearance was inhibited and the number of inflammatory cells, albumin concentration, and mucopolysaccharides concentration in BALF were increased. Erdosteine at doses of 100-600 mg/kg significantly attenuated the inhibition of mucociliary clearance and the increase of inflammatory cells, however, it did not prevent the increase of albumin and mucopolysaccharides. Other mucolytic drugs which are ambroxol and S-carboxymethylcysteine, had no effect. These results indicate that erdosteine promotes the mucociliary clearance in normal and airway-inflammation-induced rats.

  9. Effect of stress on eotaxin and expression of adhesion molecules in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Ricarda A; Sagach, Viktoriya; Quarcoo, David; Dinh, Q Thai; Arck, Petra C; Klapp, Burghard F

    2007-01-01

    Recently we have shown that sound stress enhances allergic airway inflammation in a combined murine model. In the current study we investigated mediating factors and early kinetics of stress exacerbated allergic airway inflammation. Stress significantly increased allergen induced airway inflammation as identified by leukocyte numbers in BAL fluids. Eotaxin levels from stressed mice were significantly higher 24 h after stress. No differences were found for vascular or cellular adhesion molecule expression or cytokine levels. Our data indicate that the effect of stress on allergic airway inflammation might be mediated by the chemoattractant eotaxin, while Th2 cytokines and expression of adhesion molecules seem not to be differently regulated in stressed and non-stressed mice.

  10. One-lung overventilation does not induce inflammation in the normally ventilated contralateral lung.

    PubMed

    Almendros, Isaac; Gutierrez, Patricia T; Closa, Daniel; Navajas, Daniel; Farre, Ramon

    2008-06-30

    The aim was to assess whether induction of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in one lung triggers a concomitant inflammatory response in the normally ventilated contralateral lung. To this end, a differential ventilator was used in 6 rats. One lung was normally ventilated (3.5 ml/kg b.w.) and the contralateral lung was overstretched (15 ml/kg b.w.). Six control rats were normally ventilated (3.5 ml/kg b.w. each lung). After 3h, edema and gene expression of MIP-2 in the lung, and plasma and liver TNF-alpha were assessed. Overexpression of MIP-2 and edema were found in the overventilated lung but not in the normally ventilated contralateral lung. No detectable levels of circulating and liver TNF-alpha were detected. These data do not support the hypothesis of an early positive feedback in the lung inflammation during the mechanical ventilation.

  11. Cystic fibrosis lung disease starts in the small airways: can we treat it more effectively?

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Donaldson, Scott H; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Paré, Peter D

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this article are to summarize existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of small airways disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), to speculate about additional mechanisms that might play a role, and to consider the available or potential options to treat it. In the first section, we review the evidence provided by pathologic, physiologic, and imaging studies suggesting that obstruction of small airways begins early in life and is progressive. In the second section we discuss how the relationships between CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ion transport, the volume of the periciliary liquid layer and airway mucus might lead to defective mucociliary clearance in small airways. In addition, we discuss how chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and a chronic neutrophilic inflammatory response increase the viscosity of CF secretions and exacerbate the clearance problem. Next, we discuss how the mechanical properties of small airways could be altered early in the disease process and how remodeling can contribute to small airways disease. In the final section, we discuss how established therapies impact small airways disease and new directions that may lead to improvement in the treatment of small airways disease. We conclude that there are many reasons to believe that small airways play an important role in the pathophysiology of (early) CF lung disease. Therapy should be aimed to target the small airways more efficiently, especially with drugs that can correct the basic defect at an early stage of disease.

  12. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF LUNG AIRWAY STRUCTURES USING DATA-DRIVEN SURFACE MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is a subject critical to many areas of medicine. The visualization of lung structures naturally lends itself to computer graphics modeling due to the large number of airways involved and the complexities of the branching systems...

  13. [Expression and role of sugar chains on airway mucus during the exacerbation of airway inflammation].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Inouye, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Human bronchial mucins, such as MUC5AC, have traditionally been defined as a family of high-molecular weight glycoproteins. Changes in the contents of sugar chains on MUC5AC are among the fundamental features in inflammatory respiratory disease. The changes have been shown to lead to unfavorable alterations in the viscosity of mucus, resulting in impairment of mucociliary transport, vulnerability to viral/bacterial infection as sugar chains play an important role in adhesion of some viruses and bacteria to the epithelium, and finally inflammatory cell infiltration in the airway. Recently, we found that expression of some glycosyltransferases associated with the contents and structure of sugar chains is regulated by phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase (PI-PL) C signaling in cells. L-Carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, normalized or balanced fucosylated and sialylated sugar chains, such as sialyl Lewis x through inhibition of PI-PL C signaling. We prepared MUC5AC fusion protein with tandem repeats associated with MUC5AC, and confirmed that L-carbocisteine inhibited the increases in viscosity associated with sialyl Lewis x expression levels. In addition, the clinical study (2008) noted that L-carbocisteine reduced the frequency of common colds and exacerbation of symptoms in patients with COPD. These favorable effects in patients may be due to normalization of sugar chain contents on mucins. We suggest that the inhibitory effect on infection of airway epithelial cells by rhinoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza viruses by treatment with L-carbocisteine may also be based on the regulation of sugar chain contents or structures on mucins.

  14. Naturally occurring lung CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell regulation of airway allergic responses depends on IL-10 induction of TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Joetham, Anthony; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Takada, Katsuyuki; Taube, Christian; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Matsubara, Satoko; Koya, Toshiyuki; Rha, Yeong-Ho; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2007-02-01

    Peripheral tolerance to allergens is mediated in large part by the naturally occurring lung CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, but their effects on allergen-induced airway responsiveness have not been well defined. Intratracheal, but not i.v., administration of naive lung CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells before allergen challenge of sensitized mice, similar to the administration of the combination of rIL-10 and rTGF-beta, resulted in reduced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation, lower levels of Th2 cytokines, higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta, and less severe lung histopathology. Significantly, CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells isolated from IL-10(-/-) mice had no effect on AHR and inflammation, but when incubated with rIL-10 before transfer, suppressed AHR, and inflammation, and was associated with elevated levels of bronchoalveolar lavage TGF-beta levels. By analogy, anti-TGF-beta treatment reduced regulatory T cell activity. These data identify naturally occurring lung CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells as capable of regulating lung allergic responses in an IL-10- and TGF-beta-dependent manner.

  15. Intermittent positive airway pressure to manage hypoxia during one-lung anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Russell, W J

    2009-05-01

    The effect of intermittent positive airway pressure to the non-ventilated lung was assessed in 10 patients who desaturated during one-lung ventilation. Once their saturation fell below 95% they were given a slow inflation of 2 l/min of oxygen into the non-ventilated lung for two seconds. This was repeated every 10 seconds for five minutes or until the saturation rose to 98%, whichever was sooner. The initial mean SpO2 was 89.3% +/- 4.2%. All 10 patients had an increase in saturation. The mean saturation following intermittent positive airway pressure was 96.5% +/- 1.6% (P < 0.0001). Similarly, the mean oxygen tension rose from 67.2 +/- 12.8 mmHg to 98.9 +/- 19.8 mmHg. Intermittent positive airway pressure should be considered for patients who desaturate while undergoing one-lung ventilation.

  16. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  17. Human airway organoid engineering as a step toward lung regeneration and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qi; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Organoids represent both a potentially powerful tool for the study cell-cell interactions within tissue-like environments, and a platform for tissue regenerative approaches. The development of lung tissue-like organoids from human adult-derived cells has not previously been reported. Here we combined human adult primary bronchial epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung microvascular endothelial cells in supportive 3D culture conditions to generate airway organoids. We demonstrate that randomly-seeded mixed cell populations undergo rapid condensation and self-organization into discrete epithelial and endothelial structures that are mechanically robust and stable during long term culture. After condensation airway organoids generate invasive multicellular tubular structures that recapitulate limited aspects of branching morphogenesis, and require actomyosin-mediated force generation and YAP/TAZ activation. Despite the proximal source of primary epithelium used in the airway organoids, discrete areas of both proximal and distal epithelial markers were observed over time in culture, demonstrating remarkable epithelial plasticity within the context of organoid cultures. Airway organoids also exhibited complex multicellular responses to a prototypical fibrogenic stimulus (TGF-β1) in culture, and limited capacity to undergo continued maturation and engraftment after ectopic implantation under the murine kidney capsule. These results demonstrate that the airway organoid system developed here represents a novel tool for the study of disease-relevant cell-cell interactions, and establishes this platform as a first step toward cell-based therapy for chronic lung diseases based on de novo engineering of implantable airway tissues.

  18. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  19. The Allergic Airway Inflammation Repository--a user-friendly, curated resource of mRNA expression levels in studies of allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Gawel, D R; Rani James, A; Benson, M; Liljenström, R; Muraro, A; Nestor, C E; Zhang, H; Gustafsson, M

    2014-08-01

    Public microarray databases allow analysis of expression levels of candidate genes in different contexts. However, finding relevant microarray data is complicated by the large number of available studies. We have compiled a user-friendly, open-access database of mRNA microarray experiments relevant to allergic airway inflammation, the Allergic Airway Inflammation Repository (AAIR, http://aair.cimed.ike.liu.se/). The aim is to allow allergy researchers to determine the expression profile of their genes of interest in multiple clinical data sets and several experimental systems quickly and intuitively. AAIR also provides quick links to other relevant information such as experimental protocols, related literature and raw data files.

  20. TLR-7 agonist attenuates airway reactivity and inflammation through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant protection in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Siddiqui, Nahid; Al-Harbi, Naif O; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) through innate immune system recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns and play an important role in host defense against bacteria, fungi and viruses. TLR-7 is responsible for sensing single stranded nucleic acids of viruses but its activation has been shown to be protective in mouse models of asthma. The NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes family mainly produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lung and is involved in regulation of airway inflammation in response to TLRs activation. However, NOX-4 mediated signaling in response to TLR-7 activation in a mouse model of allergic asthma has not been explored previously. Therefore, this study investigated the role TLR-7 activation and downstream oxidant-antioxidant signaling in a murine model of asthma. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) intraperitoneally and treated with TLR-7 agonist, resiquimod (RSQ) intranasally before each OVA challenge from days 14 to 16. Mice were then assessed for airway reactivity, inflammation, and NOX-4 and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) related signaling [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD)]. Treatment with RSQ reduced allergen induced airway reactivity and inflammation. This was paralleled by a decrease in ROS which was due to induction of Nrf2 and Cu/Zn SOD in RSQ treated group. Inhibition of MyD88 reversed RSQ-mediated protective effects on airway reactivity/inflammation due to reduction in Nrf2 signaling. SOD inhibition produced effects similar to MyD88 inhibition. The current study suggests that TLR-7 agonist is beneficial and may be developed into a therapeutic option in allergic asthma.

  1. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  2. Protective effects of the polyphenol sesamin on allergen-induced T(H)2 responses and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Shen, Mei-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Lee, Chen-Chen; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a lifelong airway condition that affects people of all ages. In recent decades, asthma prevalence continues to increase globally, with an estimated number of 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease. Although inhaled corticosteroids and β-adrenergic receptor agonists are the primary therapeutic avenues that effectively reduce asthma symptoms, profound side effects may occur in patients with long-term treatments. Therefore, development of new therapeutic strategies is needed as alternative or supplement to current asthma treatments. Sesamin is a natural polyphenolic compound with strong anti-oxidative effects. Several studies have reported that sesamin is effective in preventing hypertension, thrombotic tendency, and neuroinflammation. However, it is still unknown whether sesamin can reduce asthma-induced allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Our study has revealed that sesamin exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effects in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. We found that treatments with sesamin after OVA sensitization and challenge significantly decreased expression levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, and serum IgE. The numbers of total inflammatory cells and eosinophils in BALF were also reduced in the sesamin-treated animals. Histological results demonstrated that sesamin attenuated OVA-induced eosinophil infiltration, airway goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus occlusion, and MUC5AC expression in the lung tissue. Mice administered with sesamin showed limited increases in AHR compared with mice receiving vehicle after OVA challenge. OVA increased phosphorylation levels of IκB-α and nuclear expression levels of NF-κB, both of which were reversed by sesamin treatments. These data indicate that sesamin is effective in treating allergic asthma responses induced by OVA in mice.

  3. Caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 inflammasome dampens IL-33-dependent house dust mite-induced allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Madouri, Fahima; Guillou, Noëlline; Fauconnier, Louis; Marchiol, Tiffany; Rouxel, Nathalie; Chenuet, Pauline; Ledru, Aurélie; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zheng, Song Guo; Trovero, Fabrice; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Togbe, Dieudonnée

    2015-08-01

    The cysteine protease caspase-1 (Casp-1) contributes to innate immunity through the assembly of NLRP3, NLRC4, AIM2, and NLRP6 inflammasomes. Here we ask whether caspase-1 activation plays a regulatory role in house dust mite (HDM)-induced experimental allergic airway inflammation. We report enhanced airway inflammation in caspase-1-deficient mice exposed to HDM with a marked eosinophil recruitment, increased expression of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, as well as full-length and bioactive IL-33. Furthermore, mice deficient for NLRP3 failed to control eosinophil influx in the airways and displayed augmented Th2 cytokine and chemokine levels, suggesting that the NLPR3 inflammasome complex controls HDM-induced inflammation. IL-33 neutralization by administration of soluble ST2 receptor inhibited the enhanced allergic inflammation, while administration of recombinant IL-33 during challenge phase enhanced allergic inflammation in caspase-1-deficient mice. Therefore, we show that caspase-1, NLRP3, and ASC, but not NLRC4, contribute to the upregulation of allergic lung inflammation. Moreover, we cannot exclude an effect of caspase-11, because caspase-1-deficient mice are deficient for both caspases. Mechanistically, absence of caspase-1 is associated with increased expression of IL-33, uric acid, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) production. This study highlights a critical role of caspase-1 activation and NLPR3/ASC inflammasome complex in the down-modulation of IL-33 in vivo and in vitro, thereby regulating Th2 response in HDM-induced allergic lung inflammation.

  4. Effect of Obesity on Acute Ozone-Induced Changes in Airway Function, Reactivity, and Inflammation in Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, William D.; Ivins, Sally; Alexis, Neil E.; Wu, Jihong; Bromberg, Philip A.; Brar, Sukhdev S.; Travlos, Gregory; London, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously observed greater ozone-induced lung function decrements in obese than non-obese women. Animal models suggest that obesity enhances ozone-induced airway reactivity and inflammation. In a controlled exposure study, we compared the acute effect of randomized 0.4ppm ozone and air exposures (2 h with intermittent light exercise) in obese (N = 20) (30Inflammation and obesity markers were assessed in the blood (pre, 4h post, and 20h post exposures) and induced-sputum (4h post-exposures and on 24h pre-exposure training day, no exercise): measures of C reactive protein (CRP) (blood only), leptin (blood only), adiponectin, interleukins IL-6, IL-1b, and IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, and sputum cell differential cell counts. The pre- to post-exposure decrease in forced vital capacity after ozone (adjusted for the change after air exposure) was significantly greater in the obese group (12.5+/-7.5 vs. 8.0+/-5.8%, p<0.05). Post ozone exposure, 6 obese and 6 non-obese subjects responded to methacholine at ≤ 10mg/ml (the maximum dose); the degree of hyperresponsiveness was similar for the two groups. Both BMI groups showed similar and significant ozone-induced increases in sputum neutrophils. Plasma IL-6 was increased by exercise (4 hr post air exposure vs. pre) only in the obese but returned to pre-air exposure levels at 20hr post-exposure. Plasma IL-6 was significantly increased at 4hr post ozone exposure in both groups and returned to pre-exposure levels by 20h post-exposure. These results confirm our previous findings of greater post-ozone spirometric decrements in obese young women. However, acute ozone-induced airway reactivity to methacholine and airway inflammation did not differ by obesity at the exposure and exercise levels used. PMID:27513854

  5. Pluripotent allospecific CD8+ effector T cells traffic to lung in murine obliterative airway disease.

    PubMed

    West, Erin E; Lavoie, Tera L; Orens, Jonathan B; Chen, Edward S; Ye, Shui Q; Finkelman, Fred D; Garcia, Joe G N; McDyer, John F

    2006-01-01

    Long-term success in lung transplantation is limited by obliterative bronchiolitis, whereas T cell effector mechanisms in this process remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse heterotopic allogeneic airway transplant model, we studied T cell effector responses during obliterative airways disease (OAD). Allospecific CD8+ IFN-gamma+ T cells were detected in airway allografts, with significant coexpression of TNF-alpha and granzyme B. Therefore, using IFN-gamma as a surrogate marker, we assessed the distribution and kinetics of extragraft allo-specific T cells during OAD. Robust allospecific IFN-gamma was produced by draining the lymph nodes, spleen, and lung mononuclear cells from allograft, but not isograft recipients by Day 14, and significantly decreased by Day 28. Although the majority of allospecific T cells were CD8+, allospecific CD4+ T cells were also detected in these compartments, with each employing distinct allorecognition pathways. An influx of pluripotent CD8+ effector cells with a memory phenotype were detected in the lung during OAD similar to those seen in the allografts and secondary lymphoid tissue. Antibody depletion of CD8+ T cells markedly reduced airway lumen obliteration and fibrosis at Day 28. Together, these data demonstrate that allospecific CD8+ effector T cells play an important role in OAD and traffic to the lung after heterotopic airway transplant, suggesting that the lung is an important immunologic site, and perhaps a reservoir, for effector cells during the rejection process.

  6. Airway epithelial gene expression in the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Spira, Avrum; Beane, Jennifer E; Shah, Vishal; Steiling, Katrina; Liu, Gang; Schembri, Frank; Gilman, Sean; Dumas, Yves-Martine; Calner, Paul; Sebastiani, Paola; Sridhar, Sriram; Beamis, John; Lamb, Carla; Anderson, Timothy; Gerry, Norman; Keane, Joseph; Lenburg, Marc E; Brody, Jerome S

    2007-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in the US and the world. The high mortality rate (80-85% within 5 years) results, in part, from a lack of effective tools to diagnose the disease at an early stage. Given that cigarette smoke creates a field of injury throughout the airway, we sought to determine if gene expression in histologically normal large-airway epithelial cells obtained at bronchoscopy from smokers with suspicion of lung cancer could be used as a lung cancer biomarker. Using a training set (n = 77) and gene-expression profiles from Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we identified an 80-gene biomarker that distinguishes smokers with and without lung cancer. We tested the biomarker on an independent test set (n = 52), with an accuracy of 83% (80% sensitive, 84% specific), and on an additional validation set independently obtained from five medical centers (n = 35). Our biomarker had approximately 90% sensitivity for stage 1 cancer across all subjects. Combining cytopathology of lower airway cells obtained at bronchoscopy with the biomarker yielded 95% sensitivity and a 95% negative predictive value. These findings indicate that gene expression in cytologically normal large-airway epithelial cells can serve as a lung cancer biomarker, potentially owing to a cancer-specific airway-wide response to cigarette smoke.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  8. Non-invasive biomarkers of lung inflammation in smoking subjects.

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Montuschi, P

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer, but only a part of smoking subjects develop these respiratory pathologies. Therefore, it is necessary to find sensible parameters to detect early lung alterations due to chronic tobacco smoke exposure. Long-term cigarette smoking is associated with a persistent inflammatory response in the lung that leads to tissue injury and dysfunction. Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies are the gold standard techniques for assessing pulmonary inflammation, but are invasive and not routinely used. Cellular analysis of induced sputum and measurement of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (F(E)NO) are validated non-invasive techniques for assessing respiratory inflammation. Measurement of biomolecules in sputum supernatants and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are used as a research tool, but require standardization of procedures and, generally, analytical validation. Electronic nose differentiates healthy smokers from healthy nonsmokers based on breath volatile organic compounds (VOC) patterns. These techniques are potentially useful for identifying biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress. Induced sputum, F(E)NO, EBC and electronic nose are suitable for longitudinal sampling, thereby facilitating monitoring of lung damage process. This approach could enable an early identification of subgroups of healthy smokers at higher risk for tobacco-induced lung damage and prompt planning of secondary prevention strategies.

  9. Vitamin E isoforms as modulators of lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Cook-Mills, Joan M

    2013-10-31

    Asthma and allergic diseases are complex conditions caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Clinical studies suggest a number of protective dietary factors for asthma, including vitamin E. However, studies of vitamin E in allergy commonly result in seemingly conflicting outcomes. Recent work indicates that allergic inflammation is inhibited by supplementation with the purified natural vitamin E isoform α-tocopherol but elevated by the isoform γ-tocopherol when administered at physiological tissue concentrations. In this review, we discuss opposing regulatory effects of α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol on allergic lung inflammation in clinical trials and in animal studies. A better understanding of the differential regulation of inflammation by isoforms of vitamin E provides a basis towards the design of clinical studies and diets that would effectively modulate inflammatory pathways in lung disease.

  10. DHA- and EPA-derived resolvins, protectins, and maresins in airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Melody G; Levy, Bruce D

    2016-08-15

    Essential fatty acids can serve as important regulators of inflammation. A new window into mechanisms for the resolution of inflammation was opened with the identification and structural elucidation of mediators derived from these fatty acids with pro-resolving capacity. Inflammation is necessary to ensure the continued health of the organism after an insult or injury; however, unrestrained inflammation can lead to injury "from within" and chronic changes that may prove both morbid and fatal. The resolution phase of inflammation, once thought to be a passive event, is now known to be a highly regulated, active, and complex program that terminates the inflammatory response once the threat has been contained. Specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) are biosynthesized from omega-3 essential fatty acids to resolvins, protectins, and maresins and from omega-6 fatty acids to lipoxins. Through cell-specific actions mediated through select receptors, these SPMs are potent regulators of neutrophil infiltration, cytokine and chemokine production, and clearance of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages, promoting a return to tissue homeostasis. This process appears to be defective in several common human lung diseases, such as asthma and COPD, which are characterized by chronic unrestrained inflammation and significant associated morbidity. Here, we highlight translational research in animal models of disease and with human subjects that sheds light on this rapidly evolving area of science and review the molecular and cellular components of the resolution of lung inflammation.

  11. Repeated exposure to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine causes decreased proliferation and low-grade inflammation in the lungs of mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takao; Itoh, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Ryota; Uruma, Tomonori; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into proliferating cells has been used to label dividing cells in many tissues. Although BrdU has been shown to be genotoxic, teratogenic and mutagenic, such adverse effects have largely been ignored by researchers. We determined whether long-term BrdU exposure causes any histopathological changes in the lungs of mice. Eight-week-old male C57/BL6J mice were administered BrdU by intraperitoneal injection on 3 consecutive days of each week for 14 weeks. While no obvious structural changes such as tissue damage, fibrosis, emphysema, airway remodeling, vascular thickening or tumorigenesis were noted, a moderate degree of macrophage infiltration was observed in the airways and lung parenchyma in the lungs of the mice exposed repeatedly to BrdU (BrdU-exposed mice). The proliferative activities of the airway and alveolar epithelial and mesenchymal cells were reduced in the BrdU-exposed mice, although the numbers of these cells in the lungs were maintained. Double immunofluorescence study of the lungs of the BrdU-exposed mice showed overexpression of IL-6 in the airway epithelial and alveolar wall cells, some of which were also double-positive for BrdU. These results indicate that long-term exposure to BrdU inhibits cell proliferation and induces low-grade inflammation in the lungs of mice. Our findings underscore the need for caution in the interpretation of studies that involve long-term exposure to BrdU.

  12. A Cell-Impermeable Cyclosporine A Derivative Reduces Pathology in a Mouse Model of Allergic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Balsley, Molly A.; Malesevic, Miroslav; Stemmy, Erik J.; Gigley, Jason; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Herzog, Dallen; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Fischer, Gunter; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the main regulators of leukocyte trafficking are chemokines, another family of chemotactic agents is cyclophilins. Intracellular cyclophilins function as peptidyl-protyl cis-trans isomerases and are targets of the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A (CsA). Cyclophilins can also be secreted in response to stress factors, with elevated levels of extracellular cyclophilins detected in several inflammatory diseases. Extracellular cyclophilins are known to have potent chemotactic properties, suggesting they might contribute to inflammatory responses by recruiting leukocytes into tissues. The objective of the current study was to determine the impact of blocking cyclophilin activity using a cell-impermeable derivative of CsA, MM218, to specifically target extracellular pools of cyclophilins. We show that treatment with this compound in a mouse model of allergic lung inflammation: 1) demonstrates up to 80% reduction in inflammation, 2) directly inhibits the recruitment of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, and 3) works equally well when delivered at 100-fold lower doses to the airways. Our findings suggest that cell-impermeable analogs of CsA can effectively reduce inflammatory responses by targeting leukocyte recruitment mediated by extracellular cyclophilins. Specifically blocking the extracellular function(s) of cyclophilins may provide a novel approach for inhibiting the recruitment of one of the principal immune regulators of allergic lung inflammation, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, into inflamed airways and lungs. PMID:21057089

  13. Relating airway diameter distributions to regular branching asymmetry in the lung.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arnab; Alencar, Adriano M; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Hantos, Zoltán; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Stanley, H Eugene; Suki, Béla

    2005-10-14

    We study the distribution Pi(n)(D) of airway diameters D as a function of generation N in asymmetric airway trees of mammalian lungs. We find that the airway bifurcations are self-similar in four species studied. Specifically, the ratios of diameters of the major and minor daughters to their parent are constants independent of N until a cutoff diameter is reached. We derive closed form expressions for Pi(N)(D) and examine the flow resistance of the tree based on an asymmetric flow division model. Our findings suggest that the observed diameter heterogeneity is consistent with an underlying regular branching asymmetry.

  14. Long-Term Effects of Diesel Exhaust Particles on Airway Inflammation and Remodeling in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Pureun-Haneul; Lee, Shin-Hwa; Kim, Young-En; Shin, Mee-Yong; Kang, Yena; Bae, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Min-Jung; Rhim, TaiYoun; Park, Choon-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) can induce and trigger airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term DEP exposure on AHR, inflammation, lung fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia in a mouse model. Methods BALB/c mice were exposed to DEPs 1 hour a day for 5 days a week for 3 months in a closed-system chamber attached to a ultrasonic nebulizer (low dose: 100 µg/m3 DEPs, high dose: 3 mg/m3 DEPs). The control group was exposed to saline. Enhanced pause was measured as an indicator of AHR. Animals were subjected to whole-body plethysmography and then sacrificed to determine the performance of bronchoalveolar lavage and histology. Results AHR was higher in the DEP group than in the control group, and higher in the high-dose DEP than in the low-dose DEP groups at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The numbers of neutrophils and lymphocytes were higher in the high-dose DEP group than in the low-dose DEP group and control group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, and interferon-γ were higher in the low-dose DEP group than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of IL-10 was higher in the high-dose DEP group than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor was higher in the low-dose and high-dose DEP groups than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of IL-6 was higher in the low-dose DEP group than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of transforming growth factor-β was higher in the high-dose DEP group than in the control group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The collagen content and lung fibrosis in lung tissue was higher in the high-dose DEP group at 8 and 12 weeks. Conclusions These results suggest that long-term DEP exposure may increase AHR, inflammation, lung fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia in a mouse model. PMID:26922935

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus-induced CCL5/RANTES contributes to exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    John, Alison E; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2003-06-01

    Severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection has a significant impact on airway function and may induce or exacerbate the response to a subsequent allergic challenge. In a murine model combining early RSV infection with later cockroach allergen (CRA) challenge, we examined the role of RSV-induced CCL5/RANTES production on allergic airway responses. RSV infection increased CCL5 mRNA and protein levels, peaking at days 8 and 12, respectively. Administration of CCL5 antiserum during days 0-14 of the RSV infection did not significantly alter viral protein expression when compared to mice treated with control serum. In mice receiving the combined RSV-allergen challenge, lungs collected on day 22 exhibited significantly increased numbers of CD4- and CD8-positive T cells. This increase in T cell numbers was not observed in mice receiving alpha-CCL5. On day 43, peribronchial eosinophilia and leukotriene levels were increased in RSV-allergen mice. Pretreatment with CCL5 antiserum resulted in decreased recruitment of inflammatory cells to bronchoalveolar and peribronchial regions of the lungs and these reductions were associated with a reduction in both T cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space, leukotriene release and chemokine generation. Thus, CCL5 released during RSV infection has a significant effect on the inflammatory response to subsequent allergic airway challenges.

  16. Serum amyloid A opposes lipoxin A₄ to mediate glucocorticoid refractory lung inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bozinovski, Steven; Uddin, Mohib; Vlahos, Ross; Thompson, Michelle; McQualter, Jonathan L; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Wark, Peter A B; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Irving, Louis B; Levy, Bruce D; Anderson, Gary P

    2012-01-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will soon be the third most common cause of death globally. Despite smoking cessation, neutrophilic mucosal inflammation persistently damages the airways and fails to protect from recurrent infections. This maladaptive and excess inflammation is also refractory to glucocorticosteroids (GC). Here, we identify serum amyloid A (SAA) as a candidate mediator of GC refractory inflammation in COPD. Extrahepatic SAA was detected locally in COPD bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which correlated with IL-8 and neutrophil elastase, consistent with neutrophil recruitment and activation. Immunohistochemistry detected SAA was in close proximity to airway epithelium, and in vitro SAA triggered release of IL-8 and other proinflammatory mediators by airway epithelial cells in an ALX/FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor 2) receptor-dependent manner. Lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)) can also interact with ALX/FPR2 receptors and lead to allosteric inhibition of SAA-initiated epithelial responses (pA(2) 13 nM). During acute exacerbation, peripheral blood SAA levels increased dramatically and were disproportionately increased relative to LXA(4). Human lung macrophages (CD68(+)) colocalized with SAA and GCs markedly increased SAA in vitro (THP-1, pEC(50) 43 nM). To determine its direct actions, SAA was administered into murine lung, leading to induction of CXC chemokine ligand 1/2 and a neutrophilic response that was inhibited by 15-epi-LXA(4) but not dexamethasone. Taken together, these findings identify SAA as a therapeutic target for inhibition and implicate SAA as a mediator of GC-resistant lung inflammation that can overwhelm organ protective signaling by lipoxins at ALX/FPR2 receptors.

  17. Cigarette smoke, bacteria, mold, microbial toxins, and chronic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pauly, John L; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with cigarette smoke fosters malignant transformation and tumor cell proliferation and promotes certain nonneoplastic pulmonary diseases. The question arises as to whether chronic inflammation and/or colonization of the airway can be attributed, at least in part, to tobacco-associated microbes (bacteria, fungi, and spores) and/or microbial toxins (endotoxins and mycotoxins) in tobacco. To address this question, a literature search of documents in various databases was performed. The databases included PubMed, Legacy Tobacco Documents Library, and US Patents. This investigation documents that tobacco companies have identified and quantified bacteria, fungi, and microbial toxins at harvest, throughout fermentation, and during storage. Also characterized was the microbial flora of diverse smoking and smokeless tobacco articles. Evidence-based health concerns expressed in investigations of microbes and microbial toxins in cigarettes, cigarette smoke, and smokeless tobacco products are reasonable; they warrant review by regulatory authorities and, if necessary, additional investigation to address scientific gaps.

  18. Cigarette Smoke, Bacteria, Mold, Microbial Toxins, and Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, John L.; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with cigarette smoke fosters malignant transformation and tumor cell proliferation and promotes certain nonneoplastic pulmonary diseases. The question arises as to whether chronic inflammation and/or colonization of the airway can be attributed, at least in part, to tobacco-associated microbes (bacteria, fungi, and spores) and/or microbial toxins (endotoxins and mycotoxins) in tobacco. To address this question, a literature search of documents in various databases was performed. The databases included PubMed, Legacy Tobacco Documents Library, and US Patents. This investigation documents that tobacco companies have identified and quantified bacteria, fungi, and microbial toxins at harvest, throughout fermentation, and during storage. Also characterized was the microbial flora of diverse smoking and smokeless tobacco articles. Evidence-based health concerns expressed in investigations of microbes and microbial toxins in cigarettes, cigarette smoke, and smokeless tobacco products are reasonable; they warrant review by regulatory authorities and, if necessary, additional investigation to address scientific gaps. PMID:21772847

  19. Role of recently migrated monocytes in cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation in different strain of mice.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Terrón-Expósito, Raúl; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of proinflammatory monocytes recruited from blood circulation and recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in mediating the lung damage in a model of acute cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung inflammation in two strains of mice with different susceptibility to develop emphysema (susceptible -C57BL/6J and non susceptible -129S2/SvHsd). Exposure to whole-body CS for 3 consecutive research cigarettes in one single day induced acute inflammation in the lung of mice. Analysis of BAL fluid showed more influx of recently migrated monocytes at 72 h after CS-exposition in susceptible compared to non susceptible mice. It correlated with an increase in MMP-12 and TNF-α protein levels in the lung tissue, and with an increment of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay in C57BL/6J mice. To determine the functional role of these proinflammatory monocytes in mediating CS-induced airway inflammation, alveolar macrophages and blood monocytes were transiently removed by pretreatment with intratracheal and intravenous liposome-encapsulated CL2MDP, given 2 and 4 days prior to CS exposure and their repopulation was studied. Monocytes/macrophages were maximally depleted 48 h after last liposome application and subsequently recently migrated monocytes reappeared in BAL fluid of susceptible mice at 72 h after CS exposure. Recently migrated monocytes influx to the lung correlated with an increase in the MMP-12 protein level in the lung tissue, indicating that the increase in proinflammatory monocytes is associated with a major tissue damaging. Therefore our data confirm that the recruitment of proinflammatory recently migrated monocytes from the blood are responsible for the increase in MMP-12 and has an important role in the pathogenesis of lung disease induced by acute lung inflammation. These results could contribute to understanding the different susceptibility to CS of these strains of mice.

  20. Role of Recently Migrated Monocytes in Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Inflammation in Different Strain of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Terrón-Expósito, Raúl; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of proinflammatory monocytes recruited from blood circulation and recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in mediating the lung damage in a model of acute cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung inflammation in two strains of mice with different susceptibility to develop emphysema (susceptible -C57BL/6J and non susceptible -129S2/SvHsd). Exposure to whole-body CS for 3 consecutive research cigarettes in one single day induced acute inflammation in the lung of mice. Analysis of BAL fluid showed more influx of recently migrated monocytes at 72 h after CS-exposition in susceptible compared to non susceptible mice. It correlated with an increase in MMP-12 and TNF-α protein levels in the lung tissue, and with an increment of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay in C57BL/6J mice. To determine the functional role of these proinflammatory monocytes in mediating CS-induced airway inflammation, alveolar macrophages and blood monocytes were transiently removed by pretreatment with intratracheal and intravenous liposome-encapsulated CL2MDP, given 2 and 4 days prior to CS exposure and their repopulation was studied. Monocytes/macrophages were maximally depleted 48 h after last liposome application and subsequently recently migrated monocytes reappeared in BAL fluid of susceptible mice at 72 h after CS exposure. Recently migrated monocytes influx to the lung correlated with an increase in the MMP-12 protein level in the lung tissue, indicating that the increase in proinflammatory monocytes is associated with a major tissue damaging. Therefore our data confirm that the recruitment of proinflammatory recently migrated monocytes from the blood are responsible for the increase in MMP-12 and has an important role in the pathogenesis of lung disease induced by acute lung inflammation. These results could contribute to understanding the different susceptibility to CS of these strains of mice. PMID

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-inflammatory Effects of a Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicine “Shoseiryuto (Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang)” on Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takayuki; Nakao, Marino; Shimizu, Yuliko; Kodera, Yoshio; Oh-Ishi, Masamichi; Maeda, Tadakazu; Yamada, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    Effects of a Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicine “shoseiryuto (SST, xiao-qing-long-tang in Chinese)”, which has been used for the treatment of allergic bronchial asthma clinically, were examined on ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized allergic airway inflammation model (i.e., bronchial asthma) in a mouse. When SST was orally administered at 0.5 g kg−1 day−1 from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, SST reduced the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils and the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody titer in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids at 7 days after the OVA inhalation. SST also reduced the airway hyperreactivity at 6 days after the OVA inhalation. Proteomic analysis with the agarose two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that the expression of spectrin α2 was reduced in the lung tissue of OVA-sensitized mice and SST recovered the expression. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of lung tissue also confirmed this result. When prednisolone was orally administered at 3 mg kg−1 day−1 from day 1 to 6 after OVA inhalation, the inflammation in lung tissue, the number of eosinophils in BAL fluids and airway hyperreactivity were reduced in the OVA-sensitized mice. However, prednisolone did not reduce the OVA-specific IgE antibody titer in BAL fluids and did not recover the expression of spectrin α2 in lung tissue. These results suggest that at least a part of action mechanism of SST against OVA-sensitized allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model is different from that of prednisolone. PMID:19861507

  2. Sputum pentraxin 3 as a candidate to assess airway inflammation and remodeling in childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Hee Seon; Sol, In Suk; Kim, Mi Na; Hong, Jung Yeon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Kyung Won; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a soluble pattern recognition receptor and an acute-phase protein. It has gained attention as a new biomarker reflecting tissue inflammation and damage in a variety of diseases. Aim of this study is to investigate the role of PTX3 in childhood asthma. In total, 260 children (140 patients with asthma and 120 controls) were enrolled. PTX3 levels were measured in sputum supernatants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. We performed spirometry and methacholine challenge tests and measured the total eosinophil count and the serum levels of total IgE and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in all subjects. Sputum PTX3 concentration was significantly higher in children with asthma than in control subjects (P < 0.001). Furthermore, sputum PTX3 levels correlated with atopic status and disease severity among patients with asthma. A positive significant correlation was found between sputum PTX3 and the bronchodilator response (r = 0.25, P = 0.013). Sputum PTX3 levels were negatively correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = -0.30, P = 0.001), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.27, P = 0.002), and FEF25–75 (r = -0.392, P < 0.001), which are indicators of airway obstruction and inflammation. In addition, the PTX3 concentration in sputum showed negative correlations with post-bronchodilator (BD) FEV1 (r = -0.25, P < 0.001) and post-BD FEV1/FVC (r = -0.25, P < 0.001), which are parameters of persistent airflow limitation reflecting airway remodeling. Sputum PTX3 levels increased in children with asthma, suggesting that PTX3 in sputum could be a candidate molecule to evaluate airway inflammation and remodeling in childhood asthma. PMID:28002338

  3. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  4. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  5. Chinese herbal medicine formula Gu-Ben-Fang-Xiao-Tang attenuates airway inflammation by modulating Th17/Treg balance in an ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Guiying; Tao, Baohong; Wang, Dongguo; Li, Yong; Wu, Jingyi; Yin, Genquan

    2016-01-01

    Gu-Ben-Fang-Xiao-Tang (GBFXT) is a traditional Chinese medicine formula consisting of 11 medicinal plants, which has been used in the treatment of asthma. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of GBFXT on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. A total of 50 mice were randomly assigned to the following five experimental groups: Normal, model, montelukast (2.6 mg/kg), 12 g/kg GBFXT and 36 g/kg GBFXT groups. Airway responsiveness was measured using the forced oscillation technique, while differential cell count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by Wright-Giemsa staining. Histological assessment was performed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, while BALF levels of Th17/Treg cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the proportions of Th17 and Treg cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. The results showed that GBFXT suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness during methacholine-induced constriction, reduced the percentage of leukocytes and eosinophils, and resulted in decreased absolute neutrophil infiltration in lung tissue. In addition, GBFXT treatment significantly decreased the IL-17A cytokine level and increased the IL-10 cytokine level in the BALF. Furthermore, GBFXT significantly suppressed Th17 cells and increased Treg cells in asthmatic mice. In conclusion, the current results demonstrated that GBFXT may effectively inhibit the progression of airway inflammation in allergic asthma, partially by modulating the Th17/Treg cell balance. PMID:27588063

  6. Detection of a novel stem cell probably involved in normal turnover of the lung airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; de-la-Garza-González, Carlos; Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of the lung airway epithelium after injury has been extensively studied. In contrast, analysis of its turnover in healthy adulthood has received little attention. In the classical view, this epithelium is maintained in the steady-state by the infrequent proliferation of basal or Clara cells. The intermediate filament protein nestin was initially identified as a marker for neural stem cells, but its expression has also been detected in other stem cells. Lungs from CD1 mice at the age of 2, 6, 12, 18 or 24 months were fixed in neutral-buffered formalin and paraffin-embedded. Nestin expression was examined by an immunohistochemical peroxidase-based method. Nestin-positive cells were detected in perivascular areas and in connective tissue that were in close proximity of the airway epithelium. Also, nestin-positive cells were found among the cells lining the airway epithelium. These findings suggest that nestin-positive stem cells circulate in the bloodstream, transmigrate through blood vessels and localize in the lung airway epithelium to participate in its turnover. We previously reported the existence of similar cells able to differentiate into lung chondrocytes. Thus, the stem cell reported here might be a bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMDMSC) able to generate several types of lung tissues. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there exist a BMDMSC in healthy adulthood that participates in the turnover of the lung airway epithelium. These findings may improve our knowledge about the lung stem cell biology and also provide novel approaches to therapy for devastating pulmonary diseases.

  7. Protease-activated receptor-2 deficient mice have reduced house dust mite-evoked allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Van't Veer, Cornelis; Stroo, Ingrid; van der Meer, Anne J; de Vos, Alex F; van der Zee, Jaring S; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is abundantly expressed in the pulmonary compartment. House dust mite (HDM) is a common cause of allergic asthma and contains multiple PAR2 agonistic proteases. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PAR2 in HDM-induced allergic lung inflammation. For this, the extent of allergic lung inflammation was studied in wild type (Wt) and PAR2 knockout (KO) mice after repeated airway exposure to HDM. HDM exposure of Wt mice resulted in a profound influx of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and accumulation of eosinophils in lung tissue, which both were strongly reduced in PAR2 KO mice. PAR2 KO mice demonstrated attenuated lung pathology and protein leak in the bronchoalveolar space, accompanied by lower BALF levels of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. This study reveals, for the first time, an important role for PAR2 in allergic lung inflammation induced by the clinically relevant allergens contained in HDM.

  8. Toll-like Receptors, Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Family Members and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder of the airways characterized by cellular infiltration, airway hyper-responsive and airway inflammation. Innate immune cells are the first line of defense against endogenous and exogenous signals in the airways and as such possess a diverse array of pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors are crucial sentinels which when activated, can either promote or ameliorate the inflammatory response in predisposed individuals. The recently discovered triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family members are emerging mediators of inflammation. These receptors are believed to modulate inflammatory responses by collaborating with classic PRRs. Endogenous signals like HMGB-1, signaling through the receptor for advanced glycation end products, also promotes inflammation, however, its contribution to inflammation in the airways is not well known. Here, we discuss the role of each receptor in airway inflammation and highlight potential synergistic mechanisms, which contribute to disease pathogenesis in allergic asthma. PMID:26678062

  9. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed.

  10. Picroside II Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Downregulating the Transcription Factor GATA3 and Th2-Related Cytokines in a Mouse Model of HDM-Induced Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin seok; Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hyun Ah; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Su Ui; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Yun, Won-Kee; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    Picroside II isolated from Pseudolysimachion rotundum var. subintegrum has been used as traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. In this study, we assessed whether picroside II has inhibitory effects on airway inflammation in a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced asthma. In the HDM-induced asthmatic model, picroside II significantly reduced inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the levels of total immunoglobulin (Ig) E and HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 in serum, airway inflammation, and mucus hypersecretion in the lung tissues. ELISA analysis showed that picroside II down-regulated the levels of Th2-related cytokines (including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and asthma-related mediators, but it up-regulated Th1-related cytokine, IFNγ in BALF. Picroside II also inhibited the expression of Th2 type cytokine genes and the transcription factor GATA3 in the lung tissues of HDM-induced mice. Finally, we demonstrated that picroside II significantly decreased the expression of GATA3 and Th2 cytokines in developing Th2 cells, consistent with in vivo results. Taken together, these results indicate that picroside II has protective effects on allergic asthma by reducing GATA3 expression and Th2 cytokine bias. PMID:27870920

  11. Bacterial exploitation of phosphorylcholine mimicry suppresses inflammation to promote airway infection

    PubMed Central

    Hergott, Christopher B.; Roche, Aoife M.; Naidu, Nikhil A.; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of neutrophil activity is critical for immune evasion among extracellular pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which many bacteria disrupt phagocyte function remain unclear. Here, we have shown that the respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae disables neutrophils by exploiting molecular mimicry to degrade platelet-activating factor (PAF), a host-derived inflammatory phospholipid. Using mass spectrometry and murine upper airway infection models, we demonstrated that phosphorylcholine (ChoP) moieties that are shared by PAF and the bacterial cell wall allow S. pneumoniae to leverage a ChoP-remodeling enzyme (Pce) to remove PAF from the airway. S. pneumoniae–mediated PAF deprivation impaired viability, activation, and bactericidal capacity among responding neutrophils. In the absence of Pce, neutrophils rapidly cleared S. pneumoniae from the airway and impeded invasive disease and transmission between mice. Abrogation of PAF signaling rendered Pce dispensable for S. pneumoniae persistence, reinforcing that this enzyme deprives neutrophils of essential PAF-mediated stimulation. Accordingly, exogenous activation of neutrophils overwhelmed Pce-mediated phagocyte disruption. Haemophilus influenzae also uses an enzyme, GlpQ, to hydrolyze ChoP and subvert PAF function, suggesting that mimicry-driven immune evasion is a common paradigm among respiratory pathogens. These results identify a mechanism by which shared molecular structures enable microbial enzymes to subvert host lipid signaling, suppress inflammation, and ensure bacterial persistence at the mucosa. PMID:26426079

  12. Bacterial exploitation of phosphorylcholine mimicry suppresses inflammation to promote airway infection.

    PubMed

    Hergott, Christopher B; Roche, Aoife M; Naidu, Nikhil A; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2015-10-01

    Regulation of neutrophil activity is critical for immune evasion among extracellular pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which many bacteria disrupt phagocyte function remain unclear. Here, we have shown that the respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae disables neutrophils by exploiting molecular mimicry to degrade platelet-activating factor (PAF), a host-derived inflammatory phospholipid. Using mass spectrometry and murine upper airway infection models, we demonstrated that phosphorylcholine (ChoP) moieties that are shared by PAF and the bacterial cell wall allow S. pneumoniae to leverage a ChoP-remodeling enzyme (Pce) to remove PAF from the airway. S. pneumoniae-mediated PAF deprivation impaired viability, activation, and bactericidal capacity among responding neutrophils. In the absence of Pce, neutrophils rapidly cleared S. pneumoniae from the airway and impeded invasive disease and transmission between mice. Abrogation of PAF signaling rendered Pce dispensable for S. pneumoniae persistence, reinforcing that this enzyme deprives neutrophils of essential PAF-mediated stimulation. Accordingly, exogenous activation of neutrophils overwhelmed Pce-mediated phagocyte disruption. Haemophilus influenzae also uses an enzyme, GlpQ, to hydrolyze ChoP and subvert PAF function, suggesting that mimicry-driven immune evasion is a common paradigm among respiratory pathogens. These results identify a mechanism by which shared molecular structures enable microbial enzymes to subvert host lipid signaling, suppress inflammation, and ensure bacterial persistence at the mucosa.

  13. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Patrizia; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Tuccio, Vanessa; Chiancianesi, Manuela; Bacci, Giovanni; Morelli, Patrizia; Dolce, Daniela; Dalmastri, Claudia; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Taccetti, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S) versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD). Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs) no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe) were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good candidates for the

  14. A prebiotic galactooligosaccharide mixture reduces severity of hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Neil C; Johnson, Michael A; Shaw, Dominick E; Spendlove, Ian; Vulevic, Jelena; Sharpe, Graham R; Hunter, Kirsty A

    2016-09-01

    Gut microbes have a substantial influence on systemic immune function and allergic sensitisation. Manipulation of the gut microbiome through prebiotics may provide a potential strategy to influence the immunopathology of asthma. This study investigated the effects of prebiotic Bimuno-galactooligosaccharide (B-GOS) supplementation on hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB), a surrogate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and airway inflammation. A total of ten adults with asthma and HIB and eight controls without asthma were randomised to receive 5·5 g/d of either B-GOS or placebo for 3 weeks separated by a 2-week washout period. The peak fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) following eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) defined HIB severity. Markers of airway inflammation were measured at baseline and after EVH. Pulmonary function remained unchanged in the control group. In the HIB group, the peak post-EVH fall in FEV1 at day 0 (-880 (sd 480) ml) was unchanged after placebo, but was attenuated by 40 % (-940 (sd 460) v. -570 (sd 310) ml, P=0·004) after B-GOS. In the HIB group, B-GOS reduced baseline chemokine CC ligand 17 (399 (sd 140) v. 323 (sd 144) pg/ml, P=0·005) and TNF-α (2·68 (sd 0·98) v. 2·18 (sd 0·59) pg/ml, P=0·040) and abolished the EVH-induced 29 % increase in TNF-α. Baseline C-reactive protein was reduced following B-GOS in HIB (2·46 (sd 1·14) v. 1·44 (sd 0·41) mg/l, P=0·015) and control (2·16 (sd 1·02) v. 1·47 (sd 0·33) mg/l, P=0·050) groups. Chemokine CC ligand 11 and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide remained unchanged. B-GOS supplementation attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness with concomitant reductions in markers of airway inflammation associated with HIB.

  15. CD4(+) Th2 cells are directly regulated by IL-10 during allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Coomes, S M; Kannan, Y; Pelly, V S; Entwistle, L J; Guidi, R; Perez-Lloret, J; Nikolov, N; Müller, W; Wilson, M S

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an important regulatory cytokine required to control allergy and asthma. IL-10-mediated regulation of T cell-mediated responses was previously thought to occur indirectly via antigen-presenting cells. However, IL-10 can act directly on regulatory T cells and T helper type 17 (Th17) cells. In the context of allergy, it is therefore unclear whether IL-10 can directly regulate T helper type 2 (Th2) cells and whether this is an important regulatory axis during allergic responses. We sought to determine whether IL-10 signaling in CD4(+) Th2 cells was an important mechanism of immune regulation during airway allergy. We demonstrate that IL-10 directly limits Th2 cell differentiation and survival in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of IL-10 signaling in Th2 cells led to enhanced Th2 cell survival and exacerbated pulmonary inflammation in a murine model of house dust mite allergy. Mechanistically, IL-10R signaling regulated the expression of several genes in Th2 cells, including granzyme B. Indeed, IL-10 increased granzyme B expression in Th2 cells and led to increased Th2 cell death, identifying an IL-10-regulated granzyme B axis in Th2 cells controlling Th2 cell survival. This study provides clear evidence that IL-10 exerts direct effects on Th2 cells, regulating the survival of Th2 cells and severity of Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation.

  16. Cystic fibrosis lung microbiome: opportunities to reconsider management of airway infection.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Zhao, Jiangchao; LiPuma, John J

    2015-10-01

    The importance of infection in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has been long recognized, and the use of antibiotics targeting bacteria identified in cultures of respiratory specimens has played a critical role in improving outcomes for individuals with CF. Over the past ∼15 years, the use of culture-independent methods to assess airway microbiology in CF has revealed complex and dynamic CF airway bacterial communities. Recent areas of investigation of the CF lung microbiome have included exploring how bacterial community structures change over time, particularly with respect to disease progression or pulmonary exacerbation, and in response to antibiotic therapies. This review will discuss what has been learned from these studies as well as how these findings offer opportunities to further refine management of CF airway infection.

  17. Airway and Parenchymal Strains during Bronchoconstriction in the Precision Cut Lung Slice

    PubMed Central

    Hiorns, Jonathan E.; Bidan, Cécile M.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Gosens, Reinoud; Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Butler, Jim P.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Brook, Bindi S.

    2016-01-01

    The precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) is a powerful tool for studying airway reactivity, but biomechanical measurements to date have largely focused on changes in airway caliber. Here we describe an image processing tool that reveals the associated spatio-temporal changes in airway and parenchymal strains. Displacements of sub-regions within the PCLS are tracked in phase-contrast movies acquired after addition of contractile and relaxing drugs. From displacement maps, strains are determined across the entire PCLS or along user-specified directions. In a representative mouse PCLS challenged with 10−4M methacholine, as lumen area decreased, compressive circumferential strains were highest in the 50 μm closest to the airway lumen while expansive radial strains were highest in the region 50–100 μm from the lumen. However, at any given distance from the airway the strain distribution varied substantially in the vicinity of neighboring small airways and blood vessels. Upon challenge with the relaxant agonist chloroquine, although most strains disappeared, residual positive strains remained a long time after addition of chloroquine, predominantly in the radial direction. Taken together, these findings establish strain mapping as a new tool to elucidate local dynamic mechanical events within the constricting airway and its supporting parenchyma. PMID:27559314

  18. Micropolyspora faeni causes airway inflammation but not hyperresponsiveness in sensitized ponies.

    PubMed

    Derksen, F J; Scott, J S; Slocombe, R F; Robinson, N E

    1987-04-01

    We assessed the effect of aerosol Micropolyspora faeni challenge in two groups of ponies by measuring lung function, airway reactivity to aerosol histamine, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology. One group of ponies was sensitized by subcutaneous injection of M. faeni in complete Freund's adjuvant, and the other group served as control. In both groups of ponies, measurements were made at base line and 5 h after aerosol administration of 30 ml of saline or 30 ml of 1% wt/vol particulate M. faeni antigen in saline. Saline challenge had no effect on any of the measured variables. M. faeni challenge had no effect on pulmonary mechanics or gas exchange in the control group but significantly increased respiratory frequency and minute ventilation and decreased arterial CO2 tension in the sensitized ponies. In both groups of ponies, aerosol M. faeni challenge significantly increased total white blood cell count and neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid while large mononuclear cell numbers decreased. Airway responsiveness was unaltered by saline or M. faeni challenge in both pony groups. We conclude that aerosol M. faeni challenge induces pulmonary neutrophilia and abnormalities of ventilation but is not accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness in sensitized ponies.

  19. Pneumovirus-Induced Lung Disease in Mice Is Independent of Neutrophil-Driven Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, René; Boon, Louis; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract disease in young children worldwide. A hallmark of severe human RSV infection is the strong neutrophil recruitment to the airways and lungs. Massive neutrophil activation has been proven detrimental in numerous diseases, yet in RSV the contribution of neutrophils to disease severity, and thereby, the relevance of targeting them, is largely unknown. To determine the relevance of potential neutrophil targeting therapies, we implemented antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion in a mouse pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) model. PVM is a host specific murine pneumovirus closely related to human RSV, which reproduces many of the features of RSV infection, such as high viral replication and neutrophil recruitment. Clinical disease and markers of lung inflammation and injury were studied in PVM-infected mice treated with either depleting or isotype control antibodies. To confirm our results we performed all experiments in two mice strains: C57Bl6 and BALBc mice. Neutrophil depletion in blood and lungs was efficient throughout the disease. Remarkably, in both mouse strains we found no difference in clinical disease severity between neutrophil-depleted and control arms. In line with this observation, we found no differences between groups in histopathological lung injury and lung viral loads. In conclusion, our study shows that in mice neutrophil recruitment to the lungs does not affect disease outcome or viral clearance during severe PVM infection. As such, this model does not support the notion that neutrophils play a key role in mouse pneumovirus disease. PMID:28005954

  20. Effects of Woodsmoke Exposure on Airway Inflammation in Rural Guatemalan Women

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Chandreyi; Diaz, Anaite; Pope, Daniel; Smith, Kirk R.; Smith-Sivertsen, Tone; Bruce, Nigel; Solomon, Colin; McCracken, John; Balmes, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background More than two-fifths of the world’s population uses solid fuels, mostly biomass, for cooking. The resulting biomass smoke exposure is a major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among women in developing countries. Objective To assess whether lower woodsmoke exposure from use of a stove with a chimney, compared to open fires, is associated with lower markers of airway inflammation in young women. Design We carried out a cross-sectional analysis on a sub-cohort of participants enrolled in a randomized controlled trial in rural Guatemala, RESPIRE. Participants We recruited 45 indigenous women at the end of the 18-month trial; 19 women who had been using the chimney stove for 18–24 months and 26 women still using open fires. Measurements We obtained spirometry and induced sputum for cell counts, gene expression of IL-8, TNF-α, MMP-9 and 12, and protein concentrations of IL-8, myeloperoxidase and fibronectin. Exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) and 48-hr personal CO tubes were measured to assess smoke exposure. Results MMP-9 gene expression was significantly lower in women using chimney stoves. Higher exhaled CO concentrations were significantly associated with higher gene expression of IL-8, TNF-α, and MMP-9. Higher 48-hr personal CO concentrations were associated with higher gene expression of IL-8, TNF- α, MMP-9 and MMP-12; reaching statistical significance for MMP-9 and MMP-12. Conclusions Compared to using an open wood fire for cooking, use of a chimney stove was associated with lower gene expression of MMP-9, a potential mediator of airway remodeling. Among all participants, indoor biomass smoke exposure was associated with higher gene expression of multiple mediators of airway inflammation and remodeling; these mechanisms may explain some of the observed association between prolonged biomass smoke exposure and COPD. PMID:24625755

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN LUNG MEASURED BY AEROSOL-DERIVED AIRWAY MORPHEMETRY (ADAM).

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured, in vivo, the airspace calibers of the small airways and alveoli by ADAM in the lungs of children of ages 6 to 18 years and adults aged 18 to 80 years. ADAM utilizes the gravitational settling time of inhaled monodisperse particles to infer the vertical distance to th...

  2. The Effect of Lung Stretch during Sleep on Airway Mechanics in Overweight and Obese Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Campana, L.M.; Malhotra, A.; Suki, B.; Hess, L.; Israel, E.; Smales, E.; DeYoung, P.; Owens, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Both obesity and sleep reduce lung volume and limit deep breaths, possibly contributing to asthma. We hypothesize that increasing lung volume dynamically during sleep would reduce airway resistance in asthma. Asthma (n=10) and control (n=10) subjects were studied during sleep at baseline and with increased lung volume via bi-level positive airway pressure (BPAP). Using forced oscillations, respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) were measured during sleep and Rrs was partitioned to upper and lower airway resistance (Rup, Rlow) using an epiglottic pressure catheter. Rrs and Rup increased with sleep (p<0.01) and Xrs was decreased in REM (p=0.02) as compared to wake. Rrs, Rup, and Rlow, were larger (p<0.01) and Xrs was decreased (p<0.02) in asthma. On BPAP, Rrs and Rup were decreased (p<0.001) and Xrs increased (p<0.01), but Rlow was unchanged. High Rup was observed in asthma, which reduced with BPAP. We conclude that the upper airway is a major component of Rrs and larger lung volume changes may be required to alter Rlow. PMID:23041446

  3. Patterns of airway inflammation and MMP-12 expression in smokers and ex-smokers with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Babusyte, Agne; Stravinskaite, Kristina; Jeroch, Jolanta; Lötvall, Jan; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2007-01-01

    Background Smoking activates and recruits inflammatory cells and proteases to the airways. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 may be a key mediator in smoke induced emphysema. However, the influence of smoking and its cessation on airway inflammation and MMP-12 expression during COPD is still unknown. We aimed to analyse airway inflammatory cell patterns in induced sputum (IS) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from COPD patients who are active smokers and who have ceased smoking >2 years ago. Methods 39 COPD outpatients – smokers (n = 22) and ex-smokers (n = 17) were studied. 8 'healthy' smokers and 11 healthy never-smokers were tested as the control groups. IS and BAL samples were obtained for differential and MMP-12+-macrophages count analysis. Results The number of IS neutrophils was higher in both COPD groups compared to both controls. The amount of BAL neutrophils was higher in COPD smokers compared to healthy never-smokers. The number of BAL MMP-12+-macrophages was higher in COPD smokers (1.6 ± 0.3 × 106/ml) compared to COPD ex-smokers, 'healthy' smokers and healthy never-smokers (0.9 ± 0.4, 0.4 ± 0.2, 0.2 ± 0.1 × 106/ml respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusion The lower amount of BAL neutrophils in COPD ex-smokers, compared to COPD smokers, suggests positive alterations in alveolar compartment after smoking cessation. Smoking and disease itself may stimulate MMP-12 expression in airway compartments (IS and BAL) from COPD patients. PMID:18001475

  4. The Nose and the Lung: United Airway Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; Denicolò, Chiara Francesca; Rossini, Linda; Marseglia, Alessia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidences recently revealed the link between upper and lower airways, changing the global pathogenic view of respiratory allergy. The aim of this review is to highlight the strong interaction between the upper and lower respiratory tract diseases, in particular allergic rhinitis and asthma. PMID:28316969

  5. Black-pigmented material in airway macrophages from healthy children: association with lung function and modeled PM10.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeta; Pierse, Nevil; Rushton, Lesley; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Rutman, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies in children suggest that chronic inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter < or = 10 pm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) attenuates the normal growth of lung function. However, the relation between markers of PM10 exposure and the quantity of particles entering the pediatric airway is unclear. Experimental studies have shown that particles entering the lower airway remain visible in the cytoplasm of airway macrophages (AMs) for several months. We hypothesized that particle loading of AMs, detected as black-pigmented material, reflects individual exposure of healthy children to PM10. In this study, we aimed to establish the relation between the median area of black material in AMs (measured as the two-dimensional area of black material ["black area"] per AM per child) and (1) lung function, and (2) level of primary PM10 at the child's home address as estimated by dispersion modeling (referred to as "modeled primary PM10"). We also performed a series of exploratory analyses assessing the association between the median black area in AMs and (1) variables that could modify individual exposure, and (2) airway inflammation. To achieve these aims, AMs were sampled using induced sputum from children in Leicestershire, United Kingdom, and lung function was determined by spirometry. Data from 64 of 116 children who provided adequate induced sputum samples were analyzed. The area of the black material in AMs was determined by an analysis of digitized light-microscopic images of 100 randomly chosen AMs per child. There was a significant inverse association between size of black area in AMs and lung function: each 1.0-microm2 increase in the area of the black material in AMs was associated with a 17.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.6 to 28.4) reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), a 12.9% (95% CI, 0.9 to 24.8) reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC), and a 34.7% (95% CI, 11.3 to 58.1) reduction in forced expiratory flow between

  6. IL-33-mediated innate response and adaptive immune cells contribute to maximum responses of protease allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Takeda, Haruna; Tokura, Tomoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Inui, Kyoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Hironori; Matsuda, Akira; Oboki, Keisuke; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Sudo, Katsuko; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    How the innate and adaptive immune systems cooperate in the natural history of allergic diseases has been largely unknown. Plant-derived allergen, papain, and mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, belong to the same family of cysteine proteases. We examined the role of protease allergens in the induction of Ab production and airway inflammation after repeated intranasal administration without adjuvants and that in basophil/mast cell stimulation in vitro. Papain induced papain-specific IgE/IgG1 and lung eosinophilia. Der f 1 induced Der f 1-specific IgG1 and eosinophilia. Although papain-, Der f 1-, and Der p 1-stimulated basophils expressed allergy-inducing cytokines, including IL-4 in vitro, basophil-depleting Ab and mast cell deficiency did not suppress the papain-induced in vivo responses. Protease inhibitor-treated allergens and a catalytic site mutant did not induce the responses. These results indicate that protease activity is essential to Ab production and eosinophilia in vivo and basophil activation in vitro. IL-33-deficient mice lacked eosinophilia and had reduced papain-specific IgE/IgG1. Coadministration of OVA with papain induced OVA-specific IgE/IgG1, which was reduced in IL-33-deficient mice. We demonstrated IL-33 release, subsequent IL-33-dependent IL-5/IL-13 release, and activation of T1/ST2-expressing lineage(-)CD25(+)CD44(+) innate lymphoid cells in the lung after papain inhalation, suggesting the contribution of the IL-33-type 2 innate lymphoid cell-IL-5/IL-13 axis to the papain-induced airway eosinophilia. Rag2-deficient mice, which lack adaptive immune cells, showed significant, but less severe, eosinophilia. Collectively, these results suggest cooperation of adaptive immune cells and IL-33-responsive innate cells in protease-dependent allergic airway inflammation.

  7. Airway structure and alveolar emptying in the lungs of sea lions and dogs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denison, D. M.; Warrell, D. A.; West, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of various cycles of compression and decompression on the alveolar volumes of the excised lungs of sea lions and dogs. The results obtained include the finding that, in comparison to dog lungs, sea lion lungs empty more completely on mild compression and much more completely on severe compression. These findings support Scholander's (1940) hypothesis that some marine mammals are protected from decompression sickness by cartilaginous reinforcement of the small airways which permits alveolar emptying during a dive, so isolating compressed gas from pulmonary capillary blood.

  8. Hedgehog signalling within airway epithelial progenitors and in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Watkins, D Neil; Berman, David M; Burkholder, Scott G; Wang, Baolin; Beachy, Philip A; Baylin, Stephen B

    2003-03-20

    Embryonic signalling pathways regulate progenitor cell fates in mammalian epithelial development and cancer. Prompted by the requirement for sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling in lung development, we investigated a role for this pathway in regeneration and carcinogenesis of airway epithelium. Here we demonstrate extensive activation of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway within the airway epithelium during repair of acute airway injury. This mode of Hh signalling is characterized by the elaboration and reception of the Shh signal within the epithelial compartment, and immediately precedes neuroendocrine differentiation. We reveal a similar pattern of Hh signalling in airway development during normal differentiation of pulmonary neuroendocrine precursor cells, and in a subset of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), a highly aggressive and frequently lethal human tumour with primitive neuroendocrine features. These tumours maintain their malignant phenotype in vitro and in vivo through ligand-dependent Hh pathway activation. We propose that some types of SCLC might recapitulate a critical, Hh-regulated event in airway epithelial differentiation. This requirement for Hh pathway activation identifies a common lethal malignancy that may respond to pharmacological blockade of the Hh signalling pathway.

  9. Relationship between airway narrowing, patchy ventilation and lung mechanics in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Tgavalekos, N T; Musch, G; Harris, R S; Vidal Melo, M F; Winkler, T; Schroeder, T; Callahan, R; Lutchen, K R; Venegas, J G

    2007-06-01

    Bronchoconstriction in asthma results in patchy ventilation forming ventilation defects (VDefs). Patchy ventilation is clinically important because it affects obstructive symptoms and impairs both gas exchange and the distribution of inhaled medications. The current study combined functional imaging, oscillatory mechanics and theoretical modelling to test whether the degrees of constriction of airways feeding those units outside VDefs were related to the extent of VDefs in bronchoconstricted asthmatic subjects. Positron emission tomography was used to quantify the regional distribution of ventilation and oscillatory mechanics were measured in asthmatic subjects before and after bronchoconstriction. For each subject, ventilation data was mapped into an anatomically based lung model that was used to evaluate whether airway constriction patterns, consistent with the imaging data, were capable of matching the measured changes in airflow obstruction. The degree and heterogeneity of constriction of the airways feeding alveolar units outside VDefs was similar among the subjects studied despite large inter-subject variability in airflow obstruction and the extent of the ventilation defects. Analysis of the data amongst the subjects showed an inverse relationship between the reduction in mean airway conductance, measured in the breathing frequency range during bronchoconstriction, and the fraction of lung involved in ventilation defects. The current data supports the concept that patchy ventilation is an expression of the integrated system and not just the sum of independent responses of individual airways.

  10. Bosutinib Therapy Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Priscila J.; Clevelario, Amanda L.; Padilha, Gisele A.; Silva, Johnatas D.; Kitoko, Jamil Z.; Olsen, Priscilla C.; Capelozzi, Vera L.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Cruz, Fernanda F.

    2017-01-01

    nodes also decreased with bosutinib therapy without affecting thymus cellularity. In vitro, bosutinib led to a decrease in IL-12 and iNOS and increase in IL-10, arginase-1, MMP-9, and TIMP-1. In conclusion, in the current model of silicosis, bosutinib therapy yielded beneficial effects on lung inflammation and remodeling, therefore resulting in lung mechanics improvement. Bosutinib may hold promise for silicosis; however, further studies are required. PMID:28360865

  11. Living near a Major Road in Beijing: Association with Lower Lung Function, Airway Acidification, and Chronic Cough

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhan-Wei; Zhao, Yan-Ni; Cheng, Yuan; Guo, Cui-Yan; Wang, Xi; Li, Nan; Liu, Jun-Qing; Kang, Hui; Xia, Guo-Guang; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Ping-Ji; Ma, Jing; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Cheng; Su, Li; Wang, Guang-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of near-road pollution on lung function in China have not been well studied. We aimed to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution on lung function, airway inflammation, and respiratory symptoms. Methods: We enrolled 1003 residents aged 57.96 ± 8.99 years living in the Shichahai Community in Beijing. Distances between home addresses and the nearest major roads were measured to calculate home-road distance. We used the distance categories 1, 2, and 3, representing <100 m, 100–200 m, and >200 m, respectively, as the dose indicator for traffic-related air pollution exposure. Lung function, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, and interleukin 6 levels were measured. As a follow-up, 398 participants had a second lung function assessment about 3 years later, and lung function decline was also examined as an outcome. We used regression analysis to assess the impacts of home-road distance on lung function and respiratory symptoms. As the EBC biomarker data were not normally distributed, we performed correlation analysis between home-road distance categories and EBC biomarkers. Results: Participants living a shorter distance from major roads had lower percentage of predicted value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1% −1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.20 to −2.89). The odds ratio for chronic cough was 2.54 (95% CI: 1.57–4.10) for category 1 and 1.97 (95% CI: 1.16–3.37) for category 2, compared with category 3. EBC pH was positively correlated with road distance (rank correlation coefficient of Spearman [rs] = 0.176, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution in people who live near major roads in Beijing is associated with lower lung function, airway acidification, and a higher prevalence of chronic cough. EBC pH is a potential useful biomarker for evaluating air pollution exposure. PMID:27625090

  12. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  13. World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Fang, Mingzhu; Zarbl, Helmut; Massa, Christopher; Gow, Andrew J; Cervelli, Jessica A; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert J; Lioy, Paul J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to World Trade Center (WTC) dust has been linked to respiratory disease in humans. In the present studies we developed a rodent model of WTC dust exposure to analyze lung oxidative stress and inflammation, with the goal of elucidating potential epigenetic mechanisms underlying these responses. Exposure of mice to WTC dust (20μg, i.t.) was associated with upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 within 3days, a response which persisted for at least 21days. Whereas matrix metalloproteinase was upregulated 7days post-WTC dust exposure, IL-6RA1 was increased at 21days; conversely, expression of mannose receptor, a scavenger receptor important in particle clearance, decreased. After WTC dust exposure, increases in methylation of histone H3 lysine K4 at 3days, lysine K27 at 7days and lysine K36, were observed in the lung, along with hypermethylation of Line-1 element at 21days. Alterations in pulmonary mechanics were also observed following WTC dust exposure. Thus, 3days post-exposure, lung resistance and tissue damping were decreased. In contrast at 21days, lung resistance, central airway resistance, tissue damping and tissue elastance were increased. These data demonstrate that WTC dust-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with epigenetic modifications in the lung and altered pulmonary mechanics. These changes may contribute to the development of WTC dust pathologies.

  14. Prevention of bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in mice by naproxen and JNJ7777120 treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Arianna Carolina; Pini, Alessandro; Lucarini, Laura; Lanzi, Cecilia; Veglia, Eleonora; Thurmond, Robin L; Stark, Holger; Masini, Emanuela

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive and lethal lung disease characterized by inflammation and accumulation of extracellular matrix components, is a major therapeutic challenge for which new therapeutic strategies are warranted. Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been previously utilized to reduce inflammation. Histamine H4 receptor (H4R), largely expressed in hematopoietic cells, has been identified as a novel target for inflammatory and immune disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of JNJ7777120 (1-[(5-chloro-1H-indol-2-yl)carbonyl]-4-methylpiperazine), a selective H4R antagonist, and naproxen, a well known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and their combination in a murine model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Bleomycin (0.05 IU) was instilled intratracheally to C57BL/6 mice, which were then treated by micro-osmotic pump with vehicle, JNJ7777120 (40 mg/kg b.wt.), naproxen (21 mg/kg b.wt.), or a combination of both. Airway resistance to inflation, an index of lung stiffness, was assessed, and lung specimens were processed for inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis markers. Both drugs alone were able to reduce the airway resistance to inflation induced by bleomycin and the inflammatory response by decreasing COX-2 and myeloperoxidase expression and activity and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine production. Lung fibrosis was inhibited, as demonstrated by the reduction of tissue levels of transforming growth factor-β, collagen deposition, relative goblet cell number, and smooth muscle layer thickness. Our results demonstrate that both JNJ7777120 and naproxen exert an anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effect that is increased by their combination, which could be an effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  15. Surgical issues in lung transplantation: options, donor selection, graft preservation, and airway healing.

    PubMed

    Daly, R C; McGregor, C G

    1997-01-01

    To present an overview of the surgical issues in lung transplantation, including the historical context and the rationale for choosing a particular procedure for a specific patient, we reviewed and summarized the current medical literature and our personal experience. Several surgical options are available, including single lung transplantation; double lung transplantation; heart-lung transplantation; bilateral, sequential single lung transplantation; and (recently) single lobe transplantation. Although single lung transplantation is preferred for maximal use of the available organs, bilateral lung transplantation is necessary for septic lung diseases and may be appropriate for pulmonary hypertension and bullous emphysema. Heart-lung transplantation is performed for Eisenmenger's syndrome and for primary pulmonary hypertension with severe right ventricular failure. General factors for consideration in assessment of compatibility of the donor and potential recipient include ABO blood group, height (the donor should be within +/- 20% of the recipient's height), and length of the lungs (determined on an anteroposterior chest roentgenogram). Graft preservation and minimal duration of ischemia are important. Complications associated with airway healing are related to ischemia of the donor bronchus. We have addressed the issue of donor bronchial ischemia by direct revascularization of the donor bronchial arteries with use of the recipient's internal thoracic artery. Currently, lung transplantation offers a realistic therapeutic option to patients with end-stage pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease.

  16. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. Methods: This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% < 50% of predicted, together with a high RV/TLC ratio. Nonspecific lung disease (NLD) was characterized by TLC within the predicted range and no obstruction. Combined lung disease (CLD) was characterized by reduced TLC and findings indicative of airflow obstruction. Clinical diagnoses were based on clinical suspicion, a respiratory questionnaire, and the review of tests of interest. Results: We included 300 patients in the study, of whom 108 (36%) were diagnosed with RLD. In addition, 120 (40%) and 72 (24%) were diagnosed with OLD/CLD and NLD, respectively. Among the latter, 24 (33%) were clinically diagnosed with OLD. In this sample, 151 patients (50.3%) were obese, and obesity was associated with all patterns of lung disease. Conclusions: Measuring lung volumes and airway resistance is often necessary in order to provide an appropriate characterization of the pattern of lung disease in patients presenting with a spirometry pattern suggestive of restriction. Airflow obstruction is common in such cases. PMID:27812633

  17. Oral administration of allergen extracts from Dermatophagoides farinae desensitizes specific allergen-induced inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang-min; Wu, Ximei; Wu, Hui-min; Deng, Yang-mei; Zhang, Shui-juan; Zhu, Jian-ping; Dong, Xin-wei

    2008-12-10

    Clinically sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) by using allergen extracts effectively alleviates the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma. Supposed that oral administration of high-dose of allergen extracts imitates SLIT and may prevent IgE-related responses in allergic diseases, we investigated the effects of oral administration of allergen extracts from Dermatophagoides farinae (Derf) on allergen-induced inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a model of asthmatic rat. After administration to the specific Derf-sensitized rats with Derfdrop solution containing Derf1 and Derf2 extracts derived from Derf, the effects of Derfdrop on AHR, inflammatory cell accumulation, cytokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue, as well as serum IgE and IgG levels were investigated. Results indicated that Derfdrop not only dose-dependently prevented the AHR in response to methacholine, but also significantly reduced the serum total and allergen-specific IgE levels, all the maximal effects were achieved at dose of 5 mg/kg/d, and were as comparable as those of dexamethasone at dose of 1.0 mg/kg/d. Furthermore, oral administration of Derfdrop not only dose-dependently elevated allergen-specific serum IgG levels and reduced total and allergen-specific IgE levels, but also normalized the imbalance between the Th1 cytokine, IFN-gamma and Th2 cytokine, IL-4. Finally, oral administration of Derfdrop significantly reduced Goblet cell hyperplasia and eosinophilia in the Derf-sensitized allergic rat model. These data suggest that Derfdrop effectively improves specific allergen-induced inflammation and AHR in Derf-sensitized and -challenged rats and provide with the rationale for clinical SLIT by using Derfdrop in a specific allergen-induced asthma.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1-Expressing Dendritic Cells Promote Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Induce Less Severe Airway Inflammation in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Rung-Jiun; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Suen, Jau-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for instructing immune responses toward inflammatory or anti-inflammatory status. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known for its cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress and inflammation, suggesting its immune regulatory role in allergic lung inflammation. HO-1 has been implicated in affecting DC maturation; however, its role in DC-mediated T-cell differentiation is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that HO-1-expressing bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) displayed tolerogenic phenotypes, including their resistance to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maturation, high level expression of IL-10, and low T-cell stimulatory activity. In addition, HO-1-expressing DCs were able to induce antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Also, HO-1-expressing DCs modulated the severity of lung inflammatory responses in two murine models of airway inflammation. This study provided evidence supporting the role of HO-1-expressing DCs in tolerance induction and as a potential therapeutic target for allergic asthma as well as other inflammatory diseases. PMID:28033400

  19. Construction of a Der p2-transgenic plant for the alleviation of airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, CC; Ho, H; Lee, KT; Jeng, ST; Chiang, BL

    2011-01-01

    In clinical therapy, the amount of antigen administered to achieve oral tolerance for allergic diseases is large, and the cost is a major consideration. In this study, we used tobacco plants to develop a large-scale protein production system for allergen-specific immunotherapy, and we investigated the mechanisms of oral tolerance induced by a transgenic plant-derived antigen. We used plants (tobacco leaves) transgenic for the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 2 (Der p2) antigen to produce Der p2. Mice received total protein extract from Der p2 orally once per day over 6 days (days 0–2 and days 6–8). Mice were also sensitized and challenged with yeast-derived recombinant Der p2 (rDer p2), after which the mice were examined for airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation. After sensitization and challenge with rDer p2, mice that were fed with total protein extracted from transgenic plants showed decreases in serum Der p2-specific IgE and IgG1 titers, decreased IL-5 and eotaxin levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid, and eosinophil infiltration in the airway. In addition, hyper-responsiveness was also decreased in mice that were fed with total protein extracted from transgenic plants, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells were significantly increased in mediastinal and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, splenocytes isolated from transgenic plant protein-fed mice exhibited decreased proliferation and increased IL-10 secretion after stimulation with rDer p2. The data here suggest that allergen-expressing transgenic plants could be used for therapeutic purposes for allergic diseases. PMID:21602845

  20. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells: friends or foes-role in airway allergic inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pishdadian, Abbas; Varasteh, Abdol-Reza; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    Innate-like lymphocytes (ILLs) and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are two newly characterized families of lymphocytes with limited and no rearranged antigen receptors, respectively. These soldiers provide a first line of defense against foreign insults by triggering a prompt innate immune response and bridging the gap of innate and adaptive immunity. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs2) are newly identified members of the ILC family that play a key role in type 2 immune responses by prompt production of type 2 cytokines (especially IL-5 and IL-13) in response to antigen-induced IL-25/33 and by recruiting type 2 "immune franchise." Regarding the two different roles of type 2 cytokines, helminth expulsion and type 2-related diseases, here we review the latest advances in ILC2 biology and examine the pivotal role of resident ILCs2 in allergen-specific airway inflammation and asthma.

  1. Interactions of tachykinin receptor antagonists with lipopolysaccharide-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Veron, M; Guenon, I; Nenan, S; Emonds-Alt, X; Advenier, C; Lagente, V; Boichot, E

    2004-09-01

    1. Several observations suggest that tachykinins are involved in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary alterations. We have investigated the effect of antagonists for tachykinin NK1 (SR 140333), NK2 (SR 48968) or NK3 (SR 142801) receptors on inflammatory cell recruitment, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 release and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 microg/mL aerosol for 30 min). 2. Treatment of mice with a combination of SR 140333 and SR 48968 (10(-6) mol/L, aerosol) significantly reduced the increase in the number of total cells and neutrophils and MMP-9 activity in the BALF of mice 2.5 h after LPS exposure. Treatment with the NK3 antagonist SR 142801 (10(-6) mol/L, aerosol) did not inhibit the influx of neutrophils, but markedly reduced the increase in TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels at 2.5 h and MMP-9 activity at 20 h. 3. These results show that the three tachykinin receptor antagonists may interfere with the development of airway inflammation, namely neutrophilia, TNF-alpha release or MMP-9 activity in the BALF of mice exposed to LPS and suggest that not only NK1 and NK2 receptors, but also NK3 receptors are involved in the modulation of the inflammatory response and airway remodelling.

  2. Early Postnatal Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Leads to Later Airway Inflammation in Asthmatic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Cheng, Hang; Zhang, Yu-tong; Ju, Yang-hua; Li, Ya-nan

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective Asthma is one of the most common airway inflammatory diseases. In most cases, asthma development is related to ubiquitous harmful environmental exposure factors in early-life. Previous studies have indicated that smoking can promote asthma development and increase the difficulty of asthma control. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of early-life CS exposure on ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized asthmatic mice. Methods Pathological and immunological functions were analyzed in an adult asthma mice model in which mice were sensitized with OVA combined with early-life CS exposure. Results Mice exposed to CS for only 5 weeks demonstrated significantly reduced pulmonary compliance, increased airway inflammation, and augmented cellular and humoral immune responses. In addition, CS inhalation was sufficient to facilitate OVA sensitization and challenge asthmatic development. Meanwhile, CS exposure amplified regulatory T cell-mediated immunity inhibition, but still did not offset the increased effector T cell-mediated inflammatory response. Conclusion Early-life CS exposure is significantly associated with later pulmonary injury and aggravation of T-cell immunologic derangement in asthmatic mice. PMID:28135326

  3. Airway complications and management after lung transplantation: ischemia, dehiscence, and stenosis.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Jose Fernando; Mehta, Atul C

    2009-01-15

    Overall survival rates of lung transplantation have improved since the first human lung transplantation was performed. A decline in the incidence of airway complications (AC) had been a key feature to achieve the current outcomes. Several proposed risk factors to the development of airway complications have been identified, ranging from the surgical technique to the immunosuppressive regimen. There are essentially six different airway complications post-lung transplantation. The most frequently reported complication is bronchial stenosis. Other complications include bronchial dehiscence, exophytic excessive granulation tissue formation, tracheo-bronchomalacia, bronchial fistulas, and endobronchial infections. The management of post-transplant bronchial complications needs a multispecialty team approach. Prevention of some complications may be possible by early and aggressive medical management as well as by using certain surgical techniques for transplantation. Interventional bronchoscopic procedures, including balloon bronchoplasty, cryotherapy, laser photoresection, electrocautery, high-dose endobronchial brachytherapy, and bronchial stents are among the armamentarium. Also, medical management, like antibiotic prophylaxis and therapy for endobronchial infections, or noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in case of bronchomalacia, are used to treat an AC. In some cases, different surgical approaches are occasionally required. In this article we review the risk factors, the clinical presentation, the diagnostic methods, as well as the management options of the most common AC after lung transplantation.

  4. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to mannitol, airway inflammation and Asthma Control Test in atopic asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Consilvio, Nicola P.; Rapino, Daniele; Nicola, Marta Di; Scaparrotta, Alessandra; Cingolani, Anna; Petrosino, Marianna I.; Filippo, Paola Di; Pillo, Sabrina Di; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to mannitol and bronchial inflammation measured as exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and to assess whether asthma control correlates with AHR to mannitol and FeNO in atopic asthmatic children. Material and methods Allergy evaluation, the mannitol challenge test, FeNO levels and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) questionnaire were assessed in 40 children with intermittent and mild persistent allergic asthma. Results All the subjects showed positive AHR to mannitol. Pearson's correlation test revealed a significant inverse correlation between AHR (mannitol PD15) and FeNO (p = 0.020). There was also a significant positive correlation between ACT and PD15 (p = 0.020) and a significant negative correlation between ACT and FeNO levels (p = 0.003). The study population was divided into two groups according to FeNO levels (group A ≥ 16 ppb vs. group B < 16 ppb). In group A mannitol PD15 was significantly lower (p = 0.040) and ACT score values were significantly lower (p = 0.001) compared to group B. In group A, the ACT showed that 13.3% of subjects had well-controlled asthma, 80% had partially controlled asthma and 6.7% had uncontrolled asthma. In group B, the ACT showed that 72% of subjects had well-controlled asthma and 28% had partially controlled asthma. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the degree of AHR to mannitol correlates with the degree of airway inflammation in asthmatic atopic children; moreover, better control of asthma correlates with a lower degree of AHR to both mannitol and FeNO. PMID:26925129

  5. Loss of Lung WWOX Expression Causes Neutrophilic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sunit; Chen, Jiwang; Sethuraman, Shruthi; Sysol, Justin R; Gampa, Amulya; Zhao, Shuangping; Machado, Roberto F

    2017-03-10

    The tumor suppressor, WWOX, exhibits regulatory interactions with an array of transcription factors and signaling molecules that are positioned at the well-known crossroads between inflammation and cancer. WWOX is also subject to downregulation by genotoxic environmental exposures, making it of potential interest to the study of lung pathobiology. Knockdown of lung WWOX expression in mice was observed to cause neutrophil influx, and accompanied by a corresponding vascular leak and inflammatory cytokine production. In cultured human alveolar epithelial cells, loss of WWOX expression resulted in increased c-Jun- and IL-8- dependent neutrophil chemotaxis towards cell monolayers. WWOX was observed to directly interact with c-Jun in these cells, and its absence resulted in increased nuclear translocation of c-Jun. Finally, inhibition of c-Jun activating kinase, JNK, abrogated the lung neutrophil influx observed during WWOX knockdown in mice. Altogether, these observations represent a novel mechanism of pulmonary neutrophil influx that is highly relevant to the pathobiology and potential treatment of a number of different lung inflammatory conditions.

  6. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R.; Avram, Michael J.; Coppeta, Jonathan R.; Wishnok, John S.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior. PMID:26586376

  7. Lung Volume and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Heinzer, Raphael C.; Stanchina, Michael L.; Malhotra, Atul; Fogel, Robert B.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Jordan, Amy S.; Schory, Karen; White, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lung volume during wakefulness influences upper airway size and resistance, particularly in patients with sleep apnea. We sought to determine the influence of lung volume on the level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to prevent flow limitation during non-REM sleep in subjects with sleep apnea. Seventeen subjects (apnea–hypopnea index, 42.6 ± 6.2 [SEM]) were studied during stable non-REM sleep in a rigid head-out shell equipped with a positive/negative pressure attachment for manipulation of extrathoracic pressure. An epiglottic pressure catheter plus a mask/pneumotachometer were used to assess flow limitation. When lung volume was increased by 1,035 ± 22 ml, the CPAP level could be decreased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.7 cm H2O (p < 0.001) without flow limitation. The decreased CPAP at the same negative extrathoracic pressure yielded a final lung volume increase of 421 ± 36 ml above the initial value. Conversely, when lung volume was reduced by 732 ± 74 ml (n = 8), the CPAP level had to be increased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 17.1 ± 1.0 cm H2O (p < 0.001) to prevent flow limitation, with a final lung volume decrease of 567 ± 78 ml. These results demonstrate that relatively small changes in lung volume have an important effect on the upper airway in subjects with sleep apnea during non-REM sleep. PMID:15817803

  8. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  9. Eicosanoid Mediators in the Airway Inflammation of Asthmatic Patients: What is New?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid mediators contribute to inflammation providing both pro-inflammatory signals and terminating the inflammatory process by activation of macrophages. Among the most significant biologically lipid mediators, these are produced by free-radical or enzymatic oxygenation of arachidonic acid named "eicosanoids". There were some novel eicosanoids identified within the last decade, and many of them are measurable in clinical samples by affordable chromatography-mass spectrometry equipment or sensitive immunoassays. In this review, we present some recent advances in understanding of the signaling by eicosanoid mediators during asthmatic airway inflammation. Eicosanoid profiling in the exhaled breath condensate, induced sputum, or their metabolites measurements in urine is complementary to the cellular phenotyping of asthmatic inflammation. Special attention is paid to aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, a phenotype of asthma manifested by the most profound changes in the profile of eicosanoids produced. A hallmark of this type of asthma with hypersensitivity to non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is to increase biosynthesis of cysteinyl leukotrienes on the systemic level. It depends on transcellular biosynthesis of leukotriene C4 by platelets that adhere to granulocytes releasing leukotriene A4. However, other abnormalities are also reported in this type of asthma as a resistance to anti-inflammatory activity of prostaglandin E2 or a robust eosinophil interferon-γ response resulting in cysteinyl leukotrienes production. A novel mechanism is also discussed in which an isoprostane structurally related to prostaglandin E2 is released into exhaled breath condensate during a provoked asthmatic attack. However, it is concluded that any single eicosanoid or even their complex profile can hardly provide a thorough explanation for the mechanism of asthmatic inflammation. PMID:27582398

  10. IL-10 is necessary for the expression of airway hyperresponsiveness but not pulmonary inflammation after allergic sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, M. J.; Kanehiro, A.; Borish, L.; Dakhama, A.; Loader, J.; Joetham, A.; Xing, Z.; Jordana, M.; Larsen, G. L.; Gelfand, E. W.

    2000-05-01

    Cytokines play an important role in modulating inflammatory responses and, as a result, airway tone. IL-10 is a regulatory cytokine that has been suggested for treatment of asthma because of its immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to these suggestions, we demonstrate in a model of allergic sensitization that mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10/) develop a pulmonary inflammatory response but fail to exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of lung function. Reconstitution of these deficient mice with the IL-10 gene fully restores development of airway hyperresponsiveness comparable to control mice. These results identify an important role of IL-10, downstream of the inflammatory cascade, in regulating the tone of the airways after allergic sensitization and challenge.

  11. Bilateral vagotomy or atropine pre-treatment reduces experimental diesel-soot induced lung inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.S. . E-mail: D.S.McQueen@ed.ac.uk; Donaldson, K.; McNeilly, J.D.; Barton, N.J.; Duffin, R.

    2007-02-15

    To investigate the role of the vagus nerve in acute inflammatory and cardiorespiratory responses to diesel particulate (DP) in the rat airway, we measured changes in respiration, blood pressure and neutrophils in lungs of urethane anesthetized Wistar rats 6-h post-instillation of DP (500 {mu}g) and studied the effect of mid-cervical vagotomy or atropine (1 mg kg{sup -1}) pre-treatment. In conscious rats, we investigated DP, with and without atropine pre-treatment. DP increased neutrophil level in BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) fluid from intact anesthetized rats to 2.5 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8), compared with saline instillation (0.3 {+-} 0.1 x 10{sup 6}, n = 7; P < 0.05). Vagotomy reduced DP neutrophilia to 0.8 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8; P < 0.05 vs. intact); atropine reduced DP-induced neutrophilia to 0.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} (n = 4; P < 0.05). In conscious rats, DP neutrophilia of 8.5 {+-} 1.8 x 10{sup 6}, n = 4, was reduced by pre-treatment with atropine to 2.2 {+-} 1.2 x 10{sup 6} cells, n = 3. Hyperventilation occurred 6 h after DP in anesthetized rats with intact vagi, but not in bilaterally vagotomized or atropine pre-treated animals and was abolished by vagotomy (P < 0.05, paired test). There were no significant differences in the other variables (mean blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability) measured before and 360 min after DP. In conclusion, DP activates a pro-inflammatory vago-vagal reflex which is reduced by atropine. Muscarinic ACh receptors in the rat lung are involved in DP-induced neutrophilia, and hence muscarinic antagonists may reduce airway and/or cardiovascular inflammation evoked by inhaled atmospheric DP in susceptible individuals.

  12. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  13. Airway epithelial inflammation-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ store expansion is mediated by X-box binding protein-1.

    PubMed

    Martino, Mary E B; Olsen, John C; Fulcher, Nanette B; Wolfgang, Matthew C; O'Neal, Wanda K; Ribeiro, Carla M P

    2009-05-29

    Inflamed cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE), or normal HBE exposed to supernatant from mucopurulent material (SMM) from CF airways, exhibit endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Ca(2+) store expansion and amplified Ca(2+)-mediated inflammation. HBE inflammation triggers an unfolded protein response (UPR) coupled to mRNA splicing of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). Because spliced XBP-1 (XBP-1s) promotes ER expansion in other cellular models, we hypothesized that XBP-1s is responsible for the ER/Ca(2+) store expansion in inflamed HBE. XBP-1s was increased in freshly isolated infected/inflamed CF in comparison with normal HBE. The link between airway epithelial inflammation, XBP-1s, and ER/Ca(2+) store expansion was then addressed in murine airways challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa-challenged mice exhibited airway epithelial ER/Ca(2+) store expansion, which correlated with airway inflammation. P. aeruginosa-induced airway inflammation triggered XBP-1s in ER stress-activated indicator (ERAI) mice. To evaluate the functional role of XBP-1s in airway inflammation linked to ER/Ca(2+) store expansion, control, XBP-1s, or dominant negative XBP-1 (DN-XBP-1) stably expressing 16HBE14o(-) cell lines were used. Studies with cells transfected with an unfolded protein response element (UPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid confirmed that the UPRE was activated or inhibited by expression of XBP-1s or DN-XBP-1, respectively. Expression of XBP-1s induced ER/Ca(2+) store expansion and potentiated bradykinin-increased interleukin (IL)-8 secretion, whereas expression of DN-XBP-1 inhibited bradykinin-dependent IL-8 secretion. In addition, expression of DN-XBP-1 blunted SMM-induced ER/Ca(2+) store expansion and SMM-induced IL-8 secretion. These findings suggest that, in inflamed HBE, XBP-1s is responsible for the ER/Ca(2+) store expansion that confers amplification of Ca(2+)-dependent inflammatory responses.

  14. Interleukin-22 reduces lung inflammation during influenza A virus infection and protects against secondary bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stoyan; Renneson, Joelle; Fontaine, Josette; Barthelemy, Adeline; Paget, Christophe; Fernandez, Elodie Macho; Blanc, Fany; De Trez, Carl; Van Maele, Laurye; Dumoutier, Laure; Huerre, Michel-René; Eberl, Gérard; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Gosset, Pierre; Renauld, Jean Christophe; Sirard, Jean Claude; Faveeuw, Christelle; Trottein, François

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) has redundant, protective, or pathogenic functions during autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Here, we addressed the potential role of IL-22 in host defense and pathogenesis during lethal and sublethal respiratory H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) infection. We show that IL-22, as well as factors associated with its production, are expressed in the lung tissue during the early phases of IAV infection. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt)-positive αβ and γδ T cells, as well as innate lymphoid cells, expressed enhanced Il22 transcripts as early as 2 days postinfection. During lethal or sublethal IAV infections, endogenous IL-22 played no role in the control of IAV replication and in the development of the IAV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. During lethal infection, where wild-type (WT) mice succumbed to severe pneumonia, the lack of IL-22 did not accelerate or delay IAV-associated pathogenesis and animal death. In stark contrast, during sublethal IAV infection, IL-22-deficient animals had enhanced lung injuries and showed a lower airway epithelial integrity relative to WT littermates. Of importance, the protective effect of endogenous IL-22 in pulmonary damages was associated with a more controlled secondary bacterial infection. Indeed, after challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae, IAV-experienced Il22(-/-) animals were more susceptible than WT controls in terms of survival rate and bacterial burden in the lungs. Together, IL-22 plays no major role during lethal influenza but is beneficial during sublethal H3N2 IAV infection, where it limits lung inflammation and subsequent bacterial superinfections.

  15. Lung inflammation caused by inhaled toxicants: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Magun, Bruce E; Wood, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of the lungs to airborne toxicants from different sources in the environment may lead to acute and chronic pulmonary or even systemic inflammation. Cigarette smoke is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although wood smoke in urban areas of underdeveloped countries is now recognized as a leading cause of respiratory disease. Mycotoxins from fungal spores pose an occupational risk for respiratory illness and also present a health hazard to those living in damp buildings. Microscopic airborne particulates of asbestos and silica (from building materials) and those of heavy metals (from paint) are additional sources of indoor air pollution that contributes to respiratory illness and is known to cause respiratory illness in experimental animals. Ricin in aerosolized form is a potential bioweapon that is extremely toxic yet relatively easy to produce. Although the aforementioned agents belong to different classes of toxic chemicals, their pathogenicity is similar. They induce the recruitment and activation of macrophages, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, inhibition of protein synthesis, and production of interleukin-1 beta. Targeting either macrophages (using nanoparticles) or the production of interleukin-1 beta (using inhibitors against protein kinases, NOD-like receptor protein-3, or P2X7) may potentially be employed to treat these types of lung inflammation without affecting the natural immune response to bacterial infections. PMID:27382275

  16. Automated segmentation of lung airway wall area measurements from bronchoscopic optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydarian, Mohammadreza; Choy, Stephen; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David; Coxson, Harvey O.; Lam, Stephen; Parraga, Grace

    2011-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects almost 600 million people and is currently the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. COPD is an umbrella term for respiratory symptoms that accompany destruction of the lung parenchyma and/or remodeling of the airway wall, the sum of which result in decreased expiratory flow, dyspnea and gas trapping. Currently, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the main clinical method used for COPD imaging, providing excellent spatial resolution for quantitative tissue measurements although dose limitations and the fundamental spatial resolution of CT limit the measurement of airway dimensions beyond the 5th generation. To address this limitation, we are piloting the use of bronchoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), by exploiting its superior spatial resolution of 5-15 micrometers for in vivo airway imaging. Currently, only manual segmentation of OCT airway lumen and wall have been reported but manual methods are time consuming and prone to observer variability. To expand the utility of bronchoscopic OCT, automatic and robust measurement methods are required. Therefore, our objective was to develop a fully automated method for segmenting OCT airway wall dimensions and here we explore several different methods of image-regeneration, voxel clustering and post-processing. Our resultant automated method used K-means or Fuzzy c-means to cluster pixel intensity and then a series of algorithms (i.e. cluster selection, artifact removal, de-noising) was applied to process the clustering results and segment airway wall dimensions. This approach provides a way to automatically and rapidly segment and reproducibly measure airway lumen and wall area.

  17. Is airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) a risk factor for cardiovascular events?

    PubMed

    Calverley, Peter M A; Scott, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a very common cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking is a well-described risk factor for both COPD and CVD, but CVD in patients with COPD is likely to be due to other factors in addition to smoking. Inflammation may be an important common etiological link between COPD and CVD, being well described in both diseases. It is hypothesized that in COPD a "spill-over" of local airway inflammation into the systemic circulation could contribute to increased CVD in these patients. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) have well-documented anti-inflammatory effects and are commonly used for the treatment of COPD, but their effects on cardiovascular endpoints and all-cause mortality have only just started to be examined. A recent meta-analysis has suggested that ICS may reduce all-cause mortality in COPD by around 25%. A case-controlled study specifically examined the effects of ICS on myocardial infarction and suggested that ICS may decrease the incidence of MI by as much as 32%. A large multicenter prospective randomized trial (Towards a Revolution in COPD Health [TORCH]) is now ongoing and will examine the effect of fluticasone propionate in combination with salmeterol on all-cause mortality.

  18. The association of ambient air pollution with airway inflammation in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Yu; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Lee, Chung-Te; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Huang, Wen-Chuan; Jhou, Ji-Ci; Han, Yueh-Ying; Chen, Chu-Chih; Guo, Yue Leon

    2012-04-15

    The biologic mechanisms involved in airway inflammatory response to air pollution are not clearly understood. The authors conducted a longitudinal study to investigate whether exposure to ambient air pollutants affected inflammatory cells and mediators from nasal lavage in schoolchildren. Study participants were 100 elementary and middle-school students in New Taipei City, Taiwan. A structured respiratory health questionnaire was administered in September 2007, followed by monthly measurement of nasal inflammation from October 2007 to November 2009. During the study period, daily concentrations of air pollutants were obtained from the Environmental Protection Administration monitoring station and the Aerosol Supersite. Mixed-effects models were applied to examine the association between air pollution and nasal inflammatory cells and mediators, including percentages of neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes in lavaged cells and interleukin-8. A total of 824 measurements were obtained from 100 participants over a period of 10 months. The level of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM(2.5)) was found to be associated with percentage of neutrophils (β = 3.45%, 95% confidence interval: 0.89, 6.01) and interleukin-8 level (β = 29.98 pg/mL, 95% confidence interval: 3.26, 56.69) in the nasal lavage on the day of exposure. In this longitudinal cohort study of schoolchildren, results indicated that exposure to PM(2.5) might induce nasal inflammation.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of Tat-Annexin protein on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Hye Ri; Woo, Su Jung; Kim, So Mi; Jo, Hyo Sang; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Jong Hoon; Won, Moo Ho; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct a cell permeable Tat-ANX1 fusion protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the protective effects of Tat-ANX1 protein on OVA-induced asthma in animal models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transduced Tat-ANX1 protein protects from the OVA-induced production of cytokines and eosinophils in BAL fluid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tat-ANX1 protein markedly reduced OVA-induced MAPK in lung tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tat-ANX1 protein could be useful as a therapeutic agent for lung disorders including asthma. -- Abstract: Chronic airway inflammation is a key feature of bronchial asthma. Annexin-1 (ANX1) is an anti-inflammatory protein that is an important modulator and plays a key role in inflammation. Although the precise action of ANX1 remains unclear, it has emerged as a potential drug target for inflammatory diseases such as asthma. To examine the protective effects of ANX1 protein on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in animal models, we used a cell-permeable Tat-ANX1 protein. Mice sensitized and challenged with OVA antigen had an increased amount of cytokines and eosinophils in their bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. However, administration of Tat-ANX1 protein before OVA challenge significantly decreased the levels of cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and BAL fluid in lung tissues. Furthermore, OVA significantly increased the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in lung tissues, whereas Tat-ANX1 protein markedly reduced phosphorylation of MAPKs such as extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, p38, and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results suggest that transduced Tat-ANX1 protein may be a potential protein therapeutic agent for the treatment of lung disorders including asthma.

  20. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF-β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Shaw, Nicole C; Berry, Luke J; Hart, Prue H; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D-deficient or -replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five-micron sections from formalin-fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D-deficient and -replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF-β signaling pathway molecules. Eight-week-old adult vitamin D-deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D-deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D-deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF-β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D-deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D-deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D-deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease.

  1. The nervous system of airways and its remodeling in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Audrit, Katrin Julia; Delventhal, Lucas; Aydin, Öznur; Nassenstein, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases are associated with bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea and airway hyperreactivity. The majority of these symptoms cannot be primarily explained by immune cell infiltration. Evidence has been provided that vagal efferent and afferent neurons play a pivotal role in this regard. Their functions can be altered by inflammatory mediators that induce long-lasting changes in vagal nerve activity and gene expression in both peripheral and central neurons, providing new targets for treatment of pulmonary inflammatory diseases.

  2. The MIF Antagonist ISO-1 Attenuates Corticosteroid-Insensitive Inflammation and Airways Hyperresponsiveness in an Ozone-Induced Model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Kirsty E.; Chung, Kian Fan; Clarke, Colin J.; Durham, Andrew L.; Mallia, Patrick; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Barnes, Peter J.; Hall, Simon R.; Simpson, Karen D.; Starkey, Malcolm R.; Hansbro, Philip M.; Adcock, Ian M.; Wiegman, Coen H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine associated with acute and chronic inflammatory disorders and corticosteroid insensitivity. Its expression in the airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a relatively steroid insensitive inflammatory disease is unclear, however. Methods Sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and serum were obtained from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. To mimic oxidative stress-induced COPD, mice were exposed to ozone for six-weeks and treated with ISO-1, a MIF inhibitor, and/or dexamethasone before each exposure. BAL fluid and lung tissue were collected after the final exposure. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and lung function were measured using whole body plethysmography. HIF-1α binding to the Mif promoter was determined by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assays. Results MIF levels in sputum and BAL macrophages from COPD patients were higher than those from non-smokers, with healthy smokers having intermediate levels. MIF expression correlated with that of HIF-1α in all patients groups and in ozone-exposed mice. BAL cell counts, cytokine mRNA and protein expression in lungs and BAL, including MIF, were elevated in ozone-exposed mice and had increased AHR. Dexamethasone had no effect on these parameters in the mouse but ISO-1 attenuated cell recruitment, cytokine release and AHR. Conclusion MIF and HIF-1α levels are elevated in COPD BAL macrophages and inhibition of MIF function blocks corticosteroid-insensitive lung inflammation and AHR. Inhibition of MIF may provide a novel anti-inflammatory approach in COPD. PMID:26752192

  3. Airway basal cells of healthy smokers express an embryonic stem cell signature relevant to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Hackett, Neil R; Leung, Roland; Moore, Malcolm A S; Sima, Camelia S; Chao, Ion Wa; Downey, Robert J; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    Activation of the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) signature genes has been observed in various epithelial cancers. In this study, we found that the hESC signature is selectively induced in the airway basal stem/progenitor cell population of healthy smokers (BC-S), with a pattern similar to that activated in all major types of human lung cancer. We further identified a subset of 6 BC-S hESC genes, whose coherent overexpression in lung adenocarcinoma (AdCa) was associated with reduced lung function, poorer differentiation grade, more advanced tumor stage, remarkably shorter survival, and higher frequency of TP53 mutations. BC-S shared with hESC and a considerable subset of lung carcinomas a common TP53 inactivation molecular pattern which strongly correlated with the BC-S hESC gene expression. These data provide transcriptome-based evidence that smoking-induced reprogramming of airway BC toward the hESC-like phenotype might represent a common early molecular event in the development of aggressive lung carcinomas in humans.

  4. Nasal airway ion transport and lung function in young people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Helen L; Barker, Pierre M; Southern, Kevin W

    2003-09-01

    There is strong evidence that abnormal airway ion transport is the primary defect that initiates the pathophysiology of lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF). To examine the relationship between airway ion transport abnormality and severity of lung disease, we measured nasal potential difference in 51 young people with CF using a validated modified technique. There was no correlation between any component of the ion transport measurement and clinical condition (respiratory function, chest radiograph score, or Shwachman clinical score). Thirty subjects, homozygous for the DeltaF508 mutation, were divided into those above and those below average respiratory function for their age. There was no significant difference in any of the ion transport parameters between those with above and below average pulmonary function. Of the 51 subjects, 10 had significant hyperpolarization after perfusion with a zero Cl- solution (> 5 mV). This Cl- secretory capacity did not correlate with above average lung function. These data do not support the assertion that the extent of lung disease in CF reflects the degree of ion transport abnormality. We suggest that although an ion transport abnormality initiates lung disease, other factors (e.g., environmental and genetic modifiers) are more influential in determining disease severity.

  5. Rac2 is involved in bleomycin-induced lung inflammation leading to pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary fibrotic diseases induce significant morbidity and mortality, for which there are limited therapeutic options available. Rac2, a ras-related guanosine triphosphatase expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells, is a crucial molecule regulating a diversity of mast cell, macrophage, and neutrophil functions. All these cell types have been implicated in the development of pulmonary fibrosis in a variety of animal models. For the studies described here we hypothesized that Rac2 deficiency protects mice from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods To determine the role of Rac2 in pulmonary fibrosis we used a bleomycin-induced mouse model. Anesthetized C57BL/6 wild type and rac2 -/- mice were instilled intratracheally with bleomycin sulphate (1.25 U/Kg) or saline as control. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples were collected at days 3 and 7 of treatment and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). On day 21 after bleomycin treatment, we measured airway resistance and elastance in tracheotomized animals. Lung sections were stained for histological analysis, while homogenates were analyzed for hydroxyproline and total collagen content. Results BLM-treated rac2 -/- mice had reduced MMP-9 levels in the BAL on day 3 and reduced neutrophilia and TNF and CCL3/MIP-1α levels in the BAL on day 7 compared to BLM-treated WT mice. We also showed that rac2 -/- mice had significantly lower mortality (30%) than WT mice (70%) at day 21 of bleomycin treatment. Lung function was diminished in bleomycin-treated WT mice, while it was unaffected in bleomycin-treated rac2 -/- mice. Histological analysis of inflammation and fibrosis as well as collagen and hydroxyproline content in the lungs did not show significant differences between BLM-treated rac2 -/- and WT and mice that survived to day 21. Conclusion Rac2 plays an important role in bleomycin-induced lung injury. It is an important signaling molecule leading to BLM-induced mortality and it also mediates the

  6. Sarcoidosis Blood Transcriptome Reflects Lung Inflammation and Overlaps with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Peng, Jeffrey C.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine P.; Woodruff, Prescott G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, although M. tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis. The traditional view holds that inflammation in sarcoidosis is compartmentalized to involved organs. Objectives: To determine whether whole blood gene expression signatures reflect inflammatory pathways in the lung in sarcoidosis and whether these signatures overlap with tuberculosis. Methods: We analyzed transcriptomic data from blood and lung biopsies in sarcoidosis and compared these profiles with blood transcriptomic data from tuberculosis and other diseases. Measurements and Main Results: Applying machine learning algorithms to blood gene expression data, we built a classifier that distinguished sarcoidosis from health in derivation and validation cohorts (92% sensitivity, 92% specificity). The most discriminative genes were confirmed by quantitative PCR and correlated with disease severity. Transcript profiles significantly induced in blood overlapped with those in lung biopsies and identified shared dominant inflammatory pathways (e.g., Type-I/II interferons). Sarcoidosis and tuberculosis shared more overlap in blood gene expression compared with other diseases using the 86-gene signature reported to be specific for tuberculosis and the sarcoidosis signature presented herein, although reapplication of machine learning algorithms could identify genes specific for sarcoidosis. Conclusions: These data indicate that blood transcriptome analysis provides a noninvasive method for identifying inflammatory pathways in sarcoidosis, that these pathways may be leveraged to complement more invasive procedures for diagnosis or assessment of disease severity, and that sarcoidosis and tuberculosis share overlap in gene regulation of specific inflammatory pathways. PMID:21852540

  7. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lui, Justin K; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy.

  8. Shikonin inhibits maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and suppresses allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Wang, Chien-Neng; Lai, Yu-Ting; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Chen, Hui-Chen; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Shikonin exhibits a wide range of anti-inflammatory actions. Here, we assessed its effects on maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) and on allergic reactions in a murine model of asthma. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cultured murine BM-DCs were used to investigate the effects of shikonin on expression of cell surface markers and their stimulation of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. The therapeutic potential of shikonin was evaluated in a model of allergic airway disease. KEY RESULTS Shikonin dose-dependently inhibited expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD80, CD86, CCR7 and OX40L on BM-DCs, induced by a mixture of ovalbumin (OVA; 100 µg·mL−1) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP; 20 ng·mL−1). Shikonin-treated BM-DCs were poor stimulators of CD4+ T lymphocyte and induced lower levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α release by responding T-cells. After intratracheal instillation of shikonin in OVA-immunized mice, OVA challenge induced lower IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, TNF-α and eotaxin release in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid, lower IL-4 and IL-5 production in lung cells and mediastinal lymph node cells and attenuated OVA-induced lung eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Shikonin effectively suppressed OVA + TSLP-induced BM-DC maturation in vitro and inhibited allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma, showing good potential as a treatment for allergic asthma. Also, our model provides a novel platform for screening drugs for allergic diseases. PMID:20735407

  9. Adenosine deaminase 1 and concentrative nucleoside transporters 2 and 3 regulate adenosine on the apical surface of human airway epithelia: implications for inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Andrew J; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; van Heusden, Catja A; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C; Picher, Maryse

    2007-09-11

    Adenosine is a multifaceted signaling molecule mediating key aspects of innate and immune lung defenses. However, abnormally high airway adenosine levels exacerbate inflammatory lung diseases. This study identifies the mechanisms regulating adenosine elimination from the apical surface of human airway epithelia. Experiments conducted on polarized primary cultures of nasal and bronchial epithelial cells showed that extracellular adenosine is eliminated by surface metabolism and cellular uptake. The conversion of adenosine to inosine was completely inhibited by the adenosine deaminase 1 (ADA1) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA). The reaction exhibited Km and Vmax values of 24 microM and 0.14 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2). ADA1 (not ADA2) mRNA was detected in human airway epithelia. The adenosine/mannitol permeability coefficient ratio (18/1) indicated a minor contribution of paracellular absorption. Adenosine uptake was Na+-dependent and was inhibited by the concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) blocker phloridzin but not by the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) blocker dipyridamole. Apparent Km and Vmax values were 17 microM and 7.2 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2), and transport selectivity was adenosine = inosine = uridine > guanosine = cytidine > thymidine. CNT3 mRNA was detected throughout the airways, while CNT2 was restricted to nasal epithelia. Inhibition of adenosine elimination by EHNA or phloridzin raised apical adenosine levels by >3-fold and stimulated IL-13 and MCP-1 secretion by 6-fold. These responses were reproduced by the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) and blocked by the adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (8-SPT). This study shows that adenosine elimination on human airway epithelia is mediated by ADA1, CNT2, and CNT3, which constitute important regulators of adenosine-mediated inflammation.

  10. Ligation of TLR7 on CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells suppresses allergic lung inflammation via regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adnan R; Amu, Sylvie; Saunders, Sean P; Hams, Emily; Blackshields, Gordon; Leonard, Martin O; Weaver, Casey T; Sparwasser, Tim; Sheils, Orla; Fallon, Padraic G

    2015-06-01

    B cells have been described as having the capacity to regulate cellular immune responses and suppress inflammatory processes. One such regulatory B-cell population is defined as IL-10-producing CD19(+) CD1d(hi) cells. Previous work has identified an expansion of these cells in mice infected with the helminth, Schistosoma mansoni. Here, microarray analysis of CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells from mice infected with S. mansoni demonstrated significantly increased Tlr7 expression, while CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells from uninfected mice also demonstrated elevated Tlr7 expression. Using IL-10 reporter, Il10(-/-) and Tlr7(-/-) mice, we formally demonstrate that TLR7 ligation of CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells increases their capacity to produce IL-10. In a mouse model of allergic lung inflammation, the adoptive transfer of TLR7-elicited CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells reduced airway inflammation and associated airway hyperresponsiveness. Using DEREG mice to deplete FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells in allergen-sensitized mice, we show that that TLR7-elicited CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells suppress airway hyperresponsiveness via a T regulatory cell dependent mechanism. These studies identify that TLR7 stimulation leads to the expansion of IL-10-producing CD19(+) CD1d(hi) B cells, which can suppress allergic lung inflammation via T regulatory cells.

  11. Airway Wall Area Derived from 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis Differs among Lung Lobes in Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Tho, Nguyen Van; Trang, Le Thi Huyen; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Emiko; Ryujin, Yasushi; Kanda, Rie; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Goto, Kenichi; Fukunaga, Kentaro; Higami, Yuichi; Seto, Ruriko; Nagao, Taishi; Oguma, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Lan, Le Thi Tuyet; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    Background It is time-consuming to obtain the square root of airway wall area of the hypothetical airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (√Aaw at Pi10), a comparable index of airway dimensions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), from all airways of the whole lungs using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis. We hypothesized that √Aaw at Pi10 differs among the five lung lobes and √Aaw at Pi10 derived from one certain lung lobe has a high level of agreement with that derived from the whole lungs in smokers. Methods Pulmonary function tests and chest volumetric CTs were performed in 157 male smokers (102 COPD, 55 non-COPD). All visible bronchial segments from the 3rd to 5th generations were segmented and measured using commercially available 3-dimensional CT analysis software. √Aaw at Pi10 of each lung lobe was estimated from all measurable bronchial segments of that lobe. Results Using a mixed-effects model, √Aaw at Pi10 differed significantly among the five lung lobes (R2 = 0.78, P<0.0001). The Bland-Altman plots show that √Aaw at Pi10 derived from the right or left upper lobe had a high level of agreement with that derived from the whole lungs, while √Aaw at Pi10 derived from the right or left lower lobe did not. Conclusion In male smokers, CT-derived airway wall area differs among the five lung lobes, and airway wall area derived from the right or left upper lobe is representative of the whole lungs. PMID:24865661

  12. Nanoparticle mass transfer from lung airways to systemic regions--Part II: Multi-compartmental modeling.

    PubMed

    Kolanjiyil, Arun V; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2013-12-01

    This is the second article of a two-part paper, combining high-resolution computer simulation results of inhaled nanoparticle deposition in a human airway model (Kolanjiyil and Kleinstreuer, 2013, "Nanoparticle Mass Transfer From Lung Airways to Systemic Regions--Part I: Whole-Lung Aerosol Dynamics," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 135(12), p. 121003) with a new multicompartmental model for insoluble nanoparticle barrier mass transfer into systemic regions. Specifically, it allows for the prediction of temporal nanoparticle accumulation in the blood and lymphatic systems and in organs. The multicompartmental model parameters were determined from experimental retention and clearance data in rat lungs and then the validated model was applied to humans based on pharmacokinetic cross-species extrapolation. This hybrid simulator is a computationally efficient tool to predict the nanoparticle kinetics in the human body. The study provides critical insight into nanomaterial deposition and distribution from the lungs to systemic regions. The quantitative results are useful in diverse fields such as toxicology for exposure-risk analysis of ubiquitous nanomaterial and pharmacology for nanodrug development and targeting.

  13. Rapid adaptation drives invasion of airway donor microbiota by Pseudomonas after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, M.; Köhler, T.; Greub, G.; Manuel, O.; Aubert, J-D.; Baerlocher, L.; Farinelli, L.; Buckling, A.; van Delden, C.; Achermann, Rita; Amico, Patrizia; Baumann, Philippe; Beldi, Guido; Benden, Christian; Berger, Christoph; Binet, Isabelle; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Boely, Elsa; Bucher, Heiner; Bühler, Leo; Carell, Thierry; Catana, Emmanuelle; Chalandon, Yves; Geest, Sabina de; Rougemont, Olivier de; Dickenmann, Michael; Duchosal, Michel; Fehr, Thomas; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Garzoni, Christian; Soccal, Paola Gasche; Giostra, Emiliano; Golshayan, Déla; Good, Daniel; Hadaya, Karine; Halter, Jörg; Heim, Dominik; Hess, Christoph; Hillinger, Sven; Hirsch, Hans H.; Hofbauer, Günther; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Immer, Franz; Klaghofer, Richard; Koller, Michael; Laesser, Bettina; Lehmann, Roger; Lovis, Christian; Marti, Hans-Peter; Martin, Pierre Yves; Martinolli, Luca; Meylan, Pascal; Mohacsi, Paul; Morard, Isabelle; Morel, Philippe; Mueller, Ulrike; Mueller, Nicolas J; Mueller-McKenna, Helen; Müller, Antonia; Müller, Thomas; Müllhaupt, Beat; Nadal, David; Pascual, Manuel; Passweg, Jakob; Ziegler, Chantal Piot; Rick, Juliane; Roosnek, Eddy; Rosselet, Anne; Rothlin, Silvia; Ruschitzka, Frank; Schanz, Urs; Schaub, Stefan; Seiler, Christian; Stampf, Susanne; Steiger, Jürg; Stirnimann, Guido; Toso, Christian; Tsinalis, Dimitri; Venetz, Jean-Pierre; Villard, Jean; Wick, Madeleine; Wilhelm, Markus; Yerly, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas leads to progressive lung destruction ultimately requiring lung transplantation (LT). Following LT, CF-adapted Pseudomonas strains, potentially originating from the sinuses, may seed the allograft leading to infections and reduced allograft survival. We investigated whether CF-adapted Pseudomonas populations invade the donor microbiota and adapt to the non-CF allograft. We collected sequential Pseudomonas isolates and airway samples from a CF-lung transplant recipient during two years, and followed the dynamics of the microbiota and Pseudomonas populations. We show that Pseudomonas invaded the host microbiota within three days post-LT, in association with a reduction in richness and diversity. A dominant mucoid and hypermutator mutL lineage was replaced after 11 days by non-mucoid strains. Despite antibiotic therapy, Pseudomonas dominated the allograft microbiota until day 95. We observed positive selection of pre-LT variants and the appearance of novel mutations. Phenotypic adaptation resulted in increased biofilm formation and swimming motility capacities. Pseudomonas was replaced after 95 days by a microbiota dominated by Actinobacillus. In conclusion, mucoid Pseudomonas adapted to the CF-lung remained able to invade the allograft. Selection of both pre-existing non-mucoid subpopulations and of novel phenotypic traits suggests rapid adaptation of Pseudomonas to the non-CF allograft. PMID:28094327

  14. Rapid adaptation drives invasion of airway donor microbiota by Pseudomonas after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beaume, M; Köhler, T; Greub, G; Manuel, O; Aubert, J-D; Baerlocher, L; Farinelli, L; Buckling, A; van Delden, C

    2017-01-17

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas leads to progressive lung destruction ultimately requiring lung transplantation (LT). Following LT, CF-adapted Pseudomonas strains, potentially originating from the sinuses, may seed the allograft leading to infections and reduced allograft survival. We investigated whether CF-adapted Pseudomonas populations invade the donor microbiota and adapt to the non-CF allograft. We collected sequential Pseudomonas isolates and airway samples from a CF-lung transplant recipient during two years, and followed the dynamics of the microbiota and Pseudomonas populations. We show that Pseudomonas invaded the host microbiota within three days post-LT, in association with a reduction in richness and diversity. A dominant mucoid and hypermutator mutL lineage was replaced after 11 days by non-mucoid strains. Despite antibiotic therapy, Pseudomonas dominated the allograft microbiota until day 95. We observed positive selection of pre-LT variants and the appearance of novel mutations. Phenotypic adaptation resulted in increased biofilm formation and swimming motility capacities. Pseudomonas was replaced after 95 days by a microbiota dominated by Actinobacillus. In conclusion, mucoid Pseudomonas adapted to the CF-lung remained able to invade the allograft. Selection of both pre-existing non-mucoid subpopulations and of novel phenotypic traits suggests rapid adaptation of Pseudomonas to the non-CF allograft.

  15. MAP3K19 Is Overexpressed in COPD and Is a Central Mediator of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Lower Airway Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Franz-Bacon, Karin; Ludka, John; DiTirro, Danielle N.; Ly, Tai Wei; Bacon, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation and lung inflammation resulting in a progressive decline in lung function whose principle cause is cigarette smoke. MAP3K19 is a novel kinase expressed predominantly by alveolar and interstitial macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells in the lung. We found that MAP3K19 mRNA was overexpressed in a limited sampling of lung tissue from COPD patients, and a closer examination found it to be overexpressed in bronchoalveolar macrophages from COPD patients, as well as the bronchial epithelium and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. We further found MAP3K19 to be induced in various cell lines upon environmental stress, such as cigarette smoke, oxidative and osmotic stress. Exogenous expression of MAP3K19 in cells caused an upregulation of transcriptionally active NF-κB, and secretion of the chemokines CXCL-8, CCL-20 and CCL-7. Inhibition of MAP3K19 activity by siRNA or small molecular weight inhibitors caused a decrease in cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in various murine models, which included a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia and KC levels. In a chronic cigarette smoke model, inhibition of MAP3K19 significantly attenuated emphysematous changes in airway parenchyma. Finally, in a viral exacerbation model, mice exposed to cigarette smoke and influenza A virus showed a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia, pro-inflammatory cytokines and viral load upon inhibition of MAP3K19. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of MAP3K19 may represent a novel strategy to target COPD that promises to have a potential therapeutic benefit for patients. PMID:27935962

  16. MAP3K19 Is Overexpressed in COPD and Is a Central Mediator of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Lower Airway Destruction.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Stefen A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Ludka, John; DiTirro, Danielle N; Ly, Tai Wei; Bacon, Kevin B

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation and lung inflammation resulting in a progressive decline in lung function whose principle cause is cigarette smoke. MAP3K19 is a novel kinase expressed predominantly by alveolar and interstitial macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells in the lung. We found that MAP3K19 mRNA was overexpressed in a limited sampling of lung tissue from COPD patients, and a closer examination found it to be overexpressed in bronchoalveolar macrophages from COPD patients, as well as the bronchial epithelium and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. We further found MAP3K19 to be induced in various cell lines upon environmental stress, such as cigarette smoke, oxidative and osmotic stress. Exogenous expression of MAP3K19 in cells caused an upregulation of transcriptionally active NF-κB, and secretion of the chemokines CXCL-8, CCL-20 and CCL-7. Inhibition of MAP3K19 activity by siRNA or small molecular weight inhibitors caused a decrease in cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in various murine models, which included a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia and KC levels. In a chronic cigarette smoke model, inhibition of MAP3K19 significantly attenuated emphysematous changes in airway parenchyma. Finally, in a viral exacerbation model, mice exposed to cigarette smoke and influenza A virus showed a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia, pro-inflammatory cytokines and viral load upon inhibition of MAP3K19. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of MAP3K19 may represent a novel strategy to target COPD that promises to have a potential therapeutic benefit for patients.

  17. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D.; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S.; Garrison, Carly B.; Walser, Tonya C.; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C.; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R.; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O’Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  18. [Acute effect of ambient air pollution on small airway lung functions among school children in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L J; Guo, C Y; Xu, H H; Xu, D; Shen, X B; Du, X Y; Zhang, M H; Tan, J G; Zhang, J H; Dong, C Y; Qian, H L; Shi, Y W; Pan, M Z; Zhou, X D

    2017-02-10

    Objective: To study the acute effects of compound ambient air pollution on small airway lung functions among school children in Shanghai. Method: A longitudinal survey on lung functions was conducted among 233 school-children from three schools (A, B and C, located in innerring, mid-ring and outer-ring areas). Lung function test was performed once a week for 3 times respectively, among children in school A and B in Dec. 2013 and in school C in Dec. 2014. The fourth lung function test was tested in Jun. 2014 and May 2015 in the respective schools. Results: from the lung function would include items as: forced mid-expiratory flow at 25% of forced vital capacity (MEF(25%)), mid-expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (MEF(50%)), mid-expiratory flow at 75% of forced vital capacity (MEF(75%)) and mid-expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF(25%-75%)). Data regarding the daily air quality real-time of PM(2.5), PM(10), SO(2) and NO(2) in Dec. 2013, Dec. 2014, Jun. 2014 and May. 2015 from the three environmental monitoring spots and meteorological data from the Shanghai Meteorological Service system which were physically close to the three schools, were collected simultaneously. Linear mixed effect model was used to examine the levels of correlation between lung function indicators and ambient air pollutants. Results When confounding factors on meteorology and individuals were controlled, the lag effects and accumulated lag effects were found to have existed between the internal quarter rang (IQR) concentration of PM(2.5) and PM(10) in lag2 day and lag02 days, IQR concentration of SO(2) in lag02 day and IQR concentration of NO(2) lag0 day, when small airway lung functions like MEF(25%), MEF(50%), MEF(75%) and FEF(25%-75%)(P<0.05) were inspected. Results from the two air pollutants model analysis showed that SO(2) and NO(2) presenting interactive effects with PM(2.5), PM(10) and lag effects more significant than the individual SO(2) and

  19. The effect of smoke inhalation on lung function and airway responsiveness in wildland fire fighters

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Tager, I.B.; Balmes, J.R.; Harrison, R.J. )

    1992-12-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of smoke on forced expiratory volumes and airway responsiveness in wildland fire fighters during a season of active fire fighting. Sixty-three seasonal and full-time wildland fire fighters from five U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDAFS) Hotshot crews in Northern California and Montana completed questionnaires, spirometry, and methacholine challenge testing before and after an active season of fire fighting in 1989. There were significant mean individual declines of 0.09, 0.15, and 0.44 L/s in postseason values of FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75, respectively, compared with preseason values. There were no consistent significant relationships between mean individual declines of the spirometric parameters and the covariates: sex, smoking history, history of asthma or allergies, years as a fire fighter, upper/lower respiratory symptoms, or membership in a particular Hotshot crew. There was a statistically significant increase in airway responsiveness when comparing preseason methacholine dose-response slopes (DRS) with postseason dose-response slopes (p = 0.02). The increase in airway responsiveness appeared to be greatest in fire fighters with a history of lower respiratory symptoms or asthma, but it was not related to smoking history. These data suggest that wildland fire fighting is associated with decreases in lung function and increases in airway responsiveness independent of a history of cigarette smoking. Our findings are consistent with the results of previous studies of municipal fire fighters.

  20. Epithelial Notch signaling regulate