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Sample records for airway lining fluid

  1. Release of beryllium into artificial airway epithelial lining fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled beryllium particles that deposit in the lung airway lining fluid may dissolve and interact with immune-competent cells resulting in sensitization. As such, solubilization of 17 beryllium-containing materials (ore, hydroxide, metal, oxide, alloys, and process intermediates) was investigated using artificial human airway epithelial lining fluid. The maximum beryllium release in 7 days was 11.78% (from a beryl ore melter dust), although release from most materials was < 1%. Calculated dissolution half-times ranged from 30 days (reduction furnace material) to 74,000 days (hydroxide). Despite rapid mechanical clearance, billions of beryllium ions may be released in the respiratory tract via dissolution in airway lining fluid. Beryllium-containing particles that deposit in the respiratory tract dissolve in artificial lung epithelial lining fluid, thereby providing ions for absorption in the lung and interaction with immune-competent cells in the respiratory tract. PMID:23074979

  2. Breath condensate hydrogen peroxide correlates with both airway cytology and epithelial lining fluid ascorbic acid concentration in the horse.

    PubMed

    Deaton, Christopher M; Marlin, David J; Smith, Nicola C; Smith, Ken C; Newton, Richard J; Gower, Susan M; Cade, Susan M; Roberts, Colin A; Harris, Pat A; Schroter, Robert C; Kelly, Frank J

    2004-02-01

    The relationship between hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in expired breath condensate (EBC) and cytology of the respiratory tract obtained from tracheal wash (TW) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) antioxidant status is unknown. To examine this we analysed the concentration of H2O2 in breath condensate from healthy horses and horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), a condition considered to be an animal model of human asthma. The degree of airway inflammation was determined by assessing TW inflammation as mucus, cell density and neutrophil scores, and by BAL cytology. ELF antioxidant status was determined by measurement of ascorbic acid, dehydroascorbate, reduced and oxidised glutathione, uric acid and alpha-tocopherol concentrations. RAO-affected horses with marked airway inflammation had significantly higher concentrations of breath condensate H2O2 than control horses and RAO-affected horses in the absence of inflammation (2.0 +/- 0.5 micromol/l. 0.4 +/- 0.2 micromol/l and 0.9 +/- 0.2 micromol/l H2O2, respectively; p < 0.0001). The concentration of breath condensate H2O2 was related inversely to the concentration of ascorbic acid in ELF (r = -0.80; p < 0.0001) and correlated positively with TW inflammation score (r = 0.76, p < 0.0001) and BAL neutrophil count (r = 0.80, p < 0.0001). We conclude that the concentration of H2O2 in breath condensate influences the ELF ascorbic acid concentration and provides a non-invasive diagnostic indicator of the severity of neutrophilic airway inflammation. PMID:15104214

  3. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl− and HCO3− secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (Isc) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) calculated under open-circuit conditions. Isc was equivalent to the HCO3− net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas Ieq was the sum of the Cl− and HCO3− net fluxes. Ieq and HCO3− fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl2, suggesting that some secreted HCO3− is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H+ secretion. Ieq and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na+ and HCO3−. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of Ieq and HCO3− secretion, suggesting that HCO3− transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl− was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50–70% of Cl− and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl− loading by a sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO3− gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO3− secretion was increased by bilateral Cl− removal and therefore did not require apical Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO3− is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl−, and the resulting HCO3−-dependent Cl− transport provides an osmotic driving force for

  4. Luminal cholinergic signalling in airway lining fluid: a novel mechanism for activating chloride secretion via Ca2+-dependent Cl− and K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Lips, Katrin S; Wolff, Miriam; Wess, Jürgen; Gerbig, Stefanie; Takats, Zoltan; Kummer, Wolfgang; Fronius, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent studies detected the expression of proteins involved in cholinergic metabolism in airway epithelial cells, although the function of this non-neuronal cholinergic system is not known in detail. Thus, this study focused on the effect of luminal ACh as a regulator of transepithelial ion transport in epithelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH RT-PCR experiments were performed using mouse tracheal epithelial cells for ChAT and organic cation transporter (OCT) transcripts. Components of tracheal airway lining fluid were analysed with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS. Effects of nicotine on mouse tracheal epithelial ion transport were examined with Ussing-chamber experiments. KEY RESULTS Transcripts encoding ChAT and OCT1–3 were detected in mouse tracheal epithelial cells. The DESI experiments identified ACh in the airway lining fluid. Luminal ACh induced an immediate, dose-dependent increase in the transepithelial ion current (EC50: 23.3 µM), characterized by a transient peak and sustained plateau current. This response was not affected by the Na+-channel inhibitor amiloride. The Cl−-channel inhibitor niflumic acid or the K+-channel blocker Ba2+ attenuated the ACh effect. The calcium ionophore A23187 mimicked the ACh effect. Luminal nicotine or muscarine increased the ion current. Experiments with receptor gene-deficient animals revealed the participation of muscarinic receptor subtypes M1 and M3. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of luminal ACh and activation of transepithelial ion currents by luminal ACh receptors identifies a novel non-neuronal cholinergic pathway in the airway lining fluid. This pathway could represent a novel drug target in the airways. PMID:22300281

  5. Basolateral chloride loading by the anion exchanger type 2: role in fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junwei; Shan, Jiajie; Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Evagelidis, Alexandra; Alper, Seth L; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion exchanger type 2 (AE2 or SLC4A2) is an electroneutral Cl−/HCO3− exchanger expressed at the basolateral membrane of many epithelia. It is thought to participate in fluid secretion by airway epithelia. However, the role of AE2 in fluid secretion remains uncertain, due to the lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors, and because it is electrically silent and therefore does not contribute directly to short-circuit current (Isc). We have studied the role of AE2 in Cl− and fluid secretion by the airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. After confirming expression of its mRNA and protein, a knock-down cell line called AE2-KD was generated by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference in which AE2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced ≥90%. Suppressing AE2 increased the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by ∼70% without affecting the levels of NKCC1 (Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter) or NBCe1 (Na+–nHCO3− cotransporter). cAMP agonists stimulated fluid secretion by parental Calu-3 and scrambled shRNA cells >6.5-fold. In AE2-KD cells this response was reduced by ∼70%, and the secreted fluid exhibited elevated pH and [HCO3−] as compared with the control lines. Unstimulated equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) was elevated in AE2-KD cells, but the incremental response to forskolin was unaffected. The modest bumetanide-induced reductions in both Ieq and fluid secretion were more pronounced in AE2-KD cells. Basolateral Cl−/HCO3− exchange measured by basolateral pH-stat in cells with permeabilized apical membranes was abolished in AE2-KD monolayers, and the intracellular alkalinization resulting from basolateral Cl− removal was reduced by ∼80% in AE2-KD cells. These results identify AE2 as a major pathway for basolateral Cl− loading during cAMP-stimulated secretion of Cl− and fluid by Calu-3 cells, and help explain the large bumetanide-insensitive component of fluid secretion reported previously in airway

  6. Site of Fluid Secretion in Small Airways.

    PubMed

    Flores-Delgado, Guillermo; Lytle, Christian; Quinton, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    The secretion and management of readily transportable airway surface liquid (ASL) along the respiratory tract is crucial for the clearance of debris and pathogens from the lungs. In proximal large airways, submucosal glands (SMGs) can produce ASL. However, in distal small airways, SMGs are absent, although the lumens of these airways are, uniquely, highly plicated. Little is known about the production and maintenance of ASL in small airways, but using electrophysiology, we recently found that native porcine small airways simultaneously secrete and absorb. How these airways can concurrently transport ASL in opposite directions is puzzling. Using high expression of the Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) 1 protein (SLC12a2) as a phenotypic marker for fluid secretory cells, immunofluorescence microscopy of porcine small airways revealed two morphologically separated sets of luminal epithelial cells. NKCC1 was abundantly expressed by most cells in the contraluminal regions of the pleats but highly expressed very infrequently by cells in the luminal folds of the epithelial plications. In larger proximal airways, the acini of SMGs expressed NKCC1 prominently, but cells expressing NKCC1 in the surface epithelium were sparse. Our findings indicate that, in the small airway, cells in the pleats of the epithelium secrete ASL, whereas, in the larger proximal airways, SMGs mainly secrete ASL. We propose a mechanism in which the locations of secretory cells in the base of pleats and of absorptive cells in luminal folds physically help maintain a constant volume of ASL in small airways. PMID:26562629

  7. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  8. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20-70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  9. Surface fluid absorption and secretion in small airways

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, A K M; Quinton, P M

    2012-01-01

    Native small airways must remain wet enough to be pliable and support ciliary clearance, but dry enough to remain patent for gas flow. The airway epithelial lining must both absorb and secrete ions to maintain a critical level of fluid on its surface. Despite frequent involvement in lung diseases, the minuscule size has limited studies of peripheral airways. To meet this challenge, we used a capillary to construct an Ussing chamber (area <1 mm2) to measure electrolyte transport across small native airways (∼1 mm ø) from pig lung. Transepithelial potentials (Vt) were recorded in open circuit conditions while applying constant current pulses across the luminal surface of dissected airways to calculate transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt) and equivalent short circuit current () in the presence and absence of selected Na+ and Cl− transport inhibitors (amiloride, GlyH-101, Niflumic acid) and agonists (Forskolin + IBMX, UTP). Considered together the responses suggest an organ composed of both secreting and absorbing epithelia that constitutively and concurrently transport fluids into and out of the airway, i.e. in opposite directions. Since the epithelial lining of small airways is arranged in long, accordion-like rows of pleats and folds that run axially down the lumen, we surmise that cells within the pleats are mainly secretory while the cells of the folds are principally absorptive. This structural arrangement could provide local fluid transport from within the pleats toward the luminal folds that may autonomously regulate the local surface fluid volume for homeostasis while permitting acute responses to maintain clearance. PMID:22547637

  10. FLUID SECRETION BY SUBMUCOSAL GLANDS OF THE TRACHEOBRONCHIAL AIRWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Stephen T.; Spadafora, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Submucosal glands of the tracheobronchial airways provide the important functions of secreting mucins, antimicrobial substances, and fluid. This review focuses on the ionic mechanism and regulation of gland fluid secretion and examines the possible role of gland dysfunction in the lethal disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The fluid component of gland secretion is driven by the active transepithelial secretion of both Cl− and HCO3− by serous cells. Gland fluid secretion is neurally regulated with acetylcholine, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) playing prominent roles. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in the apical membrane of gland serous cells and mediates the VIP-induced component of liquid secretion whereas the muscarinic component of liquid secretion appears to be at least partially CFTR-independent. Loss of CFTR function, which occurs in CF disease, reduces the capacity of glands to secrete fluid but not mucins. The possible links between the loss of fluid secretion capability and the complex airway pathology of CF are discussed. PMID:17707699

  11. Airway Symptoms and Biological Markers in Nasal Lavage Fluid in Subjects Exposed to Metalworking Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Fornander, Louise; Graff, Pål; Wåhlén, Karin; Ydreborg, Kjell; Flodin, Ulf; Leanderson, Per; Lindahl, Mats; Ghafouri, Bijar

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds Occurrence of airway irritation among industrial metal workers was investigated. The aims were to study the association between exposures from water-based metal working fluids (MWF) and the health outcome among the personnel, to assess potential effects on the proteome in nasal mucous membranes, and evaluate preventive actions. Methods The prevalence of airway symptoms related to work were examined among 271 metalworkers exposed to MWF and 24 metal workers not exposed to MWF at the same factory. At the same time, air levels of potentially harmful substances (oil mist, morpholine, monoethanolamine, formaldehyde) generated from MWF was measured. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 13 workers and 15 controls and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach. Results Airway symptoms were reported in 39% of the workers exposed to MWF although the measured levels of MWF substances in the work place air were low. Highest prevalence was found among workers handling the MWF machines but also those working in the same hall were affected. Improvement of the ventilation to reduce MWF exposure lowered the prevalence of airway problems. Protein profiling showed significantly higher levels of S100-A9 and lower levels of SPLUNC1, cystatin SN, Ig J and β2-microglobulin among workers with airway symptoms. Conclusions This study confirms that upper airway symptoms among metal workers are a common problem and despite low levels of MWF-generated substances, effects on airway immune proteins are found. Further studies to clarify the role of specific MWF components in connection to airway inflammation and the identified biological markers are warranted. PMID:24391738

  12. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part I. Fluid flow structures.

    PubMed

    Van Rhein, Timothy; Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    A large eddy simulation-based computational study of fluid flow and particle transport in upper tracheobronchial airways is carried out to investigate the effect of ventilation parameters on pulmonary fluid flow. Respiratory waveforms commonly used by commercial mechanical ventilators are used to study the effect of ventilation parameters and ventilation circuit on pulmonary fluid dynamics. A companion paper (Alzahrany et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput, 2014) reports our findings on the effect of the ventilation parameters and circuit on particle transport and aerosolized drug delivery. The endotracheal tube (ETT) was found to be an important geometric feature and resulted in a fluid jet that caused an increase in turbulence and created a recirculation zone with high wall shear stress in the main bronchi. Stronger turbulence was found in lower airways than would be found under normal breathing conditions due to the presence of the jet caused by the ETT. The pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform induced the lowest wall shear stress on the airways wall. PMID:26563199

  13. Protein composition of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and airway surface liquid from newborn pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Albertolle, Matthew E.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Zabner, Joseph; Niles, Richard K.; Fisher, Susan J.; McCray, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The airway mucosa and the alveolar surface form dynamic interfaces between the lung and the external environment. The epithelial cells lining these barriers elaborate a thin liquid layer containing secreted peptides and proteins that contribute to host defense and other functions. The goal of this study was to develop and apply methods to define the proteome of porcine lung lining liquid, in part, by leveraging the wealth of information in the Sus scrofa database of Ensembl gene, transcript, and protein model predictions. We developed an optimized workflow for detection of secreted proteins in porcine bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in methacholine-induced tracheal secretions [airway surface liquid (ASL)]. We detected 674 and 3,858 unique porcine-specific proteins in BAL and ASL, respectively. This proteome was composed of proteins representing a diverse range of molecular classes and biological processes, including host defense, molecular transport, cell communication, cytoskeletal, and metabolic functions. Specifically, we detected a significant number of secreted proteins with known or predicted roles in innate and adaptive immunity, microbial killing, or other aspects of host defense. In greatly expanding the known proteome of the lung lining fluid in the pig, this study provides a valuable resource for future studies using this important animal model of pulmonary physiology and disease. PMID:23709621

  14. Development of cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis airway cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zabner, Joseph; Karp, Phil; Seiler, Michael; Phillips, Stacia L; Mitchell, Calista J; Saavedra, Mimi; Welsh, Michael; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we utilized the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, hTERT, and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 genes to transform normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial (HAE) cells. One cell line, designated NuLi-1 (normal lung, University of Iowa), was derived from HAE of normal genotype; three cell lines, designated CuFi (cystic fibrosis, University of Iowa)-1, CuFi-3, and CuFi-4, were derived from HAE of various CF genotypes. When grown at the air-liquid interface, the cell lines were capable of forming polarized differentiated epithelia that exhibited transepithelial resistance and maintained the ion channel physiology expected for the genotypes. The CF transmembrane conductance regulator defect in the CuFi cell lines could be corrected by infecting from the basolateral surface using adenoviral vectors. Using nuclear factor-kappaB promoter reporter constructs, we also demonstrated that the NuLi and CuFi cell lines retained nuclear factor-kappaB responses to lipopolysaccharide. These cell lines should therefore be useful as models for studying ion physiology, therapeutic intervention for CF, and innate immunity. PMID:12676769

  15. 77 FR 59391 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways Corporation, United Air Lines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways...(a) and 343.2(c); Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways...

  16. Acoustically detectable cellular-level lung injury induced by fluid mechanical stresses in microfluidic airway systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Fujioka, Hideki; Tung, Yi-Chung; Futai, Nobuyuki; Paine, Robert; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-27

    We describe a microfabricated airway system integrated with computerized air-liquid two-phase microfluidics that enables on-chip engineering of human airway epithelia and precise reproduction of physiologic or pathologic liquid plug flows found in the respiratory system. Using this device, we demonstrate cellular-level lung injury under flow conditions that cause symptoms characteristic of a wide range of pulmonary diseases. Specifically, propagation and rupture of liquid plugs that simulate surfactant-deficient reopening of closed airways lead to significant injury of small airway epithelial cells by generating deleterious fluid mechanical stresses. We also show that the explosive pressure waves produced by plug rupture enable detection of the mechanical cellular injury as crackling sounds. PMID:18006663

  17. Validation of computational fluid dynamics methodology used for human upper airway flow simulations.

    PubMed

    Mylavarapu, Goutham; Murugappan, Shanmugam; Mihaescu, Mihai; Kalra, Maninder; Khosla, Sid; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2009-07-22

    An anatomically accurate human upper airway model was constructed from multiple magnetic resonance imaging axial scans. This model was used to conduct detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations during expiration, to investigate the fluid flow in the airway regions where obstruction could occur. An identical physical model of the same airway was built using stereo lithography. Pressure and velocity measurements were conducted in the physical model. Both simulations and experiments were performed at a peak expiratory flow rate of 200 L/min. Several different numerical approaches within the FLUENT commercial software framework were used in the simulations; unsteady Large Eddy Simulation (LES), steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) with two-equation turbulence models (i.e. k-epsilon, standard k-omega, and k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST)) and with one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model. The CFD predictions of the average wall static pressures at different locations along the airway wall were favorably compared with the experimental data. Among all the approaches, standard k-omega turbulence model resulted in the best agreement with the static pressure measurements, with an average error of approximately 20% over all ports. The highest positive pressures were observed in the retroglossal regions below the epiglottis, while the lowest negative pressures were recorded in the retropalatal region. The latter is a result of the airflow acceleration in the narrow retropalatal region. The largest pressure drop was observed at the tip of the soft palate. This location has the smallest cross section of the airway. The good agreement between the computations and the experimental results suggest that CFD simulations can be used to accurately compute aerodynamic flow characteristics of the upper airway. PMID:19501360

  18. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  19. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the upper airway of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by Muller maneuver.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ping; Xu, Xiao-Long; Tang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Xue, Xiao-Chen; Wu, Ya-Dong; Zhu, Min

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to use computer simulation to describe the fluid dynamic characteristics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to evaluate the difference between during quiet respiration and the Muller maneuver (MM). Seven patients with OSAS were involved to perform computed tomographic (CT) scanning during quiet respiration and the MM. CT data in DICOM format were transformed into an anatomically three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the upper airway. The velocity magnitude, relative pressure, and flow distribution were obtained. Numerical simulation of airflow was performed to discuss how the MM affected airflow in the upper airway. To measure the discrepancy, the SPSS19.0 software package was utilized for statistic analysis. The results showed that the shape of the upper airway became narrower, and the pressure decreased during the MM. The minimal cross-sectional area (MCSA) of velopharynx was significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the airflow velocity in MCSAs of velopharynx and glossopharynx significantly accelerated (P<0.05) during the MM. This study demonstrated the possibility of CFD model combined with the MM for understanding pharyngeal aerodynamics in the pathophysiology of OSAS. PMID:26072090

  20. AMPK agonists ameliorate sodium and fluid transport and inflammation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Michael M; King, J Darwin; Oyster, Nicholas M; Fitch, Adam C; Magill, Amy; Baty, Catherine J; Watkins, Simon C; Kolls, Jay K; Pilewski, Joseph M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2010-06-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits both the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and may inhibit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in epithelia. Here we have tested in primary polarized CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells the effects of AMPK activators, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR), on various parameters that contribute to CF lung disease: ENaC-dependent short-circuit currents (I(sc)), airway surface liquid (ASL) height, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. AMPK activation after overnight treatment with either metformin (2-5 mM) or AICAR (1 mM) substantially inhibited ENaC-dependent I(sc) in both CF and non-CF airway cultures. Live-cell confocal images acquired 60 minutes after apical addition of Texas Red-dextran-containing fluid revealed significantly greater ASL heights after AICAR and metformin treatment relative to controls, suggesting that AMPK-dependent ENaC inhibition slows apical fluid reabsorption. Both metformin and AICAR decreased secretion of various proinflammatory cytokines, both with and without prior LPS stimulation. Finally, prolonged exposure to more physiologically relevant concentrations of metformin (0.03-1 mM) inhibited ENaC currents and decreased proinflammatory cytokine levels in CF HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that novel therapies to activate AMPK in the CF airway may be beneficial by blunting excessive sodium and ASL absorption and by reducing excessive airway inflammation, which are major contributors to CF lung disease. PMID:19617399

  1. Creation and characterization of an airway epithelial cell line for stable expression of CFTR variants

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Laura B.; Vecchio-Pagan, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Han, Sangwoo T.; Franca, Arianna; Wohler, Elizabeth S.; Batista, Denise A.S.; Goff, Loyal A.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Analysis of the functional consequences and treatment response of rare CFTR variants is challenging due to the limited availability of primary airways cells. Methods A Flp recombination target (FRT) site for stable expression of CFTR was incorporated into an immortalized CF bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o−). CFTR cDNA was integrated into the FRT site. Expression was evaluated by western blotting and confocal microscopy and function measured by short circuit current. RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptional profile of the resulting CF8Flp cell line to primary cells and tissues. Results Functional CFTR was expressed from integrated cDNA at the FRT site of the CF8Flp cell line at levels comparable to that seen in native airway cells. CF8Flp cells expressing WT-CFTR have a stable transcriptome comparable to that of primary cultured airway epithelial cells, including genes that play key roles in CFTR pathways. Conclusion CF8Flp cells provide a viable substitute for primary CF airway cells for the analysis of CFTR variants in a native context. PMID:26694805

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the Posterior Airway Space After Maxillomandibular Advancement For Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.; Shih, Alan M.; Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy; Ito, Yasushi; Cure, Joel K; Harding, Susan M.; Litaker, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the soft tissue change of the upper airway after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Materials and Methods Eight OSAS patients who required MMA were recruited into this study. All participants had pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) and underwent MMA by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Upper airway CT data sets for these 8 participants were created with high-fidelity 3-D numerical models for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3-D models were simulated and analyzed to study how changes in airway anatomy affects pressure effort required for normal breathing. Airway dimensions, skeletal changes, Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), and pressure efforts of pre- and post-operative 3-D models were compared and correlations interpreted. Results After MMA, laminar and turbulent air flow was significantly decreased at every level of the airway. The cross-sectional areas at the soft palate and tongue base were significantly increased. Conclusions This study shows that MMA increases airway dimensions by the increasing the occipital base (Base) - pogonion (Pg) distance. An increase of the Base-Pg distance showed a significant correlation with an AHI improvement and a decreased pressure effort of the upper airway. Decreasing the pressure effort will decrease the breathing workload. This improves the condition of OSAS. PMID:23642544

  3. Numerical simulation of soft palate movement and airflow in human upper airway by fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Chi; Wang, Yuefang; Liu, Yingxi

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors present airflow field characteristics of human upper airway and soft palate movement attitude during breathing. On the basis of the data taken from the spiral computerized tomography images of a healthy person and a patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS), three-dimensional models of upper airway cavity and soft palate are reconstructed by the method of surface rendering. Numerical simulation is performed for airflow in the upper airway and displacement of soft palate by fluid-structure interaction analysis. The reconstructed three-dimensional models precisely preserve the original configuration of upper airways and soft palate. The results of the pressure and velocity distributions in the airflow field are quantitatively determined, and the displacement of soft palate is presented. Pressure gradients of airway are lower for the healthy person and the airflow distribution is quite uniform in the case of free breathing. However, the OSAHS patient remarkably escalates both the pressure and velocity in the upper airway, and causes higher displacement of the soft palate. The present study is useful in revealing pathogenesis and quantitative mutual relationship between configuration and function of the upper airway as well as in diagnosing diseases related to anatomical structure and function of the upper airway.

  4. A microfluidic model to study fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture in small lung airways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John; Filoche, Marcel; White, Joshua; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture is important to understand mucus clearance in lung airways and potential effects of mucus plug rupture on epithelial cells at lung airway walls. We established a microfluidic model to study mucus plug rupture in a collapsed airway of the 12th generation. Mucus plugs were simulated using Carbopol 940 (C940) gels at concentrations of 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25%, and 0.3%, which have non-Newtonian properties close to healthy and diseased lung mucus. The airway was modeled with a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic channel. Plug motion was driven by pressurized air. Global strain rates and shear stress were defined to quantitatively describe plug deformation and rupture. Results show that a plug needs to overcome yield stress before deformation and rupture. The plug takes relatively long time to yield at the high Bingham number. Plug length shortening is the more significant deformation than shearing at gel concentration higher than 0.15%. Although strain rates increase dramatically at rupture, the transient shear stress drops due to the shear-thinning effect of the C940 gels. Dimensionless time-averaged shear stress, Txy, linearly increases from 3.7 to 5.6 times the Bingham number as the Bingham number varies from 0.018 to 0.1. The dimensionless time-averaged shear rate simply equals to Txy/2. In dimension, shear stress magnitude is about one order lower than the pressure drop, and one order higher than yield stress. Mucus with high yield stress leads to high shear stress, and therefore would be more likely to cause epithelial cell damage. Crackling sounds produced with plug rupture might be more detectable for gels with higher concentration. PMID:26392827

  5. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Derek M.; Martin, Luke G.; Papich, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  6. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin.

    PubMed

    Foster, Derek M; Martin, Luke G; Papich, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  7. Frenkel line and solubility maximum in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brazhkin, V V; Dove, M T; Trachenko, K

    2015-01-01

    A new dynamic line, the Frenkel line, has recently been proposed to separate the supercritical state into rigid-liquid and nonrigid gaslike fluid. The location of the Frenkel line on the phase diagram is unknown for real fluids. Here we map the Frenkel line for three important systems: CO(2), H(2)O, and CH(4). This provides an important demarcation on the phase diagram of these systems, the demarcation that separates two distinct physical states with liquidlike and gaslike properties. We find that the Frenkel line can have a similar trend as the melting line above the critical pressure. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between unexplained solubility maxima and Frenkel line, and we propose that the Frenkel line corresponds to the optimal conditions for solubility. PMID:25679575

  8. Long fluid filled bags suspended by line forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M. L.; Duncan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A previous analysis of fluid filled storage bags is extended to the case of a long fluid filled cylindrical membrane supported by uniform line loads. Cross-sectional shape, stiffness of the support system and stress resultants in the membrane are determined. The application of the numerical results to problems arising in the design of nonrigid airships is discussed.

  9. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part II: particle transport.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Van Rhein, Timothy; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The flow mechanisms that play a role on aerosol deposition were identified and presented in a companion paper (Timothy et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput. doi: 10.1007/s11517-015-1407-3 , 2015). In the current paper, the effects of invasive conventional mechanical ventilation waveforms and endotracheal tube (ETT) on the aerosol transport were investigated. In addition to the enhanced deposition seen at the carinas of the airway bifurcations, enhanced deposition was also seen in the right main bronchus due to impaction and turbulent dispersion resulting from the fluid structures created by jet caused by the ETT. The orientation of the ETT toward right bronchus resulted in a substantial deposition inside right lung compared to left lung. The deposition inside right lung was ~12-fold higher than left lung for all considered cases, except for the case of using pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform where a reduction of this ratio by ~50 % was found. The total deposition during pressure constant, volume ramp, and ascending ramp waveforms was similar and ~1.44 times higher than deposition fraction when using pressure sinusoidal waveform. Varying respiratory waveform demonstrated a significant role on the deposition enhancement factors and give evidence of drug aerosol concentrations in key deposition sites, which may be significant for drugs with negative side effects in high concentrations. These observations are thought to be important for ventilation treatment strategy. PMID:26541600

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of the upper airway of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in steady flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun; Sin, SangHun; McDonough, Joseph M; Udupa, Jayaram K; Guez, Allon; Arens, Raanan; Wootton, David M

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of airway geometry on internal pressure in the upper airway of three children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and three controls. Model geometry was reconstructed from magnetic resonance images obtained during quiet tidal breathing, meshed with an unstructured grid, and solved at normative peak resting flow. The unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved with steady flow boundary conditions in inspiration and expiration, using a two-equation low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Model results were validated using an in-vitro scale model, unsteady flow simulation, and reported nasal resistance measurements in children. Pharynx pressure drop strongly correlated to airway area restriction. Inspiratory pressure drop was primarily proportional to the square of flow, consistent with pressure losses due to convective acceleration caused by area restriction. On inspiration, in OSAS pressure drop occurred primarily between the choanae and the region where the adenoids overlap the tonsils (overlap region) due to airway narrowing, rather than in the nasal passages; in controls the majority of pressure drop was in the nasal passages. On expiration, in OSAS the majority of pressure drop occurred between the oropharynx (posterior to the tongue) and overlap region, and local minimum pressure in the overlap region was near atmospheric due to pressure recovery in the anterior nasopharynx. The results suggest that pharyngeal airway shape in children with OSAS significantly affects internal pressure distribution compared to nasal resistance. The model may also help explain regional dynamic airway narrowing during expiration. PMID:16098533

  11. The hydrodynamics of a moving fluid-liquid contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderzanden, Antonius Johannus J.

    The hydrodynamics associated with an advancing contact line, where a viscous liquid displaces a fluid with a negligible viscosity, is examined. A model is proposed which approximates the shape of an advancing meniscus in a tube or between parallel plates. Comparison of the predictions of the model with available numerical and experimental results provides an indication of its reliability. This model is applied to receding contact lines, where a viscous liquid is displaced by a fluid of negligible viscosity. The model is extended to examine moving liquid-liquid contact lines where the viscosity of neither fluid can be neglected. Experiments concerning the macroscopic shape of a meniscus in a tube and experiments which lay claim to be able to peep into the microscopic region close to the contact line not accessible with the naked eye are presented.

  12. Activation of CFTR by genistein in human airway epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Servetnyk, Zhanna; Roomans, Godfried M

    2003-08-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel expressed in epithelial cells. The effects of genistein and 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) on CFTR were studied in three human airway epithelial cell lines expressing wild-type or DeltaF508 CFTR: Calu-3, CFSMEo-, and CFBE41o- cells. The cells were loaded with the fluorescent dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide (MQAE) and chloride efflux was studied. Forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) induced chloride efflux in Calu-3 cells but not in CF lines. Genistein (2.5-50 microM) alone was able to induce chloride efflux in all cell lines. Genistein did not enhance the effect of forskolin and IBMX. PBA had little or no effect on genistein-induced chloride efflux. The effect of genistein seen at low concentrations makes genistein interesting for possible pharmacological treatment of CF, since it is known that similar concentrations can be obtained in plasma by a soy-rich diet. PMID:12914781

  13. Radiation dose to the respiratory airway linings from inhalation of (/sup 15/O)-carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bigler, R.E.; Sgouros, G.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Cosma, M.; Leonard, R.W.; Dahl, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estimates of the radiation dose to the upper airways including the trachea, oropharnyx, and nasal linings from inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled CO/sub 2/ studies are provided. Three air administration procedures were examined; inhalation by nose, by mouth and by mouth through a mouthpiece. Attention is given to the inhaled radioactive gas absorbed and retained in the mucus and saliva layers lining the respiratory passages. The authors estimates from direct measurements in saliva and mucus of the highest total radiation dose is to the oropharnyx (5.2 rads, mouth; 2.8 rads, nose). The dose to the trachea was estimated to be 3.5 rads from mucus measurements from dogs. The comparative dose to lungs is 1.2 rads (Bigler and Sgouros, JNM 24:431, 1983). These doses are for steady-state measurements involving the breathing of 1 mCi/1-air for 1 hr. Single breath estimates can be obtained by dividing by the number of breaths per hr (720). Although this procedure leads to a 10% reduction in the radiation dose to the lung, the radiation dose to the lining of the vein infused is high, ranging from 70 to 430 rads for equal activity administered. The authors recommend considering the lung as the tissue at highest risk for both inhalation and IV administration procedures.

  14. In-line monitoring of (MR) fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordonski, William; Gorodkin, Sergei; Behlok, Ray

    2015-05-01

    Proper functionality of devices and processes based on (MR) fluids greatly depends, along with other factors, on stability of fluid characteristics such as concentration of magnetic particles and magnetic properties of the particles. The concentration of magnetic particles may change due to evaporation or leakage of carrier fluid, as well as particle sedimentation. Magnetic properties may change due to temperature, corrosion of particles or irreversible aggregation. In-line noninvasive monitoring of particle concentration and magnetic properties allows, in one way or another, compensation for the impact of destabilizing factors and provides system stable output. Two novel methods of in-line measurement of MR fluid magnetic permeability or magnetic particle concentration are considered in this presentation. The first one is based on the principle of mutual inductance and is intended for monitoring MR fluid flowing in pipes or channels. In the second one, permeability is measured by a flash-mount sensor which reacts on changes in the reluctance of the MR fluid layer adjacent to the wall. The use of the methods for stabilization of the material removal rate in high precision finishing process employing aqueous MR fluid is discussed.

  15. Static and dynamic response of a fluid-fluid interface to electric point and line charge

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen A Brevik, Iver

    2012-12-15

    We consider the behavior of a dielectric fluid-fluid interface in the presence of a strong electric field from a point charge and line charge, respectively, both statically and, in the latter case, dynamically. The fluid surface is elevated above its undisturbed level until balance is reached between the electromagnetic lifting force, gravity and surface tension. We derive ordinary differential equations for the shape of the fluid-fluid interface which are solved numerically with standard means, demonstrating how the elevation depends on field strength and surface tension coefficient. In the dynamic case of a moving line charge, the surface of an inviscid liquid-liquid interface is left to oscillate behind the moving charge after it has been lifted against the force of gravity. We show how the wavelength of the oscillations depends on the relative strength of the forces of gravity and inertia, whereas the amplitude of the oscillations is a nontrivial function of the velocity at which the line charge moves. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid surface elevation analyzed near a static point and line charge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevation determined by interaction of gravity, dielectric force and surface tension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic equation of motion for the moving line charge is derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface waves behind moving charge calculated and analysed for different velocities.

  16. Hypercapnia modulates cAMP signalling and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent anion and fluid secretion in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark J; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Patel, Waseema; Ibrahim, Salam H; Verdon, Bernard; Ward, Christopher; Garnett, James P; Tarran, Robert; Cann, Martin J; Gray, Michael A

    2016-03-15

    Hypercapnia is clinically defined as an arterial blood partial pressure of CO2 of above 40 mmHg and is a feature of chronic lung disease. In previous studies we have demonstrated that hypercapnia modulates agonist-stimulated cAMP levels through effects on transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activity. In the airways, cAMP is known to regulate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated anion and fluid secretion, which contributes to airway surface liquid homeostasis. The aim of the current work was to investigate if hypercapnia could modulate cAMP-regulated ion and fluid transport in human airway epithelial cells. We found that acute exposure to hypercapnia significantly reduced forskolin-stimulated elevations in intracellular cAMP as well as both adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated increases in CFTR-dependent transepithelial short-circuit current, in polarised cultures of Calu-3 human airway cells. This CO2 -induced reduction in anion secretion was not due to a decrease in HCO3 (-) transport given that neither a change in CFTR-dependent HCO3 (-) efflux nor Na(+) /HCO3 (-) cotransporter-dependent HCO3 (-) influx were CO2 -sensitive. Hypercapnia also reduced the volume of forskolin-stimulated fluid secretion over 24 h, yet had no effect on the HCO3 (-) content of the secreted fluid. Our data reveal that hypercapnia reduces CFTR-dependent, electrogenic Cl(-) and fluid secretion, but not CFTR-dependent HCO3 (-) secretion, which highlights a differential sensitivity of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transporters to raised CO2 in Calu-3 cells. Hypercapnia also reduced forskolin-stimulated CFTR-dependent anion secretion in primary human airway epithelia. Based on current models of airways biology, a reduction in fluid secretion, associated with hypercapnia, would be predicted to have important consequences for airways hydration and the innate defence mechanisms of the lungs. PMID:26574187

  17. Nitric Oxide Oxidation Products are Increased in the Epithelial Lining Fluid of Children with Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Brown, Lou Ann S.; Holguin, Fernando; Teague, W. Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Background Children with severe allergic asthma have persistent airway inflammation and oxidant stress. Objectives We hypothesized that children with severe allergic asthma would have increased concentrations of the NO oxidation products nitrite, nitrate, and nitrotyrosine in the proximal and distal airway epithelial lining fluid (ELF). We further hypothesized that NO oxidation products would be associated with higher exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), greater allergic sensitization, and lower pulmonary function. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained from 15 children with mild-to-moderate asthma, 30 children with severe allergic asthma, 5 non-asthmatic children and 20 non-smoking adults. The BAL was divided into proximal and distal portions and nitrite, nitrate, and nitrotyrosine were quantified. Results Children with mild-to-moderate and severe allergic asthma had increased concentrations of nitrite (adult control: 15 ± 3; pediatric control: 23 ± 4; mild-to-moderate asthma: 56 ± 26; severe asthma: 74 ± 18 µM), nitrate (37 ± 13 vs. 145 ± 38 vs. 711 ± 155 vs. 870 ± 168 µM) and nitrotyrosine (2 ± 1 vs. 3 ± 1 vs. 9 ± 3 vs. 10 ± 4 µM) in the proximal ELF. Similar results were seen in the distal ELF although the concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.05 for each). Although univariate analyses revealed no associations between NO oxidation products and clinical features, multivariate analyses revealed FENO to be a significant predictor of NO oxidation in asthmatic children. Conclusions NO oxidation products are increased in the ELF of asthmatic children. The relationship between FENO and airway nitrosative stress is complicated and requires further study. PMID:19895987

  18. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  19. Relationship between surface tension of upper airway lining liquid and upper airway collapsibility during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Madronio, Melanie; Stavrinou, Rosie; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C

    2003-11-01

    Lowering surface tension (gamma) of upper airway lining liquid (UAL) reduces upper airway opening (anesthetized humans) and closing (anesthetized rabbits) pressures. We now hypothesize that in sleeping obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients lowering gamma of UAL will enhance upper airway stability and decrease the severity of sleep-disordered breathing. Nine OSAHS patients [respiratory disturbance index (RDI): 49 +/- 8 (SE) events/h, diagnostic night] participated in a two-part, one-night, polysomnography study. In the first part, upper airway closing pressures (during non-rapid eye movement sleep, Pcrit) were measured and samples of UAL (awake) were obtained before and after 2.5 ml of surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline) was instilled into the posterior pharynx. The gamma of UAL was determined with the use of the "pull-off" force technique. In the second part, subjects received a second application of 2.5 ml of surfactant and then slept the remainder of the night (205 +/- 30 min). Instillation of surfactant decreased the gamma of UAL from 60.9 +/- 3.1 mN/m (control) to 45.2 +/- 2.5 mN/m (surfactant group) (n = 9, P < 0.001). Pcrit decreased from 1.19 +/- 1.14 cmH2O (control) to -0.56 +/- 1.15 cmH2O (surfactant group) (n = 7, P < 0.02). Compared with the second half of diagnostic night, surfactant decreased RDI from 51 +/- 8 to 35 +/- 8 events/h (n = 9, P < 0.03). The fall in RDI (deltaRDI) correlated with the fall in gamma of UAL (deltagamma) (deltaRDI = 1.8 x deltagamma, r = 0.68, P = 0.04). Hypopneas decreased approximately 50% from 42 +/- 8 to 20 +/- 5 events/h (n = 9, P < 0.03, paired t-test). The gamma of UAL measured the next morning remained low at 49.5 +/- 2.7 mN/m (n = 9, P < 0.001, ANOVA, compared with control). In conclusion, instillation of surfactant reduced the gamma of UAL in OSAHS patients and decreased Pcrit and the occurrence of hypopneas. Therapeutic manipulation of gamma of UAL may be beneficial in reducing the severity

  20. Neutrophil and macrophage apoptosis in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from healthy horses and horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulation of apoptosis has been implicated in a range of diseases including tumors, neurodegenerative and autoimmine diseases, as well as allergic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans. Although it has a different pathophysiology, delayed apoptosis of various inflammatory cells may play a pivotal role in the development of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses. Reduction of inflammatory cell apoptosis or a dysregulation of this process could lead to chronic inflammation and tissue injury. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the rate of apoptosis and necrosis of neutrophils and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from seven horses suffering from RAO (study group) and seven control horses. Results We demonstrated that neutrophil/macrophage apoptosis is altered in RAO-affected horses compared with the control group in the BAL fluid. We found a significant difference between the median percentage of early and late apoptosis of neutrophils between the study and control group of horses. Moreover, we found a positive correlation between the rate of apoptosis and the median percentage of macrophages in RAO-affected horses. Conclusion The findings suggest that apoptosis dysregulation may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of RAO. However, further studies are needed to clarify the role of altered apoptosis in the course of equine recurrent airway obstruction. PMID:24460911

  1. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouly, F.; van Hirtum, A.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Pelorson, X.; Payan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    This study deals with the numerical prediction and experimental description of the flow-induced deformation in a rapidly convergent divergent geometry which stands for a simplified tongue, in interaction with an expiratory airflow. An original in vitro experimental model is proposed, which allows measurement of the deformation of the artificial tongue, in condition of major initial airway obstruction. The experimental model accounts for asymmetries in geometry and tissue properties which are two major physiological upper airway characteristics. The numerical method for prediction of the fluid structure interaction is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow are taken into account using a boundary layer theory. The overall numerical method entails finite element solving of the solid problem and finite differences solving of the fluid problem. First, the numerical method predicts the deformation of the tongue with an overall error of the order of 20%, which can be seen as a preliminary successful validation of the theory and simulations. Moreover, expiratory flow limitation is predicted in this configuration. As a result, both the physical and numerical models could be useful to understand this phenomenon reported in heavy snorers and apneic patients during sleep.

  2. The line tension of two-dimensional ionic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustaquio-Armenta, María del Rosario; Méndez-Maldonado, Gloria Arlette; González-Melchor, Minerva

    2016-04-01

    Pressure tensor components are very useful in the calculation of the tension associated with a liquid-vapor interface. In this work, we present expressions for the pressure tensor components of two-dimensional ionic fluids, modeled at the level of the primitive model. As an application, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-vapor interfaces to calculate the line tension of the 1:1 two-dimensional ionic fluid, whose liquid-vapor coexistence curve had already been obtained in a previous work. The pressure tensor components were validated by simulating states of one phase and reproducing the scalar pressure, previously obtained from bulk simulations and reported in the literature. The effects on the line tension and the coexisting densities, originated by the choice of the Ewald parameters, the cutoff radius, and the interfacial length were also evaluated.

  3. Effective string theory for vortex lines in fluids and superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the effective string theory of vortex lines in ordinary fluids and low-temperature superfluids, by describing the bulk fluid flow in terms of a two-form field to which vortex lines can couple. We derive the most general low-energy effective Lagrangian that is compatible with (spontaneously broken) Poincaré invariance and worldsheet reparameterization invariance. This generalizes the effective action developed in [1, 2]. By applying standard field-theoretical techniques, we show that certain low-energy coupling constants — most notably the string tension — exhibit RG running already at the classical level. We discuss applications of our techniques to the study of Kelvin waves, vortex rings, and the coupling to bulk sound modes.

  4. Safety System for Controlling Fluid Flow into a Suction Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A safety system includes a sleeve fitted within a pool's suction line at the inlet thereof. An open end of the sleeve is approximately aligned with the suction line's inlet. The sleeve terminates with a plate that resides within the suction line. The plate has holes formed therethrough. A housing defining a plurality of distinct channels is fitted in the sleeve so that the distinct channels lie within the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels has a first opening on one end thereof and a second opening on another end thereof. The second openings reside in the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels is at least approximately three feet in length. The first openings are in fluid communication with the water in the pool, and are distributed around a periphery of an area of the housing that prevents coverage of all the first openings when a human interacts therewith.

  5. Viscous airflow through a rigid tube with a compliant lining: a simple model for the air-mucus interaction in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Evrensel, C A; Khan, R U; Elli, S; Krumpe, P E

    1993-08-01

    The respiratory tract of mammals is lined with a layer of mucus, described as viscoelastic semi-solid, above a layer of watery serous fluid. The interaction of these compliant layers with pulmonary airflow plays a major role in lung clearance by two-phase gas-liquid flow and in increased flow resistance in patients with obstructive airway diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and asthma. Experiments have shown that such coupled systems of flow-compliant-layers are quite susceptible to sudden shear instabilities, leading to formation of relatively large amplitude waves at the interface. Although these waves enhance the lung clearance by mobilizing the secretions, they increase the flow resistance in airways. The objective of this paper is to understand the basic interaction mechanism between the two media better by studying airflow through a rigid pipe that is lined by a compliant layer. The mathematical model that has been developed for this purpose is capable of explaining some of the published experimental observations. Wave instability theory is applied to the coupled air-mucus system to explore the stability of the interface. The results show that the onset flow speed for the initiation of unstable surface waves, and the resulting wavelength, are both very sensitive to mucus thickness. The model predicts that the instabilities initiate in the form of propagating waves for the elastic mucus where the wave speed is about 40 percent of the flow speed. The wavelength and phase speed to air velocity ratio are shown to increase with increasing mucus thickness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8231141

  6. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  7. Ultrahigh fluid diffusivity in graphene-lined nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shishir; Pratap, Rudra; Raghavan, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    Control and understanding of the flow of fluids at nanoscales is of great significance to biology, separation science, energy technology, and medical diagnostics. Nanocarbons have emerged as one of the most promising materials for this quest, both as nanochannels and nanoporous membranes. However, the fluid flow in these graphitic nanostructures is not well understood, and there is a lack of straightforward route for process integration of the nanochannels. The graphene-lined nanochannels (GNCs), reported here, are aimed at solving these problems, while displaying a useful anomaly for fluidic flow. Specifically, GNCs show a large increase in the rate of removal of sacrificial materials enclosed in them. The increase is caused by 100-1000 times enhancement in the diffusivity of etchant media in the GNCs as compared to channels without graphene lining. The enhancement increases monotonically with a decrease in the height of the GNCs, which is not seen for the non-lined channels. These properties, coupled with easy and scalable fabrication, make GNCs highly suited for innovative and efficient nanofluidic devices and also for experimental investigations. We also provide a phenomenological model which assumes enhanced diffusivity of medium only near graphene surface to explain the observed dependence of diffusivity on the dimensions of the nanochannels. This rationalization of the phenomenon using only the surface effects is a significant step towards understanding anomalous fluidics of nanocarbons.

  8. Noninvasive estimation of pharyngeal airway resistance and compliance in children based on volume-gated dynamic MRI and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Persak, Steven C.; Sin, Sanghun; McDonough, Joseph M.; Arens, Raanan

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of collapsing airway geometry on internal pressure and velocity in the pharyngeal airway of three sedated children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and three control subjects. Model geometry was reconstructed from volume-gated magnetic resonance images during normal tidal breathing at 10 increments of tidal volume through the respiratory cycle. Each geometry was meshed with an unstructured grid and solved using a low-Reynolds number k-ω turbulence model driven by flow data averaged over 12 consecutive breathing cycles. Combining gated imaging with CFD modeling created a dynamic three-dimensional view of airway anatomy and mechanics, including the evolution of airway collapse and flow resistance and estimates of the local effective compliance. The upper airways of subjects with OSAS were generally much more compliant during tidal breathing. Compliance curves (pressure vs. cross-section area), derived for different locations along the airway, quantified local differences along the pharynx and between OSAS subjects. In one subject, the distal oropharynx was more compliant than the nasopharynx (1.028 vs. 0.450 mm2/Pa) and had a lower theoretical limiting flow rate, confirming the distal oropharynx as the flow-limiting segment of the airway in this subject. Another subject had a more compliant nasopharynx (0.053 mm2/Pa) during inspiration and apparent stiffening of the distal oropharynx (C = 0.0058 mm2/Pa), and the theoretical limiting flow rate indicated the nasopharynx as the flow-limiting segment. This new method may help to differentiate anatomical and functional factors in airway collapse. PMID:21852407

  9. Noninvasive estimation of pharyngeal airway resistance and compliance in children based on volume-gated dynamic MRI and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Persak, Steven C; Sin, Sanghun; McDonough, Joseph M; Arens, Raanan; Wootton, David M

    2011-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of collapsing airway geometry on internal pressure and velocity in the pharyngeal airway of three sedated children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and three control subjects. Model geometry was reconstructed from volume-gated magnetic resonance images during normal tidal breathing at 10 increments of tidal volume through the respiratory cycle. Each geometry was meshed with an unstructured grid and solved using a low-Reynolds number k-ω turbulence model driven by flow data averaged over 12 consecutive breathing cycles. Combining gated imaging with CFD modeling created a dynamic three-dimensional view of airway anatomy and mechanics, including the evolution of airway collapse and flow resistance and estimates of the local effective compliance. The upper airways of subjects with OSAS were generally much more compliant during tidal breathing. Compliance curves (pressure vs. cross-section area), derived for different locations along the airway, quantified local differences along the pharynx and between OSAS subjects. In one subject, the distal oropharynx was more compliant than the nasopharynx (1.028 vs. 0.450 mm(2)/Pa) and had a lower theoretical limiting flow rate, confirming the distal oropharynx as the flow-limiting segment of the airway in this subject. Another subject had a more compliant nasopharynx (0.053 mm(2)/Pa) during inspiration and apparent stiffening of the distal oropharynx (C = 0.0058 mm(2)/Pa), and the theoretical limiting flow rate indicated the nasopharynx as the flow-limiting segment. This new method may help to differentiate anatomical and functional factors in airway collapse. PMID:21852407

  10. Effect of surface tension of mucosal lining liquid on upper airway mechanics in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Eastwood, Peter R; Szollosi, Irene; Platt, Peter R; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Hillman, David R

    2003-07-01

    Upper airway (UA) patency may be influenced by surface tension (gamma) operating within the (UAL). We examined the role of gamma of UAL in the maintenance of UA patency in eight isoflurane-anesthetized supine human subjects breathing via a nasal mask connected to a pneumotachograph attached to a pressure delivery system. We evaluated 1). mask pressure at which the UA closed (Pcrit), 2). UA resistance upstream from the site of UA collapse (RUS), and 3). mask pressure at which the UA reopened (Po). A multiple pressure-transducer catheter was used to identify the site of airway closure (velopharyngeal in all subjects). UAL samples (0.2 microl) were collected, and the gamma of UAL was determined by using the "pull-off force" technique. Studies were performed before and after the intrapharyngeal instillation of 5 ml of exogenous surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline). The gamma of UAL decreased from 61.9 +/- 4.1 (control) to 50.3 +/- 5.0 mN/m (surfactant; P < 0.02). Changes in Po, RUS, and Po - Pcrit (change = control - surfactant) were positively correlated with changes in gamma (r2 > 0.6; P < 0.02) but not with changes in Pcrit (r2 = 0.4; P > 0.9). In addition, mean peak inspiratory airflow (no flow limitation) significantly increased (P < 0.04) from 0.31 +/- 0.06 (control) to 0.36 +/- 0.06 l/s (surfactant). These findings suggest that gamma of UAL exerts a force on the UA wall that hinders airway opening. Instillation of exogenous surfactant into the UA lowers the gamma of UAL, thus increasing UA patency and augmenting reopening of the collapsed airway. PMID:12626492

  11. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  12. Antimicrobial disposition in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid of horses, part III. cefquinome.

    PubMed

    Winther, L; Baptiste, K E; Friis, C

    2011-10-01

    Cefquinome concentrations, following intravenous and aerosol administration to horses, in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) were examined and compared to plasma concentrations. Single dose of cefquinome sulphate (1 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to six horses followed by a single aerosol administration (225 mg) with a wash-out period of 14 days between treatments. After each drug administration, cefquinome concentrations in plasma and PELF, obtained by intrabronchial cotton swabs, were determined. After intravenous administration, cefquinome concentrations in plasma declined fast and were not detectable after 12 h. After aerosol administration, plasma concentrations were low or below limit of quantification (LOQ) during the entire sampling period. The degree of penetration of cefquinome into PELF after intravenous administration as described by the AUC(PELF) /AUC(plasma) ratio was 0.33. Following aerosol administration, cefquinome concentrations in PELF were high, but only detectable for 4 h. Based on AUC values, total cefquinome concentrations in PELF were one-third of total plasma concentrations after intravenous administration together with shorter time above Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (T > MIC) in PELF, thus twice daily dosing may be required when treating lower airway infections in horses. Lower doses of cefquinome can be administered as aerosols providing high local drug concentrations in lung, but additional optimization of formulation is needed to improve distribution and persistence in lung. PMID:21083664

  13. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  14. Neutrophil elastase in respiratory epithelial lining fluid of individuals with cystic fibrosis induces interleukin-8 gene expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Yoshimura, K; McElvaney, N G; Crystal, R G

    1992-01-01

    The respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) are characterized by neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation. Since a variety of inflammatory stimuli are capable of inducing bronchial epithelial cells to express the gene for IL-8, a cytokine that attracts and activates neutrophils, mediators in respiratory epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of CF individuals might induce IL-8 production by epithelial cells, thus recruiting neutrophils to the airways. BET-1A human bronchial epithelial cells at rest or incubated with normal ELF showed little IL-8 gene expression, but after incubation with CF ELF, a marked increase in IL-8 transcript levels was observed. CF ELF contained high levels of neutrophil elastase (NE) and various serine protease inhibitors prevented CF ELF from inducing IL-8 gene expression in BET-1A cells, suggesting that NE was the dominant inducer for IL-8 production in CF ELF. The addition of purified NE caused BET-1A cells to increase IL-8 gene transcription with accumulation of mRNA transcripts and to release IL-8-like neutrophil chemotactic activity. These observations suggest a self-perpetuating inflammatory process on the CF bronchial surface where NE released by neutrophils induced the bronchial epithelium to secrete IL-8, which in turn recruits additional neutrophils to the bronchial surface. Images PMID:1569186

  15. Dynamical analysis of fluid lines coupled to mechanical systems taking into account fluid frequency-dependent damping and non-conventional constitutive models: part 1 - Modeling fluid lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catania, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The design of hydraulic transmission systems for control and actuation requires accurate knowledge of their dynamic response: some standard techniques are known to obtain a consistent dynamic model of a fluid line, including the contribution of inertia, compressibility and friction. In this paper an efficient procedure is developed for simulating the dynamic response of a fluid line in both the frequency and time domains, focusing the attention on the modal analysis of a discretized model, in view of coupling with mechanical systems. A bi-dimensional approach is adopted, and the laminar flow frequency-dependent friction is modeled using non-integer order differential laws, which may improve the accuracy of the simulated responses in comparison with more traditional Newtonian models.

  16. Alveolar lining fluid regulates mononuclear phagocyte 5-lipoxygenase metabolism.

    PubMed

    Phare, S M; Peters-Golden, M; Coffey, M J

    1998-11-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyses the synthesis of leukotrienes (LT), which are important in phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms. The alveolar macrophage (AM), the primary resident defender of the alveolar space, has a greater capacity for LT synthesis than its precursor, the peripheral blood monocyte (PBM). This study investigated whether the alveolar lining fluid (ALF) upregulates LT synthetic capacity in mononuclear phagocytes. Rat AM, peritoneal macrophages (PM) and ALF were obtained by lavage from pathogen-free animals. Human PBM were isolated from normal subjects. 5-LO metabolism and expression were measured with and without ALF. Rat ALF increased 5-LO metabolism (136.4+/-15.1% of control) in cultured PBM. This was associated with increased 5-LO activating protein (FLAP) (357+/-29.5 %), and 5-LO expression (188+/-31.3%). Culture of AM for 3 days resulted in a greater decrement in LTB4 synthesis (LTB4 15.4+/-6.9% of day 1) than in PM (54.7+/-8.3% of day 1), suggesting a greater dependence of AM 5-LO metabolism on ALF. 5-LO and FLAP expression decreased to a greater degree in AM than PM in culture. Furthermore, AM cultured with ALF maintained their LT synthetic capacity, FLAP and 5-LO expression compared with control cells cultured in medium alone. In conclusion, alveolar lining fluid increased 5-lipoxygenase metabolism in peripheral blood monocytes and maintained it in cultured alveolar macrophages, by a mechanism of increased 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein expression. This may boost host defence capabilities. PMID:9864011

  17. failure of a fluid catalytic cracker riser line bimetallic weld

    SciTech Connect

    Schult, J.T.

    1983-05-01

    A weld of Inconel 182 to 1 1/4Cr-1/2Mo failed after less than 5000 hours of service in a fluid catalytic cracker riser line. The weld was found to have a unique fracture mode with both fusion line and weld metal separation, but no evidence of base metal rupturing. Poorly documented weld procedures obscured the thermal history, but laboratory simulation and comparision of heat-affected-zone depths inferred that a 600 F preheat was used. It is theorized that high preheat led to amperage reduction, greater first pass base-to-filler metal ratio, poor mixing, and high residual stress in the weld. Stress analysis of the field repair indicated that residual shear stresses would eventually cause creep rupture of the base metal and also demonstrated sensitivity to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) variables. Of the options of using a second, higher temperature PWHT or a lowered operating temperature, the latter was chosen, and was implemented by removing insulation and adding shielding. This paper reviews the metallurgical aspects of this experience.

  18. Simulation of the Velocity and Temperature Distribution of Inhalation Thermal Injury in a Human Upper Airway Model by Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang; Zhao, Xiao-zhuo; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Fang-gang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation injury is an important cause of death after thermal burns. This study was designed to simulate the velocity and temperature distribution of inhalation thermal injury in the upper airway in humans using computational fluid dynamics. Cervical computed tomography images of three Chinese adults were imported to Mimics software to produce three-dimensional models. After grids were established and boundary conditions were defined, the simulation time was set at 1 minute and the gas temperature was set to 80 to 320°C using ANSYS software (ANSYS, Canonsburg, PA) to simulate the velocity and temperature distribution of inhalation thermal injury. Cross-sections were cut at 2-mm intervals, and maximum airway temperature and velocity were recorded for each cross-section. The maximum velocity peaked in the lower part of the nasal cavity and then decreased with air flow. The velocities in the epiglottis and glottis were higher than those in the surrounding areas. Further, the maximum airway temperature decreased from the nasal cavity to the trachea. Computational fluid dynamics technology can be used to simulate the velocity and temperature distribution of inhaled heated air. PMID:25412055

  19. Continuous monitoring of the bronchial epithelial lining fluid by microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Tyvold, Stig S; Solligård, Erik; Lyng, Oddveig; Steinshamn, Sigurd L; Gunnes, Sigurd; Aadahl, Petter

    2007-01-01

    Background Contents of the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the bronchi are of central interest in lung diseases, acute lung injury and pharmacology. The most commonly used technique broncheoalveolar lavage is invasive and may cause lung injury. Microdialysis (MD) is a method for continuous sampling of extracellular molecules in the immediate surroundings of the catheter. Urea is used as an endogenous marker of dilution in samples collected from the ELF. The aim of this study was to evaluate bronchial MD as a continuous monitor of the ELF. Methods Microdialysis catheters were introduced into the right main stem bronchus and into the right subclavian artery of five anesthetized and normoventilated pigs. The flowrate was 2 μl/min and the sampling interval was 60 minutes. Lactate and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran 4 kDa (FD-4) infusions were performed to obtain two levels of steady-state concentrations in blood. Accuracy was defined as [bronchial-MD] divided by [arterial-MD] in percent. Data presented as mean ± 95 percent confidence interval. Results The accuracy of bronchial MD was calculated with and without correction by the arteriobronchial urea gradient. The arteriobronchial lactate gradient was 1.2 ± 0.1 and FD-4 gradient was 4.0 ± 1.2. Accuracy of bronchial MD with a continuous lactate infusion was mean 25.5% (range 5.7–59.6%) with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 62.6%. With correction by the arteriobronchial urea gradient accuracy was mean 79.0% (57.3–108.1%) with a CV of 17.0%. Conclusion Urea as a marker of catheter functioning enhances bronchial MD and makes it useful for monitoring substantial changes in the composition of the ELF. PMID:17976234

  20. Fluid Line Evacuation and Freezing Experiments for Digital Radiator Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Miller, Jennifer R.; Sunada, Eric T.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Stephan, Ryan; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The digital radiator technology is one of three variable heat rejection technologies being investigated for future human-rated NASA missions. The digital radiator concept is based on a mechanically pumped fluid loop with parallel tubes carrying coolant to reject heat from the radiator surface. A series of valves actuate to start and stop fluid flow to di erent combinations of tubes, in order to vary the heat rejection capability of the radiator by a factor of 10 or more. When the flow in a particular leg is stopped, the fluid temperature drops and the fluid can freeze, causing damage or preventing flow from restarting. For this reason, the liquid in a stopped leg must be partially or fully evacuated upon shutdown. One of the challenges facing fluid evacuation from closed tubes arises from the vapor generated during pumping to low pressure, which can cause pump cavitation and incomplete evacuation. Here we present a series of laboratory experiments demonstrating fluid evacuation techniques to overcome these challenges by applying heat and pumping to partial vacuum. Also presented are results from qualitative testing of the freezing characteristics of several different candidate fluids, which demonstrate significant di erences in freezing properties, and give insight to the evacuation process.

  1. Investigation of intrapartum clearance of the upper airway in the presence of meconium contaminated amniotic fluid using an animal model.

    PubMed

    Pfenninger, E; Dick, W; Brecht-Krauss, D; Bitter, F; Hofmann, H; Bowdler, I

    1984-01-01

    In order to define as effective a procedure as possible for the intra- and post-partum clearance of the upper airways of meconium contaminated infants, three methods of suction clearance, nasal, oral and combined nasal and oral, were carried out on each of five kittens aged between 17 to 19 weeks. There was an interval of at least one week between each investigation. The animals were anaesthetized with ketamine intramuscularly. The pressure changes during delivery were simulated using a compressed blood pressure cuff around the kittens thorax. During the first minute of thoracic compression Tc 99 labeled synthetic sputum was introduced into both the oro- and nasopharynx, then during the 2nd minute the instilled fluid was removed using a conventional extractor with mucus trap. Solely oral or solely nasal routes were used, suction was carried out for 60 secs, whereas when the combined technique was applied the oral and nasal cavities were cleared for only 30 secs each. At the end at the 2nd minute thoracic compression was released and a deep inspiration occurred. After five minutes the radioactivity remaining after suction was documented using a gamma-camera. We attempted to answer the following questions: How much mucus could be extracted with each different method, and where the remaining amount was later distributed? Nasal suction alone was found to be inefficient; using this route an average of 13% (only an eight of the amount instilled) could be removed. Oral suction led to the recovery of an average of 52% of the material instilled, the combined technique much as 56%. After re-establishment of spontaneous respiration, it could be clearly seen that, independent of the efficacy of the technique used, the majority of the remaining radioactivity (55 relative percent) is localized in the head and neck area. Absolute values are 45% for nasal suction, 26% for oral, and 24% for the combined oro-nasal route. The other part of the remaining radioactivity was found in the

  2. Proteomic Changes of Alveolar Lining Fluid in Illnesses Associated with Exposure to Inhaled Non-Infectious Microbial Particles

    PubMed Central

    Teirilä, Laura; Karvala, Kirsi; Ahonen, Niina; Riska, Henrik; Pietinalho, Anne; Tuominen, Päivi; Piirilä, Päivi

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperresponsiveness to inhaled non-infectious microbial particles (NIMPs) has been associated with illnesses in the airways. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is considered to be the prototype for these NIMPs-related diseases; however, there is no consensus on the definitions or diagnostic criteria for HP and the spectrum of related illnesses. Methods and Findings In order to identify the possible diagnostic markers for illnesses associated with NIMPs in alveolar lining fluid, we performed a proteomic analysis using a two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with exposure to NIMPs in the context of damp building-related illness (DBRI) or conditions on the borderline to acute HP, designated here as agricultural type of microbial exposure (AME). Samples from patients with HP and sarcoidosis (SARC) were included for reference. Results were compared to results of healthy subjects (CTR). Western blot was used for validation of potential marker proteins from BAL fluid and plasma. Protein expression patterns suggest a close similarity between AME and HP, while DBRI was similar to CTR. However, in DBRI the levels of the inflammation associated molecules galectin-3 and alpha-1-antitrypsin were increased. A novel finding emerging from this study was the increases of semenogelin levels in BAL fluid from patients with AME, HP and SARC. Histone 4 levels were increased in AME, HP and SARC. Elevated plasma levels of histone 2B were detected in HP and SARC, suggesting it to be a potential blood indicator for inflammatory diseases of the lungs. Conclusions In this study, the proteomic changes in bronchoalveolar lavage of DBRI patients were distinct from other NIMP exposure associated lung diseases, while changes in AME overlapped those observed for HP patient samples. Some of the proteins identified in this study, semenogelin and histone 4, could function as diagnostic markers for differential diagnosis between

  3. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  4. FAIL-SAFE TRANSFER LINE FOR HAZARDOUS FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design principles, development, laboratory testing, fabrication and field testing of a fail-safe transfer line for hazardous liquids are described. The system provides a 2-inch-ID flexible hose line for off-loading tank cars or trucks and detects leaks by monitoring flow inve...

  5. Characterization of basolateral K+ channels underlying anion secretion in the human airway cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Transepithelial anion secretion in many tissues depends upon the activity of basolateral channels. Using monolayers of the Calu-3 cell line, a human submucosal serous cell model mounted in an Ussing chamber apparatus, we investigated the nature of the K+ channels involved in basal, cAMP- and Ca2+-stimulated anion secretion, as reflected by the transepithelial short circuit current (Isc). The non-specific K+ channel inhibitor Ba2+ inhibited the basal Isc by either 77 or 16 % when applied directly to the basolateral or apical membranes, respectively, indicating that a basolateral K+ conductance is required for maintenance of basal anion secretion. Using the K+ channel blockers clofilium and clotrimazole, we found basal Isc to be sensitive to clofilium, with a small clotrimazole-sensitive component. By stimulating the cAMP and Ca2+ pathways, we determined that cAMP-stimulated anion secretion was almost entirely abolished by clofilium, but insensitive to clotrimazole. In contrast, the Ca2+-stimulated response was sensitive to both clofilium and clotrimazole. Thus, pharmacologically distinct basolateral K+ channels are differentially involved in the control of anion secretion under different conditions. Isolation of the basolateral K+ conductance in permeabilized monolayers revealed a small basal and forskolin-stimulated Isc. Finally, using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, we found that Calu-3 cells express the K+ channel genes KCNN4 and KCNQ1 and the subunits KCNE2 and KCNE3. We conclude that while KCNN4 contributes to Ca2+-activated anion secretion by Calu-3 cells, basal and cAMP-activated secretion are more critically dependent on other K+ channel types, possibly involving one or more class of KCNQ1-containing channel complexes. PMID:11826162

  6. Line Fluid Actuated Valve Development Program. [for application on the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a line-fluid actuated valve design for potential application as a propellant-control valve on the space shuttle was examined. Design and analysis studies of two prototype valve units were conducted and demonstrated performance is reported. It was shown that the line-fluid actuated valve concept offers distinct weight and electrical advantages over alternate valve concepts. Summaries of projected performance and design goals are also included.

  7. Oxidant stress stimulates anion secretion from the human airway epithelial cell line calu-3: implications for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with tissue damage in the lung and may be a common element in the pathogenesis of all inflammatory lung diseases. Exposure to the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked a rapid increase in transepithelial anion secretion across monolayers of the human submucosal gland serous cell line Calu-3. This increase was almost entirely abolished by the addition of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), implicating the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel in the response. The response was also reduced by inhibitors of basolateral K+ channels. Studies of electrically isolated apical and basolateral membranes revealed that H2O2 stimulated both apical Cl− and basolateral K+ conductances (GCl and GK). Apical GCl was sensitive to DPC, but unaffected by 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suggesting that CFTR is the major anion conduction pathway mediating the response to H2O2. Additionally, H2O2 had no effect on GCl in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or following maximal stimulation of GCl with forskolin, implicating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway in the apical response to H2O2. Basolateral GK was reduced by the K+ channel inhibitors clotrimazole and clofilium, indicating roles for KCNN4 and KCNQ1 in the H2O2-stimulated response. We propose that ROS-stimulated anion secretion from serous cells plays an important role in keeping the airways clear from damaging radicals that could potentially initiate tissue destruction. Our finding that this response is CFTR dependent suggests that an important host defence mechanism would be dysfunctional in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Loss of this compensatory protective mechanism could expose the CF lung to ROS for extended periods, which could be important in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:12181292

  8. Oxidant stress stimulates anion secretion from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3: implications for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-08-15

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with tissue damage in the lung and may be a common element in the pathogenesis of all inflammatory lung diseases. Exposure to the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked a rapid increase in transepithelial anion secretion across monolayers of the human submucosal gland serous cell line Calu-3. This increase was almost entirely abolished by the addition of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), implicating the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel in the response. The response was also reduced by inhibitors of basolateral K+ channels. Studies of electrically isolated apical and basolateral membranes revealed that H2O2 stimulated both apical Cl- and basolateral K+ conductances (G(Cl) and G(K)). Apical G(Cl) was sensitive to DPC, but unaffected by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suggesting that CFTR is the major anion conduction pathway mediating the response to H2O2. Additionally, H2O2 had no effect on G(Cl) in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or following maximal stimulation of G(Cl) with forskolin, implicating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway in the apical response to H2O2. Basolateral G(K) was reduced by the K+ channel inhibitors clotrimazole and clofilium, indicating roles for KCNN4 and KCNQ1 in the H2O2-stimulated response. We propose that ROS-stimulated anion secretion from serous cells plays an important role in keeping the airways clear from damaging radicals that could potentially initiate tissue destruction. Our finding that this response is CFTR dependent suggests that an important host defence mechanism would be dysfunctional in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Loss of this compensatory protective mechanism could expose the CF lung to ROS for extended periods, which could be important in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:12181292

  9. CFD Simulation and Experimental Validation of Fluid Flow and Particle Transport in a Model of Alveolated Airways

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshun; Ruwet, Vincent; Corieri, Patricia; Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel; Darquenne, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of air flow and aerosol transport in the alveolated airways is essential for quantitative predictions of pulmonary aerosol deposition. However, experimental validation of such modeling studies has been scarce. The objective of this study is to validate CFD predictions of flow field and particle trajectory with experiments within a scaled-up model of alveolated airways. Steady flow (Re = 0.13) of silicone oil was captured by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the trajectories of 0.5 mm and 1.2 mm spherical iron beads (representing 0.7 to 14.6 μm aerosol in vivo) were obtained by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). At twelve selected cross sections, the velocity profiles obtained by CFD matched well with those by PIV (within 1.7% on average). The CFD predicted trajectories also matched well with PTV experiments. These results showed that air flow and aerosol transport in models of human alveolated airways can be simulated by CFD techniques with reasonable accuracy. PMID:20161301

  10. CFD Simulation and Experimental Validation of Fluid Flow and Particle Transport in a Model of Alveolated Airways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Ruwet, Vincent; Corieri, Patricia; Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel; Darquenne, Chantal

    2009-05-01

    Accurate modeling of air flow and aerosol transport in the alveolated airways is essential for quantitative predictions of pulmonary aerosol deposition. However, experimental validation of such modeling studies has been scarce. The objective of this study is to validate CFD predictions of flow field and particle trajectory with experiments within a scaled-up model of alveolated airways. Steady flow (Re = 0.13) of silicone oil was captured by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the trajectories of 0.5 mm and 1.2 mm spherical iron beads (representing 0.7 to 14.6 mum aerosol in vivo) were obtained by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). At twelve selected cross sections, the velocity profiles obtained by CFD matched well with those by PIV (within 1.7% on average). The CFD predicted trajectories also matched well with PTV experiments. These results showed that air flow and aerosol transport in models of human alveolated airways can be simulated by CFD techniques with reasonable accuracy. PMID:20161301

  11. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  12. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  13. INCORPORATION OF LABELED NITRIC OXIDE INTO RESPIRATORY TRACT LINING FLUIDS AND BLOOD PLASMA DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incorporation of labeled nitric oxide (N18O) into respiratory tract lining fluids and blood plasma during lung inflammation. Slade, R., Norwood, J., Crissman, K., McKee, J., Hatch, G. PTB, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Res. Tri. Pk., NC

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated t...

  14. Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. ); Wright, E.K. )

    1992-06-01

    The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

  15. Using Nonlinearity and Contact Lines to Control Fluid Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlin, M.; Schultz, W. W.; Bian, X.; Agarwal, M.

    2002-01-01

    Slug flows in a tube are affected by surface tension and contact lines, especially under microgravity. Numerical analyses and experiments are conducted of slug flows in small-diameter tubes with horizontal, inclined and vertical orientations. A PID-controlled, meter-long platform capable of following specified motions is used. An improved understanding of the contact line boundary condition for steady and unsteady contact-line motion is expected. Lastly, a direct fluid-handling method using nonlinear oscillatory motion of a tube is presented.

  16. On-line technique for producing substitution fluid in haemodiafiltration and haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Nystrand, R

    2004-01-01

    When the kidneys are not able to fulfil their task anymore the individual reaches a situation known as End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Haemodialysis may be carried out. In order to have a more efficient dialysis the treatment modes haemodiafiltration and haemofiltration are also in use. In these modes a substitution fluid is added to the bloodstream and continuously removed by the dialyser. However, these modes require large volumes of sterile fluids, 10 to 30 litres for haemodiafiltration and 70 - 100 litres for haemofiltration. This fact has made these treatment modes expensive. The fluids have traditionally been produced by the pharmaceutical industry in five litre bags, but in bags not all solutions are stable or possible to produce, for instance when sodium bicarbonate is used as a buffer. Today sodium bicarbonate is the absolute predominant buffer. An alternative way of producing the fluids has to be found. In 1978 LW Henderson (1) described a technique using filtration to produce substitution fluid on-line i.e. preparing the fluid directly on site and giving it to the patient. Since then work has taken place in order to construct a system that is able to both mix, sterilise and administrate the substitution fluid in haemodiafiltration and haemofiltration. This work has resulted in dialysis machines with the feature to fulfil the task of producing sterile substitution fluid. On-line haemodiafiltration is carried out in dialysis clinics. There are approximately 65 in Sweden, 1000 in Germany, 900 in Italy, 600 in France and 2500 in the US. The number of dialysis patients is around 1.000.000 worldwide and the increase is around 7 - 9% annually. PMID:15163028

  17. Effects of sulfuric acid mist inhalation on mucous clearance and on airway fluids of rats and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Henderson, R.F.; Gray, R.H.; Carpenter, R.L.; Hahn, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    The responses of guinea pigs and rats to inhaled sulfuric acid aerosols were compared to define species differences and to determine the small-animal model most relevant to human exposures. Rats were exposed for 6 hr to 1, 10, and 100 mg H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//m/sup 3/. Guinea pigs were exposed for 6 h to 1, 10, and 27 mg H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//m/sup 3/. Tracheal mucous clearance of guinea pigs was slowed 1 d after exposures to 1 mg H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//m/sup 3/. A tendency toward faster clearance was observed at high concentrations of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ for both guinea pigs and rats (statistically significant only for the rats). The speeding of mucous clearance was correlated with increases in airway sialic acid and also with the appearance of excess tracheal secretions, detected using scanning electron microscopy in both rats and guinea pigs. The responses of guinea pigs to sulfuric acid exposures were more similar to those reported for humans than were those of rats.

  18. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  19. Endotoxin and 'on line' production of substitution fluid in haemodiafiltration and haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Nystrand, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    In dialysis, machines intended for use in the treatment modes haemodiafiltration (HDF) and haemofiltration (HF) have been on the market about 10 years. These machines are equipped to be able to produce the substitution fluid to be used for direct infusion. In principle, this is done by using the reverse osmosis water of the clinic and mixing in concentrates as usual to form dialysis fluid. The dialysis fluid is then filtered in order to prepare it for use as substitution fluid. The volumes used when the substitution fluid is prepared on-line are usually 20-50 litres in HDF mode and 70-150 litres in HF mode. This means that a patient treated 3 times a week is exposed to a total volume of substitution fluid ranging from 3,000 litres to a maximum 23,000 litres a year. Where else in medicine do we see something coming close to this? Because of these large infusion volumes, the issue of endotoxin levels becomes as important as the issue of sterility. PMID:12371735

  20. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of the effect of ventilation mode and tracheal tube position on air flow in the large airways.

    PubMed

    Lumb, A B; Burns, A D; Figueroa Rosette, J A; Gradzik, K B; Ingham, D B; Pourkashanian, M

    2015-05-01

    We have used computational fluid dynamic modelling to study the effects of tracheal tube size and position on regional gas flow in the large airways. Using a three-dimensional mathematical model, we simulated flow with and without a tracheal tube, replicating both physiological and artificial breathing. Ventilation through a tracheal tube increased proportional flow to the left lung from 39.5% with no tube to 43.1-47.2%, depending on tube position. Ventilation mode and tube distance from the carina had no effect on flow. Lateral displacement and deflection of the tube increased ventilation to the ipsilateral lung; for example, when deflected 10° to the left of centre, flow to the left lung increased from 43.8 to 53.7%. Because of the small diameter of a tracheal tube relative to the trachea, gas exits a tube at high velocity such that regional ventilation may be affected by changes in the position and angle of the tube. PMID:25581493

  1. Increased Th2 cytokine secretion, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness in neurturin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Michel, Tatiana; Thérésine, Maud; Poli, Aurélie; Domingues, Olivia; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brons, Nicolaas H C; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have been described to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Neurturin (NTN), another neurotrophin from the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family, was shown to be produced by human immune cells: monocytes, B cells, and T cells. Furthermore, it was previously described that the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was dramatically stimulated in NTN knockout (NTN(-/-)) mice. NTN is structurally similar to TGF-β, a protective cytokine in airway inflammation. This study investigates the implication of NTN in a model of allergic airway inflammation using NTN(-/-) mice. The bronchial inflammatory response of OVA-sensitized NTN(-/-) mice was compared with wild-type mice. Airway inflammation, Th2 cytokines, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined. NTN(-/-) mice showed an increase of OVA-specific serum IgE and a pronounced worsening of inflammatory features. Eosinophil number and IL-4 and IL-5 concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were increased. In parallel, Th2 cytokine secretion of lung draining lymph node cells was also augmented when stimulated by OVA in vitro. Furthermore, AHR was markedly enhanced in NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization and challenge when compared with wild-type mice. Administration of NTN before challenge with OVA partially rescues the phenotype of NTN(-/-) mice. These findings provide evidence for a dampening role of NTN on allergic inflammation and AHR in a murine model of asthma. PMID:21508262

  2. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils. PMID:17894540

  3. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of oscillating wings and comparison to lifting-line theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keddington, Megan

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed in order to compare the solutions of oscillating wings with Prandtl's lifting-line theory. Quasi-steady and steady-periodic simulations were completed using the CFD software Star-CCM+. The simulations were performed for a number of frequencies in a pure plunging setup. Additional simulations were then completed using a setup of combined pitching and plunging at multiple frequencies. Results from the CFD simulations were compared to the quasi-steady lifting-line solution in the form of the axial-force, normal-force, power, and thrust coefficients, as well as the efficiency obtained for each simulation. The mean values were evaluated for each simulation and compared to the quasi-steady lifting-line solution. It was found that as the frequency of oscillation increased, the quasi-steady lifting-line solution was decreasingly accurate in predicting solutions.

  4. On motion of fluid in boundary layer near line of intersection of two planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L G; Bolshakov, V P

    1951-01-01

    In the paper "The Mutual Interference of Boundary Layers," the authors investigated the problem of the interference of two planes intersecting at right angles on the boundary layers formed by the motion of fluid along the line of intersection of these planes. In the present paper, the results of the preceding one are generalized to the case of planes intersecting at any angle. The motion of a fluid in an angle less than 180 degrees is discussed and the enlargement of the boundary layers near the line of intersection of the planes, the limits of the interference effects of the boundary layers, and the corrections on the drag are determined. All computations are conducted by the Karman-Pohlhausen method for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The results are reduced to tabulated form.

  5. Modeling dynamically coupled fluid-duct systems with finite line elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxon, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Structural analysis of piping systems, especially dynamic analysis, typically considers the duct structure and the contained fluid column separately. Coupling of these two systems, however, forms a new dynamic system with characteristics not necessarily described by the superposition of the two component system's characteristics. Methods for modeling the two coupled components simultaneously using finite line elements are presented. Techniques for general duct intersections, area or direction changes, long radius bends, hydraulic losses, and hydraulic impedances are discussed. An example problem and results involving time transients are presented. Additionally, a program to enhance post-processing of line element models is discussed.

  6. No Vent Tank Fill and Transfer Line Chilldown Analysis by Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present the analytical capability developed to model no vent chill and fill of cryogenic tank to support CPST (Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer) program. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) was adapted to simulate charge-holdvent method of Tank Chilldown. GFSSP models were developed to simulate chilldown of LH2 tank in K-site Test Facility and numerical predictions were compared with test data. The report also describes the modeling technique of simulating the chilldown of a cryogenic transfer line and GFSSP models were developed to simulate the chilldown of a long transfer line and compared with test data.

  7. Holographic in-line imaging setup for measuring the solid content of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikkonen, Ville A.; Mäkynen, Anssi J.

    2013-05-01

    Digital in-line holographic microscopy is a captivating imaging method for industrial applications where large volumes of fluids are to be imaged with microscopic resolution. The lensless holographic in-line imaging setup with a point light source, also known as the Gabor setup, can be built up with just a few, fairly low cost, components. In-line holography is well suited for imaging large volumes with a low concentration of scattering particles as most of the light emitted from the point source should pass through the image volume unscattered. The large depth of field of in-line holographic microscopy makes it possible to image larger volumes with comparable resolutions than what can be achieved with traditional light microscopy methods using low magnification objectives. Despite the many advantages gained over traditional microscopic methods by the use of holographic imaging for large volumes, so far it has only been widely utilized in biological and particle image velocimetry studies. The large depth of field of the holographic microscope permits simultaneous imaging of particles located at different depths without the need for mechanical scanning, and allows the use of large diameter fluidic channels which are not as prone to clogging and enable higher flow rates than smaller fluidic channels. In this paper, we present a digital in-line holographic microscope based measurement principle for measuring the solid particle content of fluids. The method proposed is demonstrated on bio-oil samples whose solid contents are less than 0.01 weight percentage.

  8. Chronic effects of mechanical force on airways.

    PubMed

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Airways are embedded in the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung. In utero, this mechanical environment is defined largely by fluid secretion into the developing airway lumen. Clinical, whole lung, and cellular studies demonstrate pivotal roles for mechanical distention in airway morphogenesis and cellular behavior during lung development. In the adult lung, the mechanical environment is defined by a dynamic balance of surface, tissue, and muscle forces. Diseases of the airways modulate both the mechanical stresses to which the airways are exposed as well as the structure and mechanical behavior of the airways. For instance, in asthma, activation of airway smooth muscle abruptly changes the airway size and stress state within the airway wall; asthma also results in profound remodeling of the airway wall. Data now demonstrate that airway epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts respond to their mechanical environment. A prominent role has been identified for the epithelium in transducing mechanical stresses, and in both the fetal and mature airways, epithelial cells interact with mesenchymal cells to coordinate remodeling of tissue architecture in response to the mechanical environment. PMID:16460284

  9. Stability and interactions of nanocolloids at fluid interfaces: effects of capillary waves and line tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehle, H.; Oettel, M.

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the effective potential for nanoparticles trapped at a fluid interface within a simple model which incorporates surface and line tensions as well as a thermal average over interface fluctuations (capillary waves). For a single colloid, a reduced steepness of the potential well hindering movements out of the interface plane compared to rigid interface models is observed, and an instability of the capillary wave partition sum in the case of negative line tensions is pointed out. For two colloids, averaging over the capillary waves leads to an effective Casimir-type interaction which is long ranged, power-like in the inverse distance, but whose power sensitively depends on possible restrictions of the colloid degrees of freedom. A nonzero line tension leads to changes in the magnitude but not in the functional form of the effective potential asymptotics.

  10. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W; Stober, Vandy P; Trempus, Carol S; Garantziotis, Stavros; Matalon, Sadis

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca(2+), and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca(2+), blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca(2+) channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  11. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  12. Tear Film Mucins: Front Line Defenders of the Ocular Surface; Comparison with Airway and Gastrointestinal Tract Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The ocular surface including the cornea and conjunctiva and its overlying tear film are the first tissues of the eye to interact with the external environment. The tear film is complex containing multiple layers secreted by different glands and tissues. Each layer contains specific molecules and proteins that not only maintain the health of the cells on the ocular surface by providing nourishment and removal of waste products but also protect these cells from environment. A major protective mechanism that the corneal and conjunctival cells have developed is secretion of the innermost layer of the tear film, the mucous layer. Both the cornea and conjunctiva express membrane spanning mucins, whereas the conjunctiva also produces soluble mucins. The mucins present in the tear film serve to maintain the hydration of the ocular surface and to provide lubrication and anti-adhesive properties between the cells of the ocular surface and conjunctiva during the blink. A third function is to contribute to the epithelial barrier to prevent pathogens from binding to the ocular surface. This review will focus on the different types of mucins produced by the corneal and conjunctival epithelia. Also included in this review will be a presentation of the structure of mucins, regulation of mucin production, role of mucins in ocular surface diseases, and the differences in mucin production by the ocular surface, airways and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23954166

  13. NOX2 (gp91phox) is a predominant O2 sensor in a human airway chemoreceptor cell line: biochemical, molecular, and electrophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Josef; Pan, Jie; Yeger, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), composed of clusters of amine [serotonin (5-HT)] and peptide-producing cells, are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of human and animal lungs. NEBs are thought to function as airway O2-sensors, since they are extensively innervated and release 5-HT upon hypoxia exposure. The small cell lung carcinoma cell line (H146) provides a useful model for native NEBs, since they contain (and secrete) 5-HT and share the expression of a membrane-delimited O2 sensor [classical NADPH oxidase (NOX2) coupled to an O2-sensitive K+ channel]. In addition, both native NEBs and H146 cells express different NADPH oxidase homologs (NOX1, NOX4) and its subunits together with a variety of O2-sensitive voltage-dependent K+ channel proteins (Kv) and tandem pore acid-sensing K+ channels (TASK). Here we used H146 cells to investigate the role and interactions of various NADPH oxidase components in O2-sensing using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis (quantum dot labeling), and electrophysiology (patchclamp, amperometry) methods. Coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated formation of molecular complexes between NOX2 and Kv3.3 and Kv4.3 ion channels but not with TASK1 ion channels, while NOX4 associated with TASK1 but not with Kv channel proteins. Downregulation of mRNA for NOX2, but not for NOX4, suppressed hypoxia-sensitive outward current and significantly reduced hypoxia -induced 5-HT release. Collectively, our studies suggest that NOX2/Kv complexes are the predominant O2 sensor in H146 cells and, by inference, in native NEBs. Present findings favor a NEB cell-specific plasma membrane model of O2-sensing and suggest that unique NOX/K+ channel combinations may serve diverse physiological functions. PMID:22865553

  14. Particle Deposition During Airway Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-Feng; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Inhaled aerosol particles deposit in the lung and may be from environmental, toxic, or medical therapy sources. While much research focuses on inspiratory deposition, primarily at airway bifurcations due to inertial impaction, there are other mechanisms that allow the particles to reach the airway surface, such as gravitational settling and diffusion depending on particle size. We introduce a new mechanism not previously studied, i.e. aerosol deposition from airway closure. The airways are lined with a liquid layer. Due to the surface tension driven instability, a liquid plug can form from this layer which blocks the airway. This process of airway closure tends to occur toward the end of expiration. In this study, the efficiency of the impaction of the particles during airway closure will be investigated. The particles will be released from the upstream of the airway and convected by the air flow and deposited onto the closing liquid layer. We solve the governing equations using a finite volume approach in conjunction with a sharp interface method for the interfaces. Once the velocity field of the gas flow is obtained, the path of the particles will be calculated and the efficiency of the deposition can be estimated. We acknowledge support from the National Institutes of Health grant number NIH HL85156.

  15. Equivalent Liénard-type models for a fluid transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Lizeth; Aguiñaga, Jorge Alejandro Delgado; Besançon, Gildas; Verde, Cristina; Begovich, Ofelia

    2016-08-01

    The main contribution of this paper is the derivation of spatiotemporal Liénard-type models for expressing the dynamical behavior of a fluid transmission line. The derivation is carried out from a quasilinear hyperbolic system made of a momentum equation and a continuity one. An advantage of these types of models is that they are suitable for formulating estimation algorithms. This claim is confirmed in the present paper for the case of fluid dynamics, since the article presents the conception and evaluation of a Liénard model-based observer that estimates the parameters of a pipeline such as the friction factor, the equivalent length and the wave speed. To show the potentiality of the approach, results based on some simulation and experimental tests are presented. xml:lang="fr"

  16. ENaC inhibitors and airway re-hydration in cystic fibrosis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Althaus, Mike

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the chloride channel "cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator" (CFTR). The lack of functional CFTR in CF airways leads to impaired ion and fluid homeostasis of the fluid layer which lines the airway surfaces (ASL). The ASL is important for proper ciliary beat and clearance of mucus from the airways. According to the "low volume hypothesis", CF airway epithelia hyperabsorb sodium via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Although the contribution of ENaC to CF pathogenesis is still under debate, there is convincing data demonstrating that re-hydration of the ASL might improve mucociliary clearance in CF patients. ASL re-hydration might, amongst other things, be achieved by a block of airway transepithelial sodium absorption with inhibitors of ENaC. This mini-review article describes the role of ENaC in ASL fluid homeostasis and rehydration, and summarizes the current state of the art in the discovery and establishment of compounds which inhibit ENaC activity and may represent pharmacological tools for the treatment of CF. PMID:23547930

  17. Relationship between trough plasma and epithelial lining fluid concentrations of voriconazole in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Heng, Siow-Chin; Snell, Gregory I; Levvey, Bronwyn; Keating, Dominic; Westall, Glen P; Williams, Trevor J; Whitford, Helen; Nation, Roger L; Slavin, Monica A; Morrissey, Orla; Kong, David C M

    2013-09-01

    Trough (predose) voriconazole concentrations in plasma and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of lung transplant recipients receiving oral voriconazole preemptive treatment were determined. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) ELF/plasma ratio was 12.5 ± 6.3. A strong positive linear relationship was noted between trough plasma and ELF voriconazole concentrations (r(2) = 0.87), suggesting the feasibility of using trough plasma voriconazole concentration as a surrogate to estimate the corresponding concentration in ELF of lung transplant recipients. PMID:23817382

  18. The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench.

    PubMed

    Quammen, Cory W; Taylor Ii, Russell M; Krajcevski, Pavel; Mitran, Sorin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Superfine, Richard; Davis, Brad; Davis, Stephanie; Zdanski, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench (VPAW) is a patient-centered surgical planning software system targeted to pediatric patients with airway obstruction. VPAW provides an intuitive surgical planning interface for clinicians and supports quantitative analysis regarding prospective surgeries to aid clinicians deciding on potential surgical intervention. VPAW enables a full surgical planning pipeline, including importing DICOM images, segmenting the airway, interactive 3D editing of airway geometries to express potential surgical treatment planning options, and creating input files for offline geometric analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulations for evaluation of surgical outcomes. In this paper, we describe the VPAW system and its use in one case study with a clinician to successfully describe an intended surgery outcome. PMID:27046595

  19. Correlation of Zeno (Z = 1) line for supercritical fluids with vapor-liquid rectilinear diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Amotz, D.; Herschbach, D.R.

    1996-08-01

    For a wide range of substances, extending well beyond the regime of corresponding states behavior, the contour in the temperature-density plane along which the compressibility factor Z = P/{rho}kT is the same as for an ideal gas is nearly linear. This Z = 1 contour, termed the Zeno line, begins deep in the liquid region and ascends as the density decreases to the Boyle point of the supercritical fluid, specified by the temperature T{sub B} for which (dZ/d{rho}){sub T} = 0 as {rho} {r_arrow} 0; equivalent, at T{sub B} the second virial coefficient vanishes. The slope of the Z = 1 line is {minus}B{sub 3}/(dB{sub 2}/dT), in terms of the third virial coefficient and the derivative of the second, evaluated at T{sub B}. Previous work has examined the Zeno line as a means to extend corresponding states and to enhance other practical approximations. Here the authors call attention to another striking aspect, a strong correlation with the line of rectilinear diameters defined by the average of the subcritical vapor and liquid densities. This correlation is obeyed well by empirical data for many substances and computer simulations for a Lennard-jones potential; the ratios of the intercepts and slopes for the Zeno and rectilinear diameter liens are remarkably close to those predicted by the van der Waals equation, 8/9 and 16/9, respectively. Properties of the slightly imperfect fluid far above the critical point thus implicitly determine the diameter of the vapor-liquid coexistence curve below the critical point.

  20. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T.; Lund, Anders H.; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype – envirotype interactions for other diseases. PMID:26263558

  1. [Single-pump on-line addition of modifier for supercritical fluid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Liu, L L; Li, L; Zhai, Z X; Wu, Y T

    1999-11-01

    Modified CO2 as mobile phase is usually necessary for packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography. Single syringe pump was applied in this work to add modifier through a parallel connection device, which can maintain constant and stable volume fraction of modifier without any contamination of the pump. Viscosity of the modifiers (here are methanol and acetone) and the length of the CO2 pipe line/modifier pipe line can affect the volume fraction. Volume fractions of methanol and acetone were determined by gas chromatography and ultraviolet spectrometry respectively and their rules of variation were also examined. It shows that the volume fraction of methanol is lower than that of acetone under similar condition. With fixed modifierr line, the longer the CO2 line is, the higher the volume fraction will be. The new device can conveniently alter the nature and ratio of the modifier with quite stable volume fraction. The online addition device can tentatively replace the dual-pump system. PMID:12552698

  2. An approximate analytic solution for the radiation from a line-driven fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diperna, Daniel T.; Feit, David

    2001-12-01

    In the analysis of a fluid loaded line-driven plate, the fields in the structure and the fluid are often expressed in terms of a Fourier transform. Once the boundary conditions are matched, the structural displacement can be expressed as an inverse transform, which can be evaluated using contour integration. The result is then a sum of propagating or decaying waves, each arising from poles in the complex plane, plus a branch cut integral. The branch cut is due to a square root in the transform of the acoustic impedance. The complex layer analysis (CLA) used here eliminates the branch cut singularity by approximating the square root with a rational function, causing the characteristic equation to become a polynomial in the transform variable. An approximate analytic solution to the characteristic equation is then found using a perturbation method. The result is four poles corresponding to the roots of the in vacuo plate, modified by the presence of the fluid, plus an infinity of poles located along the branch cut of the acoustic impedance. The solution is then found analytically using contour integration, with the integrand containing only simple poles.

  3. Proteomic analysis of the asthmatic airway.

    PubMed

    Wiktorowicz, John E; Jamaluddin, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic investigations in general utilize varied technologies for sample preparation, separations, quantification, protein identification, and biological rationalization. Their applications range from pure discovery and mechanistic studies to biomarker discovery/verification/validation. In each specific case, the analytical strategy to be implemented is tailored to the type of sample that serves as the target of the investigations. Proteomic investigations take into consideration sample complexity, the cellular heterogeneity (particularly from tissues), the potential dynamic range of the protein and peptide abundance within the sample, the likelihood of posttranslational modifications (PTM), and other important factors that might influence the final output of the study. We describe the sample types typically used for proteomic investigations into the biology of asthma and review the most recent related publications with special attention to those that deal with the unique airway samples such as bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), epithelial lining fluid and cells (ELF), induced sputum (IS), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Finally, we describe the newest proteomics approaches to sample preparation of the unique airway samples, BALF and IS. PMID:24162912

  4. A Finite Element Method for Free-Surface Flows of Incompressible Fluids in Three Dimensions, Part II: Dynamic Wetting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.A.; Cairncross, R.A.; Rao, R.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Schunk, P.R.

    1999-01-29

    To date, few researchers have solved three-dimensional free-surface problems with dynamic wetting lines. This paper extends the free-surface finite element method described in a companion paper [Cairncross, R.A., P.R. Schunk, T.A. Baer, P.A. Sackinger, R.R. Rao, "A finite element method for free surface flows of incompressible fluid in three dimensions, Part I: Boundary-Fitted mesh motion.", to be published (1998)] to handle dynamic wetting. A generalization of the technique used in two dimensional modeling to circumvent double-valued velocities at the wetting line, the so-called kinematic paradox, is presented for a wetting line in three dimensions. This approach requires the fluid velocity normal to the contact line to be zero, the fluid velocity tangent to the contact line to be equal to the tangential component of web velocity, and the fluid velocity into the web to be zero. In addition, slip is allowed in a narrow strip along the substrate surface near the dynamic contact line. For realistic wetting-line motion, a contact angle which varies with wetting speed is required because contact lines in three dimensions typically advance or recede a different rates depending upon location and/or have both advancing and receding portions. The theory is applied to capillary rise of static fluid in a corner, the initial motion of a Newtonian droplet down an inclined plane, and extrusion of a Newtonian fluid from a nozzle onto a moving substrate. The extrusion results are compared to experimental visualization. Subject Categories

  5. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  6. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  7. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  8. Airway glutathione homeostasis is altered in children with severe asthma: Evidence for oxidant stress

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Teague, W. Gerald; Holguin, Fernando; Yeh, Mary; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Severe asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and increased formation of reactive oxygen species. Objectives Glutathione (GSH) is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). We hypothesized that airway GSH homeostasis was altered in children with severe asthma and was characterized by decreased GSH and increased glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage was obtained from 65 children with severe asthma, including 35 children with baseline airway obstruction evidenced by FEV1 <80%. Control data were obtained from 6 children with psychogenic (habit) cough or vocal cord dysfunction undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy and 35 healthy adult controls. GSH, GSSG, and other determinants of airway oxidative stress including glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, and H2O2 were measured in the ELF. The ELF redox potential was calculated from GSH and GSSG by using the Nernst equation. Results: Compared with controls, subjects with severe asthma had lower airway GSH with increased GSSG despite no differences in GST, GR, and GPx activities between groups. This was accompanied by increased malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, and H2O2 concentrations in the ELF. GSH oxidation was most apparent in subjects with severe asthma with airway obstruction and was supported by an upward shift in the ELF GSH redox potential. Conclusion Children with severe asthma have increased biomarkers of oxidant stress in the ELF that are associated with increased formation of GSSG and a shift in the GSH redox potential toward the more oxidized state. PMID:19130935

  9. Plasma exudation in the airways: mechanisms and function.

    PubMed

    Persson, C G

    1991-11-01

    Inflammatory challenges of tracheobronchial and nasal mucosa produce prompt extravasation or exudation of plasma from the well developed microcirculation just beneath the epithelial base. Plasma exudation is not an exaggeration of the normal capilliary exchange of fluid and solutes but a specific inflammatory response of post-capilliary venules. The exuded plasma may not produce oedema. By a rapid, undirectional, unfiltered and yet non-injurious process, plasma exudates cross the mucosal lining to appear on the airway surface at the site of challenge. In vitro data suggests the possibility that a slightly increased hydrostatic pressure moves the acellular exudate through valve-like openings between epithelial cells. By the venular-mucosal exudation mechanism all the potent protein systems of circulating plasma will operate in respiratory defence on the surface of an intact mucosa. A further inference is that exudative indices obtained from the airway surface quantitatively reflect the intensity and time course of mucosal/submucosal inflammatory processes. Irrespective of which particular cellular mechanism happens to fuel the inflammation. Mucosal exudation of plasma characteristically occurs in health and disease also when there is no airway oedema, no epithelial disruption, and no increased absorbtion ability. However, exuded plasma and its derived peptide mediators potentially contribute to several pathophysical and pathophysiological characteristics of inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:1804675

  10. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  11. Path-integral and Ornstein-Zernike study of quantum fluid structures on the crystallization line.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M

    2016-03-01

    Liquid neon, liquid para-hydrogen, and the quantum hard-sphere fluid are studied with path integral Monte Carlo simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike pair equation on their respective crystallization lines. The results cover the whole sets of structures in the r-space and the k-space and, for completeness, the internal energies, pressures and isothermal compressibilities. Comparison with experiment is made wherever possible, and the possibilities of establishing k-space criteria for quantum crystallization based on the path-integral centroids are discussed. In this regard, the results show that the centroid structure factor contains two significant parameters related to its main peak features (amplitude and shape) that can be useful to characterize freezing. PMID:26957169

  12. Path-integral and Ornstein-Zernike study of quantum fluid structures on the crystallization line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesé, Luis M.

    2016-03-01

    Liquid neon, liquid para-hydrogen, and the quantum hard-sphere fluid are studied with path integral Monte Carlo simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike pair equation on their respective crystallization lines. The results cover the whole sets of structures in the r-space and the k-space and, for completeness, the internal energies, pressures and isothermal compressibilities. Comparison with experiment is made wherever possible, and the possibilities of establishing k-space criteria for quantum crystallization based on the path-integral centroids are discussed. In this regard, the results show that the centroid structure factor contains two significant parameters related to its main peak features (amplitude and shape) that can be useful to characterize freezing.

  13. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  14. Influence of in line monitored fluid bed granulation process parameters on the stability of Ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2015-12-30

    Ethinylestradiol (EE) as a highly active and low dosed compound is prone to oxidative degradation. The stability of the drug substance is therefore a critical parameter that has to be considered during drug formulation. Beside the stability of the drug substance, granule particle size and moisture are critical quality attributes (CQA) of the fluid bed granulation process which influence the tableting ability of the resulting granules. Both CQA should therefore be monitored during the production process by process analytic technology (PAT) according to ICH Q8. This work focusses on the effects of drying conditions on the stability of EE in a fluid-bed granulation process. We quantified EE degradation products 6-alpha-hydroxy-EE, 6-beta-hydroxy-EE, 9(11)-dehydro-EE and 6-oxo-EE during long time storage and accelerated conditions. PAT-tools that monitor granule particle size (Spatial filtering technology) and granule moisture (Microwave resonance technology) were applied and compared with off-line methods. We found a relevant influence of residual granule moisture and thermic stress applied during granulation on the storage stability of EE, whereas no degradation was found immediately after processing. Hence we conclude that drying parameters have a relevant influence on long term EE stability. PMID:26541302

  15. P2u purinoceptor regulation of mucin secretion in SPOC1 cells, a goblet cell line from the airways.

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, L H; Davis, S W; Burch, L; Yamauchi, M; Randell, S H; Nettesheim, P; Davis, C W

    1996-01-01

    The SPOC1 cell, a novel goblet cell line derived from rat trachea, was tested for its ability to exhibit regulated mucin secretion in response to purinergic (P2) agonists. High-molecular mass glycoconjugates (HMMGs) purified by CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation had a buoyant density of 1.45 g/ml. The purified HMMG material exhibited a single major band with an apparent molecular mass of greater than 1000 kDa in SDS/ polyacrylamide gels stained with silver or blotted and stained with soya-bean agglutinin. [3H]HMMG was resistant to proteoglycan-degrading enzymes, but was susceptible to neuraminidase. The HMMG was approx. 91% carbohydrate by weight, and the glycosides were O-linked. The HMMG amino acid composition was enriched in Ser and Thr (sum 27%). Thus SPOC1-cell HMMG possess the characteristics of mucin. Mucin secretion by SPOC1 cells, grown on permeable supports and perfused luminally, was stimulated by ATP, UTP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (100 microM) 4-5-fold over a baseline of 4 ng/min. The three dose-effect relations were nearly identical (K0.5 approximately 4 microM). SPOC1 cells grown on plastic and rat tracheal epithelial primary cells responded similarly to ATP and/or UTP. SPOC1 cells failed to respond to other purinergic agonists, either luminally or serosally, and consequently seem to possess an apical membrane P2u purinoceptor. SPOC1-cell total RNA was probed for P2u purinoceptor mRNA. Using conserved primers for both reverse transcriptase and PCR, a single band of the predicted size was observed, which had a nucleotide base sequence identical with the rat P2u purinoceptor mRNA. Thus SPOC1 cells secrete mucin under the control of a P2u purinoceptor; they should prove useful in dissecting the associated cellular regulatory pathways. PMID:8670174

  16. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  17. Line shape in a free-jet hypersonic expansion investigated by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suas-David, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Benidar, Abdessamad; Kassi, Samir; Georges, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Experiments are carried out for spectroscopic studies using hypersonic jet of carbon monoxide seeded in argon as a carrier gas. Probing of this jet using cavity ring-down spectroscopy revealed a double peak structure for various absorption lines. Flow field simulation using computational fluid dynamics is used to understand the shape of such lines integrated over line of sight. Absorption contribution from warmer non-isentropic part of the jet, owing to its transverse velocity variation, is found responsible for those line shapes.

  18. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  19. A new method for on-line monitoring of brake fluid condition using an enclosed reference probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuantong; Shida, Katsunori

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a new method for on-line monitoring of the liquid level and water content of brake fluid using an enclosed reference probe as the capacitive sensing part. The probe has an enclosed cavity at the end which is designed to hold fresh brake fluid as an on-line reference. Three capacitances formed by four electrodes are used for the liquid level, water content and reference measurement and form the mutual calibrating output functions of the sensing probe. The liquid level measurement is calibrated to the permittivity changes by the capacitance for water content measurement. At the same time, the water content measurement is calibrated to temperature changes and variety of fluids by the capacitance of the reference measurement. Therefore, once the permittivity characteristics of brake fluids are experimentally modeled, the proposed method has a self-calibration ability to influence factors including temperature, water content (to liquid level measurement) and variety of brake fluids without an additional sensor supported by database as in conventional intelligent sensor systems. The design and implementation method are discussed with a prototype probe developed and tested. The permittivity characteristics of brake fluid samples are discussed. The calibration method and errors analysis are presented. The method presents a different way to construct a smart sensor which is useful in brake fluid condition monitoring and also other liquid measurement applications.

  20. Colonization of CF patients' upper airways with S. aureus contributes more decisively to upper airway inflammation than P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Janhsen, Wibke Katharina; Arnold, Christin; Hentschel, Julia; Lehmann, Thomas; Pfister, Wolfgang; Baier, Michael; Böer, Klas; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Mainz, Jochen Georg

    2016-10-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients' airways, inflammatory processes decisively contribute to remodeling and pulmonary destruction. The aims of this study were to compare upper airway (UAW) inflammation in the context of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in a longitudinal setting, and to examine further factors influencing UAW inflammation. Therefore, we analyzed soluble inflammatory mediators in noninvasively obtained nasal lavage (NL) of CF patients together with microbiology, medication, and relevant clinical parameters. NL, applying 10 mL of isotonic saline per nostril, was serially performed in 74 CF patients (326 samples). Concentrations of the inflammatory mediators' interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and its anti-protease TIMP-1 were quantified by bead-based multiplexed assay, neutrophil elastase (NE) via ELISA. Culture-based microbiology of the upper and lower airways (LAW), as well as serological and clinical findings, were compiled. Our results indicate that UAW colonization with S. aureus significantly impacts the concentration of all measured inflammatory mediators in NL fluid except TIMP-1, whereas these effects were not significant for P. aeruginosa. Patients with S. aureus colonization of both the UAW and LAW showed significantly increased concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP-9, and slightly elevated concentrations of NE in NL fluid compared to non-colonized patients. This work elaborates a survey on S. aureus' virulence factors that may contribute to this underestimated pathology. Serial assessment of epithelial lining fluid by NL reveals that colonization of the UAW with S. aureus contributes more to CF airway inflammatory processes than hitherto expected. PMID:27377929

  1. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  2. Image-based finite element modeling of alveolar epithelial cell injury during airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Dailey, H L; Ricles, L M; Yalcin, H C; Ghadiali, S N

    2009-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by fluid accumulation in small pulmonary airways. The reopening of these fluid-filled airways involves the propagation of an air-liquid interface that exerts injurious hydrodynamic stresses on the epithelial cells (EpC) lining the airway walls. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that these hydrodynamic stresses may cause rupture of the plasma membrane (i.e., cell necrosis) and have postulated that cell morphology plays a role in cell death. However, direct experimental measurement of stress and strain within the cell is intractable, and limited data are available on the mechanical response (i.e., deformation) of the epithelium during airway reopening. The goal of this study is to use image-based finite element models of cell deformation during airway reopening to investigate how cell morphology and mechanics influence the risk of cell injury/necrosis. Confocal microscopy images of EpC in subconfluent and confluent monolayers were used to generate morphologically accurate three-dimensional finite element models. Hydrodynamic stresses on the cells were calculated from boundary element solutions of bubble propagation in a fluid-filled parallel-plate flow channel. Results indicate that for equivalent cell mechanical properties and hydrodynamic load conditions, subconfluent cells develop higher membrane strains than confluent cells. Strain magnitudes were also found to decrease with increasing stiffness of the cell and membrane/cortex region but were most sensitive to changes in the cell's interior stiffness. These models may be useful in identifying pharmacological treatments that mitigate cell injury during airway reopening by altering specific biomechanical properties of the EpC. PMID:19008489

  3. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  4. Effect of acute airway inflammation on the pulmonary antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Deaton, Christopher M; Marlin, David J; Smith, Nicola C; Harris, Patricia A; Dagleish, Mark P; Schroter, Robert C; Kelly, Frank J

    2005-09-01

    Effects of acute airway inflammation induced by organic dust inhalation on pulmonary antioxidant status were investigated in healthy horses and horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction. Exposure to organic dust induced acute airway neutrophilia, which was associated with increases in elastase and decreases in ascorbic acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. However, markers of oxidative stress were unaffected, as was hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate. Decreases in ascorbic acid correlated with increased respiratory resistance (P = .001) when both groups were combined. In conclusion, acute neutrophilic airway inflammation does not result in significant evidence of oxidative stress in horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction. PMID:16203621

  5. "Live cadavers" for practicing airway management.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Emad T; Aboud, Ghaith; Aboud, Talal

    2015-03-01

    Human cadavers have been used successfully as training models to practice airway management, but the lack of lifelike conditions reduces the utility of this model when softness of tissue and the ability to bleed are required for training scenarios. This report describes our "live cadaver" model, which combines lifelike conditions with real human anatomy. Five human cadavers were prepared as "live cadavers". This entailed cannulating the carotid and femoral arteries and the jugular and femoral veins, and then connected them to artificial blood reservoirs. An intra-aortic balloon pump was used to provide pulsating flow through the heart and major arteries. Finally, central and peripheral lines were inserted. Multiple techniques related to airway management were practiced in setting simulating the treatment of casualties with multiple trauma to include emergency cricothyroidotomy. With this model, participants were confronted with medical situations similar to those found in traumatized live patients (e.g., blood and other body fluids filling the mouth and nose, edema of the tongue and face). With the combination of lifelike conditions and real human anatomy, our experience demonstrated that the "live cadaver" increased the training value of traditionally prepared cadaver models. PMID:25747648

  6. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  7. The Airway Microbiome at Birth.

    PubMed

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  8. Antioxidant macromolecules in the epithelial lining fluid of the normal human lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, A M; Fells, G A; Hubbard, R C; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    We hypothesized that the alveolar structures may contain extracellular macromolecules with antioxidant properties to defend against oxidants. To evaluate this 51Cr-labeled human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) and cat lung epithelial cells (AKD) were exposed to a H2O2-generating system and alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) from healthy nonsmokers was tested for its ability to protect the lung cells from H2O2-mediated injury. The ELF provided marked antioxidant protection, with most from a H2O-soluble fraction in the 100-300-kD range. Plasma proteins with anti-H2O2 properties were in insufficient concentrations to provide the antioxidant protection observed. However, catalase, a normal intracellular antioxidant, was present in sufficient concentration to account for most of the observed anti-H2O2 properties of ELF. Depletion of ELF with an anticatalase antibody abolished the anti-H2O2 macromolecular defenses of ELF. Since catalase is not normally released by cells, a likely explanation for its presence in high concentrations in normal ELF is that it is released by lung inflammatory and parenchymal cells onto the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract during their normal turnover and collects there due to the slow turnover of ELF. It is likely that catalase in the ELF of normal individuals plays a role in protecting lung parenchymal cells against oxidants present in the extracellular milieu. Images PMID:2394842

  9. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:27334278

  10. Dynamical analysis of fluid lines coupled to mechanical systems taking into account fluid frequency-dependent damping and non-conventional constitutive models: Part 2 - Coupling with mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catania, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The design of hydraulic transmission systems for control and actuation requires accurate knowledge of their dynamic response: some standard techniques are known to obtain a consistent dynamic model of a fluid line, including the contribution of inertia, compressibility and friction. In this study an efficient procedure is developed for simulating the dynamic response of a fluid line coupled with mechanical systems, in both the frequency and time domains. A bi-dimensional approach is adopted for the fluid line, and the laminar flow frequency-dependent friction is modeled using non-integer order differential laws, which may improve the accuracy in comparison with more traditional Newtonian models. The coupling problem with mechanical systems is studied by means of both continuous models of the fluid line (yielding frequency response functions in exact analytical form), and discretized models of the fluid line (to express time response functions in approximate analytical form), focusing on the damping properties of the resulting vibrating systems.

  11. Liquid Therapy Delivery Models Using Microfluidic Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Waisman, Dan; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2013-11-01

    The propagation and break-up of viscous and surfactant-laden liquid plugs in the lungs is an active area of research in view of liquid plug installation in the lungs to treat a host of different pulmonary conditions. This includes Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome (IRDS) the primary cause of neonatal death and disability. Until present, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to low-viscosity Newtonian fluids along a single bifurcation. However, these fluids reflect poorly the actual liquid medication therapies used to treat pulmonary conditions. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of liquid plugs in the airway tree using microfluidic models spanning three or more generations of the bronchiole tree. Our approach allows the dynamics of plug propagation and break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one scale in vitro model, as a function of fluid rheology, trailing film dynamics and bronchial tree geometry. Understanding these dynamics are a first and necessary step to deliver more effectively boluses of liquid medication to the lungs while minimizing the injury caused to epithelial cells lining the lungs from the rupture of such liquid plugs.

  12. Mechanisms of surface-tension-induced epithelial cell damage in a model of pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Anastacia M; Dee, Kay C; Gaver, Donald P

    2003-02-01

    Airway collapse and reopening due to mechanical ventilation exerts mechanical stress on airway walls and injures surfactant-compromised lungs. The reopening of a collapsed airway was modeled experimentally and computationally by the progression of a semi-infinite bubble in a narrow fluid-occluded channel. The extent of injury caused by bubble progression to pulmonary epithelial cells lining the channel was evaluated. Counterintuitively, cell damage increased with decreasing opening velocity. The presence of pulmonary surfactant, Infasurf, completely abated the injury. These results support the hypotheses that mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening injure pulmonary epithelial cells and that pulmonary surfactant protects the epithelium from this injury. Computational simulations identified the magnitudes of components of the stress cycle associated with airway reopening (shear stress, pressure, shear stress gradient, or pressure gradient) that may be injurious to the epithelial cells. By comparing these magnitudes to the observed damage, we conclude that the steep pressure gradient near the bubble front was the most likely cause of the observed cellular damage. PMID:12433851

  13. On-line fast response device and method for measuring dissolved gas in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder Kumar

    2011-01-11

    A method and device for the measurement of dissolved gas within a fluid. The fluid, substantially a liquid, is pumped into a pipe. The flow of the fluid is temporally restricted, creating one or more low pressure regions. A measurement indicative of trapped air is taken before and after the restriction. The amount of dissolved air is calculated from the difference between the first and second measurements. Preferably measurements indicative of trapped air is obtained from one or more pressure transducers, capacitance transducers, or combinations thereof. In the alternative, other methods such as those utilizing x-rays or gamma rays may also be used to detect trapped air. Preferably, the fluid is a hydraulic fluid, whereby dissolved air in the fluid is detected.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of space shuttle main propulsion feed line 17-inch disconnect valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Pearce, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    A steady incompressible three-dimensional (3-D) viscous flow analysis was conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion External Tank (ET)/Orbiter (ORB) propellant feed line quick separable 17-inch disconnect flapper valves for liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2). The main objectives of the analysis were to predict and correlate the hydrodynamic stability of the flappers and pressure drop with available water test data. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer codes were procured at no cost from the public domain, and were modified and extended to carry out the disconnect flow analysis. The grid generator codes SVTGD3D and INGRID were obtained. NASA Ames Research Center supplied the flow solution code INS3D, and the color graphics code PLOT3D. A driver routine was developed to automate the grid generation process. Components such as pipes, elbows, and flappers can be generated with simple commands, and flapper angles can be varied easily. The flow solver INS3D code was modified to treat interior flappers, and other interfacing routines were developed, which include a turbulence model, a force/moment routine, a time-step routine, and initial and boundary conditions. In particular, an under-relaxation scheme was implemented to enhance the solution stability. Major physical assumptions and simplifications made in the analysis include the neglect of linkages, slightly reduced flapper diameter, and smooth solid surfaces. A grid size of 54 x 21 x 25 was employed for both the LO2 and LH2 units. Mixing length theory applied to turbulent shear flow in pipes formed the basis for the simple turbulence model. Results of the analysis are presented for LO2 and LH2 disconnects.

  15. Regulation of human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, J H; Widdicombe, J G

    1995-01-01

    Human airways are lined with a film of liquid from 5-100 microns in depth, consisting of a periciliary sol around and a mucous gel above the cilia. Microscopical studies have shown the sol to be invariably the same depth as the length of the cilia, and we discuss possible reasons for this. The composition and sources of the airway surface liquid are also described. In addition the forces regulating its volume are analyzed. Several airway diseases are characterised by dramatic changes in the volume and composition of airway liquid. We review recent research suggesting that the accumulation of airway mucous secretions in cystic fibrosis is caused by alterations in active transport of ions and water across both the surface and gland epithelia. PMID:7740210

  16. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us to simultaneously measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the on-line water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δD reliability. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δD and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed into a copper tube, attached to the line and after system stabilisation is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain δD and δ18O isotopic composition of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5‰ for δD and 0.4‰ for δ18O for water measurement for an extended range (-210 to 0‰ for δD and -27 to 0‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique.

  17. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  18. Optimization of fluid line sizes with pumping power penalty IBM-360 computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, D.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program has been developed to calculate and total weights for tubing, fluid in tubing, and weight of fuel cell power source necessary to power pump based on flow rate and pressure drop. Program can be used for fluid systems used in any type of aircraft, spacecraft, trucks, ships, refineries, and chemical processing plants.

  19. Molecular insights into the physiology of the ‘thin film’ of airway surface liquid

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, R C

    1999-01-01

    The epithelia that line the airways of the lung exhibit two general functions: (1) airway epithelia in all regions ‘defend’ the lung against infectious and noxious agents; and (2) airway epithelia in the proximal regions replenish water lost from airway surfaces, i.e. the ‘insensible water loss’, consequent to conditioning inspired air. How airway epithelia perform both functions, and co-ordinate them in health and disease, is the subject of this review. PMID:10200413

  20. In-line monitoring of particle size in a fluid bed granulator: investigations concerning positioning and configuration of the sensor.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2014-05-15

    According to the ICH Q8 guideline, analytic technologies (PAT) are important tools for characterization and optimization of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Particle size as a critical quality attribute for granules is therefore an important parameter that should be monitored during the fluid bed granulation process. This work focusses on optimizing position and configuration of an SFT-sensor for the in-line measurement of particle size distribution in a Glatt GPCG 3 fluid bed granulator. As model-substances, different grades of microcrystalline cellulose were used. The in-line measured particle size and particle rate in the sensor were evaluated. A sensor position in the deceleration zone of the granulator was found to be promising for in-line particle size measurement. Most reliable data were generated in this position when the probe was placed in a distance of 11cm from the chamber wall to avoid bias by the inlet air stream. No major influence of rotation angle of the probe was found in this position. Furthermore, an entire fluid bed granulation process was successfully monitored with the sensor installed in the optimized setting. PMID:24589125

  1. Activity of abundant antimicrobials of the human airway.

    PubMed

    Travis, S M; Conway, B A; Zabner, J; Smith, J J; Anderson, N N; Singh, P K; Greenberg, E P; Welsh, M J

    1999-05-01

    Human airways produce several antimicrobial factors; the most abundant are lysozyme and lactoferrin. Despite their likely importance in preventing infection, and their possible key role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), we know little about their antibacterial activity in the context of the CF airway. We found that abundant airway antimicrobial factors kill common CF pathogens, although Burkholderia was relatively resistant. To study the antibacterial activity, we developed a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative in vitro luminescence assay. Because NaCl concentrations may be elevated in CF airway surface liquid, we tested the effect of salt on antibacterial activity. Activity of individual factors and of airway lavage fluid was inhibited by high ionic strength, and it was particularly sensitive to divalent cations. However, it was not inhibited by nonionic osmolytes and thus did not require hypotonic liquid. The inhibition by ionic strength could be partially compensated by increased concentrations of antibacterial factors, thus there was no one unique salt concentration for inhibition. CF airway secretions also contain abundant mucin and elastase; however, these had no effect on antibacterial activity of lysozyme, lactoferrin, or airway lavage fluids. When studied at low NaCl concentrations, CF and non-CF airway lavage fluids contained similar levels of antibacterial activity. These results suggest approaches toward developing treatments aimed at preventing or reducing airway infections in individuals with CF. PMID:10226057

  2. HTLV-I associated arthritis: characteristics of an HTLV-I virus infected T cell line from synovial fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, K; Nakamura, T; Mine, M; Ida, H; Kawakami, A; Migita, K; Nagasato, K; Kurata, A; Fukuda, T; Nagataki, S

    1992-01-01

    A T cell line from mononuclear cells in the synovial fluid of a patient with polyarthritis was established. The T cell line reacted with serum samples positive for antibodies to human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and with monoclonal antibody to HTLV-I p19. In Southern blotting with an env-pX-LTR HTLV-I probe and digestion of T cell line DNA with the restriction enzymes ClaI, DraI, and PstI generated fragments that were identical to those found in two HTLV-I infected T cell lines established from adult T cell leukaemia or HTLV-I associated myelopathy. The T cell line expressed CD2, CD3, CD4, CD45RA, CD29, HLA-DR, CD25, and CD26 antigens, but not CD8 and CD20 antigens. Large amounts of interleukin 6, interferon gamma, and tumour necrosis factor alpha were secreted in the culture supernatants of this cell line. This line helped immunoglobulin production by B cells, but not K562, Raji, and synovial cell lysis. Images PMID:1616338

  3. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  4. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  5. Liquid plug propagation in flexible microchannels: A small airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Fujioka, H.; Bian, S.; Torisawa, Y.; Huh, D.; Takayama, S.; Grotberg, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of wall flexibility on the plug propagation and the resulting wall stresses in small airway models with experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimentally, a flexible microchannel was fabricated to mimic the flexible small airways using soft lithography. Liquid plugs were generated and propagated through the microchannels. The local wall deformation is observed instantaneously during plug propagation with the maximum increasing with plug speed. The pressure drop across the plug is measured and observed to increase with plug speed, and is slightly smaller in a flexible channel compared to that in a rigid channel. A computational model is then presented to model the steady plug propagation through a flexible channel corresponding to the middle plane in the experimental device. The results show qualitative agreements with experiments on wall shapes and pressure drops and the discrepancies bring up interesting questions on current field of modeling. The flexible wall deforms inward near the plug core region, the deformation and pressure drop across the plug increase with the plug speed. The wall deformation and resulting stresses vary with different longitudinal tensions, i.e., for large wall longitudinal tension, the wall deforms slightly, which causes decreased fluid stress and stress gradients on the flexible wall comparing to that on rigid walls; however, the wall stress gradients are found to be much larger on highly deformable walls with small longitudinal tensions. Therefore, in diseases such as emphysema, with more deformable airways, there is a high possibility of induced injuries on lining cells along the airways because of larger wall stresses and stress gradients.

  6. Indirect on-line determination of Newtonian fluid viscosity based on numerical flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, C.; Dantan, Ph.; Flaud, P.

    2003-01-01

    A new indirect method of determining the viscosity of a Newtonian fluid flowing in a tube with a geometrical singularity is proposed. Due to this singularity, the shape of the dimensionless velocity profiles is closely correlated with the Reynolds number of the flow. Newtonian fluid flows were simulated numerically with various Reynolds numbers. Based on the results of these calculations, an abacus was plotted showing the relationship between the dimensionless velocity and the dimensionless viscosity. On the other hand, dimensionless velocities were also obtained by measuring velocity profiles on a hydrodynamic bench with an ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. These experimental values were plotted on the abacus and the viscosity of the actual fluid was thus determined. Comparisons were made with viscometer measurements in order to assess the accuracy of the method and its range of validity. This method is of great potential interest for application to industrial plans when it is necessary to know the viscosity of a fluid undergoing a transformation without interrupting the process by taking fluid samples.

  7. Active degassing of mantle-derived fluid: A geochemical study along the Vulture line, southern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Martelli, M.; Nuccio, P. M.; Paternoster, M.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of a geochemical study of gas emissions along a NE-SW transect in southern Italy in order to test the hypothesis that the region around Monte Vulture is affected by degassing of mantle-derived fluids through a lithospheric discontinuity. We also investigated lavas from the Monte Vulture volcano displaying 3He/4He (up to ~ 6.0 Ra) and Sr isotopes that are consistent with an origin in mantle that has had minimal pollution from subducted Adriatic slab. Similar 3He/4He in fluids from around Mt. Vulture indicate that the deep volcanic system is still degassing. Mantle-derived He occurs in fluids along the length of the Vulture line, reinforcing the hypothesis that it is a deep tectonic discontinuity along which mantle fluids and/or melts advect to the surface. The CO2/3He ratios are highly variable (2.7 × 108-2.15 × 1011) in response to processes such as gas dissolution into aquifers, addition of crustal gases and degassing fractionation.

  8. The "limiting line" in mixed subsonic and supersonic flow of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Hsue-Shen

    1944-01-01

    It is well known that the vorticity for any fluid element is constant if the fluid is non-viscous and the change of state of the fluid is isentropic. When a solid body is placed in a uniform stream, the flow far ahead of the body is irrotational. Then if the flow is further assumed to be isentropic, the vorticity will be zero over the whole filed of flow. In other words, the flow is irrotational. For such flow over a solid body, it is shown by Theodorsen that the solid body experiences no resistance. If the fluid has a small viscosity, its effect will be limited in the boundary layer over the solid body and the body will have a drag due to the skin friction. This type of essentially isentropic irrotational flow is generally observed for a streamlined body placed in a uniform stream, if the velocity of the stream is kept below the so-called "critical speed." At the critical speed or rather at a certain value of the ratio of the velocity of the undisturbed flow and the corresponding velocity of sound, shock waves appear. This phenomenon is called the "compressibility bubble." Along a shock wave, the change of state of the fluid is no longer isentropic, although still adiabatic. This results in an increase in entropy of the fluid and generally introduces vorticity in an originally irrotational flow. The increase in entropy of the fluid is, of course, the consequence of changing part of the mechanical energy into heat energy. In other words, the part of fluid affected by the shock wave has a reduced mechanical energy. Therefore, with the appearance of shock waves, the wake of the streamline body is very much widened, and the drag increases drastically. Furthermore, the accompanying change in the pressure distribution over the body changes the aerodynamic moment acting on it and in the case of an airfoil decreases the lift force. All these consequences of the breakdown of isentropic irrotational flow are generally undesirable in applied aerodynamics. Its occurrence

  9. Human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells cause an anti-cancer effect on breast cancer cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghafarzadeh, M; Eatemadi, A; Fakhravar, Z

    2016-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) have the ability to self-renew, and multipotent differentiation into three germ layer cells. We obtained 5 ml amniotic fluid from ten 16-20 week pregnant women undergoing amniocentesis. hAFSCs were isolated from all samples, co-cultured with T47D breast cancer cell line and characterized using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. After 3, 4 and 5 days, T47D and HSFCs viability were evaluated with MTT assay. After 5 days of co-culture T47D cells viability were decreased. Our findings showed that hAFSCs can release soluble factors in cell culture, causing an efficient anticancer effect. PMID:27262812

  10. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  11. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  12. Antioxidant airway responses following experimental exposure to wood smoke in man

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biomass combustion contributes to the production of ambient particulate matter (PM) in rural environments as well as urban settings, but relatively little is known about the health effects of these emissions. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize airway responses in humans exposed to wood smoke PM under controlled conditions. Nineteen healthy volunteers were exposed to both wood smoke, at a particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration of 224 ± 22 μg/m3, and filtered air for three hours with intermittent exercise. The wood smoke was generated employing an experimental set-up with an adjustable wood pellet boiler system under incomplete combustion. Symptoms, lung function, and exhaled NO were measured over exposures, with bronchoscopy performed 24 h post-exposure for characterisation of airway inflammatory and antioxidant responses in airway lavages. Results Glutathione (GSH) concentrations were enhanced in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after wood smoke exposure vs. air (p = 0.025), together with an increase in upper airway symptoms. Neither lung function, exhaled NO nor systemic nor airway inflammatory parameters in BAL and bronchial mucosal biopsies were significantly affected. Conclusions Exposure of healthy subjects to wood smoke, derived from an experimental wood pellet boiler operating under incomplete combustion conditions with PM emissions dominated by organic matter, caused an increase in mucosal symptoms and GSH in the alveolar respiratory tract lining fluids but no acute airway inflammatory responses. We contend that this response reflects a mobilisation of GSH to the air-lung interface, consistent with a protective adaptation to the investigated wood smoke exposure. PMID:20727160

  13. Pim1 kinase activity preserves airway epithelial integrity upon house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M; Hesse, L; Jonker, M R; van den Berge, M; van Oosterhout, A J M; Heijink, I H; Nawijn, M C

    2015-12-01

    Most patients with allergic asthma are sensitized to house dust mite (HDM). The allergenicity of HDM largely depends on disruption of the integrity and proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that Pim1 kinase activity attenuates HDM-induced asthma by preserving airway epithelial integrity. The effects of Pim1 kinase activity on barrier function and release of the proinflammatory mediators IL-1α and CCL20 were studied in vitro in 16HBE and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs). Pim1-proficient and -deficient mice were exposed to a HDM-driven model of allergic asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured upon methacholine challenge. Airway inflammation and proinflammatory mediators in lung tissue and BAL fluid were determined. We observed that inhibition of Pim1 kinase prolongs the HDM-induced loss of barrier function in 16HBE cells and sensitizes PBECs to HDM-induced barrier dysfunction. Additionally, inhibition of Pim1 kinase increased the HDM-induced proinflammatory activity of 16HBE cells as measured by IL-1α secretion. In line herewith, HDM exposure induced an enhanced production of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL17 and CCL20 in Pim1-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. While we observed a marked increase in eosinophilic and neutrophilic granulocytes as well as mucus cell metaplasia and AHR to methacholine in mice exposed to HDM, these parameters were independent of Pim1 kinase activity. In contrast, levels of the Th2-cytokines IL-5 and IL-10 were significantly augmented in HDM-treated Pim1-deficient mice. Taken together, our study shows that Pim1 kinase activity maintains airway epithelial integrity and protects against HDM-induced proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. PMID:26453516

  14. Attenuation of Higher Order Circumferential Thermoacoustic Waves in Viscous Fluid Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, P. N.; Scarton, H. A.

    1996-06-01

    The acoustic waves propagation in viscous water, glycerin and air contained in a rigid wall, thermally insulated, infinite long, circular tube are studied using the exact three-dimensional thermal-fluid coupled equations for the vibrations in the n= 0, 1 circumferential modes. The first three axially symmetric modes at n= 0 and the first three non-axially symmetric modes at n= 1 are presented. The corresponding two-dimensional mode shapes are plotted so that the wave vibrations can be identified. It is found that the dispersion spectra, mode shapes and phase velocity dispersion plots of the three fluid mediums are very close. But the attenuation rates of glycerin and air are about 37 and 9 times higher than water, respectively.

  15. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  16. Endogenous nitrogen oxides and bronchodilator S-nitrosothiols in human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, B; Reilly, J; Drazen, J M; Fackler, J; Ramdev, P; Arnelle, D; Mullins, M E; Sugarbaker, D J; Chee, C; Singel, D J

    1993-01-01

    Recent discoveries suggesting essential bioactivities of nitric oxide (NO.) in the lung are difficult to reconcile with the established pulmonary cytotoxicity of this common air pollutant. These conflicting observations suggest that metabolic intermediaries may exist in the lung to modulate the bioactivity and toxicity of NO.. We report that S-nitrosothiols (RS-NO), predominantly the adduct with glutathione, are present at nano- to micromolar concentrations in the airways of normal subjects and that their levels vary in different human pathophysiologic states. These endogenous RS-NO are long-lived, potent relaxants of human airways under physiological O2 concentrations. Moreover, RS-NO form in high concentrations upon administration of NO. gas. Nitrite (10-20 microM) is found in airway lining fluid in concentrations linearly proportional to leukocyte counts, suggestive of local NO. metabolism. NO. itself was not detected either free in solution or in complexes with transition metals. These observations may provide insight into the means by which NO. is packaged in biological systems to preserve its bioactivity and limit its potential O2-dependent toxicity and suggest an important role for NO. in regulation of airway luminal homeostasis. PMID:8248198

  17. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, A. M.; Gaver, D. P.

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway's walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble's tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls' nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble's speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway's cellular epithelium during airway reopening.

  18. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A M; Gaver, D P

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway's walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble's tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls' nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble's speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway's cellular epithelium during airway reopening. PMID:23745044

  19. Glutathione Oxidation Is Associated With Airway Macrophage Functional Impairment in Children With Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Teague, W. Gerald; Burwell, Leandrea; Brown, Meredith S.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2011-01-01

    Airway cellular dysfunction is a differentiating feature of severe asthma in children that may be related to an imbalance of the antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). We hypothesized that oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of children with severe asthma would contribute to altered airway macrophage (AM) GSH homeostasis and AM cellular dysfunction. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 64 asthmatic children (severe asthma, n = 43). GSH, GSSG, markers of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and IL-8 were quantified in the BAL supernatant. GSH, GSSG, activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase, apoptosis, and phagocytosis were assessed in isolated AMs. Children with severe asthma had increased GSSG, lipid peroxidation, byproducts of DNA oxidation, and inflammation in the ELF. This imbalance of GSH homeostasis was also noted intracellularly within the AMs and was associated with decreased HDAC activities, increased apoptosis, and impaired phagocytosis. In vitro GSH supplementation inhibited apoptosis and rescued phagocytosis in children with severe asthma. Severe asthma in children is characterized by altered airway and intracellular AM GSH homeostasis that translates to impaired AM function. Interventions to restore airway GSH homeostasis may be warranted in children with severe asthma. PMID:20975618

  20. Glutathione oxidation is associated with airway macrophage functional impairment in children with severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Teague, W Gerald; Burwell, Leandrea; Brown, Meredith S; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2011-02-01

    Airway cellular dysfunction is a differentiating feature of severe asthma in children that may be related to an imbalance of the antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). We hypothesized that oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of children with severe asthma would contribute to altered airway macrophage (AM) GSH homeostasis and AM cellular dysfunction. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 64 asthmatic children (severe asthma, n = 43). GSH, GSSG, markers of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and IL-8 were quantified in the BAL supernatant. GSH, GSSG, activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase, apoptosis, and phagocytosis were assessed in isolated AMs. Children with severe asthma had increased GSSG, lipid peroxidation, byproducts of DNA oxidation, and inflammation in the ELF. This imbalance of GSH homeostasis was also noted intracellularly within the AMs and was associated with decreased HDAC activities, increased apoptosis, and impaired phagocytosis. In vitro GSH supplementation inhibited apoptosis and rescued phagocytosis in children with severe asthma. Severe asthma in children is characterized by altered airway and intracellular AM GSH homeostasis that translates to impaired AM function. Interventions to restore airway GSH homeostasis may be warranted in children with severe asthma. PMID:20975618

  1. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  2. Airway reopening: Steadily propagating bubbles in buckled elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L.

    2001-11-01

    Many pulmonary diseases result in the collapse and occlusion of parts of the lung by viscous fluid. The subsequent airway reopening is generally assumed to occur via the propagation of an air finger into the collapsed, fluid-filled part of the airway. The problem has some similarity to the scenario of the `first breath' when air has to enter the fluid-filled lungs of a newborn baby for the first time. We have developed the first three-dimensional computational model of airway reopening, based on a finite-element solution of the free-surface Stokes equations, fully coupled to the equations of large-displacement shell theory. Following a brief discussion of the numerical method, we will present results that illustrate the 3D flow field by which the steadily propagating air finger reopens the non-axisymmetrically collapsed airway. Finally, we will contrast the system's behaviour to predictions from earlier two-dimensional models.

  3. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  4. Zanamivir pharmacokinetics and pulmonary penetration into epithelial lining fluid following intravenous or oral inhaled administration to healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Mark J; Lovern, Mark; Ng-Cashin, Judith; Jones, Lori; Gould, Elizabeth; Gauvin, Jennifer; Rodvold, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    Zanamivir serum and pulmonary pharmacokinetics were characterized following intravenous (i.v.) or oral inhaled administration. I.v. zanamivir was given as intermittent doses of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg every 12 h (q12h) for two doses or as a continuous infusion (6-mg loading dose followed by 3 mg/h for 12 h). Oral inhaled zanamivir (two 5-mg inhalations q12h for two doses) was evaluated as well. Each zanamivir regimen was administered to six healthy subjects with serial pharmacokinetic sampling. In addition, a single bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid sample was collected at various time points and used to calculate epithelial lining fluid (ELF) drug concentrations for each subject. For intermittent i.v. administration of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF collected 12 h after dosing were 74, 146, and 419 ng/ml, respectively, each higher than the historic mean 50% inhibitory concentrations for the neuraminidases of wild-type strains of influenza A and B viruses. Median ELF/serum zanamivir concentration ratios ranged from 55 to 79% for intermittent i.v. administration (when sampled 12 h after the last dose) and 43 to 45% for continuous infusion (when sampled 6 to 12 h after the start of the infusion). For oral inhaled zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF were 891 ng/ml for the first BAL fluid collection and 326 ng/ml for subsequent BAL fluid collections (when sampled 12 h after the last dose); corresponding serum drug concentrations were undetectable. This study demonstrates zanamivir's penetration into the human pulmonary compartment and supports the doses selected for the continuing development of i.v. zanamivir in clinical studies of influenza. PMID:21896909

  5. Zanamivir Pharmacokinetics and Pulmonary Penetration into Epithelial Lining Fluid following Intravenous or Oral Inhaled Administration to Healthy Adult Subjects▿

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Mark J.; Lovern, Mark; Ng-Cashin, Judith; Jones, Lori; Gould, Elizabeth; Gauvin, Jennifer; Rodvold, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Zanamivir serum and pulmonary pharmacokinetics were characterized following intravenous (i.v.) or oral inhaled administration. I.v. zanamivir was given as intermittent doses of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg every 12 h (q12h) for two doses or as a continuous infusion (6-mg loading dose followed by 3 mg/h for 12 h). Oral inhaled zanamivir (two 5-mg inhalations q12h for two doses) was evaluated as well. Each zanamivir regimen was administered to six healthy subjects with serial pharmacokinetic sampling. In addition, a single bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid sample was collected at various time points and used to calculate epithelial lining fluid (ELF) drug concentrations for each subject. For intermittent i.v. administration of 100 mg, 200 mg, and 600 mg zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF collected 12 h after dosing were 74, 146, and 419 ng/ml, respectively, each higher than the historic mean 50% inhibitory concentrations for the neuraminidases of wild-type strains of influenza A and B viruses. Median ELF/serum zanamivir concentration ratios ranged from 55 to 79% for intermittent i.v. administration (when sampled 12 h after the last dose) and 43 to 45% for continuous infusion (when sampled 6 to 12 h after the start of the infusion). For oral inhaled zanamivir, the median zanamivir concentrations in ELF were 891 ng/ml for the first BAL fluid collection and 326 ng/ml for subsequent BAL fluid collections (when sampled 12 h after the last dose); corresponding serum drug concentrations were undetectable. This study demonstrates zanamivir's penetration into the human pulmonary compartment and supports the doses selected for the continuing development of i.v. zanamivir in clinical studies of influenza. PMID:21896909

  6. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  7. Pediatric airway management: current practices and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sunder, Rani A; Haile, Dawit T; Farrell, Patrick T; Sharma, Anshuman

    2012-10-01

    Management of a pediatric airway can be a challenge, especially for the non-pediatric anesthesiologists. Structured algorithms for an unexpected difficult pediatric airway have been missing so far. A recent step wise algorithm, based on the Difficult Airway society (DAS) adult protocol, is a step in the right direction. There have been some exciting advances in development of pediatric extra-glottic devices for maintaining ventilation, and introduction of pediatric versions of new 'non line of sight' laryngoscopes and optical stylets. The exact role of these devices in routine and emergent situations is still evolving. Recent advances in simulation technology has become a valuable tool in imparting psychomotor and procedural skills to trainees and allied healthcare workers. Moving toward the goal of eliminating serious adverse events during the management of routine and difficult pediatric airway, authors propose that institutions develop a dedicated Difficult Airway Service comprising of a team of experts in advanced airway management. PMID:22967160

  8. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  9. Interleukin-20 promotes airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuguo; Hao, Junqing; Xing, Chunyan; Chu, Qi; Wang, Guicheng; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Liang

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that interleukin-20 (IL-20) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and it has been implicated in psoriasis, lupus nephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. Little is known about the effects of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the function of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. To identify the expression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, in the airway epithelium in bronchial tissues, bronchial biopsy specimens were collected from patients and mice with asthma and healthy subjects and stained with specific antibodies. To characterize the effects of IL-20 in asthmatic airway remodeling, we silenced and stimulated IL-20 in cell lines isolated from mice by shRNA and recombinant protein approaches, respectively, and detected the expression of α-SMA and FN-1 by Western blot analysis. First, overexpression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, was detected in the airway epithelium collected from patients and mice with asthma. Second, IL-20 increased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA, and silencing of IL-20 in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 cells decreased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA. IL-20 may be a critical cytokine in airway remodeling in asthma. This study indicates that targeting IL-20 and/or its receptors may be a new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:25028099

  10. a Numerical Study of Unsteady Fluid Flow in In-Line and Staggered Tube Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, S. B.; Spalding, D. B.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the results of numerical calculations for transient flow in in-line-square and rotated-square tube banks with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2:1, in the Reynolds number range of 30-3000. Transient-periodic behaviour is induced by the consideration of two or more modules, with a sinusoidal span-wise perturbation being applied in the upstream module. There is a triode-like effect, whereby the downstream response to the stimulus is amplified, and there is a net gain in the crosswise flow component. When an appropriate feedback mechanism is provided, a stable transient behaviour is obtained, with alternate vortices being shed from each cylinder. Flow visualization studies of the results of the calculations are presented together with quantitative details of pressure drop, lift, drag and heat transfer. For the staggered bank, a wake-switching or Coanda effect was observed as the serpentine-shaped wake attached to alternate sides of the downstream cylinder. The induced response is independent of the amplitude and frequency of the applied disturbance, including the case of spontaneous behaviour with no excitation mechanism. For the in-line case where each cylinder is in the shadow of the previous one, the motion is less pronounced; however, a shear-layer instability associated with the alternating spin of shed vortices was observed. In this case, the response was found to be somewhat dependent on the frequency of the applied disturbance, and a transient motion could not be induced spontaneously in the absence of an explicit feedback mechanism. Calculated Strouhal numbers were in fair agreement with experimental data: for the staggered geometry, they had values of between 0.26 and 0.35, or from -21 to +6% higher than measured values, while for the in-line geometry, the Strouhal numbers ranged between 0.09 and 0.12, or about 20-40% lower than experimental values.

  11. Basolateral chloride current in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Itani, Omar A; Lamb, Fred S; Melvin, James E; Welsh, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Electrolyte transport by airway epithelia regulates the quantity and composition of liquid covering the airways. Previous data indicate that airway epithelia can absorb NaCl. At the apical membrane, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) provides a pathway for Cl(-) absorption. However, the pathways for basolateral Cl(-) exit are not well understood. Earlier studies, predominantly in cell lines, have reported that the basolateral membrane contains a Cl(-) conductance. However, the properties have varied substantially in different epithelia. To better understand the basolateral Cl(-) conductance in airway epithelia, we studied primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia. The basolateral membrane contained a Cl(-) current that was inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). The current-voltage relationship was nearly linear, and the halide selectivity was Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). Several signaling pathways increased the current, including elevation of cellular levels of cAMP, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and reduction of pH. In contrast, increasing cell Ca(2+) and inducing cell swelling had no effect. The basolateral Cl(-) current was present in both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF airway epithelia. Likewise, airway epithelia from wild-type mice and mice with disrupted genes for ClC-2 or ClC-3 all showed similar Cl(-) currents. These data suggest that the basolateral membrane of airway epithelia possesses a Cl(-) conductance that is not due to CFTR, ClC-2, or ClC-3. Its regulation by cAMP and PKC signaling pathways suggests that coordinated regulation of Cl(-) conductance in both apical and basolateral membranes may be important in controlling transepithelial Cl(-) movement. PMID:17660331

  12. [Effect of changes in airway pressure and the inspiratory volume on the fluid filtration rate and pulmonary artery pressure in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with blood and acellular solution].

    PubMed

    Crespo, Astrid; Novoa, Eva; Urich, Daniela; Trejo, Humberto; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Sznajder, Jacob I; Livia, Fernández; Sánchez-de León, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    It has been reported that ventilation with large tidal volumes causes pulmonary edema in rats by the stimulation and release of proinflammatory mediators. Our objective was to determine the level at which volutrauma induced by changes in Airway Pressure (PAW) and Inspiratory Volume (VI) produce significant changes on the Fluid Filtration Rate (FFR) and Pulmonary Artery Pressure (PAP) in lungs perfused with blood (cellular groups) or with a buffer-albumin solution (acellular groups), with a Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) 0 or 2 cmH2O and to study the effect of a vasodilator with antiinflammatory properties (fenoterol) in blood-perfused groups. Three experimental groups were used: the cellular groups studied the effect of increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with blood and PEEP 0 and 2; the acellular groups studied the increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with a buffer-albumin solution and PEEP 0 and 2; The fenoterol group studied the effect of increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with blood + fenoterol and PEEP 2. The results show that an increase of FFR is produced earlier in acellular groups than in cellular ones and that the damage in cellular groups is microscopically and macroscopically inferior when compared to acellular groups. Fenoterol did not inhibit edema formation, and that PEEP 2, both in the cellular and the acellular groups, has a protective effect. We propose the possible existence of mediators with protective effects against the formation of pulmonary edema in the blood. These data suggest that volutrauma induced pulmonary edema has a predominantly traumatic origin when the lungs are perfused with blood. PMID:17176901

  13. Fluid transients in pipes. Estimation of maximum pressures and forces in steam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-09-01

    Available as part of the ESDU Sub-series on Fluid Mechanics (Internal Flow), this document gives a graphical method for estimating the time-dependent pressure changes and piping forces that follow from a rapid value closure in a one-pipe system of constant cross-section carrying superheated steam. The method also assumes a frictionless flow and ignores wave steepening effects. A computer program listing in FORTRAN is also included that applies to any gas that obeys the perfect gas law, and takes into account the effects of both wall friction and wave steepening. In that case sections of the pipeline can have different cross-sectional areas and that can be used to treat a pipeline with branched ends. Worked examples are included for both methods and in the case of the computer program show specimen print-out of the input data, and of the output which includes the time variation of pressure, velocity and density at three points in the pipeline chosen by the user together with values of maximum and minimum pressure at 25 points (a value that is also open to choice by the user). The example is run for a valve with a linear variation of area with time, and for one with a nonlinear characteristic.

  14. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  15. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  16. Pressurised hot water extraction with on-line particle formation by supercritical fluid technology.

    PubMed

    Andersson, J M; Lindahl, S; Turner, C; Rodriguez-Meizoso, I

    2012-10-15

    In this work, an on-line process for pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) of antioxidants from plants as well as drying of the extract in one step by particle formation based on the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) has been developed. This process has been called WEPO®, water extraction and particle formation on-line. With this process, dried extracts from onion with the same composition of quercetin derivatives as non-dried extracts have been obtained as a fine powder with spherical particles from 250 nm to 4 μm in diameter. The major compounds present in the extract were quercetin-3,4'-diglucoside, quercetin-4'-glucoside and quercetin. An auxiliary inert gas (hot N(2)) was used to enhance the drying process. Parameters such as temperature (120 °C), SC-CO(2) and N(2) pressures (80 and 12.5 bar, respectively) and flow rate of SC-CO(2) (10 ml/min), have been settled by trial-and-error in order to achieve a fine and constant spray formation. Water content, size and morphology, antioxidant capacity and quercetin content of the particles were studied to evaluate the efficiency of the WEPO process. Results were compared with the ones from extracts obtained by continuous flow PHWE followed by freeze-drying. Results showed that both processes gave similar results in terms of antioxidant capacity, concentration of quercetin derivatives and water content, while only WEPO was able to produce defined spherical particles smaller than 4 μm. PMID:23442613

  17. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  18. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound. PMID:25567545

  19. Safer fluid prescribing at North Bristol Trust: Bringing practice in line with NICE Guidance with a redesign of the fluid prescription chart

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Johanna; Bull, Thomas; Paul, Daniel; Reynolds, Emily; Nishimura, Aimi; Lloyd, Jessica; Jetley, Amanda; Davies, Mari; Eisenhauer, Helen; Maggs, Daniel; Clapham, Sorcha; Trivedi, Kaushali; Hair, Robert; Plumb, Benjamin; Plumb, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) released new fluid guidelines following data suggesting 20% of patients receiving fluids suffer adversely (2013). This quality improvement group assessed fluid prescribing in a tertiary teaching centre and introduced a new fluid- prescribing chart to align practice with NICE recommendations. Notes and corresponding fluid prescription charts were reviewed for evidence of (1) indication, (2) co-morbidities, and (3) further management as surrogate markers of safe prescribing in accordance with NICE. Overall, the data showed practice fell short and prompted a redesign of the Trust fluid prescription chart. Three different variations of the chart were issued consecutively using a PDSA method (plan, do, study, act) over a 6-month period. They all included indication, co-morbidities and further management plans as constant design features. Suggestions from interested parties were incorporated and an educational programme was implemented to promote awareness. Prior to our intervention, an indication for fluids was documented in 26% of notes, it took an average of 4.6 minutes to find co-morbidities, and further management plans were rarely documented. Following the new prescription chart, an indication was recorded in 72% of cases, co-morbidities noted on 63% of charts with 93.1% accuracy, and further management documented in 100% of cases. The new fluid prescription chart encourages prescribers to incorporate NICE recommendations when prescribing fluids. The new fluid prescription design has since been rolled out Trust wide. PMID:26734333

  20. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Brix, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls. Method Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal cavity at three time points: baseline, within 15 minutes after being exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol in an exposure chamber and four hours after exposure termination. A total of 19 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. Furthermore, at baseline and during the exposure session, participants rated the perceived intensity, valence and levels of symptoms and autonomic recordings were obtained. Results The physiological and psychophysical measurements during the n-butanol exposure session verified a specific response in MCS individuals only. However, MCS subjects and healthy controls displayed similar upper airway inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05) at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences. Conclusion We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via excessive upper airway inflammatory processes. PMID:26599866

  1. Neutrophil extracellular traps cause airway obstruction during respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Cortjens, Bart; de Boer, Onno J; de Jong, Rineke; Antonis, Adriaan Fg; Sabogal Piñeros, Yanaika S; Lutter, René; van Woensel, Job Bm; Bem, Reinout A

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) in young children worldwide. Extensive neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and occlusion of small airways by DNA-rich mucus plugs are characteristic features of severe RSV-LRTD. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), extracellular networks of DNA covered with antimicrobial proteins, as part of the first-line defence against pathogens. NETs can trap and eliminate microbes; however, abundant NET formation may also contribute to airway occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether NETs are induced by RSV and explored their potential anti-viral effect in vitro. Second, we studied NET formation in vivo during severe RSV-LRTD in infants and bovine RSV-LRTD in calves, by examining bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue sections, respectively. NETs were visualized in lung cytology and tissue samples by DNA and immunostaining, using antibodies against citrullinated histone H3, elastase and myeloperoxidase. RSV was able to induce NET formation by human neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, NETs were able to capture RSV, thereby precluding binding of viral particles to target cells and preventing infection. Evidence for the formation of NETs in the airways and lungs was confirmed in children with severe RSV-LRTD. Detailed histopathological examination of calves with RSV-LRTD showed extensive NET formation in dense plugs occluding the airways, either with or without captured viral antigen. Together, these results suggest that, although NETs trap viral particles, their exaggerated formation during severe RSV-LRTD contributes to airway obstruction. PMID:26468056

  2. Alkaloids analysis using off-line two-dimensional supercritical fluid chromatography × ultra-high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuiyong; Fu, Qing; Xin, Huaxia; Ke, Yanxiong; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2014-07-21

    In this study, an off-line two-dimensional (2-D) supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) × ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with high orthogonality was developed for the analysis of the practical amide alkaloids fraction from P. longum L. The effects of SFC parameters such as column type, organic modifier, temperature and back-pressure on separation were systematically evaluated. Different selectivity was observed for different columns (BEH, BEH 2-EP, XAmide and CSH FP). An investigation was then carried out of the orthogonality of different columns and systems following a geometric approach with a set of amide alkaloid samples. The orthogonality between a CSH FP column and a BEH column reached 50.79%, which was much higher than that for the other columns. While the orthogonality between SFC and UHPLC based on an XAmide column and an HSS T3 column reached 69.84%, which was the highest of all the combinations. At last, the practical amide alkaloids fraction was analyzed with an off-line 2-D chromatography SFC × UHPLC system. In total, at least 340 peaks were detected by this method. Rapid separation in these two dimensions and easy post treatment of SFC facilitated this 2-D system for the separation of complex samples. PMID:24828698

  3. Effect of particle geometry on triple line motion of nano-fluid drops and deposit nano-structuring.

    PubMed

    Askounis, Alexandros; Sefiane, Khellil; Koutsos, Vasileios; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2015-08-01

    We illustrate the importance of particle geometry on droplet contact line pinning, 'coffee-stain' formation and nano-structuring within the resulting rings. We present the fundamentals of pure liquid droplet evaporation and then discuss the effect of particles on the evaporation process. The resulting coffee-stain patterns and particle structuring within them are presented and discussed. In the second part, we turn our attention to the effect of particle geometry on the evaporation process. A wide range of particle shapes, categorised according to aspect ratio, from the simple shape of a sphere to the highly irregular shapes of platelets and tubes is discussed. Particle geometry effect on evaporation behaviour was quantified in terms of change in contact angle and contact radius for the stick-slip cases. Consequently the hysteretic energy barrier pinning the droplets was estimated, showing an increasing trend with particle aspect ratio. The three-phase contact line (TL) motion kinetics are complemented with analysis of the nano-structuring behaviour of each shape, leading to the identification of the two main parameters affecting nanoparticle self-assembly behaviour at the wedge. Flow velocity and wedge constraints were found to have antagonist effects on particle deposition, although these varied with particle shape. This description should help in understanding the drying behaviour of more complex fluids. Furthermore, knowing the fundamentals of this simple and inexpensive surface patterning technique should permit its tailoring to the needs of many potential applications. PMID:24927853

  4. Investigation of fine atmospheric particle surfaces and lung lining fluid interactions using XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michaela; Hutton, Bernie M.; Tetley, Terry D.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Wigzell, Edward; Jones, Frances H.

    2001-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine surface chemical composition of atmospheric particles before and after immersion in saline and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Atmospheric particulate matter (PM 2.5) was collected on PTFE filters from clean air, outdoor urban and smoke-filled indoor sites. Low particle loads were present from the clean air site and the particle surface consisted of carbon, Cl - and oxide species. An increase in particle load was observed for the outdoor urban site with C(C, H) compounds dominating the particle surface. There was a significant contribution from C(O, N) and CO/COO-functionalities as well as oxides with traces of NO 3-, NH 4+, amide, SiC and SO 42- present. A further increase in particle load was observed for the smoke-filled indoor site. The surface consisted of 97% C(C, H) compounds with traces of oxide, amide and SiO 2. The particle load was reduced in all cases after immersion in saline mainly due to removal of loosely bound particles, especially for carbon. Changes in surface composition of the particles were also observed with removal of Cl - from the clean air site, NO 3-, NH 4+, amide, SO 42- and SiC from the urban air site and SiO 2 from the indoor smoke site; these species were deemed to be bio-available. Similar results were obtained after immersion in BALF. However, there was evidence of interaction of constituents from BALF with particles collected from the outdoor urban and indoor smoke sites. A strong amide signal was observed on particles remaining on the filter after immersion in BALF suggesting that possibly proteins or other N-containing biomolecular species from BALF were adsorbed on the surface of these particles. The surface concentrations of amide, oxide, C(O, N) and CO/COO - varied between outdoor urban and indoor smoke particles after immersion in BALF. This infers that a different interaction is occurring between BALF constituents and outdoor urban and indoor

  5. Modeling In Vivo Interactions of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Pulmonary Alveolar Lining Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary; Schwander, Stephan; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products may result in widespread human inhalation exposures. Due to their high surface area per unit mass, inhaled ENMs interact with multiple components of the pulmonary system, and these interactions affect their ultimate fate in the body. Modeling of ENM transport and clearance in vivo has traditionally treated tissues as well-mixed compartments, without consideration of nanoscale interaction and transformation mechanisms. ENM agglomeration, dissolution and transport, along with adsorption of biomolecules, such as surfactant lipids and proteins, cause irreversible changes to ENM morphology and surface properties. The model presented in this article quantifies ENM transformation and transport in the alveolar air to liquid interface and estimates eventual alveolar cell dosimetry. This formulation brings together established concepts from colloidal and surface science, physics, and biochemistry to provide a stochastic framework capable of capturing essential in vivo processes in the pulmonary alveolar lining layer. The model has been implemented for in vitro solutions with parameters estimated from relevant published in vitro measurements and has been extended here to in vivo systems simulating human inhalation exposures. Applications are presented for four different ENMs, and relevant kinetic rates are estimated, demonstrating an approach for improving human in vivo pulmonary dosimetry. PMID:26240755

  6. Asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of brake lining and asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, P; De Vuyst, P; Strauss, P; Yernault, J C

    1990-01-01

    Asbestos body (AB) concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples of 15 brake lining (BL) workers exposed only to chrysotile have been determined and compared with those from 44 asbestos cement (AC) workers extensively exposed to amphiboles. The mean AB concentrations (263 +/- 802 and 842 +/- 2086 AB/ml respectively) for those groups did not differ significantly but were much higher than those found in control groups. Analytical electron microscopy of asbestos body cores showed that in the BL group 95.6% were chrysotile fibres whereas in the AC group amphiboles accounted for 93.1%. The size characteristics of the central fibres differed for chrysotile and amphibole AB, the former being shorter and thinner. Examination of repeated bronchoalveolar lavage samples showed that the mechanisms of clearance of chrysotile fibres do not affect AB concentration for at least 10 months after cessation of exposure. It thus appears that routine counting of ABs in BAL allows the assessment of current or recent occupational exposures to asbestos. Exposures to chrysotile lead to AB concentrations comparable with those encountered in exposures to amphiboles. Images PMID:2155652

  7. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of fluids along the cameroon volcanic line, cameroon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanyileke, G.Z.; Kusakabe, M.; Evans, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Results of the chemical and isotopic analysis of the water and gases discharged from volcanic crater lakes and soda springs located along the Cameroon Volcanic Line were used to characterize and infer their genetic relationships. Variations in the solute compositions of the waters indicate the dominant influence of silicate hydrolysis. Na+ (40-95%) constitutes the major cation in the springs while Fe2+ + Mg2+ (70%) dominate in the CO2-rich lakes. The principal anion is HCO3 (>90%), except in the coastal springs where Cl predominates. Lakes Nyos and Monoun have Fe-Mg-Ca-HCO3 type signatures; the soda springs are essentially Na-HCO3 type, while all other lakes show similar ionic compositions to dilute surface waters. Dissolved gases show essentially CO2 (>90%), with small amounts of Ar and N2, while CH4 constitutes the principal component in the non-gassy lakes. Active volcanic gases are generally absent, except in the Lobe spring with detectable H2S. Stable isotope ratio evidence indicates that the bicarbonate waters are essentially of meteoric origin. CO2 (??13C = -2 to -8???) and He (3He/4He = 1 to 5.6Ra) infer a mantle contribution to the total CO2. CH4 has a biogenic source, while Ar and N2 are essentially atmospheric in origin, but mixing is quite common.

  8. On-line preconcentration of fluorescent derivatives of catecholamines in cerebrospinal fluid using flow-gated capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyang; Gong, Maojun

    2016-06-10

    Flow-gated capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with microdialysis has become an important tool for in vivo bioanalytical measurements because it is capable of performing rapid and efficient separations of complex biological mixtures thus enabling high temporal resolution in chemical monitoring. However, the limit of detection (LOD) is often limited to a micro- or nano-molar range while many important target analytes have picomolar or sub-nanomolar levels in brain and other tissues. To enhance the capability of flow-gated CE for catecholamine detection, a novel and simple on-line sample preconcentration method was developed exclusively for fluorescent derivatives of catecholamines that were fluorogenically derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) in the presence of cyanide. The effective preconcentration coupled with the sensitive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection lowered the LOD down to 20pM for norepinephrine (NE) and 50pM for dopamine (DA) at 3-fold of S/N ratio, and the signal enhancement was estimated to be over 100-fold relative to normal injection when standard analytes were dissolved in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). The basic focusing principle is novel since the sample plug contains borate while the background electrolyte (BGE) is void of borate. This strategy took advantage of the complexation between diols and borate, through which one negative charge was added to the complex entity. The sample derivatization mixture was electrokinetically injected into a capillary via the flow-gated injection, and then NE and DA derivatives were selectively focused to a narrow zone by the reversible complexation. Separation of NE and DA derivatives was executed by incoming surfactants of cholate and deoxycholate mixed in the front BGE plug. This on-line preconcentration method was finally applied to the detection of DA in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via microdialysis and on-line derivatization. It is anticipated that the method would

  9. The use of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells as the feeder layer to establish human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yung-Kwei; Huang, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Chiu-Hsiang; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Jen; Shaw, S W Steven

    2015-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells that have the potential to differentiate into the three germ layers and possibly all tissues of the human body. To fulfil the clinical potentials for cell-based therapy, banks of hESC lines that express different combinations of the major histocompatibility genes should be established, preferably without exposing such cells to animal cells and proteins. In this study, we tested human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) as feeder cells to support the growth of hESCs. Our results indicated that mitomycin-treated AFMSCs were able to support the newly established hESC lines CGLK-1 and CGLK-2. The hESC colonies cultured on AFMSCs expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-4, Nanog and Sox-2, which are markers for undifferentiated hESCs. Chromosomal analyses of both hESC lines, CGLK-1 and CGLK-2, which were cultured on AFMSC feeders for 22 and 14 passages, respectively, were confirmed to be normal karyotypes (46, XX). The ability of AFMSCs as feeder cells to maintain the undifferentiated growth and pluripotency of hESCs was confirmed by in vivo formation of teratomas derived on AFMSC hESCs in severe combined immune-compromised mice. The use of AFMSCs for feeder cells to culture hESCs has several advantages, in that AFMSCs are not tumourigenic and can be expanded extensively with a short doubling time. PMID:23460275

  10. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on inhibiting airway remodeling and airway inflammation in chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Bai, Chong; Yang, Jianming; Lou, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Ruohua

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies proved that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could improve a variety of immune-mediated disease by its immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effect on airway remodeling and airway inflammation by administrating BMSCs in chronic asthmatic mice. Forty-eight female BALB/c mice were randomly distributed into PBS group, BMSCs treatment group, BMSCs control group, and asthmatic group. The levels of cytokine and immunoglobulin in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and morphometric analysis was determined by flow cytometry, hematoxylin-eosin, immunofluorescence staining, periodic-acid Schiff, and masson staining, respectively. We found that airway remodeling and airway inflammation were evident in asthmatic mice. Moreover, low level of IL-12 and high levels of IL-13, IL-4, OVA-specific IgG1, IgE, and IgG2a and the fewer number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells were present in asthmatic group. However, transplantation of BMSCs significantly decreased airway inflammation and airway remodeling and level of IL-4, OVA-specific IgE, and OVA-specific IgG1, but elevated level of IL-12 and the number of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma (P < 0.05). However, BMSCs did not contribute to lung regeneration and had no significant effect on levels of IL-10, IFN-Y, and IL-13. In our study, BMSCs engraftment prohibited airway inflammation and airway remodeling in chronic asthmatic group. The beneficial effect of BMSCs might involved the modulation imbalance cytokine toward a new balance Th1-Th2 profiles and up-regulation of protective CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma, but not contribution to lung regeneration. PMID:23334934

  11. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26160865

  12. Mechanosensitive ATP Release Maintains Proper Mucus Hydration of Airways

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F.; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal auto-crine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  13. Mechanosensitive ATP release maintains proper mucus hydration of airways.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-06-11

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal autocrine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  14. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  15. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  16. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  17. Applications in quenching heat transfer: Liquid quenching of turbine disks and chill down in cryogenic fluid transfer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Matthew Fitch

    Liquid quenching of turbine disks concerns multiphase heat transfer (HT) during heat treating in the manufacture of gas turbine disks. Chill down (CD) in cryogenic fluid transfer lines concerns rapid cooling of cryogenic propulsion systems during startup. Quenching experiments were conducted on gas turbine disk models to obtain internal and surface temperatures. Three different disk models were tested and analyzed. The three disk models represent steps in the evolution from a simple disk shape to a scale model of an actual gas turbine disk. Experimental temperature data were used in finite element models of the disks to calculate heat transfer coefficients (h). Analysis of h for all of the quench cases studied led to a better understanding of the mechanisms of quenching HT. Insight into the mechanisms of quenching HT and the effects of forced quenchant flow led to generalizations of h with respect to local disk geometry. Correlations for single-phase and boiling HT were developed for selected quench cases. Recommendations for further study of this interesting and challenging topic are given. A numerical model to predict CD in cryogenic transfer lines was developed. Three CD cases using hydrogen are solved: (1) a simplified model amenable to analytical solution, (2) a realistic model of superheated vapor flow, and (3) a realistic model of initially subcooled liquid flow. The first case enables a comparison of the numerical model results with an analytical solution. The other cases are numerical models which provide quantities of interest in CD applications. For example, of great interest in CD applications is the ability to predict accurate values of CD time (the time required to achieve steady-state cryogenic flow). Sample CD times and other results of interest are discussed in the thesis.

  18. Using computational fluid dynamics to calculate the stimulus to the lateral line of a fish in still water.

    PubMed

    Rapo, Mark A; Jiang, Houshuo; Grosenbaugh, Mark A; Coombs, Sheryl

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the first computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of viscous flow due to a small sphere vibrating near a fish, a configuration that is frequently used for experiments on dipole source localization by the lateral line. Both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) meshes were constructed, reproducing a previously published account of a mottled sculpin approaching an artificial prey. Both the fish-body geometry and the sphere vibration were explicitly included in the simulations. For comparison purposes, calculations using potential flow theory (PFT) of a 3-D dipole without a fish body being present were also performed. Comparisons between the 2-D and 3-D CFD simulations showed that the 2-D calculations did not accurately represent the 3-D flow and therefore did not produce realistic results. The 3-D CFD simulations showed that the presence of the fish body perturbed the dipole source pressure field near the fish body, an effect that was obviously absent in the PFT calculations of the dipole alone. In spite of this discrepancy, the pressure-gradient patterns to the lateral line system calculated from 3-D CFD simulations and PFT were similar. Conversely, the velocity field, which acted on the superficial neuromasts (SNs), was altered by the oscillatory boundary layer that formed at the fish's skin due to the flow produced by the vibrating sphere (accounted for in CFD but not PFT). An analytical solution of an oscillatory boundary layer above a flat plate, which was validated with CFD, was used to represent the flow near the fish's skin and to calculate the detection thresholds of the SNs in terms of flow velocity and strain rate. These calculations show that the boundary layer effects can be important, especially when the height of the cupula is less than the oscillatory boundary layer's Stokes viscous length scale. PMID:19411543

  19. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  20. Proteomic analysis of human epithelial lining fluid by microfluidics-based nanoLC-MS/MS: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Lorenza; Govorukhina, Natalia; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Poolman, Bert; Lodewijk, Monique E; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; ten Hacken, Nick; Bischoff, Rainer

    2013-09-01

    Microfluidics-based nanoLC-MS/MS (chipLC-MS/MS) was used to identify and quantify proteins in epithelial lining fluid (ELF), collected during bronchoscopy from the main bronchi of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and healthy controls using microprobes. ELF is a biofluid that is well suited to study pathophysiological processes in the lung, because it contains high concentrations of biologically active molecules. 1D-PAGE followed by in-gel tryptic digestion and chipLC-MS/MS resulted in identification of approximately 300 proteins. A comparative study of ELF from COPD patients and non-COPD controls using chemical stable isotope labeling (iTRAQ®-8Plex) showed that the levels of lactotransferrin, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB 1), alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and cofilin-1 differed significantly in ELF from COPD patients and non-COPD controls (p-values < 0.05). These results were reproduced in another, independent set of ELF samples from COPD patients and non-COPD controls and further validated by immunohistochemistry. This study shows the feasibility of performing chipLC-MS/MS and quantitative proteomics in human ELF. PMID:23712570

  1. Airway Scope: early clinical experience in 405 patients.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro; Seo, Norimasa

    2008-01-01

    The Airway Scope (Pentax, Tokyo, Japan) is a new device used for tracheal intubation. It allows visualization of the glottis through a non-line-of sight view. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of this device for the tracheal intubation of surgical patients. In this prospective study, the Airway Scope was used for the endotracheal intubation of 405 patients by 74 airway operators. The Airway Scope allowed visualization of the glottis in all 405 patients, including those with a Cormack-Lehane view of grade III (n = 15) or grade IV (n = 1) on Macintosh laryngoscopy. All tracheal intubations using the Airway Scope were successful. The mean time to complete tracheal intubation was 42.4 +/- 19.7 s (+/-SD; range, 13-192 s). No dental damage was encountered, though minor mucosal injury caused by the blade was experienced in 2 patients. The Airway Scope consistently permitted a better intubation environment. With its potential advantages, the Airway Scope could be an effective aid to airway management in surgical patients. PMID:18306022

  2. The Role of the Extracellular Matrix Protein Mindin in Airway Response to Environmental Airways Injury

    PubMed Central

    Frush, Sarah; Li, Zhuowei; Potts, Erin N.; Du, Wanglei; Eu, Jerry P.; Garantziotis, Stavros; He, You-Wen; Foster, W. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our previous work demonstrated that the extracellular matrix protein mindin contributes to allergic airways disease. However, the role of mindin in nonallergic airways disease has not previously been explored. Objectives: We hypothesized that mindin would contribute to airways disease after inhalation of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ozone. Methods: We exposed C57BL/6J and mindin-deficient (–/–) mice to aerosolized LPS (0.9 μg/m3 for 2.5 hr), saline, ozone (1 ppm for 3 hr), or filtered air (FA). All mice were evaluated 4 hr after LPS/saline 
exposure or 24 hr after ozone/FA exposure. We characterized the physiological and biological responses by analysis of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) with a computer-controlled small-animal ventilator (FlexiVent), inflammatory cellular recruitment, total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), proinflammatory cytokine profiling, and ex vivo bronchial ring studies. Results: After inhalation of LPS, mindin–/– mice demonstrated significantly reduced total cell and neutrophil recruitment into the airspace compared with their wild-type counterparts. Mindin–/– mice also exhibited reduced proinflammatory cytokine production and lower AHR to methacholine challenge by FlexiVent. After inhalation of ozone, mice had no detectible differences in cellular inflammation or total BALF protein dependent on mindin. However, mindin–/– mice were protected from increased proinflammatory cytokine production and AHR compared with their C57BL/6J counterparts. After ozone exposure, bronchial rings derived from mindin–/– mice demonstrated reduced constriction in response to carbachol. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the extracellular matrix protein mindin modifies the airway response to both LPS and ozone. Our data support a conserved role of mindin in production of proinflammatory cytokines and the development of AHR in two divergent models of reactive airways disease, as well as a role of

  3. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and Penetration of Ceftazidime and Avibactam into Epithelial Lining Fluid in Thigh- and Lung-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Maria J.; van Mil, Anita C.; Lagarde, Claudia M.; Nichols, Wright W.

    2015-01-01

    Ceftazidime and the β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam constitute a new, potentially highly active combination in the battle against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. To determine possible clinical use, it is important to know the pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds related to each other in plasma and the different compartments of infection in experimentally infected animals and in humans. We used a neutropenic murine thigh infection model and lung infection model to study pharmacokinetics in plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Mice were infected with ca. 106 CFU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa intramuscularly into the thigh or intranasally to cause pneumonia and were given 8 different (single) subcutaneous doses of ceftazidime and avibactam in various combined concentrations, ranging from 1 to 128 mg/kg of body weight in 2-fold increases. Concomitant samples of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were taken at up to 12 time points until 6 h after administration. Pharmacokinetics of both compounds were linear and dose proportional in plasma and ELF and were independent of the infection type, with estimated half-lives (standard deviations [SD]) in plasma of ceftazidime of 0.28 (0.02) h and of avibactam of 0.24 (0.04) h and volumes of distribution of 0.80 (0.14) and 1.18 (0.34) liters/kg. The ELF-plasma (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) ratios (standard errors [SE]) were 0.24 (0.03) for total ceftazidime and 0.27 (0.03) for unbound ceftazidime; for avibactam, the ratios were 0.20 (0.02) and 0.22 (0.02), respectively. No pharmacokinetic interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam was observed. Ceftazidime and avibactam showed linear plasma pharmacokinetics that were independent of the dose combinations used or the infection site in mice. Assuming pharmacokinetic similarity in humans, this indicates that similar dose ratios of ceftazidime and avibactam could be used for different types and sites of infection. PMID:25645843

  5. Pharmacokinetics and penetration of ceftazidime and avibactam into epithelial lining fluid in thigh- and lung-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Johanna; Melchers, Maria J; van Mil, Anita C; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Lagarde, Claudia M; Nichols, Wright W; Mouton, Johan W

    2015-04-01

    Ceftazidime and the β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam constitute a new, potentially highly active combination in the battle against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. To determine possible clinical use, it is important to know the pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds related to each other in plasma and the different compartments of infection in experimentally infected animals and in humans. We used a neutropenic murine thigh infection model and lung infection model to study pharmacokinetics in plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Mice were infected with ca. 10(6) CFU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa intramuscularly into the thigh or intranasally to cause pneumonia and were given 8 different (single) subcutaneous doses of ceftazidime and avibactam in various combined concentrations, ranging from 1 to 128 mg/kg of body weight in 2-fold increases. Concomitant samples of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were taken at up to 12 time points until 6 h after administration. Pharmacokinetics of both compounds were linear and dose proportional in plasma and ELF and were independent of the infection type, with estimated half-lives (standard deviations [SD]) in plasma of ceftazidime of 0.28 (0.02) h and of avibactam of 0.24 (0.04) h and volumes of distribution of 0.80 (0.14) and 1.18 (0.34) liters/kg. The ELF-plasma (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) ratios (standard errors [SE]) were 0.24 (0.03) for total ceftazidime and 0.27 (0.03) for unbound ceftazidime; for avibactam, the ratios were 0.20 (0.02) and 0.22 (0.02), respectively. No pharmacokinetic interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam was observed. Ceftazidime and avibactam showed linear plasma pharmacokinetics that were independent of the dose combinations used or the infection site in mice. Assuming pharmacokinetic similarity in humans, this indicates that similar dose ratios of ceftazidime and avibactam could be used for different types and sites of infection. PMID

  6. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  7. Induction of IL-6 and inhibition of IL-8 secretion in the human airway cell line Calu-3 by urban particulate matter collected with a modified method of PM sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro-Moreno, Ernesto; Torres, Victor; Miranda, Javier; Martinez, Leticia; Garcia-Cuellar, Claudia; Nawrot, Tim S.; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Hoet, Peter; Ramirez-Lopez, Pavel; Rosas, Irma; Nemery, Benoit; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro Roman

    2009-07-15

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) induces inflammatory cytokines. In the present study, we evaluated the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by an airway cell line exposed to PM with a mean aerodynamic size equal to or less than 10 or 2.5 {mu}m (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}, respectively) collected in Mexico City, using a modified high-volume sampling method avoiding the use of solvents or introducing membrane components into the samples. PM was collected on cellulose-nitrate (CN) membranes modified for collection on high-volume samplers. Composition of the particles was evaluated by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and scanning electron microscopy. The particles (10-160 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) were tested on Calu-3 cells. Control cultures were exposed to LPS (10 ng/mL to 100 {mu}g/mL) or silica (10-160 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). IL-6 and IL-8 secretions were evaluated by ELISA. An average of 10 mg of PM was recovered form each cellulose-nitrate filter. No evidence of contamination from the filter was found. Cells exposed to PM{sub 10} presented an increase in the secretion of IL-6 (up to 400%), while IL-8 decreased (from 40% to levels below the detection limit). A similar but weaker effect was observed with PM{sub 2.5}. In conclusion, our modified sampling method provides a large amount of urban PM free of membrane contamination. The urban particles induce a decrease in IL-8 secretion that contrasts with the LPS and silica effects. These results suggest that the regulation of IL-8 expression is different for urban particles (complex mixture containing combustion-related particles, soil and biologic components) than for biogenic compounds or pure mineral particles.

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of upper airways from MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchet, Diane; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-03-01

    Under the framework of clinical respiratory investigation, providing accurate modalities for morpho-functional analysis is essential for diagnosis improvement, surgical planning and follow-up. This paper focuses on the upper airways investigation and develops an automated approach for 3D mesh reconstruction from MDCT acquisitions. In order to overcome the difficulties related to the complex morphology of the upper airways and to the image gray level heterogeneity of the airway lumens and thin bony septa, the proposed 3D reconstruction methodology combines 2D segmentation and 3D surface regularization approaches. The segmentation algorithm relies on mathematical morphology theory and provides airway lumen robust discrimination from the surrounding tissues, while preserving the connectivity relationship between the different anatomical structures. The 3D regularization step uses an energy-based modeling in order to achieve a smooth and well-fitted 3D surface of the upper airways. An accurate 3D mesh representation of the reconstructed airways makes it possible to develop specific clinical applications such as virtual endoscopy, surgical planning and computer assisted intervention. In addition, building up patient-specific 3D models of upper airways is highly valuable for the study and design of inhaled medication delivery via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  9. Airflow, transport and regional deposition of aerosol particles during chronic bronchitis of human central airways.

    PubMed

    Farkhadnia, Fouad; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of airway blockage in chronic bronchitis disease on the flow patterns and transport/deposition of micro-particles in a human symmetric triple bifurcation lung airway model, i.e., Weibel's generations G3-G6 was investigated. A computational fluid and particle dynamics model was implemented, validated and applied in order to evaluate the airflow and particle transport/deposition in central airways. Three breathing patterns, i.e., resting, light activity and moderate exercise, were considered. Using Lagrangian approach for particle tracking and random particle injection, an unsteady particle tracking method was performed to simulate the transport and deposition of micron-sized aerosol particles in human central airways. Assuming laminar, quasi-steady, three-dimensional air flow and spherical non-interacting particles in sequentially bifurcating rigid airways, airflow patterns and particle transport/deposition in healthy and chronic bronchitis (CB) affected airways were evaluated and compared. Comparison of deposition efficiency (DE) of aerosols in healthy and occluded airways showed that at the same flow rates DE values are typically larger in occluded airways. While in healthy airways, particles deposit mainly around the carinal ridges and flow dividers-due to direct inertial impaction, in CB affected airways they deposit mainly on the tubular surfaces of blocked airways because of gravitational sedimentation. PMID:26541595

  10. Trace elements and micropollutant anions in the dialysis and reinfusion fluid prepared on-line for haemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Surian, M; Bonforte, G; Scanziani, R; Dozio, B; Baj, A; Della Vedova, L; Toffoletto, F

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to the trace elements and micropollutions of tap water may be very considerable in dialysis patients. As few data on trace elements in reinfusion and dialysis fluid for haemodiafiltration (HDF) have been reported, we studied nine trace elements (microg/l; Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Se, Zn) and five anions (mg/l; F-, NO2-, NO3-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-)) in tap water, in water after two passages of reverse osmosis (2RO), in dialysate and in on-line prepared reinfusate. NO3- and SO4(2-) were somewhat elevated in our tap water (22.2+/-7.6 and 21.8+/-11.3 mg/l) but decreased (P<0.001) after 2RO (1.4+/-1.5 and 0.9+/-1.1 mg/l); the other anions, which were at a very low level, remained unchanged. All trace elements decreased, with statistical significance only for Al, Cr and Zn from 14.9+/-19.9, 2.6+/-0.6 and 35.1+/-41.1 microg/ to 3.2+/-2.1, 0.2+/-0.2 and 3.5+/-4.8 microg/l, respectively. Due to impurities in concentrate salts for Al (5.4+/-3.1), Cr (0.5+/-0.4) and SO4(2-) (2.4+/-1.8), greater concentrations were found in dialysate and reinfusate than in tap water after 2RO (P<0.03). For all measurements, trace elements and anions were at acceptable levels according to international standards. Simultaneous determinations of trace elements at inflow (Din) and outflow (Dout) of the dialysate as well as in plasma or in whole blood at the beginning of on-line HDF documented Dout/Din>1 for Al, Cu and Zn and a positive gradient between the concentration in blood and dialysate inlet. In conclusion, our dialysate and reinfusate can be considered safe regarding trace elements and micropollution: two passages through reverse osmosis reduces the concentrations of trace elements and anions. The impurities of concentrates are acceptable. Accumulation or depletion of trace elements should be evaluated after longitudinal studies of plasma concentrations. PMID:9623527

  11. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  12. Keratinocyte growth factor accelerates wound closure in airway epithelium during cyclic mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Waters, C M; Savla, U

    1999-12-01

    The airway epithelium may be damaged by inhalation of noxious agents, in response to pathogens, or during endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Maintenance of an intact epithelium is important for lung fluid balance, and the loss of epithelium may stimulate inflammatory responses. Epithelial repair in the airways following injury must occur on a substrate that undergoes cyclic elongation and compression during respiration. We have previously shown that cyclic mechanical strain inhibits wound closure in the airway epithelium (Savla and Waters, 1998b). In this study, we investigated the stimulation of epithelial wound closure by keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in vitro and the mechanisms by which KGF overcomes the inhibition due to mechanical strain. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) and a cell line of human airway epithelial cells, Calu 3, were grown on Silastic membranes, and a wound was scraped across the well. The wells were then exposed to cyclic strain using the Flexercell Strain Unit, and wound closure was measured. While cyclic elongation (20% maximum) and cyclic compression (approximately 2%) both inhibited wound closure in untreated wells, treatment with KGF (50 ng/ml) significantly accelerated wound closure and overcame the inhibition due to cyclic strain. Since wound closure involves cell spreading, migration, and proliferation, we investigated the effect of cyclic strain on cell area, cell-cell distance, and cell velocity at the wound edge. While the cell area increased in unstretched monolayers, the cell area of monolayers in compressed regions decreased significantly. Treatment with KGF increased the cell area in both cyclically elongated and compressed cells. Also, when cells were treated with KGF, cell velocity was significantly increased in both static and cyclically strained monolayers, and cyclic strain did not inhibit cell migration. These results suggest that KGF is an important factor in

  13. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  14. Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

  15. Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 in Allergic Airway Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Veraldi, Kristen L.; Gibson, Bethany T.; Yasuoka, Hidekata; Myerburg, Michael M.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Balzar, Silvana; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: The hallmarks of allergic asthma are airway inflammation, obstruction, and remodeling. Airway remodeling may lead to irreversible airflow obstruction with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in the treatment of asthma, the mechanisms underlying airway remodeling are still poorly understood. We reported that insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding proteins (IGFBPs) contribute to extracellular matrix deposition in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; however, their contribution to airway remodeling in asthma has not been established. Objectives: We hypothesized that IGFBP-3 is overexpressed in asthma and contributes to airway remodeling. Methods: We evaluated levels of IGFBP-3 in tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with asthma at baseline and 48 hours after allergen challenge, in reparative epithelium in an in vitro wounding assay, and in conditioned media from cytokine- and growth factor–stimulated primary epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: IGFBP-3 levels and distribution were evaluated by Western blot, ELISA, and immunofluorescence. IGFBP-3 is increased in vivo in the airway epithelium of patients with asthma compared with normal control subjects. The concentration of IGFBP-3 is increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with asthma after allergen challenge, its levels are increased in reparative epithelium in an in vitro wounding assay and in the conditioned medium of primary airway epithelial cell cultures stimulated with IGF-I. Conclusions: Our results suggest that one mechanism of allergic airway remodeling is through the secretion of the profibrotic IGFBP-3 from IGF-I–stimulated airway epithelial cells during allergic inflammation. PMID:19608721

  16. Early interleukin 4-dependent response can induce airway hyperreactivity before development of airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    To, Y; Dohi, M; Tanaka, R; Sato, A; Nakagome, K; Yamamoto, K

    2001-10-01

    In experimental models of bronchial asthma with mice, airway inflammation and increase in airway hyperreactivity (AHR) are induced by a combination of systemic sensitization and airway challenge with allergens. In this report, we present another possibility: that systemic antigen-specific sensitization alone can induce AHR before the development of inflammation in the airway. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) by a combination of intraperitoneal injection and aerosol inhalation, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity were sequentially analyzed. Bronchial response measured by a noninvasive method (enhanced pause) and the eosinophil count and interleukin (IL)-5 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) gradually increased following the sensitization, and significant increase was achieved after repeated OVA aerosol inhalation along with development of histologic changes of the airway. In contrast, AHR was already significantly increased by systemic sensitization alone, although airway inflammation hardly developed at that time point. BALF IL-4 concentration and the expression of IL-4 mRNA in the lung reached maximal values after the systemic sensitization, then subsequently decreased. Treatment of mice with anti-IL-4 neutralizing antibody during systemic sensitization significantly suppressed this early increase in AHR. In addition, IL-4 gene-targeted mice did not reveal this early increase in AHR by systemic sensitization. These results suggest that an immune response in the lung in an early stage of sensitization can induce airway hyperreactivity before development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice and that IL-4 plays an essential role in this process. If this early increase in AHR does occur in sensitized human infants, it could be another therapeutic target for early prevention of the future onset of asthma. PMID:11598151

  17. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  18. Epithelial hyperplasia, airways

    Cancer.gov

    Number of respiratory epithelial cells is increased diffusely or focally. Frequently luminal protrusions are observed, sometimes forming papillae. Mucous (goblet) cell metaplastic hyperplasia is a variant, in which the respiratory epithelium of conducting airways is replaced by mucous cells either as a single or a pseudostratified layer.

  19. Meropenem-RPX7009 Concentrations in Plasma, Epithelial Lining Fluid, and Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Adult Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Eric; Gotfried, Mark H; Loutit, Jeffrey S; Durso, Stephanie; Griffith, David C; Dudley, Michael N; Rodvold, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    The steady-state concentrations of meropenem and the β-lactamase inhibitor RPX7009 in plasma, epithelial lining fluid (ELF), and alveolar macrophage (AM) concentrations were obtained in 25 healthy, nonsmoking adult subjects. Subjects received a fixed combination of meropenem (2 g) and RPX7009 (2 g) administered every 8 h, as a 3-h intravenous infusion, for a total of three doses. A bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage were performed once in each subject at 1.5, 3.25, 4, 6, or 8 h after the start of the last infusion. Meropenem and RPX7009 achieved a similar time course and magnitude of concentrations in plasma and ELF. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters ± the standard deviations of meropenem and RPX7009 determined from serial plasma concentrations were as follows: Cmax = 58.2 ± 10.8 and 59.0 ± 8.4 μg/ml, Vss = 16.3 ± 2.6 and 17.6 ± 2.6 liters; CL = 11.1 ± 2.1 and 10.1 ± 1.9 liters/h, and t1/2 = 1.03 ± 0.15 and 1.27 ± 0.21 h, respectively. The intrapulmonary penetrations of meropenem and RPX7009 were ca. 63 and 53%, respectively, based on the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 8 h (AUC0-8) values of ELF and total plasma concentrations. When unbound plasma concentrations were considered, ELF penetrations were 65 and 79% for meropenem and RPX7009, respectively. Meropenem concentrations in AMs were below the quantitative limit of detection, whereas median concentrations of RPX7009 in AMs ranged from 2.35 to 6.94 μg/ml. The results from the present study lend support to exploring a fixed combination of meropenem (2 g) and RPX7009 (2 g) for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by meropenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens susceptible to the combination of meropenem-RPX7009. PMID:26349830

  20. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  1. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  2. Airway irritation and cough evoked by acid: from human to ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qihai; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation or aspiration of acid solution evokes airway defense responses such as cough and reflex bronchoconstriction, resulting from activation of vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibers and Aδ afferents. The stimulatory effect of hydrogen ion on these sensory nerves is generated by activation of two major types of ion channels expressed in these neurons: a rapidly activating and inactivating current mediated through ASICs, and a slow sustaining current via activation of TRPV1. Recent studies have shown that these acid-evoked responses are elevated during airway inflammatory reaction, revealing the potential convergence of a wide array of inflammatory signaling on these ion channels. Since pH in the airway fluid drops substantially in patients with inflammatory airway diseases, these heightened stimulatory effects of acid on airway sensory nerves may play a part in the manifestation of airway irritation and excessive cough under those pathophysiological conditions. PMID:21543258

  3. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  4. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  5. Chlorine-induced injury to the airways in mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Campbell, Holly R; Iijima, Hiroaki; Gautrin, Denyse; Malo, Jean-Luc; Eidelman, David H; Hamid, Qutayba; Maghni, Karim

    2003-09-01

    Exposure to chlorine gas (Cl2) causes occupational asthma that we hypothesized occurs through the induction of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness by oxidative damage. Respiratory mechanics and airway responsiveness to methacholine were assessed in A/J mice 24 hours after a 5-minute exposure to 100, 200, 400, or 800 ppm Cl2 and 2 and 7 days after inhalation of 400 ppm Cl2. Airway responsiveness was higher 24 hours after 400 and 800 ppm Cl2. Responsiveness after inhalation of 400 ppm Cl2 returned to normal by 2 days but was again elevated at 7 days. Airway epithelial loss, patchy alveolar damage, proteinaceous exudates, and inflammatory cells within alveolar walls were observed in animals exposed to 800 ppm Cl2. Macrophages, granulocytes, epithelial cells, and nitrate/nitrite levels increased in lung lavage fluid. Increased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and oxidation of lung proteins were observed. Epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages from mice exposed to 800 ppm Cl2 stained for 3-nitrotyrosine residues. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase with 1400W (1 mg/kg) abrogated the Cl2-induced changes in responsiveness. We conclude that chlorine exposure causes functional and pathological changes in the airways associated with oxidative stress. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is involved in the induction of changes in responsiveness to methacholine. PMID:12724121

  6. Effect of nutritional antioxidant supplementation on systemic and pulmonary antioxidant status, airway inflammation and lung function in heaves-affected horses.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, N; Fiévez, L; Bougnet, V; Art, T; Degand, G; Smith, N; Marlin, D; Roberts, C; Harris, P; Lekeux, P

    2002-11-01

    An oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in favour of oxidants has been identified as playing a decisive role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Nutritional antioxidant supplementation might reduce oxidative damage by enhancement of the antioxidant defence, thereby modulating inflammatory processes. In a placebo-controlled, blind study, it was tested whether a dietary antioxidant supplement administered for 4 weeks would improve lung function and reduce airway inflammation in heaves-affected horses. Eight horses in clinical remission of heaves were investigated at rest and after a standardised exercise test before and after treatment with an antioxidant supplement (consisting of a mixture of natural antioxidants including vitamins E and C and selenium from a variety of sources) or placebo (oatfeed pellets without additive). Pulmonary function and exercise tolerance were monitored; systemic and pulmonary lining fluid uric acid, glutathione and 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) were analysed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and inflammatory scoring of the airways were performed. The antioxidant treatment significantly improved exercise tolerance and significantly reduced endoscopic inflammatory score. Plasma uric acid concentrations were significantly reduced, suggesting downregulation of the xanthine-dehydrogenase and xanthine-oxydase pathway. Haemolysate glutathione showed a nonsignificant trend to increase, while plasma 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) remained unchanged. Pulmonary markers and BAL cytology were not significantly affected by antioxidant supplementation. The present study suggests that the antioxidant supplement tested modulated oxidant/antioxidant balance and airway inflammation of heaves-affected horses. PMID:12455842

  7. Lung registration using airway tree morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Park, Sang; Pu, Jiantao; Wenzel, Sally E.; Leader, Joseph K.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a non-linear medical image registration algorithm that aligns lung CT images scanned at different respiratory phases. The method uses landmarks obtained from the airway tree to find the airway branch extension lines and where the lines intersect the lung surface. The branch extension and lung intersection voxels on the surface were the crucial landmarks that initialize the non-rigid registration process. The advantage of these landmarks is that they have high correspondence between the matching patterns in the template images and deformed images. This method was developed and tested on CT examinations from participants in an asthma study. The registration accuracy was evaluated by the average distance between the corresponding airway tree branch points in the pair of images. The mean value of the distance between landmarks in template images and deformed matching images for subjects 1 and 2 were 8.44 mm (+/-4.46 mm) and 4.33 mm (+/- 3.78 mm), respectively. The results show that the lung image registration technique developed in this study may prove useful in quantifying longitudinal changes, performing regional analysis, tracking lung tumors, and compensating for subject motion across CT images.

  8. Modeling the Nonlinear Motion of the Rat Central Airways.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, G; Rona, A; Hainsworth, S V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in volumetric medical imaging techniques allowed the subject-specific modeling of the bronchial flow through the first few generations of the central airways using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a reliable CFD prediction of the bronchial flow requires modeling of the inhomogeneous deformation of the central airways during breathing. This paper addresses this issue by introducing two models of the central airways motion. The first model utilizes a node-to-node mapping between the discretized geometries of the central airways generated from a number of successive computed tomography (CT) images acquired dynamically (without breath hold) over the breathing cycle of two Sprague-Dawley rats. The second model uses a node-to-node mapping between only two discretized airway geometries generated from the CT images acquired at end-exhale and at end-inhale along with the ventilator measurement of the lung volume change. The advantage of this second model is that it uses just one pair of CT images, which more readily complies with the radiation dosage restrictions for humans. Three-dimensional computer aided design geometries of the central airways generated from the dynamic-CT images were used as benchmarks to validate the output from the two models at sampled time-points over the breathing cycle. The central airway geometries deformed by the first model showed good agreement to the benchmark geometries within a tolerance of 4%. The central airway geometry deformed by the second model better approximated the benchmark geometries than previous approaches that used a linear or harmonic motion model. PMID:26592166

  9. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes. PMID:12405726

  10. Upper Airway Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Verbraecken, Johan A.; De Backer, Wilfried A.

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiological aspects of sleep-disordered breathing, with focus on upper airway mechanics in obstructive and central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to substantial pathology, i.e. increased upper airway collapsibility, control of breathing instability, increased work of breathing, disturbed ventilatory system mechanics and neurohormonal changes. Concepts are changing. Although sleep apnoea is considered more and more to be an increased loop gain disorder, the central type of apnoea is now considered as an obstructive event, because it causes pharyngeal narrowing, associated with prolonged expiration. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious circle. Knowledge of common patterns of sleep-disordered breathing may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:19478479

  11. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  12. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    PubMed

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained. PMID:22558834

  13. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  14. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  15. Airway closure in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dutrieue, Brigitte; Verbanck, Sylvia; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G Kim

    2005-08-25

    Recent single breath washout (SBW) studies in microgravity and on the ground have suggested an important effect of airway closure on gas mixing in the human lung, reflected particularly in the phase III slope of vital capacity SBW and bolus tests. In order to explore this effect, we designed a SBW in which subjects inspired 2-l from residual volume (RV) starting with a 150 ml bolus of He and SF6. In an attempt to vary the pattern of airways closure configuration before the test, the experiments were conducted in 1G and in microgravity during parabolic flight allowing the pre-test expiration to RV to be either in microgravity or at 1.8 G, with the actual test gas inhalation performed entirely in microgravity. Contrary to our expectations, the measured phase III slope and phase IV height and volume obtained from seven subjects in microgravity were essentially identical irrespective of the gravity level during the pre-test expiration to RV. The results suggest that airway closure configuration at RV before the test inspiration has no apparent impact on phases III and IV generation. PMID:15979418

  16. O/sub 3/-induced change in bronchial reactivity to methacholine and airway inflammation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, J.; Bigby, B.G.; Stulbarg, M.; Holtzman, M.J.; Nadel, J.A.; Ueki, I.F.; Leikauf, G.D.; Goetzl, E.J.; Boushey, H.A.

    1986-04-01

    The increase in airway responsiveness induced by O/sub 3/ exposure in dogs is associated with airway epithelial inflammation, as evidenced by an increase in the number of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) found in epithelial biopsies and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We investigated in 10 healthy, human subjects whether O/sub 3/-induced hyperresponsiveness was similarly associated with airway inflammation by examining changes in the types of cells recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained after exposure to air or to O/sub 3/ (0.4 or 0.6 ppm). We also measured the concentrations of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid in lavage fluid. We measured airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine aerosol before and after each exposure and performed bronchoalveolar lavage 3 h later. We found more neutrophils in the lavage fluid from O/sub 3/-exposed subjects, especially in those in whom O/sub 3/ exposure produced an increase in airway responsiveness. We also found significant increases in the concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha, and thromboxane B2 in lavage fluid from O/sub 3/-exposed subjects. These results show that in human subjects O/sub 3/-induced hyperresponsiveness to methacholine is associated with an influx of neutrophils into the airways and with changes in the levels of some cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid.

  17. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  18. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  19. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges. PMID:25554179

  20. Oral fluid testing for cannabis: on-site OraLine IV s.a.t. device versus GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, Vincent; Villain, Marion; Mura, Patrick; Bernard, Marc; Kintz, Pascal

    2006-09-12

    Saliva or "oral fluid" has been presented as an alternative matrix to document drug use. The non-invasive collection of a saliva sample, which is relatively easy to perform and can be achieved under close supervision, is one of the most important benefits in a driving under the influence situation. Moreover, the presence of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in oral fluid is a better indication of recent use than when 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) is detected in urine, so there is a higher probability that the subject is experiencing pharmacological effects at the time of sampling. In the first part of the study, 27 drug addicts were tested for the presence of THC using the OraLine IV s.a.t. device to establish the potential of this new on-site DOA detection technique. In parallel, oral fluid was collected with the Intercept DOA Oral Specimen Collection device and tested for THC by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after methylation for THC (limit of quantification: 1 ng/mL). The OraLine device correctly identified nine saliva specimens positive for cannabis with THC concentrations ranging from 3 to 265 ng/mL, but remained negative in four other samples where low THC concentrations were detected by GC/MS (1-13 ng/mL). One false positive was noted. Secondly, two male subjects were screened in saliva using the OraLine and Intercept devices after consumption of a single cannabis cigarette containing 25mg of THC. Saliva was first tested with the OraLine device and then collected with the Intercept device for GC/MS confirmation. In one subject, the OraLine on-site test was positive for THC for 2 h following drug intake with THC concentrations decreasing from 196 to 16 ng/mL, while the test remained positive for 1.5 h for the second subject (THC concentrations ranging from 199 to 11 ng/mL). These preliminary results obtained with the OraLine IV s.a.t. device indicate more encouraging data for the detection of THC using on

  1. Epithelial cell deformation during surfactant-mediated airway reopening: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Naire, Shailesh; Jensen, Oliver E

    2005-08-01

    A theoretical model is presented describing the reopening by an advancing air bubble of an initially liquid-filled collapsed airway lined with deformable epithelial cells. The model integrates descriptions of flow-structure interaction (accounting for nonlinear deformation of the airway wall and viscous resistance of the airway liquid flow), surfactant transport around the bubble tip (incorporating physicochemical parameters appropriate for Infasurf), and cell deformation (due to stretching of the airway wall and airway liquid flows). It is shown how the pressure required to drive a bubble into a flooded airway, peeling apart the wet airway walls, can be reduced substantially by surfactant, although the effectiveness of Infasurf is limited by slow adsorption at high concentrations. The model demonstrates how the addition of surfactant can lead to the spontaneous reopening of a collapsed airway, depending on the degree of initial airway collapse. The effective elastic modulus of the epithelial layer is shown to be a key determinant of the relative magnitude of strains generated by flow-induced shear stresses and by airway wall stretch. The model also shows how epithelial-layer compressibility can mediate strains arising from flow-induced normal stresses and stress gradients. PMID:15802368

  2. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Katsuyuki; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2016-06-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  3. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  4. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  5. Different airway inflammatory responses in asthmatic and healthy humans exposed to diesel.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, N; Nordenhäll, C; Salvi, S S; Mudway, I; Söderberg, M; Blomberg, A; Helleday, R; Levin, J O; Holgate, S T; Kelly, F J; Frew, A J; Sandström, T

    2004-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution adversely affects the airways, with asthmatic subjects thought to be especially sensitive. The authors hypothesised that exposure to diesel exhaust (DE), a major source of PM, would induce airway neutrophilia in healthy subjects, and that either these responses would be exaggerated in subjects with mild allergic asthma, or DE would exacerbate pre-existent allergic airways. Healthy and mild asthmatic subjects were exposed for 2 h to ambient levels of DE (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm (PM10) 108 microg x m(-3)) and lung function and airway inflammation were assessed. Both groups showed an increase in airway resistance of similar magnitude after DE exposure. Healthy subjects developed airway inflammation 6 h after DE exposure, with airways neutrophilia and lymphocytosis together with an increase in interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein in lavage fluid, increased IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the bronchial mucosa and upregulation of the endothelial adhesion molecules. In asthmatic subjects, DE exposure did not induce a neutrophilic response or exacerbate their pre-existing eosinophilic airway inflammation. Epithelial staining for the cytokine IL-10 was increased after DE in the asthmatic group. Differential effects on the airways of healthy subjects and asthmatics of particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm at concentrations below current World Health Organisation air quality standards have been observed in this study. Further work is required to elucidate the significance of these differential responses. PMID:14738236

  6. Intra-operative on-line discrimination of kidney cancer from normal tissue by IR ATR spectroscopy of extracellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urboniene, V.; Velicka, M.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.; Steiner, G.

    2016-03-01

    Determination of cancerous and normal kidney tissues during partial, simple or radical nephrectomy surgery was performed by using differences in the IR absorption spectra of extracellular fluid taken from the corresponding tissue areas. The samples were prepared by stamping of the kidney tissue on ATR diamond crystal. The spectral measurements were performed directly in the OR during surgery for 58 patients. It was found that intensities of characteristic spectral bands of glycogen (880-1200 cm-1) in extracellular fluid are sensitive to the type of the tissue and can be used as spectral markers of tumours. Characteristic spectral band of lactic acid (1730 cm-1) - product of the anaerobic glycolysis, taking place in the cancer cells is not suitable for use as a spectral marker of cancerous tissue, since it overlaps with the band of carbonyl stretch in phospholipids and fatty acids. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis of the spectra show that the spectra of healthy and tumour tissue films can be reliably separated into two groups. On the other hand, possibility to differentiate between tumours of different types and grades remains in question. While the fluid from highly malignant G3 tumour tissue contains highly pronounced glycogen spectral bands and can be well separated from benign and G1 tumours by principal component analysis, the variations between spectra from sample to sample prevent from obtaining conclusive results about the grouping between different tumour types and grades. The proposed method is instant and can be used in situ and even in vivo.

  7. Influence of two-phase gas-liquid interaction on aerosol deposition in airways.

    PubMed

    Kim, C S; Abraham, W M; Chapman, G A; Sackner, M A

    1985-04-01

    Many patients with chronic simple bronchitis, viz., chronic productive cough without major airway obstruction, frequently show enhanced aerosol deposition in the airways. We hypothesized that this phenomenon might relate in part to wave motion of an accumulated layer of mucus caused by dynamic, two-phase gas-liquid interactions. In the present investigation, two-phase gas-liquid interaction was demonstrated in vivo by observing wave motion during tidal breathing of radiopaque-labeled viscous and viscoelastic fluids that had been added to distal tracheas of conscious sheep. Total aerosol deposition in the lung and mean pulmonary resistance (RL) were measured after addition of 4 to 10 ml of viscoelastic or viscous fluids to the distal main bronchi of conscious sheep. Change in aerosol deposition over baseline after fluid addition was compared with change in RL. In 21 experiments, 5 for each of 3 viscoelastic fluids with varying characteristics and 6 for a viscous fluid, aerosol deposition was significantly enhanced in every experiment, irrespective of the type of fluid added. This increase in aerosol deposition ranged from 13 to 66% above baseline. The RL increased in 5 of the 6 experiments with viscous fluid and in 4 of the 15 experiments with viscoelastic fluids. There was less wavelike motion with viscous than with viscoelastic fluids. These results suggest that two-phase gas-liquid interaction in the airways can account for increased aerosol deposition with little alteration in airway resistance. PMID:3994158

  8. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  10. Glandular Proteome Identifies Antiprotease Cystatin C as a Critical Modulator of Airway Hydration and Clearance.

    PubMed

    Evans, T Idil Apak; Joo, Nam Soo; Keiser, Nicholas W; Yan, Ziying; Tyler, Scott R; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Yulong; Hsiao, Jordy J; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wright, Michael E; Wine, Jeffrey J; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-04-01

    Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel lead to viscous secretions from submucosal glands that cannot be properly hydrated and cleared by beating cilia in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. The mechanisms by which CFTR, and the predominant epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), control the hydration and clearance of glandular secretions remain unclear. We used a proteomics approach to characterize the proteins contained in CF and non-CF submucosal gland fluid droplets and found that differentially regulated proteases (cathepsin S and H) and their antiprotease (cystatin C) influenced the equilibration of fluid on the airway surface and tracheal mucociliary clearance (MCC). Contrary to prevailing models of airway hydration and clearance, cystatin C, or raising the airway surface liquid (ASL) pH, inhibited cathepsin-dependent ENaC-mediated fluid absorption and raised the height of ASL, and yet decreased MCC velocity. Importantly, coupling of both CFTR and ENaC activities were required for effective MCC and for effective ASL height equilibration after volume challenge. Cystatin C-inhibitable cathepsins controlled initial phases of ENaC-mediated fluid absorption, whereas CFTR activity was required to prevent ASL dehydration. Interestingly, CF airway epithelia absorbed fluid more slowly owing to reduced cysteine protease activity in the ASL but became abnormally dehydrated with time. Our findings demonstrate that, after volume challenge, pH-dependent protease-mediated coupling of CFTR and ENaC activities are required for rapid fluid equilibration at the airway surface and for effective MCC. These findings provide new insights into how glandular fluid secretions may be equilibrated at the airway surface and how this process may be impaired in CF. PMID:26334941

  11. Surgery of the airway: historic notes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the 20th century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20th century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection. PMID:26981261

  12. Surgery of the airway: historic notes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joel D

    2016-03-01

    Prior to the 20(th) century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20(th) century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection. PMID:26981261

  13. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wykes, P M

    1991-06-01

    This is a complex condition, recognized primarily in brachycephalic breeds, that results in varying degrees of upper airway obstruction. The signs consist of respiratory distress, stridor, reduced exercise tolerance, and in more severe cases, cyanosis and collapse. The inherent anatomy of the brachycephalic skull contributes to the development of these signs. Such anatomic features include: a shortened and distorted nasopharynx, stenotic nares, an elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules. The increased negative pressure created in the pharyngolaryngeal region, as a result of these obstructing structures, ultimately results in distortion and collapse of the arytenoid cartilages of the larynx. PMID:1802247

  14. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Rancourt, Raymond C. Veress, Livia A. Ahmad, Aftab Hendry-Hofer, Tara B. Rioux, Jacqueline S. Garlick, Rhonda B. White, Carl W.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  15. Effect of simulated microgravity on nitric oxide synthase activity of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Yang, Xiao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    It is well known that microgravity could induce bone loss. However, the mechanism remains poorly understood. Osteocytes are extremely sensitive to fluid shear stress, even more than osteobleasts. The effect of simulated microgravity on osteocytes in response to fluid shear was investigated in this study in order to see if the mechanosensibility of osteocytes changed under simulated microgravity. The osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, was cultured and divided into four groups, including control (CON), control and shear (CONS), rotary (RT), rotary and shear (RTS). In RT and RTS, the cells were cultured in the rotary cell culture system to simulate microgravity condition. After 5 days, the cells in RTS and CONS were subjected to flow shear for 15 min. Then nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the cells was measured using assay kit. The results showed that NOS activity in respond to fluid shear decreased significantly in RTS compared with CONS. In addition, there was significant difference in NOS activity between CONS and CON while no significant difference between RTS and RT. These indicates that the mechanosensibility of osteocytes decreased under simulated microgravity and this maybe the partly causes of the poor effect of exercise to counter microgravity-induced-bone loss. However, further research need to be done to support this finding.

  16. NIR spectroscopic method for the in-line moisture assessment during drying in a six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous tablet production line: Validation of quantifying abilities and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Arruabarrena, Julen; de Beer, Jacques; Hellings, Mario; Van Den Kerkhof, Tom; Burggraeve, Anneleen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the thorough validation of an in-line NIR based moisture quantification method in the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line (ConsiGma™ 25, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium). The moisture assessment ability of an FT-NIR spectrometer (Matrix™-F Duplex, Bruker Optics Ltd, UK) equipped with a fiber-optic Lighthouse Probe™ (LHP, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium) was investigated. Although NIR spectroscopy is a widely used technique for in-process moisture determination, a minority of NIR spectroscopy methods is thoroughly validated. A moisture quantification PLS model was developed. Twenty calibration experiments were conducted, during which spectra were collected at-line and then regressed versus the corresponding residual moisture values obtained via Karl Fischer measurements. The developed NIR moisture quantification model was then validated by calculating the accuracy profiles on the basis of the analysis results of independent in-line validation experiments. Furthermore, as the aim of the NIR method is to replace the destructive, time-consuming Karl Fischer titration, it was statistically demonstrated that the new NIR method performs at least as good as the Karl Fischer reference method. PMID:25124155

  17. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  18. Computational Flow Modeling of Human Upper Airway Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylavarapu, Goutham

    Computational modeling of biological systems have gained a lot of interest in biomedical research, in the recent past. This thesis focuses on the application of computational simulations to study airflow dynamics in human upper respiratory tract. With advancements in medical imaging, patient specific geometries of anatomically accurate respiratory tracts can now be reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) or Computed Tomography (CT) scans, with better and accurate details than traditional cadaver cast models. Computational studies using these individualized geometrical models have advantages of non-invasiveness, ease, minimum patient interaction, improved accuracy over experimental and clinical studies. Numerical simulations can provide detailed flow fields including velocities, flow rates, airway wall pressure, shear stresses, turbulence in an airway. Interpretation of these physical quantities will enable to develop efficient treatment procedures, medical devices, targeted drug delivery etc. The hypothesis for this research is that computational modeling can predict the outcomes of a surgical intervention or a treatment plan prior to its application and will guide the physician in providing better treatment to the patients. In the current work, three different computational approaches Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Flow-Structure Interaction (FSI) and Particle Flow simulations were used to investigate flow in airway geometries. CFD approach assumes airway wall as rigid, and relatively easy to simulate, compared to the more challenging FSI approach, where interactions of airway wall deformations with flow are also accounted. The CFD methodology using different turbulence models is validated against experimental measurements in an airway phantom. Two case-studies using CFD, to quantify a pre and post-operative airway and another, to perform virtual surgery to determine the best possible surgery in a constricted airway is demonstrated. The unsteady

  19. Limonene inhalation reduces allergic airway inflammation in Dermatophagoides farinae-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Ryoji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Bhatti, Sabah Asif; Ngatu, Nlandu Roger; Muzembo, Basilua Andre; Dumavibhat, Narongpon; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Sawamura, Masayoshi; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2012-05-01

    Limonene is one of the main flavonoids which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the production of reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether limonene can inhibit Dermatophagoides farinae-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilic infiltration and other histological changes in the lung, T helper (Th) 2 cytokine production and airway remodeling in a mice model of asthma. Treatment with limonene significantly reduced the levels of IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin, MCP-1, and TGF-β₁ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The goblet cell metaplasia, thickness of airway smooth muscle, and airway fibrosis were markedly decreased in limonene-treated mice. Furthermore, AHR to acetylcholine was significantly abrogated in limonene-treated mice. These results indicate that limonene has a potential to reduce airway remodeling and AHR in asthma model. PMID:22564095

  20. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, A. M.; Gaver, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway’s walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble’s tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls’ nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble’s speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway’s cellular epithelium during airway reopening. PMID:23745044

  1. Effects of feeding sunflower oil or seal blubber oil to horses with recurrent airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Khol-Parisini, Annabella; van den Hoven, René; Leinker, Sandra; Hulan, Howard W.; Zentek, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    A crossover feeding trial was performed with 9 horses suffering from recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). The study aimed to determine whether ingestion of sunflower oil (SFO), rich in linoleic acid, or seal blubber oil (SBO), a source of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs), changes the fatty acid (FA) ratios in plasma and leukocyte membrane phospholipids (PLs) or the leukocyte numbers or proportions of cell types in the airways. We also investigated diet-related changes in respiratory rate, maximum change in pleural pressure (ΔPplmax), dynamic compliance (Cdyn), and pulmonary resistance (RL). Each animal was fed hay and oats supplemented with 320 mg/kg body weight (BW) of either SFO or SBO for 10 wk. Before and after the feeding periods, we performed FA analyses, cytologic testing of the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF), clinical scoring, and pulmonary function testing. The results demonstrated that supplementary FAs were readily ingested and incorporated into leukocyte cell membranes. The n-6:n-3 FA ratios in plasma and leukocyte PLs were reduced after SBO supplementation, as were the PELF leukocyte counts (P < 0.05). On the other hand, pulmonary function and clinical signs were not markedly changed by the different dietary FAs. These results indicate a possible influence of dietary n-3 PUFAs on the pulmonary inflammation of horses with RAO. Further studies are warranted to address effects on inflammatory mediators and clinical outcome. PMID:17193883

  2. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems using laser absorption spectroscopy: Application to stalagmites from Borneo and Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Fleitmann, Dominik; Nele Meckler, Anna; Leuenberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Speleothems are recognised as key continental archives for paleoclimate reconstructions. They contain fluid inclusions representing past drip water trapped in the calcite structure. Speleothem can be precisely dated and therefore the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of fluid inclusions constitute powerful proxies for paleotemperature or to investigate changes in the moisture source over several interglacial-glacial cycles. To liberate fluid inclusion water and to analyse its isotopic composition, a new online extraction method developed at Bern is used. The principle can be summarised as follows: Prior to crushing, the sample is placed into a copper tube, fixed to the line previously heated to 140° C and flushed with a nitrogen and standard water mixture. Thereafter, the speleothem sample is crushed using a simple hydraulic crushing device and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by the nitrogen-standard water mixture flow to a Picarro L1102-i isotopic liquid water and water vapor analyser. The measuring principle is based on wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Reproducibility of standard water measurements is typically better than 1.5 o for δD and 0.4 o for δ18O. With this method, we successfully analysed δD and δ18O isotopic composition of a stalagmite from Northern Borneo (tropical West Pacific) covering almost two glacial-interglacial cycles from MIS 12 to early MIS 9 (460-330 ka) as well as recent samples from Switzerland and Borneo. These results are used in combination with calcite δ18O to reconstruct paleotemperature. Currently, we are measuring a stalagmite from Milandre cave (Jura, Switzerland) covering the Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas cold phase and the Holocene.

  3. Ozone-induced lung function decrements do not correlate with early airway inflammatory or antioxidant responses.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, A; Mudway, I S; Nordenhäll, C; Hedenström, H; Kelly, F J; Frew, A J; Holgate, S T; Sandström, T

    1999-06-01

    This study sought to clarify the early events occurring within the airways of healthy human subjects performing moderate intermittent exercise following ozone challenge. Thirteen healthy nonsmoking subjects were exposed in a single blinded, crossover control fashion to 0.2 parts per million (ppm) O3 and filtered air for 2 h, using a standard intermittent exercise and rest protocol. Lung function was assessed pre- and immediately post-exposure. Bronchoscopy was performed with endobronchial mucosal biopsies, bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 1.5 h after the end of the exposure period. Respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF) redox status was assessed by measuring a range of antioxidants and oxidative damage markers in BW and BAL fluid samples. There was a significant upregulation after O3 exposure in the expression of vascular endothelial P-selectin (p<0.005) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (p<0.005). This was associated with a 2-fold increase in submucosal mast cells (p<0.005) in biopsy samples, without evidence of neutrophilic inflammation, and a decrease in BAL fluid macrophage numbers (1.6-fold, p<0.005), with an activation of the remaining macrophage subset (2.5-fold increase in % human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ cells, p<0.005). In addition, exposure led to a 4.5-fold and 3.1-fold increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations, in BW and BAL fluid respectively (p<0.05), with alterations in urate and alpha-tocopherol plasma/RTLF partitioning ratios (p<0.05). Spirometry showed reductions in forced vital capacity (p<0.05) and forced expiratory volume in one second (p<0.01), with evidence of small airway narrowing using forced expiratory flow values (p<0.005). Evidence was found of O3-induced early adhesion molecule upregulation, increased submucosal mast cell numbers and alterations to the respiratory tract lining fluid redox status. No clear relationship was demonstrable between changes in these early markers and the lung function

  4. Airway Injury from Initiating Ventilation in Preterm Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Pillow, J. Jane; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Nitsos, Ilias; Jobe, Alan H.

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants exposed to ventilation are at risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and persistent lung disease in childhood. We report where injury occurred within the lung following brief ventilation at birth. Preterm sheep (129d gestation) were ventilated with an escalating VT to 15mL/kg by 15 min to injure the lungs, with the placental circulation intact (Fetal) or after delivery (Newborn). Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for 2h 45min, while Newborn lambs were maintained with gentle ventilatory support for the same period. The control group was not ventilated. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were analysed. In both Fetal and Newborn lambs, ventilation caused bronchial epithelial disruption in medium-sized airways. Egr-1, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1β mRNA increased in lung tissue from Fetal and Newborn lambs. Egr-1, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNA were induced in mesenchymal cells surrounding small airways, whereas IL-1β mRNA localized to the epithelium of medium/small airways. Ventilation caused loss of HSP70 mRNA from the bronchial epithelium, but induced mRNA in smooth muscle surrounding large airways. HSP70 protein decreased in lung tissue and increased in BALF with ventilation. Initiation of ventilation induced a stress response and inflammatory cytokines in small and medium-sized airways. PMID:19816239

  5. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  6. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  7. Transient motion of mucus plugs in respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Parsa; Hu, Yingying; Helenbrook, Brian; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Airway closure occurs in lung diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, or emphysema which have an excess of mucus that forms plugs. The reopening process involves displacement of mucus plugs in the airways by the airflow of respiration. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid with a yield stress; therefore its behavior can be approximated by a Bingham fluid constitutive equation. In this work the reopening process is approximated by simulation of a transient Bingham fluid plug in a 2D channel. The governing equations are solved by an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method through an in-house code. The constitutive equation for the Bingham fluid is implemented through a regularization method. The effects of the yield stress on the flow features and wall stresses are discussed with applications to potential injuries to the airway epithelial cells which form the wall. The minimum driving pressure for the initiation of the motion is computed and its value is related to the mucus properties and the plug shape. Supported by HL84370 and HL85156.

  8. Nucleotide-mediated airway clearance.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas; Clunes, Lucy A; Salathe, Mathias; Verdugo, Pedro; Dietl, Paul; Davis, C William; Tarran, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) lines the entire surface of the lung and is the first point of contact between the lung and the environment. Surfactants contained within this layer are secreted in the alveolar region and are required to maintain a low surface tension and to prevent alveolar collapse. Mucins are secreted into the ASL throughout the respiratory tract and serve to intercept inhaled pathogens, allergens and toxins. Their removal by mucociliary clearance (MCC) is facilitated by cilia beating and hydration of the ASL by active ion transport. Throughout the lung, secretion, ion transport and cilia beating are under purinergic control. Pulmonary epithelia release ATP into the ASL which acts in an autocrine fashion on P2Y(2) (ATP) receptors. The enzymatic network describes in Chap. 2 then mounts a secondary wave of signaling by surface conversion of ATP into adenosine (ADO), which induces A(2B) (ADO) receptor-mediated responses. This chapter offers a comprehensive description of MCC and the extensive ramifications of the purinergic signaling network on pulmonary surfaces. PMID:21560046

  9. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  10. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  11. A novel angiomatoid epithelioid sarcoma cell line, Asra-EPS, forming tumors with large cysts containing hemorrhagic fluid in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas we can use several human epithelioid sarcoma (ES) cell lines for basic and preclinical research, an angiomatoid ES cell line has not been reported to date. We have treated a case of an angiomatoid ES developing in the right upper extremity of a 67-year-old man. Methods An angiomatoid ES cell line, Asra-EPS was newly established and characterized for its morphology, growth rate and chromosomal analysis. Tumorigenicity of Asra-EPS cells was also analyzed in athymic nude mice. Results Asra-EPS cells were round, polygonal or spindle-shaped with an abundant cytoplasm and have been maintained continuously in vitro for over 150 passages during more than 15 months. These cells secreted cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into the culture medium. Asra-EPS cells were tumorigenic when implanted in nude mice with tumors reaching a volume of 1000 mm3 at around 50 days. Histological features of tumors formed in mice were essentially the same as those of the original tumor, exhibiting a multinodular proliferation of eosinophilic epithelioid and spindle-shaped cells with prominent areas of hemorrhage and blood-filled cystic spaces strikingly corresponding to the potential of hemorrhagic cyst formation in the original tumor. They showed immunopositive staining for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3 and CAM5.2), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), vimentin, CD31, CD34 and CA 125, but negative for integrase interactor 1 (INI-1) and factor VIII-related antigen. Conclusions The established cell line represents a biologically relevant new tool to investigate the molecular pathology of human angiomatoid ES and to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutics both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23915498

  12. Transient two-phase flow of cryogenic fluid in a vertical transfer line during the cooldown process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatpour, Ali

    1990-08-01

    The analytical and numerical modeling for prediction of the thermofluid parameters of the cool down process of a vertical tube carrying cryogenic liquid are presented. Formulation of the problem is based on the flow patterns observed in the experimental studies. In this model, the flow field consists of four distinct regions of fully liquid, inverted annular film boiling, dispersed flow film boiling, and fully vapor. For the fully liquid and fully vapor regions, the 1-D two-fluid model conservation equations are applied. In addition, a 1-D energy equation is formulated to determine the tube wall history. The numerical approximations are based on the finite difference technique. Calculation for inverted annular flow are based on a semi-implicit model while computations for the wall, fully liquid, and dispersed flow regions are performed explicitly. Comparison of calculated results with experimental data for water and liquid nitrogen are presented.

  13. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  14. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  15. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  16. Airway Surface Dehydration Aggravates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Hallmarks of COPD in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seys, Leen J. M.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Dupont, Lisa L.; Desauter, Elke; Duerr, Julia; Seyhan Agircan, Ayca; Conickx, Griet; Joos, Guy F.; Brusselle, Guy G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Airway surface dehydration, caused by an imbalance between secretion and absorption of ions and fluid across the epithelium and/or increased epithelial mucin secretion, impairs mucociliary clearance. Recent evidence suggests that this mechanism may be implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of airway surface dehydration in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD remains unknown. Objective We aimed to investigate in vivo the effect of airway surface dehydration on several CS-induced hallmarks of COPD in mice with airway-specific overexpression of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC). Methods βENaC-Tg mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were exposed to air or CS for 4 or 8 weeks. Pathological hallmarks of COPD, including goblet cell metaplasia, mucin expression, pulmonary inflammation, lymphoid follicles, emphysema and airway wall remodelling were determined and lung function was measured. Results Airway surface dehydration in βENaC-Tg mice aggravated CS-induced airway inflammation, mucin expression and destruction of alveolar walls and accelerated the formation of pulmonary lymphoid follicles. Moreover, lung function measurements demonstrated an increased compliance and total lung capacity and a lower resistance and hysteresis in βENaC-Tg mice, compared to WT mice. CS exposure further altered lung function measurements. Conclusions We conclude that airway surface dehydration is a risk factor that aggravates CS-induced hallmarks of COPD. PMID:26066648

  17. Early Airway Structural Changes in Cystic Fibrosis Pigs as a Determinant of Particle Distribution and Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Maged; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Adam, Ryan J.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Fuld, Matthew K.; Reynolds, Karen J.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long; Stoltz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is not well understood. A porcine CF model was recently generated, and these animals develop lung disease similar to humans with CF. At birth, before infection and inflammation, CF pigs have airways that are irregularly shaped and have a reduced caliber compared to non-CF pigs. We hypothesized that these airway structural abnormalities affect airflow patterns and particle distribution. To test this hypothesis we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on airway geometries obtained by computed tomography of newborn non-CF and CF pigs. For the same flow rate, newborn CF pig airways exhibited higher air velocity and resistance compared to non-CF. Moreover we found that, at the carina bifurcation, particles greater than 5-µm preferably distributed to the right CF lung despite almost equal airflow ventilation in non-CF and CF. CFD modeling also predicted that deposition efficiency was greater in CF compared to non-CF for 5- and 10-µm particles. These differences were most significant in the airways included in the geometry supplying the right caudal, right accessory, left caudal, and left cranial lobes. The irregular particle distribution and increased deposition in newborn CF pig airways suggest that early airway structural abnormalities might contribute to CF disease pathogenesis. PMID:24310865

  18. Irritant-induced airway disorders.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M; Bernstein, I Leonard

    2011-11-01

    Thousands of persons experience accidental high-level irritant exposures each year but most recover and few die. Irritants function differently than allergens because their actions proceed nonspecifically and by nonimmunologic mechanisms. For some individuals, the consequence of a single massive exposure to an irritant, gas, vapor or fume is persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the clinical picture of asthma, referred to as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Repeated irritant exposures may lead to chronic cough and continual airway hyperresponsiveness. Cases of asthma attributed to repeated irritant-exposures may be the result of genetic and/or host factors. PMID:21978855

  19. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  20. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  1. Rare Upper Airway Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Alanna; Clemmens, Clarice; Jacobs, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of congenital upper airway anomalies can occur as a result of errors during embryologic development. In this review, we will describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies for a few select, rare congenital malformations of this system. The diagnostic tools used in workup of these disorders range from prenatal tests to radiological imaging, swallowing evaluations, indirect or direct laryngoscopy, and rigid bronchoscopy. While these congenital defects can occur in isolation, they are often associated with disorders of other organ systems or may present as part of a syndrome. Therefore workup and treatment planning for patients with these disorders often involves a team of multiple specialists, including paediatricians, otolaryngologists, pulmonologists, speech pathologists, gastroenterologists, and geneticists. PMID:26277452

  2. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  3. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  4. Dual Oxidase Regulates Neutrophil Recruitment in Allergic Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described, and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13) or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOX to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa−/−) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa−/− mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa−/− mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia, and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa+/+ mice as expected, but was absent in Duoxa−/− mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa−/− mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of

  5. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, were instilled into the trachea. Arterial O2 saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts were evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. PMID:23727623

  6. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-07-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  7. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-01-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale. PMID:23729842

  8. Nonmicrobial-mediated inflammatory airway diseases--an update.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Babu, Polani B; Krishnamoorthy, P

    2014-03-01

    In lungs, airways are in constant contact with air, microbes, allergens, and environmental pollutants. The airway epithelium represents the first line of lung defense through different mechanisms, which facilitate clearance of inhaled pathogens and environmental particles while minimizing an inflammatory response. The innate immune system facilitates immediate recognition of both foreign pathogens and tissue damage through toll-like receptor, which acts as a gateway for all intracellular events leading to inflammation. In the absence of microbial stimulus, the immune system is capable of detecting a wide range of insults against the host. This review focuses on various molecular mechanisms involved in pathophysiology of airway inflammation mediated by environmental factors, cellular stress, and pharmacological and clinical agents. PMID:24293217

  9. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea. PMID:27101494

  10. Ciliated neurons lining the central canal sense both fluid movement and pH through ASIC3.

    PubMed

    Jalalvand, Elham; Robertson, Brita; Wallén, Peter; Grillner, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c) cells are found in all vertebrates but their function has remained elusive. We recently identified one type of laterally projecting CSF-c cell in lamprey spinal cord with neuronal properties that expresses GABA and somatostatin. We show here that these CSF-c neurons respond to both mechanical stimulation and to lowered pH. These effects are most likely mediated by ASIC3-channels, since APETx2, a specific antagonist of ASIC3, blocks them both. Furthermore, lowering of pH as well as application of somatostatin will reduce the locomotor burst rate. The somatostatin receptor antagonist counteracts the effects of both a decrease in pH and of somatostatin. Lateral bending movement imposed on the spinal cord, as would occur during natural swimming, activates CSF-c neurons. Taken together, we show that CSF-c neurons act both as mechanoreceptors and as chemoreceptors through ASIC3 channels, and their action may protect against pH-changes resulting from excessive neuronal activity. PMID:26743691

  11. Ciliated neurons lining the central canal sense both fluid movement and pH through ASIC3

    PubMed Central

    Jalalvand, Elham; Robertson, Brita; Wallén, Peter; Grillner, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c) cells are found in all vertebrates but their function has remained elusive. We recently identified one type of laterally projecting CSF-c cell in lamprey spinal cord with neuronal properties that expresses GABA and somatostatin. We show here that these CSF-c neurons respond to both mechanical stimulation and to lowered pH. These effects are most likely mediated by ASIC3-channels, since APETx2, a specific antagonist of ASIC3, blocks them both. Furthermore, lowering of pH as well as application of somatostatin will reduce the locomotor burst rate. The somatostatin receptor antagonist counteracts the effects of both a decrease in pH and of somatostatin. Lateral bending movement imposed on the spinal cord, as would occur during natural swimming, activates CSF-c neurons. Taken together, we show that CSF-c neurons act both as mechanoreceptors and as chemoreceptors through ASIC3 channels, and their action may protect against pH-changes resulting from excessive neuronal activity. PMID:26743691

  12. A Mixture Reflecting Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Profiles Detected in Human Follicular Fluid Significantly Affects Steroidogenesis and Induces Oxidative Stress in a Female Human Granulosa Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Pavine L C; Wade, Mike; Goodyer, Cindy; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Brominated flame retardants are incorporated into consumer products to prevent flame propagation. These compounds leach into the domestic environment, resulting in chronic exposure. Pregnancy failure is associated with high levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a major class of brominated flame retardants, in human follicular fluid, raising serious questions regarding their impact on female fertility. Our goal was to elucidate the effects of a mixture of PBDEs, similar to the profile found in human follicular fluid, on an immortalized human granulosa cell line, the KGN cell line. We showed that cell viability was altered and oxidative stress was induced as reflected by increased reactive oxygen species formation at 100 μM of the PBDE mixture. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that PBDE treatments of 1, 5, and 20 μM altered the expression of several genes involved in the reactive oxygen species signaling pathway. Significant dose-dependent reductions in progesterone and estradiol levels in the culture medium were measured after PBDE treatment; in parallel, the expression of genes involved in estradiol metabolism, namely CYP1A1, was up-regulated by 5 and 20 μM of the PBDE mixture. Treatment with 20 μM PBDE also increased the expression and secretion of the proinflammatory factor, IL-6, into the KGN cell culture medium. Our results demonstrate that PBDEs can alter human granulosa cell functions by inducing oxidative stress and disrupting steroidogenesis. These results indicate that PBDEs may be detrimental to ovarian functions and thus may adversely affect female reproductive health after chronic exposure. PMID:27219277

  13. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  14. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  15. Tachykinin receptors and airway pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian tachykinins (TKs), substance P and neurokinin A, are present in sensory nerve fibres in the upper and lower airways of various mammalian species, including humans. TKs are released from these afferent nerves in an "efferent" mode at peripheral level, especially in response to irritant stimuli. TKs exert a variety of biological effects (bronchoconstriction, plasma protein extravasation, stimulation of mucus secretion), collectively known as "neurogenic inflammation", and this process is thought to be of potential pathogenic relevance for various airway diseases. The recent development of potent and selective TK receptor antagonists on the one hand provides important new tools for the understanding of basic airway physiology and pathophysiology and, on the other, opens new possibilities for therapy of airway diseases. PMID:8390944

  16. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  17. Imaging of the Distal Airways

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P.; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques of the lung continues to advance with improving ability to image the more distal airways. Two imaging techniques are reviewed, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance with hyperpolarized helium-3. PMID:19962040

  18. Airway surface liquid depth imaged by surface laser reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Song, Yuanlin; Derichs, Nico; Verkman, A S

    2010-09-01

    The thin layer of liquid at the surface of airway epithelium, the airway surface liquid (ASL), is important in normal airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. At present, the best method to measure ASL depth involves scanning confocal microscopy after staining with an aqueous-phase fluorescent dye. We describe here a simple, noninvasive imaging method to measure ASL depth by reflectance imaging of an epithelial mucosa in which the surface is illuminated at a 45-degree angle by an elongated 13-microm wide rectangular beam produced by a 670-nm micro-focus laser. The principle of the method is that air-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-cell interfaces produce distinct specular or diffuse reflections that can be imaged to give a micron-resolution replica of the mucosal surface. The method was validated using fluid layers of specified thicknesses and applied to measure ASL depth in cell cultures and ex vivo fragments of pig trachea. In addition, the method was adapted to measure transepithelial fluid transport from the dynamics of fluid layer depth. Compared with confocal imaging, ASL depth measurement by surface laser reflectance microscopy does not require dye staining or costly instrumentation, and can potentially be adapted for in vivo measurements using fiberoptics. PMID:20713545

  19. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  20. Ultrasound: A promising tool for contemporary airway management.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rakesh; Gupta, Anju

    2015-11-16

    Airway evaluation and its management remains an ever emerging clinical science. Present airway management tools are static and do not provide dynamic airway management option. Visualized procedures like ultrasound (US) provide point of care real time dynamic views of the airway in perioperative, emergency and critical care settings. US can provide dynamic anatomical assessment which is not possible by clinical examination alone. US aids in detecting gastric contents and the nature of gastric contents (clear fluid, thick turbid or solid) as well. US can help in predicting endotracheal tube size by measuring subglottic diameter and diameter of left main stem bronchus. US was found to be a sensitive in detecting rotational malposition of LMA in children. Also, US is the fastest and highly sensitive tool to rule out a suspected intraoperative pneumothorax. In intensive care units, US helps torule out causes of inadequate ventilation, determine the tracheal width and distance from the skin to predict tracheotomy tube size and shape and assist with percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. US can help in confirming the correct tracheal tube placement by dynamic visualisation of the endotracheal tube insertion, widening of vocal cords (children), and bilateral lung-sliding and diaphragmatic movement. Thus, ultrasonography has brought a paradigm shift in the practise of airway management. With increasing awareness, portability, accessibility and further sophistication in technology, it is likely to find a place in routine airway management. We are not far from the time when all of us will be carrying a pocket US machine like stethoscopes to corroborate our clinical findings at point of care. PMID:26601094

  1. Ultrasound: A promising tool for contemporary airway management

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Gupta, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Airway evaluation and its management remains an ever emerging clinical science. Present airway management tools are static and do not provide dynamic airway management option. Visualized procedures like ultrasound (US) provide point of care real time dynamic views of the airway in perioperative, emergency and critical care settings. US can provide dynamic anatomical assessment which is not possible by clinical examination alone. US aids in detecting gastric contents and the nature of gastric contents (clear fluid, thick turbid or solid) as well. US can help in predicting endotracheal tube size by measuring subglottic diameter and diameter of left main stem bronchus. US was found to be a sensitive in detecting rotational malposition of LMA in children. Also, US is the fastest and highly sensitive tool to rule out a suspected intraoperative pneumothorax. In intensive care units, US helps torule out causes of inadequate ventilation, determine the tracheal width and distance from the skin to predict tracheotomy tube size and shape and assist with percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. US can help in confirming the correct tracheal tube placement by dynamic visualisation of the endotracheal tube insertion, widening of vocal cords (children), and bilateral lung-sliding and diaphragmatic movement. Thus, ultrasonography has brought a paradigm shift in the practise of airway management. With increasing awareness, portability, accessibility and further sophistication in technology, it is likely to find a place in routine airway management. We are not far from the time when all of us will be carrying a pocket US machine like stethoscopes to corroborate our clinical findings at point of care. PMID:26601094

  2. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  3. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  4. The effect of viscoelasticity on the stability of a pulmonary airway liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The lungs consist of a network of bifurcating airways that are lined with a thin liquid film. This film is a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid possessing viscoelastic characteristics. Surface tension induces flows within the layer, which may cause the lung's airways to close due to liquid plug formation if the liquid film is sufficiently thick. The stability of the liquid layer is also influenced by the viscoelastic nature of the liquid, which is modeled using the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation or as a Jeffreys fluid. To examine the role of mucus alone, a single layer of a viscoelastic fluid is considered. A system of nonlinear evolution equations is derived using lubrication theory for the film thickness and the film flow rate. A uniform film is initially perturbed and a normal mode analysis is carried out that shows that the growth rate g for a viscoelastic layer is larger than for a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. Closure occurs if the minimum core radius, Rmin(t), reaches zero within one breath. Solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations reveal that Rmin normally decreases to zero faster with increasing relaxation time parameter, the Weissenberg number We. For small values of the dimensionless film thickness parameter ɛ, the closure time, tc, increases slightly with We, while for moderate values of ɛ, ranging from 14% to 18% of the tube radius, tc decreases rapidly with We provided the solvent viscosity is sufficiently small. Viscoelasticity was found to have little effect for ɛ >0.18, indicating the strong influence of surface tension. The film thickness parameter ɛ and the Weissenberg number We also have a significant effect on the maximum shear stress on tube wall, max(τw), and thus, potentially, an impact on cell damage. Max(τw) increases with ɛ for fixed We, and it decreases with increasing We for small We provided the solvent viscosity parameter is sufficiently

  5. The effect of viscoelasticity on the stability of a pulmonary airway liquid layer

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The lungs consist of a network of bifurcating airways that are lined with a thin liquid film. This film is a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid possessing viscoelastic characteristics. Surface tension induces flows within the layer, which may cause the lung’s airways to close due to liquid plug formation if the liquid film is sufficiently thick. The stability of the liquid layer is also influenced by the viscoelastic nature of the liquid, which is modeled using the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation or as a Jeffreys fluid. To examine the role of mucus alone, a single layer of a viscoelastic fluid is considered. A system of nonlinear evolution equations is derived using lubrication theory for the film thickness and the film flow rate. A uniform film is initially perturbed and a normal mode analysis is carried out that shows that the growth rate g for a viscoelastic layer is larger than for a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. Closure occurs if the minimum core radius, Rmin(t), reaches zero within one breath. Solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations reveal that Rmin normally decreases to zero faster with increasing relaxation time parameter, the Weissenberg number We. For small values of the dimensionless film thickness parameter ε, the closure time, tc, increases slightly with We, while for moderate values of ε, ranging from 14% to 18% of the tube radius, tc decreases rapidly with We provided the solvent viscosity is sufficiently small. Viscoelasticity was found to have little effect for ε>0.18, indicating the strong influence of surface tension. The film thickness parameter ε and the Weissenberg number We also have a significant effect on the maximum shear stress on tube wall, max(τw), and thus, potentially, an impact on cell damage. Max(τw) increases with ε for fixed We, and it decreases with increasing We for small We provided the solvent viscosity parameter is sufficiently

  6. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of airway allergic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelium lining the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human IgE receptor, CD23 (Fc'RII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monola...

  7. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  8. Laryngopyocoele presenting with acute airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Raine, J I; Allin, D; Golding-Wood, D

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was transferred to the emergency department with a left-sided neck lump and fever. She was stridulous with reduced consciousness level and required immediate intubation to protect her airway. CT imaging showed a fluid-filled and air-filled lesion in the left side of the neck; the diagnosis was later confirmed as an infected laryngocoele. She underwent ultrasound guided drainage of the lesion with successful reduction of the neck lump. Following elective tracheostomy she was weaned from ventilation. Subsequent direct endoscopy and biopsy showed no evidence of malignancy or other lesion. She was discharged with permanent tracheostomy to be sustained until definitive surgical resection of the laryngocoele. PMID:25028406

  9. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. Methods In this study, 90 cases of 1–14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%–50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. Results There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (p<0.05). Conclusion We concluded that for airway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA. PMID:27366563

  10. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  11. Role of Small Airways in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Finkas, Lindsay K; Martin, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition of both the small and large airways. Recently the small airways have gained attention as studies have shown significant inflammation in the small airways in all severities of asthma. This inflammation has correlated with peripheral airway resistance and as a result, noninvasive methods to reliably measure small airways have been pursued. In addition, recent changes in asthma inhalers have led to alterations in drug formulations and the development of extrafine particle inhalers that improve delivery to the distal airways. PMID:27401620

  12. INFLUENCES OF CARTILAGINOUS RINGS ON TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluid dynamics patterns within tracheobronchial airways reflect interactions between cartilaginous rings and inspiratory flow rates. The results of supercomputer simulations performed herein were complex, yet systematic. The effects of cartilaginous rings upon tracheobronchial fl...

  13. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  14. Biomechanics of liquid-epithelium interactions in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Ghadiali, Samir N; Gaver, Donald P

    2008-11-30

    The delicate structure of the lung epithelium makes it susceptible to surface tension induced injury. For example, the cyclic reopening of collapsed and/or fluid-filled airways during the ventilation of injured lungs generates hydrodynamic forces that further damage the epithelium and exacerbate lung injury. The interactions responsible for epithelial injury during airway reopening are fundamentally multiscale, since air-liquid interfacial dynamics affect global lung mechanics, while surface tension forces operate at the molecular and cellular scales. This article will review the current state-of-knowledge regarding the effect of surface tension forces on (a) the mechanics of airway reopening and (b) epithelial cell injury. Due to the complex nature of the liquid-epithelium system, a combination of computational and experimental techniques are being used to elucidate the mechanisms of surface-tension induced lung injury. Continued research is leading to an integrated understanding of the biomechanical and biological interactions responsible for cellular injury during airway reopening. This information may lead to novel therapies that minimize ventilation induced lung injury. PMID:18511356

  15. On locating the obstruction in the human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, S.

    2013-11-01

    The fluid dynamical properties of the air flow in the human upper airway (UA) are not fully understood at present due to the three-dimensional, patient-specific complex geometry of the airway, flow transition from laminar to turbulent and flow-structure interaction during the breathing cycle. One of the major challenges to surgeons is determining the location of the UA obstruction before performing corrective surgeries. It is quite difficult at present to experimentally measure the instantaneous velocity and pressure at specific points in the human airway. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) can predict all the flow properties and resolve all its relevant length- and time-scales. We developed a DNS solver with lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and used it to investigate the flow in two patient-specific UAs reconstructed from CT scan data. Inspiration and expiration flows through these two airways are studied and compared. Pressure gradient-time signals at different locations in the UAs are used to determine the location of the obstruction. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  16. Penetration of anti-infective agents into pulmonary epithelial lining fluid: focus on antifungal, antitubercular and miscellaneous anti-infective agents.

    PubMed

    Rodvold, Keith A; Yoo, Liz; George, Jomy M

    2011-11-01

    Epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is often considered to be the site of extracellular pulmonary infections. During the past 25 years, a limited number of studies have evaluated the intrapulmonary penetration of antifungal, antitubercular, antiparasitic and antiviral agents. For antifungal agents, differences in drug concentrations in ELF or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were observed among various formulations or routes of administration, and between agents within the same class. Aerosolized doses of deoxycholate amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B and amphotericin B lipid complex resulted in higher concentrations in ELF or BAL fluid than after intravenous administration. The mean concentrations in ELF following intravenous administration of both anidulafungin and micafungin ranged between 0.04 and 1.38 μg/mL, and the ELF to plasma concentration ratios (based on the area under the concentration-time curve for total drug concentrations) were between 0.18 and 0.22 during the first 3 days of therapy. Among the azole agents, intravenous administration of voriconazole resulted in the highest mean ELF concentrations (range 10.1-48.3 μg/mL) and ratio of penetration (7.1). The range of mean ELF concentrations of itraconazole and posaconazole following oral administration was 0.2-1.9 μg/mL, and the ELF to plasma concentration ratios were <1. A series of studies have evaluated the intrapulmonary penetration of first- and second-line oral antitubercular agents in healthy adult subjects and patients with AIDS. The ELF to plasma concentration ratio was >1 for isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide and ethionamide. For rifampicin (rifampin) and rifapentine, the ELF to plasma concentration ratio ranged between 0.2 and 0.32, but in alveolar macrophages the concentration of rifampicin was much higher (145-738 μg/mL compared with 3.3-7.5 μg/mL in ELF). No intrapulmonary studies have been conducted for rifabutin. Sex, AIDS status or smoking history had no significant effects

  17. Serum enhanced cytokine responses of macrophages to silica and iron oxide particles and nanomaterials: a comparison of serum to lung lining fluid and albumin dispersions.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Johnston, Helinor; Gubbins, Eva; Stone, Vicki

    2014-11-01

    The potential hazard to humans exposed to nanomaterials such as silica and iron oxide was investigated using an in vitro macrophage cell culture system. Amorphous silica and iron oxide particles and nanomaterials (NMs) were dispersed in cell culture medium supplemented with either bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum, in order to mimic the body fluids encountered during different routes of exposure in the body. End points investigated included macrophage viability and cytokine production. Silica NMs and particles (50 and 200 nm, respectively) were unmodified (plain) or aminated (NH2 ). Iron oxide NMs and particles, Fe3 O4 45 nm and Fe2 O3 280 nm were also used in this study. Silica particles and NMs induced a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity as measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Serum enhanced silica-induced interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1β and MCP-1 release, whereas albumin partially inhibited MCP-1 release. Aminated silica, 50 nm was more potent than the 200-nm particles at inducing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production when dispersed in medium or LLF, suggesting a size specific effect for these particles and this cytokine. Iron oxide particles were relatively inert compared with the silica particles and NMs; however, serum and albumin did affect cytokine release in some treatments. In conclusion, the data suggests that serum, compared with medium, BSA and LLF is very potent at enhancing macrophage responses to silica and iron oxide particles and NMs. Size was only influential in LLF for a limited number of parameters, whereas surface chemistry was not of consequence in this in vitro macrophage system. PMID:24737200

  18. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  19. Laryngo-tracheal ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway placement.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A; Cattano, Davide

    2014-12-01

    Waveform capnography was recommended as the most reliable method to confirm correct endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway placements. However, capnography may be unreliable during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and during low flow states. It may lead to an unnecessary removal of a well-placed endotracheal tube, re-intubation and interruption of chest compressions. Real-time upper airway (laryngo-tracheal) ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube placement was shown to be very useful in cadaveric models and during emergency intubation. Tracheal ultrasonography does not interrupt chest compressions and is not affected by low pulmonary flow or airway obstruction, but is limited by ultrasonography scattering and acoustic artifacts generated in air - mucosa interfaces. Sonographic upper airway assessment emerges as a rapid and easily available method to predict difficult intubation, to assess the laryngeal and hypopharyngeal size and visualize the position of the laryngeal mask airway in situ. This study demonstrates that the replacement of air with saline in endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway cuffs and the use of the contrast agents enables detection of cuffs in the airway. It also allows visualization of the surrounding structures or tissues as the ultrasound beam can be transmitted through the fluid - filled cuffs without being reflected from air - mucosal interfaces. PMID:26672974

  20. Effect of endothelin antagonism on the production of cytokines in eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Finsnes, F; Lyberg, T; Christensen, G; Skjønsberg, O H

    2001-04-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 has been launched as an important mediator in bronchial asthma, which is an eosinophilic airway inflammation. However, the interplay between ET-1 and other proinflammatory mediators during the development of airway inflammation has not been elucidated. We wanted to study 1) whether the production of ET-1 precedes the production of other proinflammatory mediators and 2) whether ET-1 stimulates the production of these mediators within the airways. These hypotheses were studied during the development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation in rats. The increase in ET-1 mRNA level in lung tissue preceded the increase in mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-8. Treatment of the animals with the ET receptor antagonist bosentan resulted in a substantial decrease in the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-4, IL-1beta, interferon-gamma, and ET-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In conclusion, the synthesis of ET-1 as measured by increased mRNA level precedes the synthesis of other proinflammatory cytokines of importance for the development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation, and ET antagonism inhibits the production of these mediators within the airways. Whether treatment with ET antagonists will prove beneficial for patients with eosinophilic airway inflammations like bronchial asthma is not yet known. PMID:11238005

  1. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  2. Epidermal growth factor system regulates mucin production in airways

    PubMed Central

    Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Dabbagh, Karim; Lee, Heung-Man; Agustí, Carlos; Lausier, James A.; Ueki, Iris F.; Grattan, Kathleen M.; Nadel, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    Goblet-cell hyperplasia is a critical pathological feature in hypersecretory diseases of airways. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown, and no effective therapy exists. Here we show that stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) by its ligands, EGF and transforming growth factor α (TGFα), causes MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells both in in vitro and in vivo. We found that a MUC5AC-inducing epithelial cell line, NCI-H292, expresses EGF-R constitutively; EGF-R gene expression was stimulated further by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). EGF-R ligands increased the expression of MUC5AC at both gene and protein levels, and this effect was potentiated by TNFα. Selective EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked MUC5AC expression induced by EGF-R ligands. Pathogen-free rats expressed little EGF-R protein in airway epithelial cells; intratracheal instillation of TNFα induced EGF-R in airway epithelial cells, and subsequent instillation of EGF-R ligands increased the number of goblet cells, Alcian blue–periodic acid–Schiff staining (reflecting mucous glycoconjugates), and MUC5AC gene expression, whereas TNFα, EGF, or TGFα alone was without effect. In sensitized rats, three intratracheal instillations of ovalbumin resulted in EGF-R expression and goblet-cell production in airway epithelium. Pretreatment with EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, BIBX1522, prevented goblet-cell production both in rats stimulated by TNFα-EGF-R ligands and in an asthma model. These findings suggest potential roles for inhibitors of the EGF-R cascade in hypersecretory diseases of airways. PMID:10077640

  3. Respiratory Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James

    2005-11-01

    This brief overview of our groups activities includes liquid plug propagation in single and bifurcating tubes, a subject which pertains to surfactant delivery, liquid ventilation, pulmonary edema, and drowning. As the plug propagates, a variety of flow patterns may emerge depending on the parameters. It splits unevenly at airway bifurcations and can rupture, which reopens the airway to gas flow. Both propagation and rupture may damage the underlying airway wall cells. Another topic is surfactant dynamics and flow in a model of an oscillating alveolus. The analysis shows a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration time periods and the sorption parameter. Vortices, single and multiple, may be achieved, as well as a saddle point configuration. Potential applications are pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. Finally, capillary instabilities which cause airway closure, and strategies for stabilization, will be presented. This involves the core-annular flow of a liquid-lined tube, where the core (air) is forced to oscillate axially. The stabilization mechanism is similar to that of a reversing butter knife, where the core shear wipes the growing liquid bulge, from the Rayleigh instability, back on to the tube wall during the main tidal volume stroke, but allows it to grow back as the stroke and shear turn around.

  4. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways. PMID:15301356

  5. Airway basal stem cells: a perspective on their roles in epithelial homeostasis and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jason R; Randell, Scott H; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2010-01-01

    The small airways of the human lung undergo pathological changes in pulmonary disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiolitis obliterans and cystic fibrosis. These clinical problems impose huge personal and societal healthcare burdens. The changes, termed 'pathological airway remodeling', affect the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and the reciprocal trophic interactions that occur between these tissues. Most of the normal human airway is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium of ciliated cells, secretory cells and 6-30% basal cells, the proportion of which varies along the proximal-distal axis. Epithelial abnormalities range from hypoplasia (failure to differentiate) to basal- and goblet-cell hyperplasia, squamous- and goblet-cell metaplasia, dysplasia and malignant transformation. Mesenchymal alterations include thickening of the basal lamina, smooth muscle hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation. Paradoxically, given the prevalence and importance of airway remodeling in lung disease, its etiology is poorly understood. This is due, in part, to a lack of basic knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maintenance and repair of the airway epithelium. Specifically, little is known about the proliferation and differentiation of basal cells, a multipotent stem cell population of the pseudostratified airway epithelium. This Perspective summarizes what we know, and what we need to know, about airway basal cells to evaluate their contributions to normal and abnormal airway remodeling. We contend that exploiting well-described model systems using both human airway epithelial cells and the pseudostratified epithelium of the genetically tractable mouse trachea will enable crucial discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of airway disease. PMID:20699479

  6. IL-10 reduces Th2 cytokine production and eosinophilia but augments airway reactivity in allergic mice.

    PubMed

    van Scott, M R; Justice, J P; Bradfield, J F; Enright, E; Sigounas, A; Sur, S

    2000-04-01

    We investigated the effects of interleukin (IL)-10 administration on allergen-induced Th2 cytokine production, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway reactivity. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ragweed (RW) adsorbed to Alum and challenged by intratracheal instillation of the allergen. Sensitization and challenge with RW increased concentrations of IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from undetectable levels to 60 pg/ml over 72 h. Intratracheal instillation of 25 ng of recombinant murine IL-10 at the time of RW challenge further elevated BAL fluid IL-10 concentration to 440 pg/ml but decreased BAL fluid IL-4, IL-5, and interferon-gamma levels by 40-85% and eosinophil numbers by 70% (P < 0.0001). Unexpectedly, the same IL-10 treatment increased airway reactivity to methacholine in spontaneously breathing mice that had been sensitized and challenged with RW (P < 0.001). IL-10 treatment in naive animals or RW-sensitized mice challenged with PBS failed to increase airway reactivity, demonstrating that IL-10 induces an increase in airway reactivity only when it is administered in conjunction with allergic sensitization and challenge. The results demonstrate that IL-10 reduces Th2 cytokine levels and eosinophilic inflammation but augments airway hyperreactivity. Thus, despite its potent anti-inflammatory activity, IL-10 could contribute to the decline in pulmonary function observed in asthma. PMID:10749743

  7. Bactericidal activity of moxifloxacin against multidrug-resistant Streptoccocus pneumoniae at clinically achievable serum and epithelial lining fluid concentrations compared with three other antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Cafini, Fabio; Alou, Luis; Sevillano, David; Valero, Eva; Prieto, José

    2004-10-01

    Time-kill studies compared the activities of moxifloxacin with those of levofloxacin, azithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanate against 10 pneumococcal strains with various drug susceptibilities. Three Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were resistant to moxifloxacin: 6, 7 and 2 strains were resistant to levofloxacin, azithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively. Of these, 1 strain was resistant to all antimicrobial agents studied. Moxifloxacin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were bactericidal after 24h at serum Cmax levels against 9 and 8 strains, respectively, while levofloxacin and azithromycin were bactericidal against 3 and 2 strains, respectively. A higher activity was only observed for amoxicillin-clavulanate for logarithmic phase cultures at 1, 4 and 8h compared with stationary phase organisms. Amoxicillin-clavulanate and moxifloxacin were bactericidal at free serum levels (protein unbound) after 24h against 8 and 3 strains, respectively. Moxifloxacin was bactericidal at epithelial lining fluid levels against all strains at 24h, including one moxifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate and azithromycin-resistant strain; lower levels of bactericidal activity was observed for levofloxacin, azithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanate against 7, 2 and 4 strains, respectively. This demonstrated the importance of moxifloxacin tissue levels. PMID:15380257

  8. OH-Radical Specific Addition to Glutathione S-Atom at the Air-Water Interface: Relevance to the Redox Balance of the Lung Epithelial Lining Fluid.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in epithelial lining fluids (ELF) prevent inhaled air pollutants from reaching lung tissue. This process, however, may upset ELF's redox balance, which is deemed to be expressed by the ratio of the major antioxidant glutathione (GSH) to its putative oxidation product GSSG. Previously, we found that at physiological pH O3(g) rapidly oxidizes GS(2-)(aq) (but not GSH(-)) to GSO3(-) rather than GSSG. Here, we report that in moderately acidic pH ≤ 5 media ·OH(g) oxidizes GSH(-)(aq) to sulfenic GSOH(-), sulfinic GSO2(-), and sulfonic GSO3(-) acids via ·OH specific additions to reduced S-atoms. The remarkable specificity of ·OH on water versus its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during [OH···GSH] interfacial encounters. Thus, both O3 and ·OH oxidize GSH to GSOH(-) under most conditions, and since GSOH(-) is reduced back to GSH in vivo by NADPH, redox balance may be in fact signaled by GSH/GSOH ratios. PMID:26722895

  9. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway connector. 868.5810 Section 868.5810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5810 Airway connector. (a) Identification. An airway connector is a device intended to...

  10. Laryngeal mask airway: an alternative for the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Jones, J R

    1995-10-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was invented by Dr. Archie Brain at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, in 1981. Dr. Brain's main objective for the LMA was that it would provide a better method of maintaining a patient's airway than by face mask. Also, the LMA would be less hemodynamically stressful than with insertion of an endotracheal tube. The LMA consists of a silicone rubber tube connected to a miniature silicone mask. The perimeter of the mask consists of an inflatable elliptical cuff, which forms a tip at the distal aspect of the LMA. The aperture bars in the dome of the mask lift the epiglottis away, so the lumen remains unobstructive. The LMA forms a low pressure seal around the larynx. The LMA is contraindicated in any situation where the patient is at risk for pulmonary aspiration. The LMA is not a substitute for a properly placed endotracheal tube in this situation. The American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm recommends the insertion of an LMA when ventilation and/or intubation are difficult. The distal aperture of the LMA is in close approximation to the vocal cords, so a 6.0-mm internal diameter endotracheal tube can be passed over an intubating stylet or a pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope to secure a patient's airway. PMID:7502644

  11. Allergen-induced airway remodeling is impaired in galectin-3 deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Kang, Bit Na; Hosseinkhani, Reza M.; Ha, Sung Gil; Frenzel, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2010-01-01

    The role played by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal-3) in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of asthma that leads to airway dysfunction and poor clinical outcome in humans, was investigated in a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and Gal-3 knock-out (KO) mice were subjected to repetitive allergen challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) up to 12 weeks and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue collected after the last challenge were evaluated for cellular features associated with airway remodeling. Compared to WT mice, chronic OVA challenge in Gal-3 KO mice resulted in diminished remodeling of the airways with significantly reduced mucus secretion, sub-epithelial fibrosis, smooth muscle thickness, and peribronchial angiogenesis. The higher degree of airway remodeling in WT mice was associated with higher Gal-3 expression in the BALF as well as lung tissue. Cell counts in BALF and lung immunohistology demonstrated that eosinophil infiltration in OVA-challenged Gal-3 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to WT mice. Evaluation of cellular mediators associated with eosinophil recruitment and airway remodeling revealed that levels of eotaxin-1, IL-5, IL-13, FIZZ1 and TGF-β were substantially lower in Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, leukocytes from Gal-3 KO mice demonstrated decreased trafficking (rolling) on vascular endothelial adhesion molecules compared to WT cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Gal-3 is an important lectin that promotes airway remodeling via airway recruitment of inflammatory cells, specifically eosinophils, and the development of a Th2 phenotype as well as increased expression of eosinophil-specific chemokines, pro-fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators. PMID:20543100

  12. The Difficult Paediatric Airway: Two Cases of large Cystic Hygroma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aditya; Mehrotra, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of a two cases of difficult intubation experienced in paediatric surgical cases. Both the infants, aged one and three-month-old respectively, had very large cystic hygroma of the neck area. Prior hematological and radiological investigations (USG and CT scan of the swelling) and preanaesthesia check up was done and cases were posted for surgical excision. Case I had difficult airway due to pressure of the tumour/cystic hygroma over the airway and posed difficulty for intubation, but was managed well. Case II had respiratory distress during preoperative period. She had been postponed for surgical excision of the cystic hygroma of neck twice due to the difficulties experienced during intubation. Needle aspiration of hygroma fluid helped to reduce the respiratory distress, and the size of the tumour as well, which further helped in the smooth intubation after a week. The postoperative period was uneventful in both the infants. PMID:26894158

  13. Fluid-line math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandelman, A.; Nelson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified mathematical model simulates large hydraulic systems on either analog or digital computers. Models of pumps, servoactuators, reservoirs, accumulators, and valves are connected generating systems containing six hundred elements.

  14. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management. PMID:12943860

  15. Molecular mechanisms controlling CFTR gene expression in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Ott, Christopher J; Lewandowska, Marzena A; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The low levels of CFTR gene expression and paucity of CFTR protein in human airway epithelial cells are not easily reconciled with the pivotal role of the lung in cystic fibrosis pathology. Previous data suggested that the regulatory mechanisms controlling CFTR gene expression might be different in airway epithelium in comparison to intestinal epithelium where CFTR mRNA and protein is much more abundant. Here we examine chromatin structure and modification across the CFTR locus in primary human tracheal (HTE) and bronchial (NHBE) epithelial cells and airway cell lines including 16HBE14o- and Calu3. We identify regions of open chromatin that appear selective for primary airway epithelial cells and show that several of these are enriched for a histone modification (H3K4me1) that is characteristic of enhancers. Consistent with these observations, three of these sites encompass elements that have cooperative enhancer function in reporter gene assays in 16HBE14o- cells. Finally, we use chromosome conformation capture (3C) to examine the three-dimensional structure of nearly 800 kb of chromosome 7 encompassing CFTR and observe long-range interactions between the CFTR promoter and regions far outside the locus in cell types that express high levels of CFTR. PMID:21895967

  16. Patient-Specific Modeling of Regional Antibiotic Concentration Levels in Airways of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Are We Dosing High Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Aukje C.; van Holsbeke, Cedric; de Backer, Jan W.; van Westreenen, Mireille; Janssens, Hettie M.; Vos, Wim G.; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) infection is an important contributor to the progression of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The cornerstone treatment for Pa infection is the use of inhaled antibiotics. However, there is substantial lung disease heterogeneity within and between patients that likely impacts deposition patterns of inhaled antibiotics. Therefore, this may result in airways below the minimal inhibitory concentration of the inhaled agent. Very little is known about antibiotic concentrations in small airways, in particular the effect of structural lung abnormalities. We therefore aimed to develop a patient-specific airway model to predict concentrations of inhaled antibiotics and to study the impact of structural lung changes and breathing profile on local concentrations in airways of patients with CF. Methods In- and expiratory CT-scans of children with CF (5–17 years) were scored (CF-CT score), segmented and reconstructed into 3D airway models. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed on 40 airway models to predict local Aztreonam lysine for inhalation (AZLI) concentrations. Patient-specific lobar flow distribution and nebulization of 75 mg AZLI through a digital Pari eFlow model with mass median aerodynamic diameter range were used at the inlet of the airway model. AZLI concentrations for central and small airways were computed for different breathing patterns and airway surface liquid thicknesses. Results In most simulated conditions, concentrations in both central and small airways were well above the minimal inhibitory concentration. However, small airways in more diseased lobes were likely to receive suboptimal AZLI. Structural lung disease and increased tidal volumes, respiratory rates and larger particle sizes greatly reduced small airway concentrations. Conclusions CFD modeling showed that concentrations of inhaled antibiotic delivered to the small airways are highly patient specific and vary throughout the

  17. Host-Integration of a Tissue-Engineered Airway Patch: Two-Year Follow-Up in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dally, Iris; Friedel, Godehard; Walles, Heike; Walles, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Different bioengineering techniques have been applied repeatedly for the reconstruction of extensive airway defects in the last few years. While short-term surgical success is evident, there is a lack of long-term results in patients. Here, we report the case of a young male who received a 5×2 cm bioartificial airway patch for tracheoesophageal reconstruction focusing on clinical defect healing and histomorphological tissue reorganization 2.5 years after surgery. We generated bioartificial airway tissue using a cell-free biological vascularized scaffold that was re-endothelialized and reseeded with the recipient's autologous primary cells and we implanted it into the recipient's left main bronchus. To investigate host-integration 2.5 years after the implantation, we obtained biopsies of the implant and adjacent tracheal tissue and processed these for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The early postoperative course was uneventful and the transplanted airway tissue was integrated into the host. 2.5 years after transplantation, a bronchoscopy confirmed the scar-free reconstruction of the former airway defect. Histological work-up documented respiratory airway mucosa lining the bronchial reconstruction, making it indistinguishable from native airway mucosa. After transplantation, our bioartificial airway tissue provided perfect airway healing, with no histological evidence of tissue dedifferentiation. PMID:25316325

  18. Jaw thrust can deteriorate upper airway patency.

    PubMed

    von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Erb, T O; Frei, F J

    2005-04-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a frequent problem in spontaneously breathing children undergoing anesthesia or sedation procedures. Failure to maintain a patent airway can rapidly result in severe hypoxemia, bradycardia, or asystole, as the oxygen demand of children is high and oxygen reserve is low. We present two children with cervical masses in whom upper airway obstruction exaggerated while the jaw thrust maneuver was applied during induction of anesthesia. This deterioration in airway patency was probably caused by medial displacement of the lateral tumorous tissues which narrowed the pharyngeal airway. PMID:15777312

  19. Fluid resuscitation strategies in the Israeli army.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Michael M

    2003-05-01

    Medical training in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is currently based on the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course of the American College of Surgeons termed Military Trauma Life Support. The Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines provide a systematic standardized approach to the treatment of trauma casualties that has been very successful in civilian trauma. On the battlefield, however, these guidelines have been modified according to the combat environment. The factors that influence these changes are tactical considerations, availability and level of training of medical personal, direct enemy fire, medical equipment limitations, means of transportation of casualties, and the variable transportation time from the front line to the first medical echelon. The basic strategy of the IDF is to bring the military physician or paramedic and airlifted surgical units as close as possible to the front line, to minimize evacuation time. Also, evacuation helicopters that land in the combat zone close to the front line, sometimes under direct fire, usually have a military physician on board. The dilemma of "scoop and run" or "stay and stabilize" in hemorrhagic shock has been solved in the IDF toward early rapid evacuation of casualties to a surgical unit. Immediately after airway and breathing have been secured, if evacuation time is less than 1 hour, the intravenous line and fluid resuscitation is started en route to the medical facility. When evacuation time is longer than 1 hour, an intravenous line is always started before evacuation. In controlled hemorrhagic shock, where the source of bleeding has been controlled and evacuation time is less than 1 hour, fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution or normal saline is started, to achieve normalization of hemodynamic parameters. When evacuation time exceeds 60 minutes, colloids such as Hemaccel or hydroxyethyl starch are added. In uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock, where internal bleeding has

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid in naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in multisource commingled feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, K D; Apley, M D; Li, M; Gehring, R; Harhay, D M; Lubbers, B V; White, B J; Capik, S F; KuKanich, B; Riviere, J E; Tessman, R K

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether an association exists between individual pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment outcome when feeder cattle were diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and treated with gamithromycin (Zactran(®) ) at the label dose and (ii) whether there was a stronger association between treatment outcome and gamithromycin concentration in plasma or in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) effect compartment. The study design was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial utilizing three groups of 60 (362-592 lb) steers/bulls randomly allocated within origin to sham injection or gamithromycin mass medication. Cattle were evaluated daily for signs of BRD by a veterinarian blinded to treatment. Animals meeting the BRD case definition were enrolled and allocated to a sample collection scheme consisting of samples for bacterial isolation (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and nasopharyngeal swabs) and gamithromycin concentration determination (PELF and plasma). Gamithromycin susceptibility of M. haemolytica (n = 287) and P. multocida (n = 257) were determined using broth microdilution with frozen panels containing gamithromycin at concentrations from 0.03 to 16 μg/mL. A two-compartment plasma pharmacokinetic model with an additional compartment for gamithromycin in PELF was developed using rich data sets from published and unpublished studies. The sparse data from our study were then fit to this model using nonlinear mixed effects modeling to estimate individual parameter values. The resulting parameter estimates were used to simulate full time-concentration profiles for each animal in this study. These profiles were analyzed using noncompartmental methods so that PK/PD indices (AUC24 /MIC, AUC∞ /MIC, CMAX /MIC) could be calculated for plasma and PELF (also T>MIC) for each individual. The calculated PK/PD indices were indicative that for both M. haemolytica and P. multocida a higher drug

  1. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  2. Systems-level airway models of bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding lung and airway behavior presents a number of challenges, both experimental and theoretical, but the potential rewards are great in terms of both potential treatments for disease and interesting biophysical phenomena. This presents an opportunity for modeling to contribute to greater understanding, and here, we focus on modeling efforts that work toward understanding the behavior of airways in vivo, with an emphasis on asthma. We look particularly at those models that address not just isolated airways but many of the important ways in which airways are coupled both with each other and with other structures. This includes both interesting phenomena involving the airways and the layer of airway smooth muscle that surrounds them, and also the emergence of spatial ventilation patterns via dynamic airway interaction. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:459-467. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27348217

  3. The Importance of Airway Management in Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lenworth M.

    1988-01-01

    The airway is the most important priority in the management of the severely injured patient. It is essential to open and clear the airway to allow free access of air to the distal endobronchial tree. Manual methods of opening the airway are described. Numerous methods for establishing definitive control of the airway as well as the associated devices currently available to maintain control are described. Once the airway is maintained, it is important to ensure adequate oxygenation and ventilation through the airway. Modern portable devices that monitor the carbon dioxide in the expired air at the end of each breath are currently available. These devices allow the physician to verify the position of the tube in the airway as well as to continuously monitor the efficacy of ventilation. PMID:3073226

  4. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  5. Fluid Mechanics of Capillary-Elastic Instabilities in Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the closure and reopening of lung airways due to surface tension forces, coupled with airway elasticity. Airways are liquid-lined, flexible tubes and closure of airways can occur by a Rayleigh instability of the liquid lining, or an instability of the elastic support for the airway as the surface tension of the air-liquid interface pulls the tube shut, or both. Regardless of the mechanism, the airway is closed because the liquid lining has created a plug that prevents axial gas exchange. In the microgravity environment, surface tension forces dominate lung mechanics and would lead to more prevalent, and more uniformly distributed air-way closure, thereby creating a potential for respiratory problems for astronauts. Once closed the primary option for reopening an airway is by deep inspiration. This maneuver will pull the flexible airways open and force the liquid plug to flow distally by the incoming air stream. Airway reopening depends to a large extent on this plug flow and how it may lead to plug rupture to regain the continuity of gas between the environment and the alveoli. In addition to mathematical modeling of plug flows in liquid-lined, flexible tubes, this work has involved benchtop studies of propagating liquid plugs down tube networks that mimic the human airway tree. We have extended the work to involve animal models of liquid plug propagation in rat lungs. The liquid is radio-opaque and x-ray video imaging is used to ascertain the movement and distribution of the liquid plugs so that comparisons to theory may be made. This research has other uses, such as the delivery of liquids or drugs into the lung that may be used for surfactant replacement therapy or for liquid ventilation.

  6. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  7. Sampling the Airway: Improving the Predictive and Toxicological Value of Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a relatively simple technique to obtain biological material in the form of BAL fluid (BALF) from airways of humans and laboratory animals. Numerous predictive biomarkers of pulmonary injury and diseases can be detected in BALF which aid in diagnosi...

  8. Comparison of the Pharmacodynamics of Biapenem in Bronchial Epithelial Lining Fluid in Healthy Volunteers Given Half-Hour and Three-Hour Intravenous Infusions▿

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Eiki; Kikuchi, Junko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    The time above the MIC (T>MIC) is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameter that correlates with the therapeutic efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics. A prolonged infusion can provide plasma drug concentrations that remain above the MIC for a long period. The objective of this study was to compare the PK/PD parameters in bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of biapenem given as 0.5-h and 3-h infusions by using bronchoscopic microsampling (BMS). Six healthy adult volunteers received 0.5-h and 3-h infusions of 0.3 g of biapenem with a washout interval. BMS was performed repeatedly from 0.5 to 24 h after biapenem administration in order to determine the pharmacokinetics in bronchial ELF. The subjects received intravenous biapenem with the same regimens again and then underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at the end of infusion in order to determine the concentration of the drug in alveolar ELF. The percentages (means ± standard deviations) of T>MIC in bronchial ELF at MICs from 0.25 to 4 μg/ml ranged from zero to 34.6% ± 5.2% after the 0.5-h infusion and from 5.1% ± 5.6% to 52.2% ± 17.0% after the 3-h infusion. The percentage of T>MIC in bronchial ELF after the 3-h infusion tended to be higher than that after the 0.5-h infusion. The concentrations of the drug in alveolar ELF after 0.5-h and 3-h infusions were 3.5 ± 1.2 μg/ml and 1.3 ± 0.3 μg/ml, respectively. The present results support the use of prolonged infusions of beta-lactam antibiotics and may provide critical information for successful treatment of lower respiratory tract infections based on PK/PD parameters in bronchial ELF. PMID:19380601

  9. In vitro activity of human-simulated epithelial lining fluid exposures of ceftaroline, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    MacVane, Shawn H; So, Wonhee; Nicolau, David P; Kuti, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) strains, is an important pathogen of bacterial pneumonia. As antibiotic concentrations at the site of infection are responsible for killing, we investigated the activity of human-simulated epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exposures of three antibiotics (ceftaroline, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin) commonly used for treatment of S. aureus pneumonia. An in vitro pharmacodynamic model was used to simulate ELF exposures of vancomycin (1 g every 12 h [q12h]), ceftaroline (600 mg q12h and q8h), and ceftriaxone (2 g q24h and q12h). Four S. aureus isolates (2 MSSA and 2 MRSA) were evaluated over 72 h with a starting inoculum of ∼ 10(6) CFU/ml. Time-kill curves were constructed, and microbiological response (change in log10 CFU/ml from 0 h and the area under the bacterial killing and regrowth curve [AUBC]) was assessed in duplicate. The change in 72-h log10 CFU/ml was largest for ceftaroline q8h (reductions of >3 log10 CFU/ml against all strains). This regimen also achieved the lowest AUBC against all organisms (P < 0.05). Vancomycin produced reliable bacterial reductions of 0.9 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml, while the activity of ceftaroline q12h was more variable (reductions of 0.2 to 2.3 log10 CFU/ml against 3 of 4 strains). Both regimens of ceftriaxone were poorly active against MSSA tested (0.1 reduction to a 1.8-log10 CFU/ml increase). Against these S. aureus isolates, ELF exposures of ceftaroline 600 mg q8h exhibited improved antibacterial activity compared with ceftaroline 600 mg q12h and vancomycin, and therefore, this q8h regimen deserves further evaluation for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia. These data also suggest that ceftriaxone should be avoided for S. aureus pneumonia. PMID:25288076

  10. Comparison of the pharmacodynamics of biapenem in bronchial epithelial lining fluid in healthy volunteers given half-hour and three-hour intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Eiki; Kikuchi, Junko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-07-01

    The time above the MIC (T>MIC) is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameter that correlates with the therapeutic efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics. A prolonged infusion can provide plasma drug concentrations that remain above the MIC for a long period. The objective of this study was to compare the PK/PD parameters in bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of biapenem given as 0.5-h and 3-h infusions by using bronchoscopic microsampling (BMS). Six healthy adult volunteers received 0.5-h and 3-h infusions of 0.3 g of biapenem with a washout interval. BMS was performed repeatedly from 0.5 to 24 h after biapenem administration in order to determine the pharmacokinetics in bronchial ELF. The subjects received intravenous biapenem with the same regimens again and then underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at the end of infusion in order to determine the concentration of the drug in alveolar ELF. The percentages (means +/- standard deviations) of T>MIC in bronchial ELF at MICs from 0.25 to 4 microg/ml ranged from zero to 34.6% +/- 5.2% after the 0.5-h infusion and from 5.1% +/- 5.6% to 52.2% +/- 17.0% after the 3-h infusion. The percentage of T>MIC in bronchial ELF after the 3-h infusion tended to be higher than that after the 0.5-h infusion. The concentrations of the drug in alveolar ELF after 0.5-h and 3-h infusions were 3.5 +/- 1.2 microg/ml and 1.3 +/- 0.3 microg/ml, respectively. The present results support the use of prolonged infusions of beta-lactam antibiotics and may provide critical information for successful treatment of lower respiratory tract infections based on PK/PD parameters in bronchial ELF. PMID:19380601

  11. Cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy using the Airway Scope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Y; Fujita, A; Seo, N; Sugimoto, H

    2007-10-01

    The Airway Scope is a new rigid laryngoscope. This intubation device provides a non-line-of sight view of the glottis. A non-line-of sight view is expected to cause less movement of the cervical spine during laryngeal visualisation. We compared the degree of cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope and conventional direct laryngoscope. Twenty patients requiring general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation were studied. Movements of the cervical spine were measured using radiography in the same patient during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope and a Macintosh laryngoscope. Cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope was 37%, 37% and 68% less than that with the Macintosh laryngoscope at the C0/C1, C1/C2 and C3/C4 motion segments, respectively (p < 0.05). The movement of the atlanto-occipital distance using the Airway Scope was 42% less than that during laryngoscopy using the Macintosh laryngoscope (p < 0.05). Laryngoscopy using the Airway Scope involves less movement of the cervical spine compared to conventional laryngoscopy using the Macintosh laryngoscope. PMID:17845658

  12. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  13. Origins of and implementation concepts for upper airway stimulation therapy for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl M D, Kingman P; Baskin M D, Jonathan; Lance M D, Colleen; Ponsky M D, Diana; Weidenbecher M D, Mark; Strohl B A, Madeleine; Yamauchi M D, Motoo

    2016-07-01

    Upper airway stimulation, specifically hypoglossal (CN XII) nerve stimulation, is a new, alternative therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome who cannot tolerate positive airway pressure, the first-line therapy for symptomatic patients. Stimulation therapy addresses the cause of inadequate upper airway muscle activation for nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this report is to outline the development of this first-in-class therapy and its clinical implementation. Another practical theme is assessment of the features for considering a surgically implanted device and the insight as to how both clinical and endoscopic criteria increase the likelihood of safe and durable outcomes for an implant and how to more generally plan for management of CPAP-intolerant patients. A third theme is the team building required among sleep medicine and surgical specialties in the provision of individualized neurostimulation therapy. PMID:27424823

  14. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  15. Airway branching morphogenesis in three dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lungs develop from the fetal digestive tract where epithelium invades the vascular rich stroma in a process called branching morphogenesis. In organogenesis, endothelial cells have been shown to be important for morphogenesis and the maintenance of organ structure. The aim of this study was to recapitulate human lung morphogenesis in vitro by establishing a three dimensional (3D) co-culture model where lung epithelial cells were cultured in endothelial-rich stroma. Methods We used a human bronchial epithelial cell line (VA10) recently developed in our laboratory. This cell line cell line maintains a predominant basal cell phenotype, expressing p63 and other basal markers such as cytokeratin-5 and -14. Here, we cultured VA10 with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), to mimic the close interaction between these cell types during lung development. Morphogenesis and differentiation was monitored by phase contrast microscopy, immunostainings and confocal imaging. Results We found that in co-culture with endothelial cells, the VA10 cells generated bronchioalveolar like structures, suggesting that lung epithelial branching is facilitated by the presence of endothelial cells. The VA10 derived epithelial structures display various complex patterns of branching and show partial alveolar type-II differentiation with pro-Surfactant-C expression. The epithelial origin of the branching VA10 colonies was confirmed by immunostaining. These bronchioalveolar-like structures were polarized with respect to integrin expression at the cell-matrix interface. The endothelial-induced branching was mediated by soluble factors. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR-2) and sprouty-2 were expressed at the growing tips of the branching structures and the branching was inhibited by the FGFR-small molecule inhibitor SU5402. Discussion In this study we show that a human lung epithelial cell line can be induced by endothelial cells to form branching

  16. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  17. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  18. Chrysin alleviates allergic inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Jiang, Mingzi; Zhang, Yunshi; Liu, Xing; Du, Qiang; Feng, Ganzhu

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder and progresses mainly due to airway remodeling. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess multiple biologic activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-proliferation. The present study aimed to investigate whether chrysin could relieve allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma and the mechanism involved. The female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) successfully developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation and remodeling. The experimental data showed that chrysin could alleviate OVA-induced AHR. Chrysin could also reduce OVA-induced increases in the number of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, interleukin (IL) -4, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total IgE in serum. The decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) level in BALF was also upregulated by chrysin. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) around bronchioles were suppressed by chrysin. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) could be decreased by chrysin, which are associated with airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. These results indicate the promising therapeutic effect of chrysin on chronic asthma, especially the progression of airway remodeling. PMID:26780233

  19. Wall shear stress distributions in a model of normal and constricted small airways.

    PubMed

    Evans, David J; Green, Anthony S; Thomas, Nicholas K

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have highlighted flow shear stress as a possible damage mechanism for small airways, in particular those liable to constriction through disease or injury due to mechanical ventilation. Flow experiments in vitro have implicated shear stress as a relevant factor for mechanotransduction pathways with respect to airway epithelial cell function. Using computational fluid dynamics analysis, this study reports velocity profiles and calculations for wall shear stress distributions in a three-generation, asymmetric section of the small airways subjected to a steady, inspiratory flow. The results show distal variation of wall shear stress distributions due to velocity gradients on the carina side of each daughter airway branch. The maximum wall shear stresses in both normal and constricted small airways are shown to exceed those calculated using data from previous simpler one-dimensional experimental analyses. These findings have implications for lung cell flow experiments involving shear stress in the consideration of both normal airway function and pathology due to mechanotransduction mechanisms. PMID:24618983

  20. Computational analysis of microbubble flows in bifurcating airways: role of gravity, inertia, and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zielinski, Rachel; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2014-10-01

    Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy for patients with severe lung disorders, the microbubble flows generated during ventilation generate hydrodynamic stresses, including pressure and shear stress gradients, which damage the pulmonary epithelium. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics to investigate how gravity, inertia, and surface tension influence both microbubble flow patterns in bifurcating airways and the magnitude/distribution of hydrodynamic stresses on the airway wall. Direct interface tracking and finite element techniques were used to simulate bubble propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled bifurcating airway. Computational solutions of the full incompressible Navier-Stokes equation were used to investigate how inertia, gravity, and surface tension forces as characterized by the Reynolds (Re), Bond (Bo), and Capillary (Ca) numbers influence pressure and shear stress gradients at the airway wall. Gravity had a significant impact on flow patterns and hydrodynamic stress magnitudes where Bo > 1 led to dramatic changes in bubble shape and increased pressure and shear stress gradients in the upper daughter airway. Interestingly, increased pressure gradients near the bifurcation point (i.e., carina) were only elevated during asymmetric bubble splitting. Although changes in pressure gradient magnitudes were generally more sensitive to Ca, under large Re conditions, both Re and Ca significantly altered the pressure gradient magnitude. We conclude that inertia, gravity, and surface tension can all have a significant impact on microbubble flow patterns and hydrodynamic stresses in bifurcating airways. PMID:25068642

  1. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  2. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  3. Treatment with Pyranopyran-1, 8-Dione Attenuates Airway Responses in Cockroach Allergen Sensitized Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  4. Treatment with pyranopyran-1, 8-dione attenuates airway responses in cockroach allergen sensitized asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Park, Min-Sun; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  5. PAF mediates cigarette smoke-induced goblet cell metaplasia in guinea pig airways.

    PubMed

    Komori, M; Inoue, H; Matsumoto, K; Koto, H; Fukuyama, S; Aizawa, H; Hara, N

    2001-03-01

    Goblet cell metaplasia is an important morphological feature in the airways of patients with chronic airway diseases; however, the precise mechanisms that cause this feature are unknown. We investigated the role of endogenous platelet-activating factor (PAF) in airway goblet cell metaplasia induced by cigarette smoke in vivo. Guinea pigs were exposed repeatedly to cigarette smoke for 14 consecutive days. The number of goblet cells in each trachea was determined with Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff staining. Differential cell counts and PAF levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were also evaluated. Cigarette smoke exposure significantly increased the number of goblet cells. Eosinophils, neutrophils, and PAF levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were also significantly increased after cigarette smoke. Treatment with a specific PAF receptor antagonist, E-6123, significantly attenuated the increases in the number of airway goblet cells, eosinophils, and neutrophils observed after cigarette smoke exposure. These results suggest that endogenous PAF may play a key role in goblet cell metaplasia induced by cigarette smoke and that potential roles exist for inhibitors of PAF receptor in the treatment of hypersecretory airway diseases. PMID:11159026

  6. Dynamics of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange in the human airways: 1. A model study.

    PubMed

    Tsu, M E; Babb, A L; Ralph, D D; Hlastala, M P

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide a means for analysis of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange with the airways during tidal ventilation, a one dimensional theoretical model describing heat and water exchange in the respiratory airways has been extended to include soluble gas exchange with the airway mucosa and water exchange with the mucous layer lining the airways. Not only do heat, water, and gas exchange occur simultaneously, but they also interact. Heating and cooling of the airway surface and mucous lining affects both evaporative water and soluble gas exchange. Water evaporation provides a major source of heat exchange. The model-predicted mean airway temperature profiles agree well with literature data for both oral and nasal breathing validating that part of the model. With model parameters giving the best fit to experimental data, the model shows: (a) substantial heat recovery in the upper airways, (b) minimal respiratory heat and water loss, and (c) low average mucous temperatures and maximal increases in mucous thickness. For resting breathing of room air, heat and water conservation appear to be more important than conditioning efficiency. End-tidal expired partial pressures of very soluble gases eliminated by the lungs are predicted to be lower than the alveolar partial pressures due to the absorption of the expired gases by the airway mucosa. The model may be usable for design of experiments to examine mechanisms associated with the local hydration and dehydration dynamics of the mucosal surface, control of bronchial perfusion, triggering of asthma, mucociliary clearance and deposition of inhaled pollutant gases. PMID:3228218

  7. Interaction between haemopoietic regulation and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, P M; Gauvreau, G M; Wood, L J

    1999-06-01

    Asthma is characterized by reversible airway narrowing, by airway hyperresponsiveness, and by airway inflammation. Inhaled allergens are the most important of the stimuli known to cause asthma. Methods for studying inhaled allergen in the laboratory have been well standardized and extensively used for the investigation of the pathophysiology and the pharmacological modulation of allergen-induced airway responses. Allergen inhalation by a sensitized subject results in an early asthmatic response, and, in the majority of subjects, a late asthmatic response and airway hyperresponsiveness. The late response and airway hyperresponsiveness are associated with increases in airway eosinophils and metachromatic cells. Allergen-induced airway inflammation in dogs (predominantly neutrophilic) is associated with increased granulocyte-macrophage progenitors in bone marrow, which is dependent on the effects of a circulating serum factor stimulating the bone marrow. The newly formed cells traffic to the airways. These increases in granulocyte-macrophage progenitors are blocked by inhaled corticosteroids. In human subjects, allergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation is associated with increases in Eo/B progenitors, mediated through up-regulation if the IL-5 receptor on progenitors and increases responsiveness to IL-5. Inhaled corticosteroids also attenuate all allergen-induced physiological responses and airway inflammation, an effect possibly mediated, in part, through inhibition of eosinophil and basophil maturation or release from the bone marrow. PMID:10421819

  8. Paediatric airway management: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R; Archana, SR

    2012-01-01

    Airway management plays a pivotal role in Paediatric Anaesthesia. Over the last two decades many improvements in this area have helped us to overcome this final frontier. From an era where intubation with a conventional laryngoscope or blind nasal intubation was the only tool for airway management, we have come a long way. Today supraglottic airway devices have pride of place in the Operating Room and are becoming important airway devices used in routine procedures. Direct and indirect fibreoptic laryngoscopes and transtracheal devices help us overcome difficult and previously impossible airway situations. These developments mean that we need to update our knowledge on these devices. Also much of our basic understanding of the physiology and anatomy of the paediatric airway has changed. This article attempts to shed light on some of the most important advances/opinions in paediatric airway management like, cuffed endotracheal tubes, supraglottic airway devices, video laryngoscopes, rapid sequence intubation, the newly proposed algorithm for difficult airway management and the role of Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment (EXIT) procedure in the management of the neonatal airway. PMID:23293383

  9. Interleukin-22 exacerbates airway inflammation induced by short-term exposure to cigarette smoke in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiu-rong; Zhou, Wei-xun; Huang, Ke-wu; Jin, Yang; Gao, Jin-ming

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Interleukin-22 (IL-22) exhibits both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties in various biological processes. In this study we explored the effects of exogenous recombinant IL-22 (rIL-22) on cigarette smoke (CS)-induced airway inflammation in mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into groups: (1) CS group exposed to tobacco smoke for 3 consecutive days, (2) rIL-22 group received rIL-22 (100 mg/kg, ip), and (3) CS plus rIL-22 group, received rIL-22 (100 mg/kg, ip) before the CS exposure. The airway resistance (Rn), lung morphology, inflammatory cells in the airways, and inflammatory cytokines and CXCR3 ligands in both bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and lung tissues were analyzed. Results: CS alone significantly elevated IL-22 level in the BAL fluid. Both CS and rIL-22 significantly augmented airway resistance, an influx of inflammatory cells into the airways and lung parenchyma, and significantly elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TGFβ1 and IL-17A) and CXCR3 chemokines (particularly CXCL10) at the mRNA and/or protein levels. Furthermore, the effects of rIL-22 on airway resistance and inflammation were synergistic with those of CS, as demonstrated by a further increased Rn value, infiltration of greater numbers of inflammatory cells into the lung, higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and more severe pathological changes in CS plus rIL-22 group as compared to those in CS group. Conclusion: Exogenous rIL-22 exacerbates the airway inflammatory responses to CS exposure in part by inducing expression of several proinflammatory cytokines and CXCR3 ligands. PMID:25345745

  10. A Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitor Reduces Airway Remodeling in a Murine Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun H.; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  11. A plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor reduces airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun H; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  12. JNK-TLR9 signal pathway mediates allergic airway inflammation through suppressing melatonin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Mei; Shen, Qi-Ying; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hai; Shen, Pei-Ting; Liu, Ya-Jing; Liu, Rong-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. TLR9 is one of the most extensively studied TLRs as an approach to treat asthma. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR9 in the allergic airway inflammation and the underlying mechanism. Wild-type (WT) mice and TLR9(-/-) mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA to establish allergic airway disease model. We found that the expression of TLR9 was elevated concomitantly with airway inflammation post-OVA challenge, and TLR9 deficiency effectively inhibited airway inflammation, including serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), pulmonary inflammatory cell recruitment, mucus secretion, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) inflammatory cytokine production. Meanwhile, the protein expression of hydroxyindole-o-methyltransferase (HIOMT) in lung tissues, the level of melatonin in serum, and BALF were reduced in OVA-challenged WT mice, while these reductions were significantly restored by TLR9 deficiency. Additionally, we showed that although TLR9 deficiency had no effect on OVA-induced phosphorylation of JNK, inhibition of JNK by specific inhibitor SP600125 significantly decreased OVA-induced expression of TLR9, suggesting that JNK is the upstream signal molecular of TLR9. Furthermore, SP600125 treatment promoted resolution of allergic airway inflammation in OVA-challenged WT mice, but not further ameliorated allergic airway inflammation in OVA-challenged TLR9(-/-) mice. Similarly, SP600125 significantly restored the protein expression of HIOMT and the level of melatonin in OVA-challenged WT mice, while such effect was not further enhanced by TLR9 deficiency. Collectively, our results indicated that JNK-TLR9 signal pathway mediates allergic airway inflammation through suppressing melatonin biosynthesis. PMID:26914888

  13. Airway anastomosis for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Venuta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is the only viable option for a selected group of patients with end stage pulmonary diseases. During the recent years satisfactory results in terms of long-term survival and quality of life have been achieved with improvements in surgical technique, immunosuppression and perioperative management. Since the beginning, the airway anastomosis has been considered crucial and significant efforts have been made to understand the healing process. A number of experimental studies allowed improving the surgical technique by modifying the technique of suturing, the anastomotic protection and type and dose of immunosuppression, reducing the risk of airway complications. Furthermore, a huge progress has been made in the management of such complications. Early diagnosis of bronchial complications and their prompt and correct management are crucial to achieve long-term survival. PMID:26981271

  14. Nrf2 protects against airway disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hye-Youn; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a ubiquitous master transcription factor that regulates antioxidant response elements (AREs)-mediated expression of antioxidant enzyme and cytoprotective proteins. In the unstressed condition, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) suppresses cellular Nrf2 in cytoplasm and drives its proteasomal degradation. Nrf2 can be activated by diverse stimuli including oxidants, pro-oxidants, antioxidants, and chemopreventive agents. Nrf2 induces cellular rescue pathways against oxidative injury, abnormal inflammatory and immune responses, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Application of Nrf2 germ-line mutant mice has identified an extensive range of protective roles for Nrf2 in experimental models of human disorders in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, airway, kidney, brain, circulation, and immune or nerve system. In the lung, lack of Nrf2 exacerbated toxicity caused by multiple oxidative insults including supplemental respiratory therapy (e.g., hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation), cigarette smoke, allergen, virus, bacterial endotoxin and other inflammatory agents (e.g., carrageenin), environmental pollution (e.g., particles), and a fibrotic agent bleomycin. Microarray analyses and bioinformatic studies elucidated functional AREs and Nrf2-directed genes that are critical components of signaling mechanisms in pulmonary protection by Nrf2. Association of loss of function with promoter polymorphisms in NRF2 or somatic and epigenetic mutations in KEAP1 and NRF2 has been found in cohorts of patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome or lung cancer, which further supports the role for NRF2 in these lung diseases. In the current review, we address the role of Nrf2 in airways based on emerging evidence from experimental oxidative disease models and human studies.

  15. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce eosinophilic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Liang; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hau-Inh; Liao, Huang-Shen; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2015-10-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been widely used in industry. The metal composition of PM2.5 might contribute to the higher prevalence of asthma. To investigate the effects of ZnO NPs on allergic airway inflammation, mice were first exposed to different concentrations of ZnO NPs (0.1 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg) or to a combination of ZnO NPs and chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) by oropharyngeal aspiration on day 0 and day 7 and then were sacrificed 5 days later. The subsequent time course of airway inflammation in the mice after ZnO NPs exposure was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14. To further determine the role of zinc ions, ZnCl2 was also administered. The inflammatory cell count, cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung histopathology were examined. We found significant neutrophilia after exposure to high-dose ZnO NPs on day 1 and significant eosinophilia in the BALF at 7 days. However, the expression levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 increased significantly after 24h of exposure to only ZnO NPs and then decreased gradually. These results suggested that ZnO NPs could cause eosinophilic airway inflammation in the absence of allergens. PMID:26010476

  16. Measurement of airway function using invasive and non-invasive methods in mild and severe models for allergic airway inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Verheijden, Kim A. T.; Henricks, Paul A. J.; Redegeld, Frank A.; Garssen, Johan; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-01-01

    In this study a direct comparison was made between non-invasive and non-ventilated unrestrained whole body plethysmography (Penh) (conscious animals) and the invasive ventilated lung resistance (RL) method (anesthetized animals) in both mild and severe allergic airway inflammation models. Mild inflammation was induced by intraperitoneal sensitization and aerosols of ovalbumin. Severe inflammation was induced by intraperitoneal sensitization using trinitrophenyl-ovalbumin, followed by intranasal challenges with IgE-allergen complexes. A significant increase in airway responsiveness to methacholine was observed in the mild inflammation group when RL was measured. Significant changes in both RL and Penh were observed in the severe inflammation groups. There was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells in the Broncho-Alveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF) in both the mild and severe inflammation animals. The enforced ventilation of the animals during the RL measurement further increased the number of cells in the BALF. IL-2 and RANTES levels in the BALF were higher in the severe inflammation groups compared to the mild inflammation groups. Penh gave only reliable measurements during severe airway inflammation. Measuring RL gave consistent results in both mild and severe allergic airway inflammation models however, ventilation induced an additional cell influx into the airways. PMID:25161620

  17. Effects of irrigation fluid in shoulder arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surbhi; Manjuladevi, M; Vasudeva Upadhyaya, KS; Kutappa, AM; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Arpana, J

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Extravasation of irrigation fluid used in shoulder arthroscopy can lead to life-threatening airway and systemic complications. This study was conducted to assess the effect of irrigation fluid absorption on measurable anthropometric parameters and to identify whether these parameters predict airway/respiratory compromise. Methods: Thirty six American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status one or two patients aged 15–60 years undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under general anaesthesia were recruited. Measured variables preoperatively (baseline) and at the end of surgery were neck, chest, midarm and midthigh circumferences, weight, haemoglobin and serum sodium. Temperature, endotracheal tube cuff pressure, airway pressure, duration of surgery, amount of irrigation fluid and intravenous fluid used were also noted. Measured parameters were correlated with the duration of surgery and the amount of irrigation fluid used. Results: Postoperatively, the changes in variables showed a significant increase in the mean values (cm) for neck, chest, midarm and midthigh circumference (mean ± standard deviation: 2.35 ± 1.9, P < 0.001; 2.9 ± 3.88 cm, P < 0.001; 3.28 ± 2.44, P < 0.001 and 0.39 ± 0.71, P = 0.002, respectively) and weight (kg) (1.17 ± 1.24, P < 0.001). The post-operative haemoglobin (g/dL) levels decreased significantly (0.89 ± 1.23, P < 0.001) as compared to the baseline. No significant change was found in the serum sodium levels (P = 0.92). No patient experienced airway/respiratory compromise. Conclusion: Regional and systemic absorption of irrigation fluid in arthroscopic shoulder surgery is reflected in the degree of change in the measured anthropometric variables. However, this change was not significant enough to cause airway/respiratory compromise. PMID:27053783

  18. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion. PMID:25422617

  19. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  20. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    PubMed

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes. PMID:22247295

  1. Uterine fluid proteins and egg quality characteristics for 2 commercial and 2 heritage laying hen lines in response to manipulation of dietary calcium and vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Rathgeber, Bruce M; Thompson, Kristen L; Macisaac, Janice

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of eggs from 2 selected commercial strains of laying hens and 2 unselected lines of chickens fed diets with different combinations of Ca and vitamin D and relate it to the profile of uterine proteins and ultrastructure of the shell. A group of 4 chickens was housed in each of 24 cages. The group consisted of one representative from each of the following breeds: Lohmann LSL- Lite, Lohmann Classic-Brown, Fayoumi, and Light Sussex. Six dietary combinations of Ca and vitamin D(3) (3.35%, 2,500 IU; 4.10%, 2,500 IU (control); 4.85%, 2,500 IU; 3.35%, 200 IU; 4.10%, 200 IU; and 4.85%, 200 IU) were randomly assigned to 4 replicate cages for 2 treatment periods (26-29 and 56-59 wk of age). Data were analyzed as a split-plot design with cage as the main plot and hen as the subplot. Egg quality traits were different (P < 0.0001) between commercial and heritage breeds. Lohmann Brown had stronger shells with higher specific gravity compared with other breeds. Both commercial and heritage birds responded to a drop in vitamin D3 level by marked reduction in shell thickness. The SDS-PAGE profiles of uterine fluid samples revealed a decrease (P < 0.05) in 200-, 150-, 116-, and ≤6.5-kDa proteins, whereas proteins with molecular weight (MW) of 80, 55, 52, 45, 42, and 28 kDa increased with bird age. A 36- and 52-kDa protein band was most intense for Fayoumi compared with other breeds. Ultrastructural characteristics showed flattened and deeply etched mammillary caps for Lohmann Brown and the presence of type A and type B bodies between mammillary cones in eggshells from Fayoumi and Lohmann Lite. The negative correlation between ultrastructural characteristics, which decrease with bird age, and the 116-kDa uterine protein band could provide insight into reduced eggshell quality as hens age. PMID:23960126

  2. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques. PMID:26061578

  3. Acid aspiration-induced airways hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Gilman B; Leclair, Timothy R; von Reyn, Jessica; Larrabee, Yuna C; Cloutier, Mary E; Irvin, Charles G; Bates, Jason H T

    2009-12-01

    The role of gastroesophageal reflux and micro-aspiration as a trigger of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma is controversial. The role of acid reflux and aspiration as a direct cause of AHR in normal subjects is also unclear. We speculated that aspiration of a weak acid with a pH (1.8) equivalent to the upper range of typical gastric contents would lead to AHR in naive mice. We further speculated that modest reductions in aspirate acidity to a level expected during gastric acid suppression therapy (pH 4.0) would impede aspiration-induced AHR. BALB/c female mice were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane and allowed to aspirate 75 microl of saline with HCl (pH 1.8, 4.0, or 7.4) or underwent sham aspiration. Mice were re-anesthetized 2 or 24 h later, underwent tracheostomy, and were coupled to a mechanical ventilator. Forced oscillations were used to periodically measure respiratory impedance (Zrs) following aerosol delivery of saline and increasing doses of methacholine to measure for AHR. Values for elastance (H), airways resistance (R(N)), and tissue damping (G) were derived from Zrs. Aspirate pH of 1.8 led to a significant overall increase in peak R(N), G, and H compared with pH 4.0 and 7.4 at 2 and 24 h. Differences between pH 7.4 and 4.0 were not significant. In mice aspirating pH 1.8 compared with controls, airway lavage fluid contained more neutrophils, higher protein, and demonstrated higher permeability. We conclude that acid aspiration triggers an acute AHR, driven principally by breakdown of epithelial barrier integrity within the airways. PMID:19797689

  4. Acid aspiration-induced airways hyperresponsiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leclair, Timothy R.; von Reyn, Jessica; Larrabee, Yuna C.; Cloutier, Mary E.; Irvin, Charles G.; Bates, Jason H. T.

    2009-01-01

    The role of gastroesophageal reflux and micro-aspiration as a trigger of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma is controversial. The role of acid reflux and aspiration as a direct cause of AHR in normal subjects is also unclear. We speculated that aspiration of a weak acid with a pH (1.8) equivalent to the upper range of typical gastric contents would lead to AHR in naive mice. We further speculated that modest reductions in aspirate acidity to a level expected during gastric acid suppression therapy (pH 4.0) would impede aspiration-induced AHR. BALB/c female mice were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane and allowed to aspirate 75 μl of saline with HCl (pH 1.8, 4.0, or 7.4) or underwent sham aspiration. Mice were re-anesthetized 2 or 24 h later, underwent tracheostomy, and were coupled to a mechanical ventilator. Forced oscillations were used to periodically measure respiratory impedance (Zrs) following aerosol delivery of saline and increasing doses of methacholine to measure for AHR. Values for elastance (H), airways resistance (RN), and tissue damping (G) were derived from Zrs. Aspirate pH of 1.8 led to a significant overall increase in peak RN, G, and H compared with pH 4.0 and 7.4 at 2 and 24 h. Differences between pH 7.4 and 4.0 were not significant. In mice aspirating pH 1.8 compared with controls, airway lavage fluid contained more neutrophils, higher protein, and demonstrated higher permeability. We conclude that acid aspiration triggers an acute AHR, driven principally by breakdown of epithelial barrier integrity within the airways. PMID:19797689

  5. Contribution of upper airway geometry to convective mixing.

    PubMed

    Jayaraju, Santhosh T; Paiva, Manuel; Brouns, Mark; Lacor, Chris; Verbanck, Sylvia

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the axial dispersive effect of the upper airway structure (comprising mouth cavity, oropharynx, and trachea) on a traversing aerosol bolus. This was done by means of aerosol bolus experiments on a hollow cast of a realistic upper airway model (UAM) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in the same UAM geometry. The experiments showed that 50-ml boluses injected into the UAM dispersed to boluses with a half-width ranging from 80 to 90 ml at the UAM exit, across both flow rates (250, 500 ml/s) and both flow directions (inspiration, expiration). These experimental results imply that the net half-width induced by the UAM typically was 69 ml. Comparison of experimental bolus traces with a one-dimensional Gaussian-derived analytical solution resulted in an axial dispersion coefficient of 200-250 cm(2)/s, depending on whether the bolus peak and its half-width or the bolus tail needed to be fully accounted for. CFD simulations agreed well with experimental results for inspiratory boluses and were compatible with an axial dispersion of 200 cm(2)/s. However, for expiratory boluses the CFD simulations showed a very tight bolus peak followed by an elongated tail, in sharp contrast to the expiratory bolus experiments. This indicates that CFD methods that are widely used to predict the fate of aerosols in the human upper airway, where flow is transitional, need to be critically assessed, possibly via aerosol bolus simulations. We conclude that, with all its geometric complexity, the upper airway introduces a relatively mild dispersion on a traversing aerosol bolus for normal breathing flow rates in inspiratory and expiratory flow directions. PMID:18818384

  6. Investigation of mucus transport in an idealized lung airway model using multiphase CFD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Rahul; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    Mucus, a Bingham fluid is transported in the pulmonary airways by consistent beating of the cilia and exhibits a wide range of physical properties in response to the core air flow and various pathological conditions. A better understanding of the interfacial instability is required as it plays a crucial role in gas transport, mixing, mucus clearance and drug delivery. In the current study, mucus is modelled as a Newtonian fluid and the two phase gas-liquid flow in the airways is investigated using an inhomogeneous Eulerian-Eulerian approach. The complex interface between the phases is tracked using the conventional VOF (Volume of Fluid) method. Results from our CFD simulations which are performed in idealized single and double bifurcation geometries will be presented and the influence of airflow rate, mucus layer thickness, mucus viscosity, airway geometry (branching & diameter) and surface tension on mucus flow behavior will be discussed. Mean mucus layer thickness, pressure drop due to momentum transfer & increased airway resistance, mucus transport speed and the flow morphology will be compared to existing experimental and theoretical data.

  7. A bug's view of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter S; Campbell, Dianne E

    2016-06-01

    The increase in allergic airways disease has been linked to modern urbanization and lifestyle. Recent evidence suggests that the associated reduction in microbial exposure, reduction in dietary fibre intake and increased antibiotic use may cause early dysbiosis in infancy, which predisposes to immune dysregulation and allergic airways disease later in life. This implies that there may be a window of opportunity for primary prevention strategies aimed to protect or restore the microbiome early in life and thereby decrease the risk of developing allergic airways disease. Alternatively, strategies that correct dysbiosis may aid in the treatment of established allergic airways disease. PMID:27012478

  8. Airway vascular damage in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Moreira, André; Palmares, Carmo; Lopes, Cristina; Delgado, Luís

    2011-11-01

    We postulated that high level swimming can promote airway inflammation and thus asthma by enhancing local vascular permeability. We aimed to test this hypothesis by a cross-sectional study comparing swimmers (n = 13, 17 ± 3 years, competing 7 ± 4 years, training 18 ± 3 h per week), asthmatic-swimmers (n = 6, 17 ± 2 years, competing 8 ± 3 years, training 16 ± 4 h per week), and asthmatics (n = 19, 14 ± 3 years). Subjects performed induced sputum and had exhaled nitric oxide, lung volumes, and airway responsiveness determined. Airway vascular permeability index was defined as the ratio of albumin in sputum and serum. Results from the multiple linear regression showed each unit change in airway vascular permeability index was associated with an increase of 0.97% (95%CI: 0.02 to 1.92; p = 0.047) in sputum eosinophilis, and of 2.64% (95%CI:0.96 to 4.31; p = 0.006) in sputum neutrophils after adjustment for confounders. In a general linear model no significant differences between airway vascular permeability between index study groups existed, after controlling for sputum eosinophilis and neutrophils. In conclusion, competitive swimmers training in chlorine-rich pools have similar levels of airway vascular permeability than asthmatics. Although competitive swimming has been associated with asthma, airway inflammation and airway hyperesponsiveness do not seem to be dependent on increased airway vascular permeability. PMID:21669516

  9. Automated lobe-based airway labeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  10. Airway sonography in live models and cadavers.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban; Ip, Vivian; Walji, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Sonography using cadavers is beneficial in teaching and learning sonoanatomy, which is particularly important because imaging of the airway can be challenging due to the cartilaginous landmarks and air artifacts. In this exploratory study, we have attempted to compare the airway sonoanatomy of cadavers and live models. Our observations support the use of cadavers as teaching tools for learning airway sonoanatomy and practicing procedures involving airway structures, such as superior laryngeal nerve blocks, transtracheal injections, and needle cricothyroidotomy, before performance on patients in clinical situations. We believe this process will improve patient safety and enhance the competency of trainees and practitioners in rare procedures such as needle cricothyroidotomy. PMID:23716527

  11. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  12. Physical principle of airway design in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Son, Taeho; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    From an engineering perspective, lungs are natural microfluidic devices that extract oxygen from air. In the bronchial tree, airways branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. It is generally accepted that in conducting airways, which air passes on the way to the acinar airways from the atmosphere, the reduction ratio of diameter is closely related to the minimization of viscous dissipation. Such a principle is formulated as the Hess-Murray law. However, in acinar airways, where oxygen transfer to alveolae occurs, the diameter reduction with progressive generations is more moderate than in conducting airways. Noting that the dominant transfer mechanism in acinar airways is diffusion rather than advection, unlike conducting airways, we construct a mathematical model for oxygen transfer through a series of acinar airways. Our model allows us to predict the optimal airway reduction ratio that maximizes the oxygen transfer in a finite airway volume, thereby rationalizing the observed airway reduction ratio in acinar airways.

  13. Immunomodulation of airway epithelium cell activation by mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1α and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  14. Prolonged increased responsiveness of canine peripheral airways after exposure to O/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, W.S.; Freed, A.N.; Turner, C.; Menkes, H.A.

    1988-02-01

    Because it is relatively insoluble, the oxidant gas O3 may penetrate to small peripheral airways when it is inhaled. Increased responsiveness in large airways after O3 breathing has been associated with the presence of inflammatory cells. To determine whether O3 produces prolonged hyperresponsiveness of small airways associated with the presence of inflammatory cells, we exposed the peripheral lungs of anesthetized dogs to 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 h using a wedged bronchoscope technique. A contralateral sublobar segment was simultaneously exposed to air as a control. In the O3-exposed segments, collateral resistance (Rcs) was increased within 15 min and remained elevated approximately 150% throughout the 2-h exposure period. Fifteen hours later, the base-line Rcs of the O3-exposed sublobar segments was significantly elevated, and these segments demonstrated increased responsiveness to aerosolized acetylcholine (100 and 500 micrograms/ml). There were no differences in neutrophils, mononuclear cells, or mast cells (numbers or degree of mast cell degranulation) between O3 and air-exposed airways at 15 h. The small airways of the lung periphery thus are capable of remaining hyperresponsive hours after cessation of localized exposure to O3, but this does not appear to be dependent on the presence of inflammatory cells in the small airway wall.

  15. Synergistic and additive killing by antimicrobial factors found in human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Tack, B F; McCray, P B; Welsh, M J

    2000-11-01

    Airway surface liquid contains multiple factors thought to provide a first line of defense against bacteria deposited in the airways. Although the antimicrobial action of individual factors has been studied, less is known about how they work in combination. We examined the combined action of six antimicrobial peptides found in airway surface liquid. The paired combinations of lysozyme-lactoferrin, lysozyme-secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and lactoferrin-SLPI were synergistic. The triple combination of lysozyme, lactoferrin, and SLPI showed even greater synergy. Other combinations involving the human beta-defensins, LL-37, and tobramycin (often administered to cystic fibrosis patients by inhalation) were additive. Because the airway surface liquid salt concentration may be elevated in cystic fibrosis patients, we examined the effect of salt on the synergistic combinations. As the ionic strength increased, synergistic interactions were lost. Our data suggest that the antibacterial potency of airway surface liquid may be significantly increased by synergistic and additive interactions between antimicrobial factors. These results also suggest that increased salt concentrations that may exist in cystic fibrosis could inhibit airway defenses by diminishing these synergistic interactions. PMID:11053013

  16. FLUID DYNAMICS OF THE HUMAN LARYNX AND UPPER TRACHEOBRONCHIAL AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An airflow pattern that is used to study aerosol deposition in the human lung must attempt to be physiologically realistic. ecause of anatomical conditions, caution must be applied in using only calculated Reynolds number values in biological applications to designate either velo...

  17. A standardized aqueous extract of Anoectochilus formosanus modulated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-inhaled murine model.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C-C; Hsiao, H-B; Lin, W-C

    2010-07-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus HAYATA, a Chinese herb, is a valued folk medicine for fever, pain, and diseases of the lung and liver. Allergic asthma is characterized by increased serum IgE level and inflammation of the airways with high levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). Constriction of airway smooth muscle and development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) are the most important symptoms of allergic asthma. In our previous study, a standardized aqueous extract of A. formosanus (SAEAF) was used to modulate innate immunity of normal mice. In this study, airway inflammatory infiltrations, including T cell differentiation, cytokine modulation, allergic antibodies estimation, pulmonary pathology, and enhanced pause (Penh) of AHR were used to evaluate SAEAF treatment of an ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled airway allergic murine model. The resulting cytokine profiles demonstrated that SAEAF can significantly reduce Th2 polarization after administration of SAEAF in OVA inhalation. These results also suggest that SAEAF modulates cytokine secretion in allergic asthma. Modulated natural T regulatory cells (CD25+/CD4+, Treg) were also shown to increase immuno-suppression in the allergic lung inflammation and further down-regulate airway inflammatory infiltration in eosinophils and macrophages. Finally, decreased airway anti-OVA IgE secretion and reduced AHR were observed. Our results indicate that the administration of SAEAF can modulate cytokines and T cell subpopulation by regulating inflammatory cell infiltration and modulating the allergic response. PMID:20092984

  18. Effects of tracheal airway occlusion on hyoid muscle length and upper airway volume.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E; Haxhiu, M A; Cherniack, N S

    1989-12-01

    Complex relationships exist among electromyograms (EMGs) of the upper airway muscles, respective changes in muscle length, and upper airway volume. To test the effects of preventing lung inflation on these relationships, recordings were made of EMGs and length changes of the geniohyoid (GH) and sternohyoid (SH) muscles as well as of tidal changes in upper airway volume in eight anesthetized cats. During resting breathing, tracheal airway occlusion tended to increase the inspiratory lengthening of GH and SH. In response to progressive hypercapnia, the GH eventually shortened during inspiration in all animals; the extent of muscle shortening was minimally augmented by airway occlusion despite substantial increases in EMGs. SH lengthened during inspiration in six of eight animals under hypercapnic conditions, and in these cats lengthening was greater during airway occlusion even though EMGs increased. Despite the above effects on SH and GH length, upper airway tidal volume was increased significantly by tracheal occlusion under hypercapnic conditions. These data suggest that the thoracic and upper airway muscle reflex effects of preventing lung inflation during inspiration act antagonistically on hyoid muscle length, but, because of the mechanical arrangement of the hyoid muscles relative to the airway and thorax, they act agonistically to augment tidal changes in upper airway volume. The augmentation of upper airway tidal volume may occur in part as a result of the effects of thoracic movements being passively transmitted through the hyoid muscles. PMID:2606835

  19. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  20. Correction of defective CFTR/ENaC function and tightness of cystic fibrosis airway epithelium by amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Annalucia; Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Diana, Anna; Paracchini, Valentina; Di Gioia, Sante; Seia, Manuela; Casavola, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Conese, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, with most of the mortality given by the lung disease. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hAMSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine in the field of lung disease; however, their potential as therapeutics for CF lung disease has not been fully explored. In the present study, hAMSCs were analysed in co-cultures on Transwell filters with CF immortalized airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line) at different ratios to exploit their potency to resume basic defects associated with CF. The results show that F-actin content was increased in co-cultures as compared with CF cells and actin was reorganized to form stress fibres. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that co-cultures had a tendency of increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 at the intercellular borders, paralleled by a decrease in dextran permeability, suggestive of more organized tight junctions (TJs). Spectrofluorometric analysis of CFTR function demonstrated that hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures resumed chloride transport, in line with the appearance of the mature Band C of CFTR protein by Western blotting. Moreover, hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures, at a 1:5 ratio, showed a decrease in fluid absorption, as opposed to CFBE cell monolayers that displayed a great rate of fluid resorption from the apical side. Our data show that human amniotic MSCs can be used in co-culture with CF respiratory epithelial cells to model their engraftment into the airways and have the potential to resume a tight epithelium with partial correction of the CF phenotype. PMID:24894806

  1. Athletic Trainers' Knowledge Regarding Airway Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor; Roman, Christopher; Mata, Heather Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research suggests that knowledge gaps regarding the appropriate use of airway adjuncts exist among various health care practitioners, and that knowledge is especially limited within athletic training. Objective: To determine the relationship between perceived knowledge (PK) and actual knowledge (AK) of airway adjunct use and the…

  2. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  3. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  4. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  10. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  11. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  12. Trefoil factor-2 reverses airway remodeling changes in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Lim, Clarice; Muljadi, Ruth C; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C; Giraud, Andrew S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a small peptide with an important role in mucosal repair. TFF2 is up-regulated in asthma, suggesting a role in asthma pathogenesis. Given its known biological role in promoting epithelial repair, TFF2 might be expected to exert a protective function in limiting the progression of airway remodeling in asthma. The contribution of TFF2 to airway remodeling in asthma was investigated by examining the expression of TFF2 in the airway and lung, and evaluating the effects of recombinant TFF2 treatment on established airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD). BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 9 weeks, whereas mice with established OVA-induced AAD were treated with TFF2 or vehicle control (intranasally for 14 d). Effects on airway remodeling, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness were then assessed, whereas TFF2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. TFF2 expression was significantly increased in the airways of mice with AAD, compared with expression levels in control mice. TFF2 treatment resulted in reduced epithelial thickening, subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet-cell metaplasia, bronchial epithelium apoptosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness (all P < 0.05, versus vehicle control), but TFF2 treatment did not influence airway inflammation. The increased expression of endogenous TFF2 in response to chronic allergic inflammation is insufficient to prevent the progression of airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic AAD. However, exogenous TFF2 treatment is effective in reversing aspects of established airway remodeling. TFF2 has potential as a novel treatment for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22652198

  13. INTRAOPERATIVE LONG RANGE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY AS A NOVEL METHOD OF IMAGING THE PEDIATRIC UPPER AIRWAY BEFORE AND AFTER ADENOTONSILLECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Lazarow, Frances B.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Loy, Anthony Chin; Su, Erica; Nguyen, Tony D.; Sharma, Giriraj K.; Wang, Alex; Jing, Joe; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES While upper airway obstruction is a common problem in the pediatric population, the first-line treatment, adenotonsillectomy, fails in up to 20% of patients. The decision to proceed to surgery is often made without quantitative anatomic guidance. We evaluated the use of a novel technique, long-range optical coherence tomography (LR-OCT), to image the upper airway of children under general anesthesia immediately before and after tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy. We investigated the feasibility of LR-OCT to identify both normal anatomy and sites of airway narrowing and to quantitatively compare airway lumen size in the oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal regions pre- and post-operatively. METHODS 46 children were imaged intraoperatively with a custom-designed LR-OCT system, both before and after adenotonsillectomy. These axial LR-OCT images were both rendered into 3D airway models for qualitative analysis and manually segmented for quantitative comparison of cross-sectional area. RESULTS LR-OCT images demonstrated normal anatomic structures (base of tongue, epiglottis) as well as regions of airway narrowing. Volumetric rendering of pre- and post-operative images clearly showed regions of airway collapse and post-surgical improvement in airway patency. Quantitative analysis of cross-sectional images showed an average change of 70.52mm2 (standard deviation 47.87mm2) in the oropharynx after tonsillectomy and 105.58mm2 (standard deviation 60.62mm2) in the nasopharynx after adenoidectomy. CONCLUSIONS LR-OCT is an emerging technology that rapidly generates 3D images of the pediatric upper airway in a feasible manner. This is the first step toward development of an office-based system to image awake pediatric subjects and thus better identify loci of airway obstruction prior to surgery. PMID:25479699

  14. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Liu, Xiaoyang; Periasamy, Sivakumar; Ma, Aiying; Tang, Jin; Jenkins, Mark; Tuo, Wenbin; Song, Wenxia; Keegan, Achsah D.; Conrad, Daniel H.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human low affinity IgE receptor, CD23 (FcεRII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monolayer in vitro. However, it remains unknown whether the CD23-dependent IgE transfer pathway in AECs initiates and facilitates allergic inflammation in vivo, and whether inhibition of this pathway attenuates allergic inflammation. To this end, we show that in wild-type (WT) mice, epithelial CD23 transcytosed both IgE and ovalbumin (OVA)-IgE complexes across the airway epithelial barrier, while neither type of transcytosis was observed in CD23 knockout (KO) mice. In chimeric mice, OVA sensitization and aerosol challenge of WT/WT (bone-marrow transfer from the WT to WT) or CD23KO/WT (CD23KO to WT) chimeric mice, which express CD23 on radioresistant airway structural cells (mainly epithelial cells) resulted in airway eosinophilia, including collagen deposition and a significant increase in goblet cells, and increased airway hyperreactivity. In contrast, the absence of CD23 expression on airway structural or epithelial cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, in WT/CD23KO (the WT to CD23KO) chimeric mice significantly reduced OVA-driven allergic airway inflammation. In addition, inhalation of the CD23-blocking B3B4 antibody in sensitized WT mice before or during airway challenge suppressed the salient features of asthma, including bronchial hyperreactivity. Taken together, these results identify a previously unproven mechanism in which epithelial CD23 plays a central role in the development of allergic inflammation. Further, our study suggests that functional inhibition of CD23 in the airway is a potential therapeutic approach with which to inhibit the development of asthma. PMID:25783969

  15. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  16. Neutrophilic oxidative stress mediates organic dust-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Toby K; Chen, Michael; Allard, Benoit; Larsson, Kjell; Martin, James G; Adner, Mikael

    2016-01-15

    Airway exposure to organic dust (OD) from swine confinement facilities induces airway inflammation dominated by neutrophils and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). One important neutrophilic innate defense mechanism is the induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that neutrophils exacerbate airway dysfunction following OD exposure by increasing oxidant burden. BALB/C mice were given intranasal challenges with OD or PBS (1/day for 3 days). Mice were untreated or treated with a neutrophil-depleting antibody, anti-Ly6G, or the antioxidant dimethylthiourea (DMTU) prior to OD exposure. Twenty-four hours after the final exposure, we measured airway responsiveness in response to methacholine (MCh) and collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid to assess pulmonary inflammation and total antioxidant capacity. Lung tissue was harvested to examine the effect of OD-induced antioxidant gene expression and the effect of anti-Ly6G or DMTU. OD exposure induced a dose-dependent increase of airway responsiveness, a neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, and secretion of keratinocyte cytokine. Depletion of neutrophils reduced OD-induced AHR. DMTU prevented pulmonary inflammation involving macrophages and neutrophils. Neutrophil depletion and DMTU were highly effective in preventing OD-induced AHR affecting large, conducting airways and tissue elastance. OD induced an increase in total antioxidant capacity and mRNA levels of NRF-2-dependent antioxidant genes, effects that are prevented by administration of DMTU and neutrophil depletion. We conclude that an increase in oxidative stress and neutrophilia is critical in the induction of OD-induced AHR. Prevention of oxidative stress diminishes neutrophil influx and AHR, suggesting that mechanisms driving OD-induced AHR may be dependent on neutrophil-mediated oxidant pathways. PMID:26545900

  17. EFFECTS OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE EXPOSURE ON NEUROIMMUNE RESPONSES IN RAT AIRWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Scuri, Mario; Chen, Bean T.; Castranova, Vincent; Reynolds, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Victor J.; Samsell, Lennie; Walton, Cheryl; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ambient nanoparticles (defined as particulate matter [PM] having one dimension < 100 nm) is associated with increased risk of childhood and adult asthma. Nanomaterials feature a smaller aerodynamic diameter and a higher surface area per unit mass ratio compared to fine or coarse-sized particles, resulting in greater lung deposition efficiency and an increased potential for biological interaction. The neurotrophins nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are key regulatory elements of neuronal development and responsiveness of airway sensory neurons. Changes in their expression are associated with bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation. The neurogenic-mediated control of airway responses is a key pathophysiological mechanism of childhood asthma. However, the effects of nanoparticle exposure on neurotrophin-driven airway responses and their potential role as a predisposing factor for developing asthma have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, in vivo inhalation exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (12 mg/m13; 5.6 h/d for 3 d) produced upregulation of lung neurotrophins in weanling (2-wk-old) and newborn (2-d-old) rats but not in adult (12-wk-old) animals compared to controls. This effect was associated with increased airway responsiveness and upregulation of growth-related oncogene/keratine-derived chemokine (GRO/KC; CXCL1, rat equivalent of human interleukin [IL]-8) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data show for the first time that exposure to nanoparticulate upregulates the expression of lung neurotrophins in an age-dependent fashion and that this effect is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. These results suggest the presence of a critical window of vulnerability in earlier stages of lung development, which may lead to a higher risk of developing asthma. PMID:20818535

  18. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  19. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  20. Airway fires during surgery: Management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Navaid; Ansar, Farrukh; Baig, Mirza Shahzad; Abbas, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airway fires pose a serious risk to surgical patients. Fires during surgery have been reported for many years with flammable anesthetic agents being the main culprits in the past. Association of airway fires with laser surgery is well-recognized, but there are reports of endotracheal tube fires ignited by electrocautery during pharyngeal surgery or tracheostomy or both. This uncommon complication has potentially grave consequences. While airway fires are relatively uncommon occurrences, they are very serious and can often be fatal. Success in preventing such events requires a thorough understanding of the components leading to a fire (fuel, oxidizer, and ignition source), as well as good communication between all members present to appropriately manage the fire and ensure patient safety. We present a case of fire in the airway during routine adenotonsillectomy. We will review the causes, preventive measures, and brief management for airway fires. PMID:27006554

  1. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-01-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom’s 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists’ difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  2. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-03-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom's 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  3. Characterization of side population cells from human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Jacoby, David B; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M; Knight, Darryl A

    2008-10-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45(-) SP, CD45(+) SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45(-) SP cells made up 0.12% +/- 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% +/- 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45(-) SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45(-) SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45(-) SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and long-term proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18653771

  4. Processes involved in the repair of injured airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered many aspects of the repair processes that follow airway epithelial injury. Although the repair process has common elements among various epithelia, such as the ones lining the airways, skin, and gut, there are differences based on their diverse functions. Whenever possible, similarities are pointed out that could help researchers further investigate their application to airway epithelia, although it would be beyond the scope of this review to cover the processes that may occur during the repair of all types of epithelia. In general, five major steps are involved in the recovery of airway epithelia from injury: 1) epithelial cells migrate to cover denuded areas within minutes, and certain proteins, such as the trefoil factor family proteins, are crucial to this process; 2) epithelial cells start to proliferate in order to replace injured cells and to differentiate to establish squamous or mucous cell metaplasia; 3) because more epithelial cells are present after proliferation, some of the cells must be discarded to restore the epithelium to the original condition; 4) once the cell numbers have been reduced to those found in unexposed individuals, the normal proportions of cell types are restored; 5) finally, studies from exposures of rats to ozone show that epithelial cells can adapt and develop a memory of the chronic exposure to which they were exposed. This adaptation allows the epithelium to respond quickly, thus minimizing further injury. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in these major steps of the recovery process are largely unknown, disruption of these steps clearly causes the permanent changes observed in diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and cancer; therefore, extensive research of these mechanisms may provide ideas for novel therapies. PMID:14626427

  5. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  6. Fluid handling equipment: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Devices and techniques used in fluid-handling and vacuum systems are described. Section 1 presents several articles on fluid lines and tubing. Section 2 describes a number of components such as valves, filters, and regulators. The last section contains descriptions of a number of innovative fluid-handling systems.

  7. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bandla, Preetam; Huang, Jingtao; Karamessinis, Laurie; Kelly, Andrea; Pepe, Michelle; Samuel, John; Brooks, Lee; Mason, Thornton. A.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading declines with age. The epidemiology of obstructive sleep apnea suggests that sex hormones play a role in modulating upper airway function. Sex hormones increase gradually during puberty, from minimally detectable to adult levels. We hypothesized that the upper airway response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with increasing pubertal Tanner stage in males but remained stable during puberty in females. Design: Upper airway dynamic function during sleep was measured over the course of puberty. Participants: Normal subjects of Tanner stages 1 to 5. Measurements: During sleep, maximal inspiratory airflow was measured while varying the level of nasal pressure. The slope of the upstream pressure-flow relationship (SPF) was measured. Results: The SPF correlated with age and Tanner stage. However, the relationship with Tanner stage became nonsignificant when the correlation due to the mutual association with age was removed. Females had a lower SPF than males. Conclusions: In both sexes, the upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with age rather than degree of pubertal development. Thus, changes in sex hormones are unlikely to be a primary modulator of upper airway function during the transition from childhood to adulthood. Although further studies of upper airway structural changes during puberty are needed, we speculate that the changes in upper airway function with age are due to the depressant effect of age on ventilatory drive, leading to a decrease in upper airway neuromotor tone. Citation: Bandla P; Huang J; Karamessinis L; Kelly A; Pepe M; Samuel J; Brooks L; Mason TA; Gallagher PR; Marcus CL. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep. SLEEP 2008;31(4):534-541. PMID:18457241

  8. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  9. Airway responses to methacholine and exercise at high altitude in healthy lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale; Quaranta, Marco; Aliverti, Andrea; Kayser, Bengt; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Fasano, Valter; Cogo, Annalisa; Milanese, Manlio; Cornara, Giuseppe; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele

    2010-02-01

    Peribronchial edema has been proposed as a mechanism enhancing airway responses to constrictor stimuli. Acute exposure to altitude in nonacclimatized lowlanders leads to subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that lasts for several days after ascent, as suggested by changes in lung mechanics. We, therefore, investigated whether changes in lung mechanics consistent with fluid accumulation at high altitude within the lungs are associated with changes in airway responses to methacholine or exercise. Fourteen healthy subjects were studied at 4,559 and at 120 m above sea level. At high altitude, both static and dynamic lung compliances and respiratory reactance at 5 Hz significantly decreased, suggestive of interstitial pulmonary edema. Resting minute ventilation significantly increased by approximately 30%. Compared with sea level, inhalation of methacholine at high altitude caused a similar reduction of partial forced expiratory flow but less reduction of maximal forced expiratory flow, less increments of pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5 Hz, and similar effects of deep breath on pulmonary and respiratory resistance. During maximal incremental exercise at high altitude, partial forced expiratory flow gradually increased with the increase in minute ventilation similarly to sea level but both achieved higher values at peak exercise. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to methacholine at high altitude is well preserved despite the occurrence of interstitial pulmonary edema. We suggest that this may be the result of the increase in resting minute ventilation opposing the effects and/or the development of airway smooth muscle force, reduced gas density, and well preserved airway-to-parenchyma interdependence. PMID:19940099

  10. Suppression of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma by exogenous mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hai-Feng; Huang, Yun; Hu, Xing-Bin; Wu, Chang-Gui

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have significant immunomodulatory effects in the development of acute lung inflammation and fibrosis. However, it is still unclear as to whether MSCs could attenuate allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We firstly investigated whether exogenous MSCs can relocate to lung tissues in asthmatic mice and analyzed the chemotactic mechanism. Then, we evaluated the in vivo immunomodulatory effect of exogenous MSCs in asthma. MSCs (2 × 10(6)) were administered through the tail vein to mice one day before the first airway challenge. Migration of MSCs was evaluated by flow cytometry. The immunomodulatory effect of MSCs was evaluated by cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), histology, mast cell degranulation, airway hyperreactivity and cytokine profile in BALF. Exogenous MSCs can migrate to sites of inflammation in asthmatic mice through a stromal cell-derived factor-1α/CXCR4-dependent mechanism. MSCs can protect mice against a range of allergic airway inflammatory pathologies, including the infiltration of inflammatory cells, mast cell degranulation and airway hyperreactivity partly via shifting to a T-helper 1 (Th1) from a Th2 immune response to allergens. So, immunotherapy based on MSCs may be a feasible, efficient therapy for asthma. PMID:22114062

  11. Pegylation of Antimicrobial Peptides Maintains the Active Peptide Conformation, Model Membrane Interactions, and Antimicrobial Activity while Improving Lung Tissue Biocompatibility following Airway Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Beck, Konrad; Fox, Marc A.; Ulaeto, David; Clark, Graeme C.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential, particularly for localized infections such as those of the lung. Here we show that airway administration of a pegylated AMP minimizes lung tissue toxicity while nevertheless maintaining antimicrobial activity. CaLL, a potent synthetic AMP (KWKLFKKIFKRIVQRIKDFLR) comprising fragments of LL-37 and cecropin A peptides, was N-terminally pegylated (PEG-CaLL). PEG-CaLL derivatives retained significant antimicrobial activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s] 2- to 3-fold higher than those of CaLL) against bacterial lung pathogens even in the presence of lung lining fluid. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that conformational changes associated with the binding of CaLL to model microbial membranes were not disrupted by pegylation. Pegylation of CaLL reduced AMP-elicited cell toxicity as measured using in vitro lung epithelial primary cell cultures. Further, in a fully intact ex vivo isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) model, airway-administered PEG-CaLL did not result in disruption of the pulmonary epithelial barrier, whereas CaLL caused an immediate loss of membrane integrity leading to pulmonary edema. All AMPs (CaLL, PEG-CaLL, LL-37, cecropin A) delivered to the lung by airway administration showed limited (<3%) pulmonary absorption in the IPRL with extensive AMP accumulation in lung tissue itself, a characteristic anticipated to be beneficial for the treatment of pulmonary infections. We conclude that pegylation may present a means of improving the lung biocompatibility of AMPs designed for the treatment of pulmonary infections. PMID:22430978

  12. Noninvasive detection of airway constriction in awake guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Tidal volume measured by the barometric method is very sensitive to increases in compression and expansion of alveolar gas, such as would be expected to occur during airway narrowing or closure. By comparing a barometric method tidal volume signal (VT') with a reference tidal volume (VT) obtained with a head-out pressure plethysmograph, a simple index related to gas compressibility effects was calculated (VT/VT'). Changes in this index were compared with decreases in dynamic compliance (Cdyn) during histamine aerosol challenge of 15 Charles River Hartley guinea pigs. Decreases in VT/VT' occurred during all aerosol challenges and were correlated with decreases in Cdyn. Decreases in VT/VT' were most marked at Cdyn values of less than 50% of base line. At Cdyn of less than 15% of base line, VT' was 3.1-4.8 times the VT reference signal. No increase in total pulmonary resistance was noted, and Cdyn and VT/VT' returned to base line after histamine exposure was stopped. The authors conclude that gas compressibility effects become substantial during histamine-induced airway constriction in the guinea pig and that the VT/VT' ratio appears to provide a simple noninvasive method of detecting these changes.

  13. Allergic airways disease develops after an increase in allergen capture and processing in the airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    von Garnier, Christophe; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Zosky, Graeme; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D; Smith, Miranda; Thomas, Jennifer A; Judd, Samantha R; Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G; Stumbles, Philip A

    2007-11-01

    Airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDC) and other airway APCs continuously sample inhaled Ags and regulate the nature of any resulting T cell-mediated immune response. Although immunity develops to harmful pathogens, tolerance arises to nonpathogenic Ags in healthy individuals. This homeostasis is thought to be disrupted in allergic respiratory disorders such as allergic asthma, such that a potentially damaging Th2-biased, CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response develops against intrinsically nonpathogenic allergens. Using a mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD), we have investigated the functional changes occurring in AMDC and other airway APC populations during disease onset. Onset of EAAD was characterized by early and transient activation of airway CD4(+) T cells coinciding with up-regulation of CD40 expression exclusively on CD11b(-) AMDC. Concurrent enhanced allergen uptake and processing occurred within all airway APC populations, including B cells, macrophages, and both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) AMDC subsets. Immune serum transfer into naive animals recapitulated the enhanced allergen uptake observed in airway APC populations and mediated activation of naive allergen-specific, airway CD4(+) T cells following inhaled allergen challenge. These data suggest that the onset of EAAD is initiated by enhanced allergen capture and processing by a number of airway APC populations and that allergen-specific Igs play a role in the conversion of normally quiescent AMDC subsets into those capable of inducing airway CD4(+) T cell activation. PMID:17947647

  14. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m3) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m3) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10. PMID:24730559

  15. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  16. Accurate measurement of respiratory airway wall thickness in CT images using a signal restoration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Kwang Gi; Lee, Sang Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2008-03-01

    Airway wall thickness (AWT) is an important bio-marker for evaluation of pulmonary diseases such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis. While an image-based analysis of the airway tree can provide precise and valuable airway size information, quantitative measurement of AWT in Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography (MDCT) images involves various sources of error and uncertainty. So we have developed an accurate AWT measurement technique for small airways with three-dimensional (3-D) approach. To evaluate performance of these techniques, we used a set of acryl tube phantom was made to mimic small airways to have three different sizes of wall diameter (4.20, 1.79, 1.24 mm) and wall thickness (1.84, 1.22, 0.67 mm). The phantom was imaged with MDCT using standard reconstruction kernel (Sensation 16, Siemens, Erlangen). The pixel size was 0.488 mm × 0.488 mm × 0.75 mm in x, y, and z direction respectively. The images were magnified in 5 times using cubic B-spline interpolation, and line profiles were obtained for each tube. To recover faithful line profile from the blurred images, the line profiles were deconvolved with a point spread kernel of the MDCT which was estimated using the ideal tube profile and image line profile. The inner diameter, outer diameter, and wall thickness of each tube were obtained with full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) method for the line profiles before and after deconvolution processing. Results show that significant improvement was achieved over the conventional FWHM method in the measurement of AWT.

  17. Small particles disrupt postnatal airway development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongYoub; Wallis, Chris; Schelegle, Edward S.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Plopper, Charles G.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Kumfer, Ben; Kennedy, Ian M.; Chan, Jackie K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of epidemiologic studies associate air pollution exposure in children with decreased lung function development. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of exposure to combustion-generated fine [230 and 212 nm number mean aerodynamic particle diameter (NMAD)] to ultrafine (73 nm NMAD) particles differing in elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon content on postnatal airway development in rats. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed from postnatal day 7 through 25, and lung function and airway architecture were evaluated 81 days of age. In a separate group of rats, cell proliferation was examined after a single particle exposure at 7 days of age. Early life exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particles altered distal airway architecture and resulted in subtle changes in lung mechanics. Early life exposure to 212 nm high OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture but did alter lung mechanics in a manner suggestive of central airway changes. In contrast, early life exposure to 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture or mechanics. A single 6-h exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particle decreased airway cell proliferation, whereas 212 nm high OC/EC particles increased it and 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not. The early life exposure to ultrafine, high OC/EC particles results in persistent alterations in distal airway architecture that is characterized by an initial decrease in airway cell proliferation. PMID:20634362

  18. Lung Transplantation: The State of the Airways.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aliya N; Garrity, Edward R

    2016-03-01

    Context .- Lung transplantation has become a viable option for definitive treatment of several end-stage lung diseases for which there are no other options available. However, long-term survival continues to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction, which primarily affects the airways. Objective . -To highlight the complications occurring mainly in the airways of the lung transplant recipient from the early to late posttransplant periods. Data Sources .- Review literature focusing on the airways in patients with lung transplants and clinical experience of the authors. Conclusions .- Postsurgical complications and infections of the airways have decreased because of better techniques and management. Acute cellular rejection of the airways can be distinguished from infection pathologically and on cultures. Separating small from large airways need not be an issue because both are risk factors for bronchiolitis obliterans. Grading of airway rejection needs to be standardized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction consists of both bronchiolitis obliterans and restrictive allograft syndrome, neither of which can be treated very effectively at present. PMID:26927718

  19. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  20. Breath tests and airway gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Measuring soluble gas in the exhaled breath is a non-invasive technique used to estimate levels of respiratory, solvent, and metabolic gases. The interpretation of these measurements is based on the assumption that the measured gases exchange in the alveoli. While the respiratory gases have a low blood-solubility and exchange in the alveoli, high blood-soluble gases exchange in the airways. The effect of airway gas exchange on the interpretation of these exhaled breath measurements can be significant. We describe airway gas exchange in relation to exhaled measurements of soluble gases that exchange in the alveoli. The mechanisms of airway gas exchange are reviewed and criteria for determining if a gas exchanges in the airways are provided. The effects of diffusion, perfusion, temperature and breathing maneuver on airway gas exchange and on measurement of exhaled soluble gas are discussed. A method for estimating the impact of airway gas exchange on exhaled breath measurements is presented. We recommend that investigators should carefully control the inspired air conditions and type of exhalation maneuver used in a breath test. Additionally, care should be taken when interpreting breath tests from subjects with pulmonary disease. PMID:16413216

  1. Human airway measurement from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.; Fotin, Sergei; Apanasovich, Tatiyana; Yankelevitz, David

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary diseases, including common ones such as COPD, affect the airways. If the dimensions of airway can be measured with high confidence, the clinicians will be able to better diagnose diseases as well as monitor progression and response to treatment. In this paper, we introduce a method to assess the airway dimensions from CT scans, including the airway segments that are not oriented axially. First, the airway lumen is segmented and skeletonized, and subsequently each airway segment is identified. We then represent each airway segment using a segment-centric generalized cylinder model and assess airway lumen diameter (LD) and wall thickness (WT) for each segment by determining inner and outer wall boundaries. The method was evaluated on 14 healthy patients from a Weill Cornell database who had two scans within a 2 month interval. The corresponding airway segments were located in two scans and measured using the automated method. The total number of segments identified in both scans was 131. When 131 segments were considered altogether, the average absolute change over two scans was 0.31 mm for LD and 0.12 mm for WT, with 95% limits of agreement of [-0.85, 0.83] for LD and [-0.32, 0.26] for WT. The results were also analyzed on per-patient basis, and the average absolute change was 0.19 mm for LD and 0.05 mm for WT. 95% limits of agreement for per-patient changes were [-0.57, 0.47] for LD and [-0.16, 0.10] for WT.

  2. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. It is ... in the womb, the baby floats in the amniotic fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at ...

  3. Secondary Reverse Slide Tracheoplasty for Airway Rescue.

    PubMed

    Kopelovich, Jonathan C; Wine, Todd M; Rutter, Michael J; Mitchell, Max B; Prager, Jeremy D

    2016-03-01

    Slide tracheoplasty is used in cases of tracheal stenosis or injury. With expanding indications for its use at tertiary centers, salvage techniques for dehiscence or restenosis after slide tracheoplasty are increasingly relevant. We present a case in which slide tracheoplasty was augmented with an anterior costochondral graft that stenosed again and ultimately failed. We salvaged this airway emergency by performing a secondary reverse slide tracheoplasty. Using this technique, we were able to establish a safe and durable airway using only native airway tissue. PMID:26897214

  4. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. PMID:23830132

  5. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: pathophysiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-07-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Primary malformations include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea, which cause an increase in negative pressure within the upper airways that can eventually lead to secondary abnormalities such as everted laryngeal saccules, everted tonsils, and laryngeal and tracheal collapse. Abnormal nasopharyngeal turbinates are also encountered, but have not been classified as primary or secondary. BAS is readily diagnosed, and quality of life is improved with appropriate medical and/or surgical management. PMID:22847322

  6. Airway nitric oxide in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, D.; Gustafsson, L.; Hemmingsson, Tryggve; Frostell, C.; Paiva, M.

    2005-10-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO), a molecule with a wide range of biological effects, is found in exhaled gas. Elevation of expired NO is an early sign of airway inflammation in asthma and dust inhalation. Animal experiments have demonstrated a marked increase of expired NO after venous gas emboli (bubbles, VGE), which may occur after decompression in conjunction with extravehicular activity (EVA). For this MAP project, astronauts will perform a simple inhalation-exhalation procedure weekly during their flights, and before and after EVA. Furthermore, the microgravity environment offers a possibility to gain new insights into how and where NO is formed in the lungs and what local effects NO may have there. The planned experiments have been made possible by recent developments of new techniques by the team's industrial partners; Aerocrine has developed a highly compact and accurate NO analyser, and Linde Gas Theapeutics has developed a highly compact device for NO administration in the inhaled air.

  7. Role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and an inhibitory effect of erythromycin on IL-8 release in the airways of patients with chronic airway diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, K; Sonoda, F; Kobayashi, S; Iwagaki, A; Nagatake, T; Matsushima, K; Matsumoto, K

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate of the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemotactic cytokine, in the continuous neutrophil accumulation in the airways of patients with chronic airway disease (CAD) and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, we investigated the cell population, IL-8 levels, IL-1 beta levels, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activities, and neutrophil elastase (NE) activities of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids in 17 CAD patients (with P. aeruginosa infections [CAD+PA], n = 9; without any bacterial infections [CAD-PA], n = 8) and 8 normal volunteers. We found significant elevations of neutrophil numbers, IL-8/albumin ratios, and NE/albumin ratios in BAL fluids from CAD patients, in the following rank order: CAD+PA > CAD-PA > normal volunteers. IL-1 beta/albumin ratios were elevated only in CAD+PA, while no TNF bioactivity was detected in BAL fluids. The neutrophil numbers correlated significantly with the IL-8/albumin ratios and NE/albumin ratios in the BAL fluids of CAD patients. When anti-human IL-8 immunoglobulin G was used for neutralizing neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) activities in BAL fluids, the mean reduction rate of NCF activities in CAD+PA patients was significantly higher than that in CAD-PA patients. We also evaluated the effects of low-dose, long-term erythromycin therapy in BAL fluids from three CAD+PA and two CAD-PA patients. Treatment with erythromycin caused significant reductions of neutrophil numbers, IL-8/albumin ratios, and NE/albumin ratios in BAL fluids from these patients. To elucidate the mechanism of erythromycin therapy, we also examined whether erythromycin suppressed IL-8 production by human alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. We demonstrated a moderate inhibitory effect of erythromycin on IL-8 production in Pseudomonas-stimulated neutrophils but not in alveolar macrophages. Our data support the view that persistent P. aeruginosa infection enhances IL-8 production and IL-8-derived NCF activity, causing neutrophil

  8. Comprehensive Airway Management of Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Robert M.; Losquadro, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma is complicated by injuries to routes of intubation, and the surgeon is frequently asked to secure the airway. Airway obstruction from hemorrhage, tissue prolapse, or edema may require emergent intervention for which multiple intubation techniques exist. Competing needs for both airway and surgical access create intraoperative conflicts during repair of maxillofacial fractures. Postoperatively, edema and maxillomandibular fixation place the patient at risk for further airway compromise. PMID:22110788

  9. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  10. Foxm1 Transcription Factor Is Critical for Proliferation and Differentiation of Clara Cells during Development of Conducting Airways

    PubMed Central

    Ustiyan, Vladimir; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Wang, I-Ching; Kalin, Tanya V.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Kalinichenko, Kalinichenko

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory epithelial cells are derived from cell progenitors in the foregut endoderm that subsequently differentiate into the distinct cell types lining the conducting and alveolar regions of the lung. To identify transcriptional mechanisms regulating differentiation and maintenance of respiratory epithelial cells, we conditionally deleted Foxm1 transcription factor from the conducting airways of the developing mouse lung. Conditional deletion of Foxm1 from Clara cells, controlled by the Scgb1a1 promoter, dramatically altered airway structure and caused peribronchial fibrosis, resulting in airway hyperreactivity in adult mice. Deletion of Foxm1 inhibited proliferation of Clara cells and disrupted the normal patterning of epithelial cell differentiation in the bronchioles, causing squamous and goblet cell metaplasia, and the loss of Clara and ciliated cells. Surprisingly, conducting airways of Foxm1-deficient mice contained highly differentiated cuboidal type II epithelial cells that are normally restricted to the alveoli. Lineage tracing studies showed that the ectopic alveolar type II cells in Foxm1-deficient airways were derived from Clara cells. Deletion of Foxm1 inhibited Sox2 and Scgb1a1, both of which are critical for differentiation and function of Clara cells. In co-transfection experiments, Foxm1 directly bound to and induced transcriptional activity of Scgb1a1 and Sox2 promoters. Foxm1 is required for differentiation and maintenance of epithelial cells lining conducting airways. PMID:22885335

  11. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  12. Gene Transfer by Guanidinium-Cholesterol Cationic Lipids into Airway Epithelial Cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Peuchmaur, Michel; Leclerc, Tony; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Lehn, Pierre

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic vectors represent an attractive alternative approach to viral vectors for gene transfer, in particular into airway epithelial cells for lung-directed gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Having recently found that guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipids are efficient reagents for gene transfer into mammalian cell lines in vitro, we have investigated their use for gene delivery into primary airway epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained indicate that the lipid bis (guanidinium)-tren-cholesterol (BGTC) can be used to transfer a reporter gene into primary human airway epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, liposomes composed of BGTC and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) are efficient for gene delivery to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo. Transfected cells were detected both in the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands. In addition, the transfection efficiency of BGTC/DOPE liposomes in vivo was quantitatively assessed by using the luciferase reporter gene system.

  13. In vivo size and shape measurement of the human upper airway using endoscopic longrange optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Julian J.; Leigh, Matthew S.; Walton, Ian D.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Schwer, Stefan; Sampson, David D.; Hillman, David R.; Eastwood, Peter R.

    2003-07-01

    We describe a long-range optical coherence tomography system for size and shape measurement of large hollow organs in the human body. The system employs a frequency-domain optical delay line of a configuration that enables the combination of high-speed operation with long scan range. We compare the achievable maximum delay of several delay line configurations, and identify the configurations with the greatest delay range. We demonstrate the use of one such long-range delay line in a catheter-based optical coherence tomography system and present profiles of the human upper airway and esophagus in vivo with a radial scan range of 26 millimeters. Such quantitative upper airway profiling should prove valuable in investigating the pathophysiology of airway collapse during sleep (obstructive sleep apnea).

  14. Lubiprostone targets prostanoid EP4 receptors in ovine airways

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, AW

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Lubiprostone, a prostaglandin E1 derivative, is reported to activate ClC-2 chloride channels located in the apical membranes of a number of transporting epithelia. Lack of functioning CFTR chloride channels in epithelia is responsible for the genetic disease cystic fibrosis, therefore, surrogate channels that can operate independently of CFTR are of interest. This study explores the target receptor(s) for lubiprostone in airway epithelium. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH All experiments were performed on the ventral tracheal epithelium of sheep. Epithelia were used to measure anion secretion from the apical surface as short circuit current or as fluid secretion from individual airway submucosal glands, using an optical method. KEY RESULTS The EP4 antagonists L-161982 and GW627368 inhibited short circuit current responses to lubiprostone, while EP1,2&3 receptor antagonists were without effect. Similarly, lubiprostone induced secretion in airway submucosal glands was inhibited by L-161982. L-161982 effectively competed with lubiprostone with a Kd value of 0.058 µM, close to its value for binding to human EP4 receptors (0.024 µM). The selective EP4 agonist L-902688 and lubiprostone behaved similarly with respect to EP4 receptor antagonists. Results of experiments with H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, were consistent with lubiprostone acting through a Gs-protein coupled EP4 receptor/cAMP cascade. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Lubiprostone-induced short-circuit currents and submucosal gland secretions were inhibited by selective EP4 receptor antagonists. The results suggest EP4 receptor activation by lubiprostone triggers cAMP production necessary for CFTR activation and the secretory responses, a possibility precluded in CF tissues. PMID:20883477

  15. Mechanisms to Suppress ILC2-induced Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kabata, Hiroki; Moro, Kazuyo; Koyasu, Shigeo; Fukunaga, Koichi; Asano, Koichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2016-03-01

    Epithelial cell-derived cytokines such as IL-33 and IL-25 activate group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), which are known to be important sources of type 2 cytokines such as IL-5 and IL-13 in a variety of asthma mouse models. Recently, human studies have also reported the involvement of ILC2s in asthma, as ILC2s are increased in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with asthma. Compared with positive regulators such as IL-25 and IL-33, the mechanisms to suppress the ILC2s-induced inflammation remain unclear. Because ILC2s express various cytokine receptors, the function of ILC2s would likely be influenced by cytokines present around ILC2s in the lungs. We reported that IL-2, IL-7, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and promoted the proliferation of ILC2s and type 2 cytokine production when combined with IL-33. TSLP enhanced the expression of Bcl-xL, an antiapoptotic molecule, and caused corticosteroid-resistant airway inflammation via ILC2s in mice. Furthermore, pimozide, a STAT5 inhibitor, counteracted the TSLP-induced corticosteroid resistance and suppressed airway inflammation. As a negative regulator, we have found that IFN-γ and IL-27 suppressed the proliferation and type 2 cytokine production of ILC2s in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, ILC2s-induced eosinophilic inflammation was more severe in IFN-γ receptor-deficient mice than in control mice. These findings suggest the importance of environmental cytokines for the regulation of ILC2s, and this would lead to a new approach to control airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27027961

  16. An asymptotic model of particle deposition at an airway bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Halpern, David; Filoche, Marcel; Sapoval, Bernard; Grotberg, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Particle transport and deposition associated with flow over a wedge is investigated as a model for particle transport and flow at the carina of an airway bifurcation during inspiration. Using matched asymptotics, a uniformly valid solution is obtained to represent the high Reynolds number flow over a wedge that considers the viscous boundary layer near the wedge and the outer inviscid region and is then used to solve the particle transport equations. Sometimes particle impaction on the wedge is prevented due to the boundary layer. We call this boundary layer shielding (BLS). This effect can be broken down into different types: rejection, trapping and deflection that are described by what happens to the particle’s initial negative velocity normal to the wall either changing sign, reaching zero, or remaining negative in the boundary layer region. The deposition efficiency depends on the critical Stokes number but exhibits a weak dependence on Reynolds number. Deposition efficiency for Sc in the range 0 < Sc < 0.4 yields the following relationship De ≈ (1.867 Sc1.78− 0.016) sin(βπ/2) at large Reynolds numbers, where βπ is the wedge angle. For a specific deposition efficiency, Sc decreases as βπ increases. The distribution of impacted particles was also computed and revealed that particles primarily impact within one airway diameter of the carina, consistent with computational fluid dynamics approaches. This work provides a new insight that the BLS inherent to the wedge component of the structure is the dominant reason for the particle distribution. This finding is important in linking aerosol deposition to the location of airway disease as well as target sites for therapeutic deposition. PMID:22378463

  17. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  18. Airway registry: a performance improvement surveillance project of emergency department airway management.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Michael P; Glauser, Jonathan; Yuen, Ho-Wang A; Sturges-Smith, Elizabeth; Schrump, Stefanie E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if use of a standardized airway data collection sheet can survey airway management practices in an emergency department. Success rates and trends from the authors' facility have been benchmarked against the National Emergency Airway Registry (NEAR). This study included all patients requiring invasive airway management during a 21-month period (July 1, 2005, through March 31, 2007). An audit form was developed and implemented to collect data on intubations. During the study period, 224 patients required invasive airway control. Of all airways managed by emergency medicine residents, the intubation success rate was 99% (200/203; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 96%-100%), with 3% of those (6/203; 95% CI = 1%-6%) requiring more than 3 attempts; 3 patients (1%; 95% CI = 0%-4%) could not be intubated and required a surgical airway. Use of an airway registry based on the NEAR registry as a benchmark of rates and types of successful intubation allows comparison of airway practices. PMID:20505111

  19. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M; Barker, Donna M; Barcham, Garry J; Ugalde, Cathryn L; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K; Snibson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10(+)-20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  20. Vaccination against IL-33 Inhibits Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation in a House Dust Mite Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ying; Adner, Mikael; Hellman, Lars; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    In several clinical and experimental studies IL-33 and its receptor have been found to play important roles in the development of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. We evaluated the effects of vaccination against IL-33 in a mouse model of airway inflammation induced by house dust mite (HDM) allergen. Balb/c mice received the IL-33 vaccine subcutaneously, followed by intranasal administration of HDM for up to six weeks. Vaccination against IL-33 induced high titers of specific anti-IL-33 IgG antibodies that inhibited HDM-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in the conducting airways and tissue damping. The vaccination also attenuated the HDM-induced elevation in the numbers of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airways. Furthermore, the levels of IL-17A, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP in lung tissue homogenates were reduced by vaccination against IL-33. These observations demonstrate that vaccination against IL-33 inhibits HDM-induced development of AHR, airway inflammation and production of inflammatory cytokines. The results also indicate an important role of IL-33 in the regulation of AHR of the distal lung compartments. Thus, administration of such a vaccine is potentially an effective therapeutic tool for treating allergic asthma. PMID:26214807

  1. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M.; Barker, Donna M.; Barcham, Garry J.; Ugalde, Cathryn L.; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A.; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K.; Snibson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10+–20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  2. Side-stream tobacco smoke-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in early postnatal period is involved nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z-X; Hunter, D D; Batchelor, T P; Dey, R D

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that children are more susceptible to adverse respiratory effects of passive smoking than adults. The goal of this study is to elucidate the possible neural mechanism induced by exposure to passive smoking during early life. Postnatal day (PD) 2 and PD 21 mice were exposed to side-stream tobacco smoke (SS), a surrogate to secondhand smoke, or filtered air (FA) for 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary function, substance P (SP) airway innervation, neurotrophin gene expression in lung and nerve growth factor (NGF) release in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were measured at different times after the last SS or FA exposure. Exposure to SS significantly altered pulmonary function in PD2, accompanied with an enhanced SP innervation in airway. However, exposure to SS during the later developmental period (PD21) did not appear to affect pulmonary function and SP innervation of the airways. Interestingly, SS exposure in PD2 group significantly induced an increased gene expression on NGF, and decreased NGF receptor P75 in lung; parallel with high levels of NGF protein in BAL. Furthermore, pretreatment with NGF antibody significantly diminished SS-induced airway hyperresponsivenss and the increased SP airway innervation in the PD2 group. These findings suggest that enhanced NGF released in the lung contributes to SS-enhanced SP tracheal innervation and airway responsiveness in early life. PMID:26638730

  3. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  4. Accurate airway segmentation based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qier; Kitsaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel airway segmentation method based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut. Airway segmentation is an important step in analyzing chest CT volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis, asthma diagnosis, and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3-D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite challenging. Several researchers have proposed automated algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However these methods failed to detect the peripheral bronchi branches. They caused a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach that permits more accurate extraction of complex bronchial airway region. Our method are composed of three steps. First, the Hessian analysis is utilized for enhancing the line-like structure in CT volumes, then a multiscale cavity-enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure from the previous enhanced result. In the second step, we utilize the support vector machine (SVM) to construct a classifier for removing the FP regions generated. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is utilized to connect all of the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. We applied this method to sixteen cases of 3D chest CT volumes. The results showed that the branch detection rate of this method can reach about 77.7% without leaking into the lung parenchyma areas.

  5. The active contribution of Toll-like receptors to allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Wang, Ji Ming

    2011-10-01

    Epithelia lining the respiratory tract represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms and allergens and are equipped with innate and adaptive immune signaling receptors for host protection. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize microbial components and evoke diverse responses in cells of the respiratory system. TLR stimulation by microorganism-derived molecules activates antigen presenting cells, control T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 immune cell differentiation, cytokine production by mast cells, and activation of eosinophils. It is clear that TLR are involved in the pathophysiology of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs), a kind of antigen presenting cells, which play a key role in the induction of allergic airway inflammation, are privileged targets for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During the allergic responses, engagement of TLRs on DCs determines the Th2 polarization of the T cells. TLR signaling in mast cells increases the release of IL-5, and TLR activation of airway epithelial cells forces the generation of proallergic Th2 type of cytokines. Although these responses aim to protect the host, they may also result in inflammatory tissue damage in the airway. Under certain conditions, stimulation of TLRs, in particular, TLR9, may reduce Th2-dependent allergic inflammation by induction of Th1 responses. Therefore, understanding the complex regulatory roles of TLRs in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation should facilitate the development of preventive and therapeutic measures for asthmatic patients. PMID:21624504

  6. Therapeutic bronchoscopic interventions for malignant airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dalar, Levent; Özdemir, Cengiz; Abul, Yasin; Karasulu, Levent; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Akbaş, Ayşegül; Altın, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no definitive consensus about the factors affecting the choice of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of malignant airway obstruction. The present study defines the choice of the interventional bronchoscopic modality and analyzes the factors influencing survival in patients with malignant central airway obstruction. Totally, over 7 years, 802 interventional rigid bronchoscopic procedures were applied in 547 patients having malignant airway obstruction. There was a significant association between the type of stent and the site of the lesion in the present study. Patients with tracheal involvement and/or involvement of the main bronchi had the worst prognosis. The sites of the lesion and endobronchial treatment modality were independent predictors of survival in the present study. The selection of different types of airway stents can be considered on the base of site of the lesion. Survival can be estimated based on the site of the lesion and endobronchial brochoscopic modality used. PMID:27281104

  7. BEHAVIOR OF CIGARETTE SMOKE IN HUMAN AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental deposition patterns of cigarette smoke in surrogate human airway systems are very heterogeneous. article deposits are enhanced at predictable, well-defined morphological regions; most specifically, carinal ridges within bifurcation zones, and along posterior sections...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  12. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  13. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  14. Virtual Airway Skills Trainer (VAST) Simulator.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Doga; Yu, Alexander; Halic, Tansel; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Ryason, Adam; Spindler, David; Butler, Kathryn L; Cao, Caroline; Petrusa, Emil; Molina, Marcos; Jones, Dan; De, Suvranu; Demoya, Marc; Jones, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of Virtual Airway Skill Trainer (VAST) tasks. The simulated tasks are a part of two main airway management techniques; Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) and Cricothyroidotomy (CCT). ETI is a simple nonsurgical airway management technique, while CCT is the extreme surgical alternative to secure the airway of a patient. We developed identification of Mallampati class, finding the optimal angle for positioning pharyngeal/mouth axes tasks for ETI and identification of anatomical landmarks and incision tasks for CCT. Both ETI and CCT simulators were used to get physicians' feedback at Society for Education in Anesthesiology and Association for Surgical Education spring meetings. In this preliminary validation study, total 38 participants for ETI and 48 for CCT performed each simulation task and completed pre and post questionnaires. In this work, we present the details of the simulation for the tasks and also the analysis of the collected data from the validation study. PMID:27046559

  15. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery. PMID:27036600

  16. The origin of fluids and gases in the DFDP-2B borehole, New Zealand; insight from on-line mud gas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathewson, Loren; Wiersberg, Thomas; Niedermann, Samuel; Erzinger, Joerg; Menzies, Catriona; Toy, Virginia; Zimmer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to improve our understanding of the Alpine Fault Zone, a tectonically active fault system in New Zealand known to rupture in large events, by deep scientific drilling. The borehole DFDP-2B approached the Alpine Fault at depth, reaching a final depth of 892 m. During drilling, gas was extracted from returning drilling mud and changes in the gas composition were tracked by mass spectrometry (N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CH4, He, and H2), gas chromatography (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, i/n-C4H10), and alpha-spectrometry for 222Rn. The rapid formation of mud wall cake seals the borehole from fluid inflow along the borehole; hence formation-derived gases enter mostly at the drill bit during drilling. Gas was sampled for offline analyses on noble gas and stable isotopes to complement the dataset. Apart from an atmospheric input, the gases in drilling mud derive from the pore space of rock, crushed at the drill bit, and from permeable layers intersected by the borehole. OLGA thus may provide information on fluid origins, flow rates and paths, fluid-rock interactions along these paths, and the permeability structure of the faulted rock mass. The principle formation-derived gases found in drilling mud during drilling of DFDP-2 were CO2 (≤1.7 vol.-%), H2 (<2.5 vol.-%), and CH4 (≤0.18 vol.-%), with minor contributions of He. Zones of enhanced gas concentrations and high radon activity are interpreted to reflect intervals of active fluid flow through highly fractured and faulted rock. Air-corrected 3He/4He values of samples from 236m (0.68 Ra), 610m (1.03 Ra) and 707m (0.63 Ra) show mantle helium contributions similar to those measured in hot springs along the Alpine Fault, e.g. Fox River (0.64 Ra), Copland (0.42 Ra), Lower Wanganui (0.81 Ra). CH4/C2H6 (~20) and δ13C of methane (-31.7 ‰ PDB) underpin a thermogenic origin of hydrocarbons at depths below 600m, while mixing with biogenic gas is indicated at shallower depth (δ13C of methane= -46.7

  17. Inhibitory effect of Platycodi Radix on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Ho; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Hyun Sun; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by an associated increase in airway responsiveness. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of an aqueous extract from the root of Platycodi Radix (Changkil: CK) on airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma. Mice were sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation to induce chronic airway inflammation and airway remodeling. CK markedly decreased the number of infiltrated inflammatory cells and the levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and chemokines compared with those in the OVA-induced group. In addition, CK reduced OVA-specific IgE levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Based on lung histopathological studies, inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion were inhibited by CK administration compared to that in the OVA-induced group. Lung weight was reduced after CK administration. Also, increased generation of ROS in BAL fluid, as well as NF-kappaB nuclear translocation, by inhalation of OVA was diminished by CK. Moreover, CK reduced the OVA-induced upregulation of matrix metalloproteases activity. These findings indicate that oxidative stress may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma induced by OVA and that CK may be useful as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of bronchial asthma. PMID:19264106

  18. Pulmonary fluid flow challenges for experimental and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B; Forest, M Gregory; Grotberg, James B

    2014-12-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  19. Pulmonary Fluid Flow Challenges for Experimental and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory; Grotberg, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  20. Endotracheal Tube Management and Obstructed Airway.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, Manu; Force, Seth

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic surgery encompasses a wide array of surgical techniques, most of which require lung isolation for surgical exposure in the pleural cavity; this, in turn, demands an extensive knowledge of respiratory mechanics and modalities of airway control. Likewise, effective treatment of an acute central airway obstruction calls for a systematic approach using clear communication between teams and a comprehensive knowledge of available therapeutic modalities by the surgeon. PMID:26210924

  1. Medical management considerations for upper airway disease.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, G L

    1992-06-01

    The conducting airways, also commonly referred to as the upper airways, provide for the passage of air to and from the atmosphere and lungs. Anatomical components include the nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and mainstem bronchi. Clinical problems involving the conducting airways can be manifested by relatively mild clinical signs of stertorous breathing, by life-threatening dyspnea, or by chronic bouts of inspiratory stridor and cough. Concurrent disease of the lower respiratory system (ie, chronic bronchitis) as well as other organ systems (ie, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine) may significantly contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of upper airway disease. Diagnosis of the diseases of the conducting airways is primarily based on history and physical examination. The dynamic nature of some conditions, related to the phases of respiration, can make diagnosis more difficult. In addition to direct visualization, radiographic and endoscopic evaluation are often useful. Many upper airway problems, especially congenital conditions, lend themselves to surgical palliation that should be performed as early in life as possible. Medical management is often directed at treating underlying diseases and the relief of clinical signs. Historically, the use of variety of drugs have been advocated and frequently include decongestants, cough suppressants, bronchodilators, glucocorticoids, and antibiotics. However, their use may be detrimental and contraindicated. In addition, therapy for some conditions (ie, laryngeal paralysis and intrathoracic tracheal collapse) may be better directed at increasing airway muscle tone in order to stabilized airway patency. Therapeutic agents that may be useful include aspirin and digitalis. The overall objective to medical management must be to balance potential therapeutic benefit against untoward effects in order to minimize clinical signs and to improve the animal's quality of life. PMID:1643322

  2. Tracheal and airway collapse in dogs.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, Ann Della

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal and airway collapse (bronchomalacia) are common causes of chronic cough in middle-aged to older dogs where weakening of cartilage within the respiratory system leads to narrowing of airways, coughing, wheezing, and other secondary effects. Successful treatment involves correct identification of the problem, recognition of concurrent problems, and appropriate medical therapy. Surgical and noninvasive treatment options are becoming readily available, and it is important to understand indications for such procedures. PMID:24268337

  3. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration. PMID:24743971

  4. Exposure to welding fumes and lower airway infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Reetika; Periselneris, Jimstan; Lanone, Sophie; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Melton, Geoffrey; Palmer, Keith T.; Andujar, Pascal; Antonini, James M.; Cohignac, Vanessa; Erdely, Aaron; Jose, Ricardo J.; Mudway, Ian; Brown, Jeremy; Grigg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Welders are at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanism for this association is not known. The capacity of pneumococci to adhere to and infect lower airway cells is mediated by host-expressed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR). Objective We sought to assess the effect of mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF) on PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection to human airway cells in vitro and on pneumococcal airway infection in a mouse model. Methods The oxidative potential of MS-WF was assessed by their capacity to reduce antioxidants in vitro. Pneumococcal adhesion and infection of A549, BEAS-2B, and primary human bronchial airway cells were assessed by means of quantitative bacterial culture and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU). After intranasal instillation of MS-WF, mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung CFU values were determined. PAFR protein levels were assessed by using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and PAFR mRNA expression was assessed by using quantitative PCR. PAFR was blocked by CV-3988, and oxidative stress was attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. Results: MS-WF exhibited high oxidative potential. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells MS-WF increased pneumococcal adhesion and infection and PAFR protein expression. Both CV-3988 and N-acetylcysteine reduced MS-WF–stimulated pneumococcal adhesion and infection of airway cells. MS-WF increased mouse lung PAFR mRNA expression and increased BALF and lung pneumococcal CFU values. In MS-WF–exposed mice CV-3988 reduced BALF CFU values. Conclusions Hypersusceptibility of welders to pneumococcal pneumonia is in part mediated by the capacity of welding fumes to increase PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection of lower airway cells. PMID:26277596

  5. The effect of rhinovirus on airway inflammation in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene; Lee, Huisu; Kim, Hyun Sook; Won, Sulmui; Lee, Eu Kyoung; Kim, Hwan Soo; Bang, Kyongwon; Chun, Yoon Hong; Yoon, Jong-Seo; Kim, Jin Tack; Lee, Joon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to investigate the differences in lower airway inflammatory immune responses, including cellular responses and responses in terms of inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the airway, to rhinovirus (RV) infection on asthma exacerbation by comparing a control and a murine asthma model, with or without RV infection. Methods BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with a crude extract of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and were subsequently intranasally treated with a crude extract of Df or PBS. Airway responsiveness and cell infiltration, differential cell counts in BALF, and cytokine and chemokine concentrations in BALF were measured 24 hours after intranasal RV1B infection. Results RV infection increased the enhanced pause (Penh) in both the Df sensitized and challenged mice (Df mice) and PBS-treated mice (PBS mice) (P<0.05). Airway eosinophil infiltration increased in Df mice after RV infection (P<0.05). The levels of interleukin (IL) 13, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and regulated on activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) increased in response to RV infection in Df mice, but not in PBS mice (P<0.05). The level of IL-10 significantly decreased following RV infection in Df mice (P<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the augmented induction of proinflammatory cytokines, Th2 cytokines, and chemokines that mediate an eosinophil response and the decreased induction of regulatory cytokines after RV infection may be important manifestations leading to airway inflammation with eosinophil infiltration and changes in airway responsiveness in the asthma model. PMID:24348661

  6. A comparison of airway dimensions, measured by acoustic reflectometry and ultrasound before and after general anaesthesia.