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Sample records for airway lining fluid

  1. Release of beryllium into artificial airway epithelial lining fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled beryllium particles that deposit in the lung airway lining fluid may dissolve and interact with immune-competent cells resulting in sensitization. As such, solubilization of 17 beryllium-containing materials (ore, hydroxide, metal, oxide, alloys, and process intermediates) was investigated using artificial human airway epithelial lining fluid. The maximum beryllium release in 7 days was 11.78% (from a beryl ore melter dust), although release from most materials was < 1%. Calculated dissolution half-times ranged from 30 days (reduction furnace material) to 74,000 days (hydroxide). Despite rapid mechanical clearance, billions of beryllium ions may be released in the respiratory tract via dissolution in airway lining fluid. Beryllium-containing particles that deposit in the respiratory tract dissolve in artificial lung epithelial lining fluid, thereby providing ions for absorption in the lung and interaction with immune-competent cells in the respiratory tract.

  2. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl− and HCO3− secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (Isc) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) calculated under open-circuit conditions. Isc was equivalent to the HCO3− net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas Ieq was the sum of the Cl− and HCO3− net fluxes. Ieq and HCO3− fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl2, suggesting that some secreted HCO3− is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H+ secretion. Ieq and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na+ and HCO3−. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of Ieq and HCO3− secretion, suggesting that HCO3− transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl− was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50–70% of Cl− and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl− loading by a sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO3− gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO3− secretion was increased by bilateral Cl− removal and therefore did not require apical Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO3− is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl−, and the resulting HCO3−-dependent Cl− transport provides an osmotic driving force for

  3. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-11-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (I(sc)) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (I(eq)) calculated under open-circuit conditions. I(sc) was equivalent to the HCO(3)(-) net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas I(eq) was the sum of the Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) net fluxes. I(eq) and HCO(3)(-) fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl(2), suggesting that some secreted HCO(3)(-) is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H(+) secretion. I(eq) and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na(+) and HCO(3)(-). The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of I(eq) and HCO(3)(-) secretion, suggesting that HCO(3)(-) transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl(-) was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50-70% of Cl(-) and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl(-) loading by a sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO(3)(-) gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO(3)(-) secretion was increased by bilateral Cl(-) removal and therefore did not require apical Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO(3)(-) is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl(-), and the resulting HCO(3)(-)-dependent Cl(-) transport

  4. Basolateral chloride loading by the anion exchanger type 2: role in fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junwei; Shan, Jiajie; Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Evagelidis, Alexandra; Alper, Seth L; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion exchanger type 2 (AE2 or SLC4A2) is an electroneutral Cl−/HCO3− exchanger expressed at the basolateral membrane of many epithelia. It is thought to participate in fluid secretion by airway epithelia. However, the role of AE2 in fluid secretion remains uncertain, due to the lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors, and because it is electrically silent and therefore does not contribute directly to short-circuit current (Isc). We have studied the role of AE2 in Cl− and fluid secretion by the airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. After confirming expression of its mRNA and protein, a knock-down cell line called AE2-KD was generated by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference in which AE2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced ≥90%. Suppressing AE2 increased the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by ∼70% without affecting the levels of NKCC1 (Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter) or NBCe1 (Na+–nHCO3− cotransporter). cAMP agonists stimulated fluid secretion by parental Calu-3 and scrambled shRNA cells >6.5-fold. In AE2-KD cells this response was reduced by ∼70%, and the secreted fluid exhibited elevated pH and [HCO3−] as compared with the control lines. Unstimulated equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) was elevated in AE2-KD cells, but the incremental response to forskolin was unaffected. The modest bumetanide-induced reductions in both Ieq and fluid secretion were more pronounced in AE2-KD cells. Basolateral Cl−/HCO3− exchange measured by basolateral pH-stat in cells with permeabilized apical membranes was abolished in AE2-KD monolayers, and the intracellular alkalinization resulting from basolateral Cl− removal was reduced by ∼80% in AE2-KD cells. These results identify AE2 as a major pathway for basolateral Cl− loading during cAMP-stimulated secretion of Cl− and fluid by Calu-3 cells, and help explain the large bumetanide-insensitive component of fluid secretion reported previously in airway

  5. Basolateral chloride loading by the anion exchanger type 2: role in fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junwei; Shan, Jiajie; Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Evagelidis, Alexandra; Alper, Seth L; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-11-01

    Anion exchanger type 2 (AE2 or SLC4A2) is an electroneutral Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger expressed at the basolateral membrane of many epithelia. It is thought to participate in fluid secretion by airway epithelia. However, the role of AE2 in fluid secretion remains uncertain, due to the lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors, and because it is electrically silent and therefore does not contribute directly to short-circuit current (I(sc)). We have studied the role of AE2 in Cl(-) and fluid secretion by the airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. After confirming expression of its mRNA and protein, a knock-down cell line called AE2-KD was generated by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference in which AE2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced 90%. Suppressing AE2 increased the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by ∼70% without affecting the levels of NKCC1 (Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter) or NBCe1 (Na(+)-nHCO(3)(-) cotransporter). cAMP agonists stimulated fluid secretion by parental Calu-3 and scrambled shRNA cells >6.5-fold. In AE2-KD cells this response was reduced by ∼70%, and the secreted fluid exhibited elevated pH and [HCO(3)(-)] as compared with the control lines. Unstimulated equivalent short-circuit current (I(eq)) was elevated in AE2-KD cells, but the incremental response to forskolin was unaffected. The modest bumetanide-induced reductions in both I(eq) and fluid secretion were more pronounced in AE2-KD cells. Basolateral Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange measured by basolateral pH-stat in cells with permeabilized apical membranes was abolished in AE2-KD monolayers, and the intracellular alkalinization resulting from basolateral Cl(-) removal was reduced by ∼80% in AE2-KD cells. These results identify AE2 as a major pathway for basolateral Cl(-) loading during cAMP-stimulated secretion of Cl(-) and fluid by Calu-3 cells, and help explain the large bumetanide-insensitive component of fluid secretion reported previously in

  6. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  7. Surface fluid absorption and secretion in small airways

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, A K M; Quinton, P M

    2012-01-01

    Native small airways must remain wet enough to be pliable and support ciliary clearance, but dry enough to remain patent for gas flow. The airway epithelial lining must both absorb and secrete ions to maintain a critical level of fluid on its surface. Despite frequent involvement in lung diseases, the minuscule size has limited studies of peripheral airways. To meet this challenge, we used a capillary to construct an Ussing chamber (area <1 mm2) to measure electrolyte transport across small native airways (∼1 mm ø) from pig lung. Transepithelial potentials (Vt) were recorded in open circuit conditions while applying constant current pulses across the luminal surface of dissected airways to calculate transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt) and equivalent short circuit current () in the presence and absence of selected Na+ and Cl− transport inhibitors (amiloride, GlyH-101, Niflumic acid) and agonists (Forskolin + IBMX, UTP). Considered together the responses suggest an organ composed of both secreting and absorbing epithelia that constitutively and concurrently transport fluids into and out of the airway, i.e. in opposite directions. Since the epithelial lining of small airways is arranged in long, accordion-like rows of pleats and folds that run axially down the lumen, we surmise that cells within the pleats are mainly secretory while the cells of the folds are principally absorptive. This structural arrangement could provide local fluid transport from within the pleats toward the luminal folds that may autonomously regulate the local surface fluid volume for homeostasis while permitting acute responses to maintain clearance. PMID:22547637

  8. Airway goblet cells: responsive and adaptable front-line defenders.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D F

    1994-09-01

    Goblet cells are situated in the epithelium of the conducting airways, often with their apical surfaces protruding into the lumen, a location which fits them for a rapid response to inhaled airway insults. Together with the submucosal glands, goblet cells secrete high molecular weight mucus glycoproteins (mucins), which confer upon the airway surface fluid the requisite biochemical and biophysical properties which determine the efficiency of entrapment and transportation of inhaled irritants, particles and micro-organisms. The diversity of glycosylation of airway mucins may be important in facilitating adherence of micro-organisms to mucus prior to mucociliary clearance. Other secretory products, including lipids and "small" glycoproteins, may also be produced by goblet cells. It is possible that goblet cells have the potential to produce markedly more mucus than do the glands. Mucins are tightly packed in the intracellular granules of the goblet cell. The morphology of these granules varies with fixation technique, and release of mucins may be via a combination of merocrine and apocrine secretion. Discharge of mucus is accomplished remarkably rapidly (tens of milliseconds) and vast quantities of mucus are released (size expansions from the granule of many hundredfold). Depending upon species and preparation, goblet cells discharge mucus in response to a wide variety of stimuli, including proteinases, irritant gases, inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species, nerve activation and changes in the biophysical environment. Under normal conditions, goblet cell proliferation and differentiation, particularly to ciliated cells, contributes to maintenance of the airway epithelial cell population. In addition to participating in acute airway defence, goblet cells increase in number in response to chronic airway insult, with a resultant increase in output of mucus. The increase in number of cells is via hyperplastic and metaplastic mechanisms. Early triggers for the

  9. Fluid dynamics in airway bifurcations: I. Primary flows.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X; Schreck, R M

    2001-04-01

    The subject of fluid dynamics within human airways is of great importance for the risk assessment of air pollutants (inhalation toxicology) and the targeted delivery of inhaled pharmacologic drugs (aerosol therapy). As cited herein, experimental investigations of flow patterns have been performed on airway models and casts by a number of investigators. We have simulated flow patterns in human lung bifurcations and compared the results with the experimental data of Schreck (1972). The theoretical analyses were performed using a third-party software package, FIDAP, on the Cray T90 supercomputer. This effort is part of a systematic investigation where the effects of inlet conditions, Reynolds numbers, and dimensions and orientations of airways were addressed. This article focuses on primary flows using convective motion and isovelocity contour formats to describe fluid dynamics; subsequent articles in this issue consider secondary currents (Part II) and localized conditions (Part III). The agreement between calculated and measured results, for laminar flows with either parabolic or blunt inlet conditions to the bifurcations, was very good. To our knowledge, this work is the first to present such detailed comparisons of theoretical and experimental flow patterns in airway bifurcations. The agreement suggests that the methodologies can be employed to study factors affecting airflow patterns and particle behavior in human lungs.

  10. Fluid dynamics in airway bifurcations: III. Localized flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X; Schreck, R M

    2001-04-01

    Localized flow conditions (e.g., backflows) in transition regions between parent and daughter airways of bifurcations were investigated using a computational fluid dynamics software code (FIDAP) with a Cray T90 supercomputer. The configurations of the bifurcations were based on Schreck s (1972) laboratory models. The flow intensities and spatial regions of reversed motion were simulated for different conditions. The effects of inlet velocity profiles, Reynolds numbers, and dimensions and orientations of airways were addressed. The computational results showed that backflow was increased for parabolic inlet conditions, larger Reynolds numbers, and larger daughter-to-parent diameter ratios. This article is the third in a systematic series addressed in this issue; the first addressed primary velocity patterns and the second discussed secondary currents.

  11. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part I. Fluid flow structures.

    PubMed

    Van Rhein, Timothy; Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    A large eddy simulation-based computational study of fluid flow and particle transport in upper tracheobronchial airways is carried out to investigate the effect of ventilation parameters on pulmonary fluid flow. Respiratory waveforms commonly used by commercial mechanical ventilators are used to study the effect of ventilation parameters and ventilation circuit on pulmonary fluid dynamics. A companion paper (Alzahrany et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput, 2014) reports our findings on the effect of the ventilation parameters and circuit on particle transport and aerosolized drug delivery. The endotracheal tube (ETT) was found to be an important geometric feature and resulted in a fluid jet that caused an increase in turbulence and created a recirculation zone with high wall shear stress in the main bronchi. Stronger turbulence was found in lower airways than would be found under normal breathing conditions due to the presence of the jet caused by the ETT. The pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform induced the lowest wall shear stress on the airways wall. PMID:26563199

  12. Protein composition of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and airway surface liquid from newborn pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Albertolle, Matthew E.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Zabner, Joseph; Niles, Richard K.; Fisher, Susan J.; McCray, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The airway mucosa and the alveolar surface form dynamic interfaces between the lung and the external environment. The epithelial cells lining these barriers elaborate a thin liquid layer containing secreted peptides and proteins that contribute to host defense and other functions. The goal of this study was to develop and apply methods to define the proteome of porcine lung lining liquid, in part, by leveraging the wealth of information in the Sus scrofa database of Ensembl gene, transcript, and protein model predictions. We developed an optimized workflow for detection of secreted proteins in porcine bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in methacholine-induced tracheal secretions [airway surface liquid (ASL)]. We detected 674 and 3,858 unique porcine-specific proteins in BAL and ASL, respectively. This proteome was composed of proteins representing a diverse range of molecular classes and biological processes, including host defense, molecular transport, cell communication, cytoskeletal, and metabolic functions. Specifically, we detected a significant number of secreted proteins with known or predicted roles in innate and adaptive immunity, microbial killing, or other aspects of host defense. In greatly expanding the known proteome of the lung lining fluid in the pig, this study provides a valuable resource for future studies using this important animal model of pulmonary physiology and disease. PMID:23709621

  13. 77 FR 59391 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways Corporation, United Air Lines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways...(a) and 343.2(c); Delta Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., JetBlue Airways...

  14. Fluid dynamics in airway bifurcations: II. Secondary currents.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X; Schreck, R M

    2001-04-01

    As the second component of a systematic investigation on flows in bifurcations reported in this journal, this work focused on secondary currents. The first article addressed primary flows and the third discusses localized conditions (both in this issue). Secondary flow patterns were studied in two lung bifurcation models (Schreck, 1972) using FIDAP with the Cray T90 supercomputer. The currents were examined at different prescribed distances distal to the carina. Effects of inlet conditions, Reynolds numbers, and diameter ratios and orientations of airways were addressed. The secondary currents caused by the presence of the carina and inclination of the daughter tubes exhibited symmetric, multivortex patterns. The intensities of the secondary currents became stronger for larger Reynolds numbers and larger angles of bifurcation.

  15. Influence of Rapid Fluid Loading on Airway Structure and Function in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    CERIDON, MAILE L.; SNYDER, ERIC M.; STROM, NICHOLAS A.; TSCHIRREN, JUERG; JOHNSON, BRUCE D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study examined the influence of rapid intravenous fluid loading (RFL) on airway structure and pulmonary vascular volumes using computed tomography imaging and the subsequent impact on pulmonary function in healthy adults (n = 16). Methods and Results Total lung capacity (ΔTLC = −6%), forced vital capacity (ΔFVC = −14%), and peak expiratory flow (ΔPEF = −19%) decreased, and residual volume (ΔRV = +38%) increased post-RFL (P < .05). Airway luminal cross-sectional area (CSA) decreased at the trachea, and at airway generation 3 (P < .05), wall thickness changed minimally with a tendency for increasing in generation five (P = .13). Baseline pulmonary function was positively associated with airway luminal CSA; however, this relationship deteriorated after RFL. Lung tissue volume and pulmonary vascular volumes increased 28% (P < .001) post-RFL, but did not fully account for the decline in TLC. Conclusions These data suggest that RFL results in obstructive/restrictive PF changes that are most likely related to structural changes in smaller airways or changes in extrapulmonary vascular beds. PMID:20142030

  16. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  17. Acinar origin of CFTR-dependent airway submucosal gland fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin V; Krouse, Mauri E; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease arises from defective innate defenses, especially defective mucus clearance of microorganisms. Airway submucosal glands secrete most airway mucus, and CF airway glands do not secrete in response to VIP or forskolin. CFTR, the protein that is defective in CF, is expressed in glands, but immunocytochemistry finds the highest expression of CFTR in either the ciliated ducts or in the acini, depending on the antibodies used. CFTR is absolutely required for forskolin-mediated gland secretion; we used this finding to localize the origin of forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent gland fluid secretion. We tested the hypothesis that secretion to forskolin might originate from the gland duct rather than or in addition to the acini. We ligated gland ducts at various points, stimulated the glands with forskolin, and monitored the regions of the glands that swelled. The results supported an acinar rather than ductal origin of secretion. We tracked particles in the mucus using Nomarski time-lapse imaging; particles originated in the acini and traveled toward the duct orifice. Estimated bulk flow accelerated in the acini and mucus tubules, consistent with fluid secretion in those regions, but was constant in the unbranched duct, consistent with a lack of fluid secretion or absorption by the ductal epithelium. We conclude that CFTR-dependent gland fluid secretion originates in the serous acini. The failure to observe either secretion or absorption from the CFTR and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-rich ciliated ducts is unexplained, but may indicate that this epithelium alters the composition rather than the volume of gland mucus. PMID:16997881

  18. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the upper airway of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by Muller maneuver.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ping; Xu, Xiao-Long; Tang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Xue, Xiao-Chen; Wu, Ya-Dong; Zhu, Min

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to use computer simulation to describe the fluid dynamic characteristics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to evaluate the difference between during quiet respiration and the Muller maneuver (MM). Seven patients with OSAS were involved to perform computed tomographic (CT) scanning during quiet respiration and the MM. CT data in DICOM format were transformed into an anatomically three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the upper airway. The velocity magnitude, relative pressure, and flow distribution were obtained. Numerical simulation of airflow was performed to discuss how the MM affected airflow in the upper airway. To measure the discrepancy, the SPSS19.0 software package was utilized for statistic analysis. The results showed that the shape of the upper airway became narrower, and the pressure decreased during the MM. The minimal cross-sectional area (MCSA) of velopharynx was significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the airflow velocity in MCSAs of velopharynx and glossopharynx significantly accelerated (P<0.05) during the MM. This study demonstrated the possibility of CFD model combined with the MM for understanding pharyngeal aerodynamics in the pathophysiology of OSAS. PMID:26072090

  19. Mechanisms of airway protection after pharyngeal fluid infusion in healthy sleeping piglets.

    PubMed

    Page, M; Jeffery, H E; Marks, V; Post, E J; Wood, A K

    1995-05-01

    The airway protective mechanisms evoked after infusion of fluids into the pharynx were examined in the intact and healthy newborn piglet during sleep. Thirteen healthy normothermic piglets (3-6 days of age) were examined on 4 consecutive days during sleep. The fluids infused (0.05-1.5 ml) were 0.9% saline, distilled water, and HCl (pH 3 and pH 2). Respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation (SaO2), swallowing, and arousal were compared pre- and postinfusion during active (AS) and quiet sleep (QS) for each test fluid. The most common response in AS and QS was swallowing (90%) and then arousal (24%); however, no apnea occurred, and respiratory rate and SaO2 were always maintained. A significant difference occurred between HCl infusions of pH 2 and pH 3; at pH 2, the frequency of swallows and latency to the first swallow were reduced (P < 0.05) and the frequency of arousal was reduced in AS compared with that in QS (P < 0.01). Airway protection after pharyngeal fluid stimulation is achieved primarily by swallowing and arousal, without any effect on respiratory rate and SaO2. Attenuation of protective mechanisms occurred, however, when the infusate was at pH 2. PMID:7649933

  20. Creation and characterization of an airway epithelial cell line for stable expression of CFTR variants

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Laura B.; Vecchio-Pagan, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Han, Sangwoo T.; Franca, Arianna; Wohler, Elizabeth S.; Batista, Denise A.S.; Goff, Loyal A.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Analysis of the functional consequences and treatment response of rare CFTR variants is challenging due to the limited availability of primary airways cells. Methods A Flp recombination target (FRT) site for stable expression of CFTR was incorporated into an immortalized CF bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o−). CFTR cDNA was integrated into the FRT site. Expression was evaluated by western blotting and confocal microscopy and function measured by short circuit current. RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptional profile of the resulting CF8Flp cell line to primary cells and tissues. Results Functional CFTR was expressed from integrated cDNA at the FRT site of the CF8Flp cell line at levels comparable to that seen in native airway cells. CF8Flp cells expressing WT-CFTR have a stable transcriptome comparable to that of primary cultured airway epithelial cells, including genes that play key roles in CFTR pathways. Conclusion CF8Flp cells provide a viable substitute for primary CF airway cells for the analysis of CFTR variants in a native context. PMID:26694805

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the Posterior Airway Space After Maxillomandibular Advancement For Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Waite, Peter D.; Shih, Alan M.; Cheng, Gary C.; Koomullil, Roy; Ito, Yasushi; Cure, Joel K; Harding, Susan M.; Litaker, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the soft tissue change of the upper airway after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Materials and Methods Eight OSAS patients who required MMA were recruited into this study. All participants had pre- and post-operative computed tomography (CT) and underwent MMA by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Upper airway CT data sets for these 8 participants were created with high-fidelity 3-D numerical models for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3-D models were simulated and analyzed to study how changes in airway anatomy affects pressure effort required for normal breathing. Airway dimensions, skeletal changes, Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), and pressure efforts of pre- and post-operative 3-D models were compared and correlations interpreted. Results After MMA, laminar and turbulent air flow was significantly decreased at every level of the airway. The cross-sectional areas at the soft palate and tongue base were significantly increased. Conclusions This study shows that MMA increases airway dimensions by the increasing the occipital base (Base) - pogonion (Pg) distance. An increase of the Base-Pg distance showed a significant correlation with an AHI improvement and a decreased pressure effort of the upper airway. Decreasing the pressure effort will decrease the breathing workload. This improves the condition of OSAS. PMID:23642544

  2. Free DNA in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Fluids Correlates with Airflow Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Veronica; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Önder Yildirim, Ali; Bohla, Alexander; Hector, Andreas; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Stoiber, Walter; Griese, Matthias; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A.; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease determines morbidity and mortality of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF airways are characterized by a nonresolving neutrophilic inflammation. After pathogen contact or prolonged activation, neutrophils release DNA fibres decorated with antimicrobial proteins, forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs have been described to act in a beneficial way for innate host defense by bactericidal, fungicidal, and virucidal actions. On the other hand, excessive NET formation has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disease conditions. We quantified free DNA structures characteristic of NETs in airway fluids of CF patients and a mouse model with CF-like lung disease. Free DNA levels correlated with airflow obstruction, fungal colonization, and CXC chemokine levels in CF patients and CF-like mice. When viewed in combination, our results demonstrate that neutrophilic inflammation in CF airways is associated with abundant free DNA characteristic for NETosis, and suggest that free DNA may be implicated in lung function decline in patients with CF. PMID:25918476

  3. Numerical simulation of soft palate movement and airflow in human upper airway by fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Chi; Wang, Yuefang; Liu, Yingxi

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors present airflow field characteristics of human upper airway and soft palate movement attitude during breathing. On the basis of the data taken from the spiral computerized tomography images of a healthy person and a patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS), three-dimensional models of upper airway cavity and soft palate are reconstructed by the method of surface rendering. Numerical simulation is performed for airflow in the upper airway and displacement of soft palate by fluid-structure interaction analysis. The reconstructed three-dimensional models precisely preserve the original configuration of upper airways and soft palate. The results of the pressure and velocity distributions in the airflow field are quantitatively determined, and the displacement of soft palate is presented. Pressure gradients of airway are lower for the healthy person and the airflow distribution is quite uniform in the case of free breathing. However, the OSAHS patient remarkably escalates both the pressure and velocity in the upper airway, and causes higher displacement of the soft palate. The present study is useful in revealing pathogenesis and quantitative mutual relationship between configuration and function of the upper airway as well as in diagnosing diseases related to anatomical structure and function of the upper airway.

  4. A microfluidic model to study fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture in small lung airways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John; Filoche, Marcel; White, Joshua; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture is important to understand mucus clearance in lung airways and potential effects of mucus plug rupture on epithelial cells at lung airway walls. We established a microfluidic model to study mucus plug rupture in a collapsed airway of the 12th generation. Mucus plugs were simulated using Carbopol 940 (C940) gels at concentrations of 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25%, and 0.3%, which have non-Newtonian properties close to healthy and diseased lung mucus. The airway was modeled with a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic channel. Plug motion was driven by pressurized air. Global strain rates and shear stress were defined to quantitatively describe plug deformation and rupture. Results show that a plug needs to overcome yield stress before deformation and rupture. The plug takes relatively long time to yield at the high Bingham number. Plug length shortening is the more significant deformation than shearing at gel concentration higher than 0.15%. Although strain rates increase dramatically at rupture, the transient shear stress drops due to the shear-thinning effect of the C940 gels. Dimensionless time-averaged shear stress, Txy, linearly increases from 3.7 to 5.6 times the Bingham number as the Bingham number varies from 0.018 to 0.1. The dimensionless time-averaged shear rate simply equals to Txy/2. In dimension, shear stress magnitude is about one order lower than the pressure drop, and one order higher than yield stress. Mucus with high yield stress leads to high shear stress, and therefore would be more likely to cause epithelial cell damage. Crackling sounds produced with plug rupture might be more detectable for gels with higher concentration. PMID:26392827

  5. The mechanics of airway closure.

    PubMed

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2008-11-30

    We describe how surface-tension-driven instabilities of the lung's liquid lining may lead to pulmonary airway closure via the formation of liquid bridges that occlude the airway lumen. Using simple theoretical models, we demonstrate that this process may occur via a purely fluid-mechanical "film collapse" or through a coupled, fluid-elastic "compliant collapse" mechanism. Both mechanisms can lead to airway closure in times comparable with the breathing cycle, suggesting that surface tension is the primary mechanical effect responsible for the closure observed in peripheral regions of the human lungs. We conclude by discussing the influence of additional effects not included in the simple models, such as gravity, the presence of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory flow and wall motion, the airways' geometry, and the mechanical structure of the airway walls. PMID:18595784

  6. Cellular component of lavage fluid from broilers with normal versus aerosol-primed airways.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, A G; Erf, G F; Rath, N C; Wideman, R F

    2009-02-01

    Previously, we reported that intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide elicited pulmonary hypertension (PH) in broilers reared under commercial conditions and in broilers reared in environmental chambers and pretreated with aerosolized red food colorant # 3 and propylene glycol (Red#3+PG), but not in control broilers reared in environmental chambers. The objective of the present experiment was to determine possible changes in the number or proportion of airway leukocytes that could contribute to the magnitude of the PH responses elicited in broilers. Birds were aerosolized for 40 min with a saturated mixture of Red#3+PG. After 24 h, a blood sample was taken, the broilers were killed, and a pulmonary lavage process was conducted in each bird. Leukocyte concentration (white blood cells/microL) and differential leukocyte counts (%) were measured in blood and lavage fluid. Leukocyte concentration in blood did not differ between groups, but the percentage of blood lymphocytes was lower in broilers from the Red#3+PG group compared with birds from the control group (52.4+/-2.9 and 56.9+/-2.9%, respectively). Cells recovered from the lavage fluid from both groups were primarily heterophils. The concentration of leukocytes was greater in the lavage fluid of broilers from the Red#3+PG group compared with broilers from the control group (763.2+/-158.7 and 402.9+/-62.6 white blood cells/microL, respectively), but the proportions among leukocytes were not different between the 2 groups. We propose that the increased concentration of leukocytes present within the airways was one of the components that enabled broilers pre-treated with aerosolized Red#3+PG to exhibit PH responses to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide.

  7. Airway surface fluid composition in the rat determined by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, E A; Govindaraju, K; Lloyd, D K; Eidelman, D H

    1997-10-01

    The apical surface of respiratory epithelial cells is covered by a thin layer of low-viscosity fluid termed airway surface fluid (ASF), about which relatively little is known. We collected samples of ASF from anesthetized rats, which were then analyzed using capillary electrophoresis, a method that enables extremely small quantities of fluid to be analyzed. We found values for Na+ (40.57 +/- 3.08 mM), K+ (1.74 +/- 0.36 mM), and Cl- (45.16 +/- 1.81 mM), indicating that this fluid is hypotonic compared with rat plasma. In contrast, the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate within ASF were higher than reported plasma values. Additionally, intravenous administration of the cholinergic agonist methacholine (MCh) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the concentration of Na+ and Cl- within the ASF. This increase is approximately 50% in these ions after a dose of 100 ng MCh/g body wt. This animal model, together with this microanalytical technique, may be useful for investigating the in vivo regulation of ASF composition.

  8. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Derek M.; Martin, Luke G.; Papich, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  9. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part II: particle transport.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Van Rhein, Timothy; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The flow mechanisms that play a role on aerosol deposition were identified and presented in a companion paper (Timothy et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput. doi: 10.1007/s11517-015-1407-3 , 2015). In the current paper, the effects of invasive conventional mechanical ventilation waveforms and endotracheal tube (ETT) on the aerosol transport were investigated. In addition to the enhanced deposition seen at the carinas of the airway bifurcations, enhanced deposition was also seen in the right main bronchus due to impaction and turbulent dispersion resulting from the fluid structures created by jet caused by the ETT. The orientation of the ETT toward right bronchus resulted in a substantial deposition inside right lung compared to left lung. The deposition inside right lung was ~12-fold higher than left lung for all considered cases, except for the case of using pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform where a reduction of this ratio by ~50 % was found. The total deposition during pressure constant, volume ramp, and ascending ramp waveforms was similar and ~1.44 times higher than deposition fraction when using pressure sinusoidal waveform. Varying respiratory waveform demonstrated a significant role on the deposition enhancement factors and give evidence of drug aerosol concentrations in key deposition sites, which may be significant for drugs with negative side effects in high concentrations. These observations are thought to be important for ventilation treatment strategy. PMID:26541600

  10. Fluid-Structure Analysis of Opening Phenomena in a Collapsible Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir N.; Banks, Julie; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2003-11-01

    Several physiological functions require the opening of collapsed respiratory airways. For example, the Eustachian tube (ET), which connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME), must be periodically opened to maintain ambient ME pressures. These openings normally occur during swallowing when muscle contraction deforms the surrounding soft tissue. The inability to open the ET results in the most common and costly ear disease in children, Otitis Media. Although tissue-based treatments have been purposed, the influence of the various tissue mechanical properties on flow phenomena has not been investigated. A computational model of ET opening was developed using in-vivo structural data to investigate these fluid-structure interactions. This model accounts for both tissue deformation and the resulting airflow in a non-circular conduit. Results indicate that ET opening is more sensitive to the applied muscle forces than elastic tissue properties. These models have therefore identified how different tissue elements alter ET opening phenomena, which elements should be targeted for treatment and the optimal mechanical properties of these tissue constructs. Research supported by NIH grant DC005345.

  11. Frenkel line and solubility maximum in supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2015-01-01

    A new dynamic line, the Frenkel line, has recently been proposed to separate the supercritical state into rigid-liquid and nonrigid gaslike fluid. The location of the Frenkel line on the phase diagram is unknown for real fluids. Here we map the Frenkel line for three important systems: CO2,H2O , and CH4. This provides an important demarcation on the phase diagram of these systems, the demarcation that separates two distinct physical states with liquidlike and gaslike properties. We find that the Frenkel line can have a similar trend as the melting line above the critical pressure. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between unexplained solubility maxima and Frenkel line, and we propose that the Frenkel line corresponds to the optimal conditions for solubility.

  12. Frenkel line and solubility maximum in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brazhkin, V V; Dove, M T; Trachenko, K

    2015-01-01

    A new dynamic line, the Frenkel line, has recently been proposed to separate the supercritical state into rigid-liquid and nonrigid gaslike fluid. The location of the Frenkel line on the phase diagram is unknown for real fluids. Here we map the Frenkel line for three important systems: CO(2), H(2)O, and CH(4). This provides an important demarcation on the phase diagram of these systems, the demarcation that separates two distinct physical states with liquidlike and gaslike properties. We find that the Frenkel line can have a similar trend as the melting line above the critical pressure. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between unexplained solubility maxima and Frenkel line, and we propose that the Frenkel line corresponds to the optimal conditions for solubility.

  13. Frenkel line and solubility maximum in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brazhkin, V V; Dove, M T; Trachenko, K

    2015-01-01

    A new dynamic line, the Frenkel line, has recently been proposed to separate the supercritical state into rigid-liquid and nonrigid gaslike fluid. The location of the Frenkel line on the phase diagram is unknown for real fluids. Here we map the Frenkel line for three important systems: CO(2), H(2)O, and CH(4). This provides an important demarcation on the phase diagram of these systems, the demarcation that separates two distinct physical states with liquidlike and gaslike properties. We find that the Frenkel line can have a similar trend as the melting line above the critical pressure. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between unexplained solubility maxima and Frenkel line, and we propose that the Frenkel line corresponds to the optimal conditions for solubility. PMID:25679575

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of the upper airway of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in steady flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun; Sin, SangHun; McDonough, Joseph M; Udupa, Jayaram K; Guez, Allon; Arens, Raanan; Wootton, David M

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of airway geometry on internal pressure in the upper airway of three children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and three controls. Model geometry was reconstructed from magnetic resonance images obtained during quiet tidal breathing, meshed with an unstructured grid, and solved at normative peak resting flow. The unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved with steady flow boundary conditions in inspiration and expiration, using a two-equation low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Model results were validated using an in-vitro scale model, unsteady flow simulation, and reported nasal resistance measurements in children. Pharynx pressure drop strongly correlated to airway area restriction. Inspiratory pressure drop was primarily proportional to the square of flow, consistent with pressure losses due to convective acceleration caused by area restriction. On inspiration, in OSAS pressure drop occurred primarily between the choanae and the region where the adenoids overlap the tonsils (overlap region) due to airway narrowing, rather than in the nasal passages; in controls the majority of pressure drop was in the nasal passages. On expiration, in OSAS the majority of pressure drop occurred between the oropharynx (posterior to the tongue) and overlap region, and local minimum pressure in the overlap region was near atmospheric due to pressure recovery in the anterior nasopharynx. The results suggest that pharyngeal airway shape in children with OSAS significantly affects internal pressure distribution compared to nasal resistance. The model may also help explain regional dynamic airway narrowing during expiration. PMID:16098533

  15. Long fluid filled bags suspended by line forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M. L.; Duncan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A previous analysis of fluid filled storage bags is extended to the case of a long fluid filled cylindrical membrane supported by uniform line loads. Cross-sectional shape, stiffness of the support system and stress resultants in the membrane are determined. The application of the numerical results to problems arising in the design of nonrigid airships is discussed.

  16. Hypercapnia modulates cAMP signalling and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent anion and fluid secretion in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark J; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Patel, Waseema; Ibrahim, Salam H; Verdon, Bernard; Ward, Christopher; Garnett, James P; Tarran, Robert; Cann, Martin J; Gray, Michael A

    2016-03-15

    Hypercapnia is clinically defined as an arterial blood partial pressure of CO2 of above 40 mmHg and is a feature of chronic lung disease. In previous studies we have demonstrated that hypercapnia modulates agonist-stimulated cAMP levels through effects on transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activity. In the airways, cAMP is known to regulate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated anion and fluid secretion, which contributes to airway surface liquid homeostasis. The aim of the current work was to investigate if hypercapnia could modulate cAMP-regulated ion and fluid transport in human airway epithelial cells. We found that acute exposure to hypercapnia significantly reduced forskolin-stimulated elevations in intracellular cAMP as well as both adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated increases in CFTR-dependent transepithelial short-circuit current, in polarised cultures of Calu-3 human airway cells. This CO2 -induced reduction in anion secretion was not due to a decrease in HCO3 (-) transport given that neither a change in CFTR-dependent HCO3 (-) efflux nor Na(+) /HCO3 (-) cotransporter-dependent HCO3 (-) influx were CO2 -sensitive. Hypercapnia also reduced the volume of forskolin-stimulated fluid secretion over 24 h, yet had no effect on the HCO3 (-) content of the secreted fluid. Our data reveal that hypercapnia reduces CFTR-dependent, electrogenic Cl(-) and fluid secretion, but not CFTR-dependent HCO3 (-) secretion, which highlights a differential sensitivity of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transporters to raised CO2 in Calu-3 cells. Hypercapnia also reduced forskolin-stimulated CFTR-dependent anion secretion in primary human airway epithelia. Based on current models of airways biology, a reduction in fluid secretion, associated with hypercapnia, would be predicted to have important consequences for airways hydration and the innate defence mechanisms of the lungs.

  17. Static and dynamic response of a fluid-fluid interface to electric point and line charge

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen A Brevik, Iver

    2012-12-15

    We consider the behavior of a dielectric fluid-fluid interface in the presence of a strong electric field from a point charge and line charge, respectively, both statically and, in the latter case, dynamically. The fluid surface is elevated above its undisturbed level until balance is reached between the electromagnetic lifting force, gravity and surface tension. We derive ordinary differential equations for the shape of the fluid-fluid interface which are solved numerically with standard means, demonstrating how the elevation depends on field strength and surface tension coefficient. In the dynamic case of a moving line charge, the surface of an inviscid liquid-liquid interface is left to oscillate behind the moving charge after it has been lifted against the force of gravity. We show how the wavelength of the oscillations depends on the relative strength of the forces of gravity and inertia, whereas the amplitude of the oscillations is a nontrivial function of the velocity at which the line charge moves. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid surface elevation analyzed near a static point and line charge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevation determined by interaction of gravity, dielectric force and surface tension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic equation of motion for the moving line charge is derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface waves behind moving charge calculated and analysed for different velocities.

  18. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  19. Traction in elastohydrodynamic line contacts for two synthesized hydrocarbon fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The paper describes the disk machine designed and constructed for the investigation of the traction in elastohydrodynamic line contacts for two synthesized hydrocarbon fluids. The results of this experimental study are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions of traction according to the thermal and non-Newtonian theory recently presented by the authors.

  20. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - Fluid line repair kit development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Marshall's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) is used to simulate the gravitational fields and buoyancy effects outer space has on astronauts and their ability to perform tasks in this environment. In this example, a diver performs a temporary fluid line repair task using a repair kit developed by Marshall engineers. The analysis will determine the value of this repair kit and its feasibility.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouly, F.; van Hirtum, A.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Pelorson, X.; Payan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    This study deals with the numerical prediction and experimental description of the flow-induced deformation in a rapidly convergent divergent geometry which stands for a simplified tongue, in interaction with an expiratory airflow. An original in vitro experimental model is proposed, which allows measurement of the deformation of the artificial tongue, in condition of major initial airway obstruction. The experimental model accounts for asymmetries in geometry and tissue properties which are two major physiological upper airway characteristics. The numerical method for prediction of the fluid structure interaction is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow are taken into account using a boundary layer theory. The overall numerical method entails finite element solving of the solid problem and finite differences solving of the fluid problem. First, the numerical method predicts the deformation of the tongue with an overall error of the order of 20%, which can be seen as a preliminary successful validation of the theory and simulations. Moreover, expiratory flow limitation is predicted in this configuration. As a result, both the physical and numerical models could be useful to understand this phenomenon reported in heavy snorers and apneic patients during sleep.

  2. Comparison of the intubating laryngeal mask airway and laryngeal tube placement during manual in-line stabilisation of the neck.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, R; Nagata, O; Kamata, K; Yamagata, K; Sessler, D I; Ozaki, M

    2005-02-01

    We compared the placement of the laryngeal tube (LT) with the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) in 51 patients whose necks were stabilised by manual in-line traction. Following induction of anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, the LT and ILMA were inserted consecutively in a randomised, crossover design. Using pressure-controlled ventilation (20 cmH(2)O inspiratory pressure), we measured insertion attempts, time to establish positive-pressure ventilation, tidal volume, gastric insufflation, and minimum airway pressure at which gas leaked around the cuff. Data were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Insertion was found to be more difficult with the LT (successful at first attempt in 16 patients) than with the ILMA (successful at first attempt in 42 patients, p < 0.0001). Time required for insertion was longer for the LT (28 [23-35] s, median [interquartile range]) than for the ILMA (20 [15-25] s, p = 0.0009). Tidal volume was less for the LT (440 [290-670] ml) than for the ILMA (630 [440-750] ml, p = 0.013). Minimum airway pressure at which gas leak occurred and incidence of gastric insufflation were similar with two devices. In patients whose necks were stabilised with manual in-line traction, insertion of the ILMA was easier and quicker than insertion of the LT and tidal volume was greater with the ILMA than the LT.

  3. Effective string theory for vortex lines in fluids and superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the effective string theory of vortex lines in ordinary fluids and low-temperature superfluids, by describing the bulk fluid flow in terms of a two-form field to which vortex lines can couple. We derive the most general low-energy effective Lagrangian that is compatible with (spontaneously broken) Poincaré invariance and worldsheet reparameterization invariance. This generalizes the effective action developed in [1, 2]. By applying standard field-theoretical techniques, we show that certain low-energy coupling constants — most notably the string tension — exhibit RG running already at the classical level. We discuss applications of our techniques to the study of Kelvin waves, vortex rings, and the coupling to bulk sound modes.

  4. Pharyngeal airway protective reflexes are triggered before the maximum volume of fluid that the hypopharynx can safely hold is exceeded

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Kulwinder; Surapaneni, Sri Naveen; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Hafeezullah, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Aerodigestive reflexes triggered by pharyngeal stimulation can protect the airways by clearing fluid from the pharynx. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the maximum capacity of fluid that can safely dwell in the hypopharynx [hypopharyngeal safe volume (HPSV)] before spilling into the larynx and the threshold volumes required to trigger pharyngoglottal closure reflex (PGCR), pharyngo-upper esophageal sphincter contractile reflex (PUCR), and reflexive pharyngeal swallow (RPS). Twenty-five healthy volunteers (mean age 24 yr, 8 males) were studied in the semi-inclined supine position. PGCR, PUCR, and RPS were elicited using techniques of concurrent upper esophageal sphincter manometry and pharyngo-laryngoscopy. The hypopharynx was then anesthetized to abolish RPS. HPSV was determined by infusing water in the pharynx, and perfusion was stopped when the infusate reached the superior margin of the interarytenoid fold. The threshold volumes for triggering PGCR, PUCR, and RPS by slow and rapid injections before pharyngeal anesthesia were 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 ml; 0.20 ± 0.020 and 0.13 ± 0.04 ml; and 0.61 ± 0.04 and 0.4 ± 0.06 ml, respectively. All of the above volumes were significantly smaller than the HPSV (0.70 ± 0.06 ml, P < 0.01) except for the threshold volume to elicit RPS during slow perfusion, which was not significantly different (P = 0.23). We conclude that pharyngeal aerodigestive reflexes are triggered by both slow and rapid pharyngeal perfusion of water at significantly smaller volumes than the maximum capacity of the hypopharynx to safely hold contents without spilling into the airway. These reflexes thereby aid in prevention of aspiration. PMID:21566013

  5. Viscous airflow through a rigid tube with a compliant lining: a simple model for the air-mucus interaction in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Evrensel, C A; Khan, R U; Elli, S; Krumpe, P E

    1993-08-01

    The respiratory tract of mammals is lined with a layer of mucus, described as viscoelastic semi-solid, above a layer of watery serous fluid. The interaction of these compliant layers with pulmonary airflow plays a major role in lung clearance by two-phase gas-liquid flow and in increased flow resistance in patients with obstructive airway diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and asthma. Experiments have shown that such coupled systems of flow-compliant-layers are quite susceptible to sudden shear instabilities, leading to formation of relatively large amplitude waves at the interface. Although these waves enhance the lung clearance by mobilizing the secretions, they increase the flow resistance in airways. The objective of this paper is to understand the basic interaction mechanism between the two media better by studying airflow through a rigid pipe that is lined by a compliant layer. The mathematical model that has been developed for this purpose is capable of explaining some of the published experimental observations. Wave instability theory is applied to the coupled air-mucus system to explore the stability of the interface. The results show that the onset flow speed for the initiation of unstable surface waves, and the resulting wavelength, are both very sensitive to mucus thickness. The model predicts that the instabilities initiate in the form of propagating waves for the elastic mucus where the wave speed is about 40 percent of the flow speed. The wavelength and phase speed to air velocity ratio are shown to increase with increasing mucus thickness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Safety System for Controlling Fluid Flow into a Suction Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A safety system includes a sleeve fitted within a pool's suction line at the inlet thereof. An open end of the sleeve is approximately aligned with the suction line's inlet. The sleeve terminates with a plate that resides within the suction line. The plate has holes formed therethrough. A housing defining a plurality of distinct channels is fitted in the sleeve so that the distinct channels lie within the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels has a first opening on one end thereof and a second opening on another end thereof. The second openings reside in the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels is at least approximately three feet in length. The first openings are in fluid communication with the water in the pool, and are distributed around a periphery of an area of the housing that prevents coverage of all the first openings when a human interacts therewith.

  7. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  8. Noninvasive estimation of pharyngeal airway resistance and compliance in children based on volume-gated dynamic MRI and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Persak, Steven C; Sin, Sanghun; McDonough, Joseph M; Arens, Raanan; Wootton, David M

    2011-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of collapsing airway geometry on internal pressure and velocity in the pharyngeal airway of three sedated children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and three control subjects. Model geometry was reconstructed from volume-gated magnetic resonance images during normal tidal breathing at 10 increments of tidal volume through the respiratory cycle. Each geometry was meshed with an unstructured grid and solved using a low-Reynolds number k-ω turbulence model driven by flow data averaged over 12 consecutive breathing cycles. Combining gated imaging with CFD modeling created a dynamic three-dimensional view of airway anatomy and mechanics, including the evolution of airway collapse and flow resistance and estimates of the local effective compliance. The upper airways of subjects with OSAS were generally much more compliant during tidal breathing. Compliance curves (pressure vs. cross-section area), derived for different locations along the airway, quantified local differences along the pharynx and between OSAS subjects. In one subject, the distal oropharynx was more compliant than the nasopharynx (1.028 vs. 0.450 mm(2)/Pa) and had a lower theoretical limiting flow rate, confirming the distal oropharynx as the flow-limiting segment of the airway in this subject. Another subject had a more compliant nasopharynx (0.053 mm(2)/Pa) during inspiration and apparent stiffening of the distal oropharynx (C = 0.0058 mm(2)/Pa), and the theoretical limiting flow rate indicated the nasopharynx as the flow-limiting segment. This new method may help to differentiate anatomical and functional factors in airway collapse. PMID:21852407

  9. Ultrahigh fluid diffusivity in graphene-lined nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shishir; Pratap, Rudra; Raghavan, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    Control and understanding of the flow of fluids at nanoscales is of great significance to biology, separation science, energy technology, and medical diagnostics. Nanocarbons have emerged as one of the most promising materials for this quest, both as nanochannels and nanoporous membranes. However, the fluid flow in these graphitic nanostructures is not well understood, and there is a lack of straightforward route for process integration of the nanochannels. The graphene-lined nanochannels (GNCs), reported here, are aimed at solving these problems, while displaying a useful anomaly for fluidic flow. Specifically, GNCs show a large increase in the rate of removal of sacrificial materials enclosed in them. The increase is caused by 100-1000 times enhancement in the diffusivity of etchant media in the GNCs as compared to channels without graphene lining. The enhancement increases monotonically with a decrease in the height of the GNCs, which is not seen for the non-lined channels. These properties, coupled with easy and scalable fabrication, make GNCs highly suited for innovative and efficient nanofluidic devices and also for experimental investigations. We also provide a phenomenological model which assumes enhanced diffusivity of medium only near graphene surface to explain the observed dependence of diffusivity on the dimensions of the nanochannels. This rationalization of the phenomenon using only the surface effects is a significant step towards understanding anomalous fluidics of nanocarbons.

  10. A spatial model of fluid recycling in the airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Katie; Crampin, Edmund; Sneyd, James

    2015-10-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and results in viscous mucus and impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic recurring pulmonary infections. Although extensive experimental research has been conducted over the last few decades, CF lung pathophysiology remains controversial. There are two competing explanations for the observed depletion of periciliary liquid (PCL) in CF lungs. The low volume hypothesis assumes fluid hyperabsorption through surface epithelia due to an over-active epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and the low secretion hypothesis assumes inspissated mucins secreted from glands due to lack of serous fluid secreted from gland acini. We present a spatial mathematical model that reflects in vivo fluid recycling via submucosal gland (SMG) secretion, and absorption through surface epithelia. We then test the model in CF conditions by increasing ENaC open probability and decreasing SMG flux while simultaneously reducing CFTR open probability. Increasing ENaC activity only results in increased fluid absorption across surface epithelia, as seen in in vitro experiments. However, combining potential CF mechanisms results in markedly less fluid absorbed while providing the largest reduction in PCL volume, suggesting that a compromise in gland fluid secretion dominates over increased ENaC activity to decrease the amount of fluid transported transcellularly in CF lungs in vivo. Model results also indicate that a spatial model is necessary for an accurate calculation of total fluid transport, as the effects of spatial gradients can be severe, particularly in close proximity to the SMGs.

  11. A spatial model of fluid recycling in the airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Katie; Crampin, Edmund; Sneyd, James

    2015-10-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and results in viscous mucus and impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic recurring pulmonary infections. Although extensive experimental research has been conducted over the last few decades, CF lung pathophysiology remains controversial. There are two competing explanations for the observed depletion of periciliary liquid (PCL) in CF lungs. The low volume hypothesis assumes fluid hyperabsorption through surface epithelia due to an over-active epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and the low secretion hypothesis assumes inspissated mucins secreted from glands due to lack of serous fluid secreted from gland acini. We present a spatial mathematical model that reflects in vivo fluid recycling via submucosal gland (SMG) secretion, and absorption through surface epithelia. We then test the model in CF conditions by increasing ENaC open probability and decreasing SMG flux while simultaneously reducing CFTR open probability. Increasing ENaC activity only results in increased fluid absorption across surface epithelia, as seen in in vitro experiments. However, combining potential CF mechanisms results in markedly less fluid absorbed while providing the largest reduction in PCL volume, suggesting that a compromise in gland fluid secretion dominates over increased ENaC activity to decrease the amount of fluid transported transcellularly in CF lungs in vivo. Model results also indicate that a spatial model is necessary for an accurate calculation of total fluid transport, as the effects of spatial gradients can be severe, particularly in close proximity to the SMGs. PMID:26169010

  12. Respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants: the first line of defence against gaseous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, F J; Cotgrove, M; Mudway, I S

    1996-01-01

    All tissues are vulnerable to oxidant damage, but by virtue of its location, anatomy and function, the epithelial surface of the lung is one of the most vulnerable targets in the body. Recent studies have shown that epithelial lining fluid (ELF), a thin layer of fluid which covers the epithelial surface of the respiratory tract, contains an interesting complement of antioxidants, some of which, like glutathione, are present in concentrations much higher than those found in plasma. It is likely that ELF forms the first line of defence against inhaled toxins such as ozone and nitrogen dioxide. By employing an ex vivo exposure system we have demonstrated that when lung lining fluid is in contact with environmentally relevant concentrations of ozone or nitrogen dioxide, there is differential consumption of the water-soluble antioxidants in the order, uric acid > ascorbic acid > glutathione. Given that the majority of ozone and nitrogen dioxide reacts within the ELF compartment, the antioxidant composition of this fluid is critically important in determining an individual's sensitivity to gaseous pollutants.

  13. Effect of surface tension of mucosal lining liquid on upper airway mechanics in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Eastwood, Peter R; Szollosi, Irene; Platt, Peter R; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Hillman, David R

    2003-07-01

    Upper airway (UA) patency may be influenced by surface tension (gamma) operating within the (UAL). We examined the role of gamma of UAL in the maintenance of UA patency in eight isoflurane-anesthetized supine human subjects breathing via a nasal mask connected to a pneumotachograph attached to a pressure delivery system. We evaluated 1). mask pressure at which the UA closed (Pcrit), 2). UA resistance upstream from the site of UA collapse (RUS), and 3). mask pressure at which the UA reopened (Po). A multiple pressure-transducer catheter was used to identify the site of airway closure (velopharyngeal in all subjects). UAL samples (0.2 microl) were collected, and the gamma of UAL was determined by using the "pull-off force" technique. Studies were performed before and after the intrapharyngeal instillation of 5 ml of exogenous surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline). The gamma of UAL decreased from 61.9 +/- 4.1 (control) to 50.3 +/- 5.0 mN/m (surfactant; P < 0.02). Changes in Po, RUS, and Po - Pcrit (change = control - surfactant) were positively correlated with changes in gamma (r2 > 0.6; P < 0.02) but not with changes in Pcrit (r2 = 0.4; P > 0.9). In addition, mean peak inspiratory airflow (no flow limitation) significantly increased (P < 0.04) from 0.31 +/- 0.06 (control) to 0.36 +/- 0.06 l/s (surfactant). These findings suggest that gamma of UAL exerts a force on the UA wall that hinders airway opening. Instillation of exogenous surfactant into the UA lowers the gamma of UAL, thus increasing UA patency and augmenting reopening of the collapsed airway. PMID:12626492

  14. Hypercapnia modulates cAMP signalling and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator‐dependent anion and fluid secretion in airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark J.; Saint‐Criq, Vinciane; Patel, Waseema; Ibrahim, Salam H.; Verdon, Bernard; Ward, Christopher; Garnett, James P.; Tarran, Robert; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Raised arterial blood CO2 (hypercapnia) is a feature of many lung diseases.CO2 has been shown to act as a cell signalling molecule in human cells, notably by influencing the levels of cell signalling second messengers: cAMP and Ca2+.Hypercapnia reduced cAMP‐stimulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator‐dependent anion and fluid transport in Calu‐3 cells and primary human airway epithelia but did not affect cAMP‐regulated HCO3 − transport via pendrin or Na+/HCO3 − cotransporters.These results further support the role of CO2 as a cell signalling molecule and suggests CO2‐induced reductions in airway anion and fluid transport may impair innate defence mechanisms of the lungs. Abstract Hypercapnia is clinically defined as an arterial blood partial pressure of CO2 of above 40 mmHg and is a feature of chronic lung disease. In previous studies we have demonstrated that hypercapnia modulates agonist‐stimulated cAMP levels through effects on transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activity. In the airways, cAMP is known to regulate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)‐mediated anion and fluid secretion, which contributes to airway surface liquid homeostasis. The aim of the current work was to investigate if hypercapnia could modulate cAMP‐regulated ion and fluid transport in human airway epithelial cells. We found that acute exposure to hypercapnia significantly reduced forskolin‐stimulated elevations in intracellular cAMP as well as both adenosine‐ and forskolin‐stimulated increases in CFTR‐dependent transepithelial short‐circuit current, in polarised cultures of Calu‐3 human airway cells. This CO2‐induced reduction in anion secretion was not due to a decrease in HCO3 − transport given that neither a change in CFTR‐dependent HCO3 − efflux nor Na+/HCO3 − cotransporter‐dependent HCO3 − influx were CO2‐sensitive. Hypercapnia also reduced the volume of forskolin‐stimulated fluid

  15. Role of anion exchangers in Cl- and HCO3- secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dusik; Kim, Juyeon; Burghardt, Beáta; Best, Len; Steward, Martin C

    2014-07-15

    Despite the importance of airway surface liquid pH in the lung's defenses against infection, the mechanism of airway HCO3- secretion remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the contribution of apical and basolateral Cl-/HCO3- exchangers to Cl- and HCO3- transport in the Calu-3 cell line, derived from human airway submucosal glands. Changes in intracellular pH (pHi) were measured following substitution of Cl- with gluconate. Apical Cl- substitution led to an alkalinization in forskolin-stimulated cells, indicative of Cl-/HCO3- exchange. This was unaffected by the anion exchange inhibitor DIDS but inhibited by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172, suggesting that the HCO3- influx might occur via CFTR, rather than a solute carrier family 26 (SLC26) exchanger, as recently proposed. The anion selectivity of the recovery process more closely resembled that of CFTR than an SLC26 exchanger, and quantitative RT-PCR showed only low levels of SLC26 exchanger transcripts relative to CFTR and anion exchanger 2 (AE2). For pHi to rise to observed values (∼7.8) through HCO3- entry via CFTR, the apical membrane potential must reverse to at least +20 mV following Cl- substitution; this was confirmed by perforated-patch recordings. Substitution of basolateral Cl- evoked a DIDS-sensitive alkalinization, attributed to Cl-/HCO3- exchange via AE2. This appeared to be abolished in forskolin-stimulated cells but was unmasked by blocking apical efflux of HCO3- via CFTR. We conclude that Calu-3 cells secrete HCO3- predominantly via CFTR, and, contrary to previous reports, the basolateral anion exchanger AE2 remains active during stimulation, providing an important pathway for basolateral Cl- uptake.

  16. Numerical investigation on the flow characteristics and aerodynamic force of the upper airway of patient with obstructive sleep apnea using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Kim, Woo-Seung; Sung, Sang-Jin

    2007-07-01

    Developing a mathematical model to predict the abnormal flow characteristics that are produced by obstructive sleep apnea is an important step in learning the pathophysiology of the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) disease. The present study provides detailed calculations of flow in the pharyngeal airway of a patient with obstructive sleep apnea. To achieve this goal, a computational fluid dynamics model was constructed using raw data from three-dimensional computed tomogram (CT) images of an OSA patient. To reproduce the important transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the pharyngeal airway, the low Reynolds number k-epsilon model was adopted and successfully validated using previous open literature. The results show that the flow in the pharyngeal airway of patients with OSA comprises a turbulent jet formed by area restriction at the velopharynx. This turbulent jet causes higher shear and pressure forces in the vicinity of the velopharynx. From the results, It may be deduced that the most collapsible area in the pharyngeal airway of OSA patients is the velopharynx where minimum intraluminal pressure and maximum aerodynamic force lie.

  17. Assessment of airway inflammation by exhaled breath condensate and impedance due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Dobashi, Kunio; Nagoshi, Atsuto; Kawamura, Osamu; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-09-01

    Avoiding oxidative stress in the airways is important for the treatment of respiratory disease associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is often difficult to decide whether GERD is causing airway inflammation or whether an airway disease is complicated by GERD. Measurement of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is performed by cooling and collecting the airway lining fluid contained in exhaled air. A decrease of pH and an increase of the 8-isoprostane concentration in EBC have been observed in patients with mild to moderate asthma accompanied by GERD. There are still problems to be overcome before EBC can be used clinically, but pH and 8-isoprostane may be promising objective markers of airway inflammation due to GERD. The disease concept and diagnosis of GERD are constantly advancing, including the development of impedance methods. It is expected that treatment will be based on the latest diagnostic knowledge of GERD associated with respiratory disease and on monitoring of airway inflammation.

  18. Fluid Line Evacuation and Freezing Experiments for Digital Radiator Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Miller, Jennifer R.; Sunada, Eric T.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Stephan, Ryan; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The digital radiator technology is one of three variable heat rejection technologies being investigated for future human-rated NASA missions. The digital radiator concept is based on a mechanically pumped fluid loop with parallel tubes carrying coolant to reject heat from the radiator surface. A series of valves actuate to start and stop fluid flow to di erent combinations of tubes, in order to vary the heat rejection capability of the radiator by a factor of 10 or more. When the flow in a particular leg is stopped, the fluid temperature drops and the fluid can freeze, causing damage or preventing flow from restarting. For this reason, the liquid in a stopped leg must be partially or fully evacuated upon shutdown. One of the challenges facing fluid evacuation from closed tubes arises from the vapor generated during pumping to low pressure, which can cause pump cavitation and incomplete evacuation. Here we present a series of laboratory experiments demonstrating fluid evacuation techniques to overcome these challenges by applying heat and pumping to partial vacuum. Also presented are results from qualitative testing of the freezing characteristics of several different candidate fluids, which demonstrate significant di erences in freezing properties, and give insight to the evacuation process.

  19. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  20. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future.

  1. Airway statuses and nasopharyngeal airway use for airway obstruction in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Kouga, Takeshi; Tanoue, Koji; Matsui, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is associated with a high rate of respiratory difficulty, due mainly to midfacial hypoplasia. Nasopharyngeal airway establishment has been reported as the first-line approach to airway obstruction and may obviate the need for a highly invasive tracheotomy. No previous studies have compared airway obstruction status in syndromic craniosynostosis between cases requiring and not requiring airway managements. We focus on nasopharyngeal airway use and airway status outcomes to assess respiratory difficulty in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. A retrospective data analysis of 51 cases with syndromic craniosynostosis was carried out. We divided 30 of the 51 cases with lateral pharyngeal x-rays taken before operations affecting airway diameters into 2 groups, one with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and the other with one or both of these interventions, and the mean diameters for 8 indices related to the pharyngeal space were compared. Cases with respiratory difficulty due to nasopharyngeal stenosis and requiring airway managements comprised a significantly higher proportion of those with Pfeiffer syndrome than patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Comparative examination of lateral x-ray cephalometry between cases with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and cases with one or both revealed oropharyngeal diameters tended to be smaller in those with interventions. Cases requiring nasopharyngeal airway insertion were able to continue nasopharyngeal airway use for more than 1 year and a considerable number avoided tracheotomy. It may be worth considering an oropharyngeal-bypass nasopharyngeal airway before performing a tracheotomy. PMID:24820706

  2. Line Fluid Actuated Valve Development Program. [for application on the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a line-fluid actuated valve design for potential application as a propellant-control valve on the space shuttle was examined. Design and analysis studies of two prototype valve units were conducted and demonstrated performance is reported. It was shown that the line-fluid actuated valve concept offers distinct weight and electrical advantages over alternate valve concepts. Summaries of projected performance and design goals are also included.

  3. Airway inflammation and IgE production induced by dust mite allergen-specific memory/effector Th2 cell line can be effectively attenuated by IL-35.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Hui; Loo, Evelyn Xiu-Ling; Kuo, I-Chun; Soh, Gim Hooi; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Lee, Bee Wah; Chua, Kaw Yan

    2011-07-01

    CD4(+) memory/effector T cells play a central role in orchestrating the rapid and robust immune responses upon re-encounter with specific Ags. However, the immunologic mechanism(s) underlying these responses are still not fully understood. To investigate this, we generated an allergen (major house dust mite allergen, Blo t 5)-specific murine Th2 cell line that secreted IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13, but not IL-9 or TNF-α, upon activation by the cognate Ag. These cells also exhibited CD44(high)CD62L(-) and CD127(+) (IL-7Rα(+)) phenotypes, which are characteristics of memory/effector T cells. Experiments involving adoptive transfer of this Th2 cell line in mice, followed by three intranasal challenges with Blo t 5, induced a dexamethasone-sensitive eosinophilic airway inflammation. This was accompanied by elevation of Th2 cytokines and CC- and CXC-motif chemokines, as well as recruitment of lymphocytes and polymorphic mononuclear cells into the lungs. Moreover, Blo t 5-specific IgE was detected 4 d after the last intranasal challenge, whereas elevation of Blo t 5-specific IgG1 was found at week two. Finally, pulmonary delivery of the pVAX-IL-35 DNA construct effectively downregulated Blo t 5-specific allergic airway inflammation, and i.m. injection of pVAX-IL-35 led to long-lasting suppression of circulating Blo t 5-specific and total IgE. This model provides a robust research tool to elucidate the immunopathogenic role of memory/effector Th2 cells in allergic airway inflammation. Our results suggested that IL-35 could be a potential therapeutic target for allergic asthma through its attenuating effects on allergen-specific CD4(+) memory/effector Th2 cell-mediated airway inflammation.

  4. Evaluation and comparison of nasal airway flow patterns among three subjects from Caucasian, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups using computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian Hua; Lee, Heow Pueh; Lim, Kian Meng; Lee, Shu Jin; Wang, De Yun

    2011-01-31

    Nasal airflow is one of the most important determinants for nasal physiology. During the long evolution of human beings, different races have developed their own attributes of nasal morphologies which result in variations of nasal airflow patterns and nasal functions. This study evaluated and compared the effects of differences of nasal morphology among three healthy male subjects from Caucasian, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups on nasal airflow patterns using computational fluid dynamics simulation. By examining the anterior nasal airway, the nasal indices and the nostril shapes of the three subjects were found to be similar to nasal cavities of respective ethnic groups. Computed tomography images of these three subjects were obtained to reconstruct 3-dimensional models of nasal cavities. To retain the flow characteristics around the nasal vestibules, a 40 mm-radius semi sphere was assembled around the human face for the prescription of zero ambient gauge pressure. The results show that more airflow tends to pass through the middle passage of the nasal airway in the Caucasian model, and through the inferior portion in the Indian model. The Indian model was found with extremely low flow flux flowing through the olfactory region. The sizes of vortexes near the anterior cavity were found to be correlated with the angles between the upper nasal valve wall and the anterior head of the nasal cavity. PMID:20854936

  5. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  6. Prostasin, a membrane-anchored serine peptidase, regulates sodium currents in JME/CF15 cells, a cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhenyue; Illek, Beate; Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Verghese, George M; Caughey, George H

    2004-11-01

    Prostasin is a tryptic peptidase expressed in prostate, kidney, lung, and airway. Mammalian prostasins are related to Xenopus channel-activating protease, which stimulates epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity in frogs. In human epithelia, prostasin is one of several membrane peptidases proposed to regulate ENaC. This study tests the hypothesis that prostasin can regulate ENaC in cystic fibrosis epithelia in which excessive Na+ uptake contributes to salt and water imbalance. We show that prostasin mRNA and protein are strongly expressed by human airway epithelial cell lines, including immortalized JME/CF15 nasal epithelial cells homozygous for the DeltaF508 cystic fibrosis mutation. Epithelial cells transfected with vectors encoding recombinant soluble prostasin secrete active, tryptic peptidase that is highly sensitive to inactivation by aprotinin. When studied as monolayers in Ussing chambers, JME/CF15 cells exhibit amiloride-sensitive, transepithelial Na+ currents that are markedly diminished by aprotinin, suggesting regulation by serine-class peptidases. Overproduction of membrane-anchored prostasin in transfected JME/CF15 cells does not augment Na+ currents, and trypsin-induced increases are small, suggesting that baseline serine peptidase-dependent ENaC activation is maximal in these cells. To probe prostasin's involvement in basal ENaC activity, we silenced expression of prostasin using short interfering RNA targeting of prostasin mRNA's 3'-untranslated region. This drops ENaC currents to 26 +/- 9% of baseline. These data predict that prostasin is a major regulator of ENaC-mediated Na+ current in DeltaF508 cystic fibrosis epithelia and suggest that airway prostasin is a target for therapeutic inhibition to normalize ion current in cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:15246975

  7. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  8. INCORPORATION OF LABELED NITRIC OXIDE INTO RESPIRATORY TRACT LINING FLUIDS AND BLOOD PLASMA DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incorporation of labeled nitric oxide (N18O) into respiratory tract lining fluids and blood plasma during lung inflammation. Slade, R., Norwood, J., Crissman, K., McKee, J., Hatch, G. PTB, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Res. Tri. Pk., NC

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated t...

  9. Effects of sulfuric acid mist inhalation on mucous clearance and on airway fluids of rats and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Henderson, R.F.; Gray, R.H.; Carpenter, R.L.; Hahn, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    The responses of guinea pigs and rats to inhaled sulfuric acid aerosols were compared to define species differences and to determine the small-animal model most relevant to human exposures. Rats were exposed for 6 hr to 1, 10, and 100 mg H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//m/sup 3/. Guinea pigs were exposed for 6 h to 1, 10, and 27 mg H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//m/sup 3/. Tracheal mucous clearance of guinea pigs was slowed 1 d after exposures to 1 mg H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//m/sup 3/. A tendency toward faster clearance was observed at high concentrations of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ for both guinea pigs and rats (statistically significant only for the rats). The speeding of mucous clearance was correlated with increases in airway sialic acid and also with the appearance of excess tracheal secretions, detected using scanning electron microscopy in both rats and guinea pigs. The responses of guinea pigs to sulfuric acid exposures were more similar to those reported for humans than were those of rats.

  10. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  11. Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. ); Wright, E.K. )

    1992-06-01

    The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

  12. Using Nonlinearity and Contact Lines to Control Fluid Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlin, M.; Schultz, W. W.; Bian, X.; Agarwal, M.

    2002-01-01

    Slug flows in a tube are affected by surface tension and contact lines, especially under microgravity. Numerical analyses and experiments are conducted of slug flows in small-diameter tubes with horizontal, inclined and vertical orientations. A PID-controlled, meter-long platform capable of following specified motions is used. An improved understanding of the contact line boundary condition for steady and unsteady contact-line motion is expected. Lastly, a direct fluid-handling method using nonlinear oscillatory motion of a tube is presented.

  13. Flow boundary conditions for fluid mixtures at solid walls and moving contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2005-11-01

    Molecular simulations of slip at solid surfaces have focused on single component systems, but polymers are frequently blended to optimize performance. This talk will examine counterintuitive behavior that can arise when binary fluid mixtures flow past stationary solid walls in simple shear and at moving contact lines. In general the velocities of the two species do not go to zero at the walls. In addition to the slip found for single fluids, there may be velocity discontinuities due to diffusive fluxes and to interfacial forces when there is a concentration gradient.^1 Cases where the fluid velocity is largest near the wall and where the apparent slip length diverges will be shown, and a general boundary condition for multi-phase flow presented. The no-slip boundary condition leads to singular dissipation when the contact line between a fluid interface and solid moves, but it was suggested that a diffusive flux could remove this singularity.^2 The flow and stress near moving contact lines are analyzed for a range of interfacial widths, velocities and interactions. A significant diffusive flux is only observed in the layer closest to the solid and is not sufficient to remove the singularity. Instead, the finite molecular size and non-Newtonian effects cutoff the singularity.1. C. Denniston and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 178302 (2001).2. H.-Y. Chen and D. Jasnow and J. Vinals, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1686 (2000).

  14. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of the effect of ventilation mode and tracheal tube position on air flow in the large airways.

    PubMed

    Lumb, A B; Burns, A D; Figueroa Rosette, J A; Gradzik, K B; Ingham, D B; Pourkashanian, M

    2015-05-01

    We have used computational fluid dynamic modelling to study the effects of tracheal tube size and position on regional gas flow in the large airways. Using a three-dimensional mathematical model, we simulated flow with and without a tracheal tube, replicating both physiological and artificial breathing. Ventilation through a tracheal tube increased proportional flow to the left lung from 39.5% with no tube to 43.1-47.2%, depending on tube position. Ventilation mode and tube distance from the carina had no effect on flow. Lateral displacement and deflection of the tube increased ventilation to the ipsilateral lung; for example, when deflected 10° to the left of centre, flow to the left lung increased from 43.8 to 53.7%. Because of the small diameter of a tracheal tube relative to the trachea, gas exits a tube at high velocity such that regional ventilation may be affected by changes in the position and angle of the tube. PMID:25581493

  15. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils.

  16. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils. PMID:17894540

  17. On motion of fluid in boundary layer near line of intersection of two planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L G; Bolshakov, V P

    1951-01-01

    In the paper "The Mutual Interference of Boundary Layers," the authors investigated the problem of the interference of two planes intersecting at right angles on the boundary layers formed by the motion of fluid along the line of intersection of these planes. In the present paper, the results of the preceding one are generalized to the case of planes intersecting at any angle. The motion of a fluid in an angle less than 180 degrees is discussed and the enlargement of the boundary layers near the line of intersection of the planes, the limits of the interference effects of the boundary layers, and the corrections on the drag are determined. All computations are conducted by the Karman-Pohlhausen method for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The results are reduced to tabulated form.

  18. No Vent Tank Fill and Transfer Line Chilldown Analysis by Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present the analytical capability developed to model no vent chill and fill of cryogenic tank to support CPST (Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer) program. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) was adapted to simulate charge-holdvent method of Tank Chilldown. GFSSP models were developed to simulate chilldown of LH2 tank in K-site Test Facility and numerical predictions were compared with test data. The report also describes the modeling technique of simulating the chilldown of a cryogenic transfer line and GFSSP models were developed to simulate the chilldown of a long transfer line and compared with test data.

  19. Modeling dynamically coupled fluid-duct systems with finite line elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, J. B.

    1994-02-01

    Structural analysis of piping systems, especially dynamic analysis, typically considers the duct structure and the contained fluid column separately. Coupling of these two systems, however, forms a new dynamic system with characteristics not necessarily described by the superposition of the two component system's characteristics. Methods for modeling the two coupled components simultaneously using finite line elements are presented. Techniques for general duct intersections, area or direction changes, long radius bends, hydraulic losses, and hydraulic impedances are discussed. An example problem and results involving time transients are presented. Additionally, a program to enhance post-processing of line element models is discussed.

  20. Clinical applications of image-based airway computational fluid dynamics: assessment of inhalation medication and endobronchial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, Jan W.; Vos, Wim G.; Germonpré, Paul; Salgado, Rodrigo; Parizel, Paul M.; De Backer, Wilfried

    2009-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a technique that is used increasingly in the biomedical field. Solving the flow equations numerically provides a convenient way to assess the efficiency of therapies and devices, ranging from cardiovascular stents and heart valves to hemodialysis workflows. Also in the respiratory field CFD has gained increasing interest, especially through the combination of three dimensional image reconstruction which results in highend patient-specific models. This paper provides an overview of clinical applications of CFD through image based modeling, resulting from recent studies performed in our center. We focused on two applications: assessment of the efficiency of inhalation medication and analysis of endobronchial valve placement. In the first application we assessed the mode of action of a novel bronchodilator in 10 treated patients and 4 controls. We assessed the local volume increase and resistance change based on the combination of imaging and CFD. We found a good correlation between the changes in volume and resistance coming from the CFD results and the clinical tests. In the second application we assessed the placement and effect of one way endobronchial valves on respiratory function in 6 patients. We found a strong patientspecific result of the therapy where in some patients the therapy resulted in complete atelectasis of the target lobe while in others the lobe remained inflated. We concluded from these applications that CFD can provide a better insight into clinically relevant therapies.

  1. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  2. Tear Film Mucins: Front Line Defenders of the Ocular Surface; Comparison with Airway and Gastrointestinal Tract Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The ocular surface including the cornea and conjunctiva and its overlying tear film are the first tissues of the eye to interact with the external environment. The tear film is complex containing multiple layers secreted by different glands and tissues. Each layer contains specific molecules and proteins that not only maintain the health of the cells on the ocular surface by providing nourishment and removal of waste products but also protect these cells from environment. A major protective mechanism that the corneal and conjunctival cells have developed is secretion of the innermost layer of the tear film, the mucous layer. Both the cornea and conjunctiva express membrane spanning mucins, whereas the conjunctiva also produces soluble mucins. The mucins present in the tear film serve to maintain the hydration of the ocular surface and to provide lubrication and anti-adhesive properties between the cells of the ocular surface and conjunctiva during the blink. A third function is to contribute to the epithelial barrier to prevent pathogens from binding to the ocular surface. This review will focus on the different types of mucins produced by the corneal and conjunctival epithelia. Also included in this review will be a presentation of the structure of mucins, regulation of mucin production, role of mucins in ocular surface diseases, and the differences in mucin production by the ocular surface, airways and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23954166

  3. NOX2 (gp91phox) is a predominant O2 sensor in a human airway chemoreceptor cell line: biochemical, molecular, and electrophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Josef; Pan, Jie; Yeger, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), composed of clusters of amine [serotonin (5-HT)] and peptide-producing cells, are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of human and animal lungs. NEBs are thought to function as airway O2-sensors, since they are extensively innervated and release 5-HT upon hypoxia exposure. The small cell lung carcinoma cell line (H146) provides a useful model for native NEBs, since they contain (and secrete) 5-HT and share the expression of a membrane-delimited O2 sensor [classical NADPH oxidase (NOX2) coupled to an O2-sensitive K+ channel]. In addition, both native NEBs and H146 cells express different NADPH oxidase homologs (NOX1, NOX4) and its subunits together with a variety of O2-sensitive voltage-dependent K+ channel proteins (Kv) and tandem pore acid-sensing K+ channels (TASK). Here we used H146 cells to investigate the role and interactions of various NADPH oxidase components in O2-sensing using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis (quantum dot labeling), and electrophysiology (patchclamp, amperometry) methods. Coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated formation of molecular complexes between NOX2 and Kv3.3 and Kv4.3 ion channels but not with TASK1 ion channels, while NOX4 associated with TASK1 but not with Kv channel proteins. Downregulation of mRNA for NOX2, but not for NOX4, suppressed hypoxia-sensitive outward current and significantly reduced hypoxia -induced 5-HT release. Collectively, our studies suggest that NOX2/Kv complexes are the predominant O2 sensor in H146 cells and, by inference, in native NEBs. Present findings favor a NEB cell-specific plasma membrane model of O2-sensing and suggest that unique NOX/K+ channel combinations may serve diverse physiological functions. PMID:22865553

  4. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an intravenous line and fluid bottle fixation design.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Piao-Yi; Chien, Chih-Yin; Shiu, Ting-Ru; Lin, Pei-Jiun; Lin, Wan-Yu; Jiang, Yi-Rung

    2015-01-01

    It's important to improve the stability of intravenous (IV) lines and bottles during patient activity and nursing care. We developed an intravenous line and fluid bottle fixation design (ILFBFD) which includes a bottle retaining clip and line fixation kit. We randomly assigned 60 participants each to the experimental and control groups. Participants were asked to push an IV stand without and with ILFBFD 11 meters on uneven pavement and a sloping floor. The distance the IV bottle moved was recorded. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect the opinions of the participants. Use of ILFBFD, resulted in less movement in the anteroposterior and left/right directions (differences of 46.98 cm2, t= 12.80, p < 0.000 and 39.24 cm2, t= 8.01, p< 0.000, respectively) compared with not using ILFBFD. The average scores for bottle movement when participants walked on a flat floor, uneven pavement and sloping floor, IV line tangling and dropping, and organization of Liv lines were significantly better in those using than not using ILFBFD. The results can be used in clinical practice to reduce knotting of IV lines, and to enhance the safety and quality of patient care. PMID:26409547

  5. ENaC inhibitors and airway re-hydration in cystic fibrosis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Althaus, Mike

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the chloride channel "cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator" (CFTR). The lack of functional CFTR in CF airways leads to impaired ion and fluid homeostasis of the fluid layer which lines the airway surfaces (ASL). The ASL is important for proper ciliary beat and clearance of mucus from the airways. According to the "low volume hypothesis", CF airway epithelia hyperabsorb sodium via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Although the contribution of ENaC to CF pathogenesis is still under debate, there is convincing data demonstrating that re-hydration of the ASL might improve mucociliary clearance in CF patients. ASL re-hydration might, amongst other things, be achieved by a block of airway transepithelial sodium absorption with inhibitors of ENaC. This mini-review article describes the role of ENaC in ASL fluid homeostasis and rehydration, and summarizes the current state of the art in the discovery and establishment of compounds which inhibit ENaC activity and may represent pharmacological tools for the treatment of CF. PMID:23547930

  6. Equivalent Liénard-type models for a fluid transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Lizeth; Aguiñaga, Jorge Alejandro Delgado; Besançon, Gildas; Verde, Cristina; Begovich, Ofelia

    2016-08-01

    The main contribution of this paper is the derivation of spatiotemporal Liénard-type models for expressing the dynamical behavior of a fluid transmission line. The derivation is carried out from a quasilinear hyperbolic system made of a momentum equation and a continuity one. An advantage of these types of models is that they are suitable for formulating estimation algorithms. This claim is confirmed in the present paper for the case of fluid dynamics, since the article presents the conception and evaluation of a Liénard model-based observer that estimates the parameters of a pipeline such as the friction factor, the equivalent length and the wave speed. To show the potentiality of the approach, results based on some simulation and experimental tests are presented. xml:lang="fr"

  7. Advantages and disadvantages of straight-lined and nonstraight-lined organizations at the airway facilities training division of the Federal Aviation Administration Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Jessie L.

    Scope and method of study. This study describes the advantages and the disadvantages of straight-lined and nonstraight-lined organizations at the MMAC FAA Academy. The primary focus will be on the AF division within the FAA Academy. This study will assist in making sound decisions about which structure is better at the present time. Others who read this research will gain an awareness of advantages and disadvantages of each structure. The reason for focusing primarily on individuals from the FAA is because of their experience in straight-line and nonstraight-line organizations. Data were collected during the study and analyzed to determine what the majority of the candidates thought about the structure. Findings and conclusions. Many of the respondents believe the FAA Academy AF Division should be straight-lined to the AFZ organization in Headquarters. Most of the respondents still see the FAA organization as a closed-type structure with a top-down management style. Another important outcome of the findings was many of the respondents believed, regardless of the structure, employees should be empowered more and allowed to participate in the decision-making process. Based on the findings some of the advantages of straight-lined organizations were: it brings the parent organization in and gives them a first hand view of its operations, there is no middle person involved, and there is a direct line to parent organization. The disadvantages of straight-lined organizations based on the findings were: there is no middle management to speak to headquarters as an intermediator on training issues/concerns, it requires more resources and funding that may not be forthcoming, and it compels a parent organization to acquire more resources to handle its own business.

  8. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Marion; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders H; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype-envirotype interactions for other diseases.

  9. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T.; Lund, Anders H.; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype – envirotype interactions for other diseases. PMID:26263558

  10. Correlation of Zeno (Z = 1) line for supercritical fluids with vapor-liquid rectilinear diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Amotz, D.; Herschbach, D.R.

    1996-08-01

    For a wide range of substances, extending well beyond the regime of corresponding states behavior, the contour in the temperature-density plane along which the compressibility factor Z = P/{rho}kT is the same as for an ideal gas is nearly linear. This Z = 1 contour, termed the Zeno line, begins deep in the liquid region and ascends as the density decreases to the Boyle point of the supercritical fluid, specified by the temperature T{sub B} for which (dZ/d{rho}){sub T} = 0 as {rho} {r_arrow} 0; equivalent, at T{sub B} the second virial coefficient vanishes. The slope of the Z = 1 line is {minus}B{sub 3}/(dB{sub 2}/dT), in terms of the third virial coefficient and the derivative of the second, evaluated at T{sub B}. Previous work has examined the Zeno line as a means to extend corresponding states and to enhance other practical approximations. Here the authors call attention to another striking aspect, a strong correlation with the line of rectilinear diameters defined by the average of the subcritical vapor and liquid densities. This correlation is obeyed well by empirical data for many substances and computer simulations for a Lennard-jones potential; the ratios of the intercepts and slopes for the Zeno and rectilinear diameter liens are remarkably close to those predicted by the van der Waals equation, 8/9 and 16/9, respectively. Properties of the slightly imperfect fluid far above the critical point thus implicitly determine the diameter of the vapor-liquid coexistence curve below the critical point.

  11. Newborn pig trachea cell line cultured in air-liquid interface conditions allows a partial in vitro representation of the porcine upper airway tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is an excellent animal model to study human microbial diseases due to its similarity to humans in terms of anatomy, physiology, and genetics. We assessed the suitability of an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system for newborn pig trachea (NPTr) cells as a practical tool for analyzing the immune response of respiratory epithelial cells to aggressors. This cell line offers a wide microbial susceptibility spectrum to both viruses and bacteria. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and characterize diverse aspects of cell differentiation using different culture media. After the NPTr cells reached confluence, the apical medium was removed and the cells were fed by medium from the basal side. Results We assessed the cellular layer’s capacity to polarize and differentiate in ALI conditions. Using immunofluorescence and electronic microscopy we evaluated the presence of goblet and ciliated cells, the epithelial junction organization, and the transepithelial electrical resistance. We found that the cellular layer develops a variable density of mucus producing cells and acquires a transepithelial resistance. We also identified increased development of cellular junctions over the culture period. Finally, we observed variable expression of transcripts associated to proteins such as keratin 8, mucins (MUC1, MUC2, and MUC4), occludin, and villin 1. Conclusions The culture of NPTr cells in ALI conditions allows a partial in vitro representation of porcine upper airway tissue that could be used to investigate some aspects of host/respiratory pathogen interactions. PMID:24885012

  12. An approximate analytic solution for the radiation from a line-driven fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diperna, Daniel T.; Feit, David

    2001-12-01

    In the analysis of a fluid loaded line-driven plate, the fields in the structure and the fluid are often expressed in terms of a Fourier transform. Once the boundary conditions are matched, the structural displacement can be expressed as an inverse transform, which can be evaluated using contour integration. The result is then a sum of propagating or decaying waves, each arising from poles in the complex plane, plus a branch cut integral. The branch cut is due to a square root in the transform of the acoustic impedance. The complex layer analysis (CLA) used here eliminates the branch cut singularity by approximating the square root with a rational function, causing the characteristic equation to become a polynomial in the transform variable. An approximate analytic solution to the characteristic equation is then found using a perturbation method. The result is four poles corresponding to the roots of the in vacuo plate, modified by the presence of the fluid, plus an infinity of poles located along the branch cut of the acoustic impedance. The solution is then found analytically using contour integration, with the integrand containing only simple poles.

  13. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  14. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Internal Physiological Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a selective review of recent progress in the analysis of several physiological and physiologically inspired fluid-structure interaction problems, our aim being to explain the underlying physical mechanisms that cause the observed behaviors. Specifically, we discuss recent studies of self-excited oscillations in collapsible tubes, focusing primarily on studies of an idealized model system, the Starling resistor -- a device used in most laboratory experiments. We next review studies of a particular physiological, flow-induced oscillation: vocal-fold oscillations during phonation. Finally, we discuss the closure and reopening of pulmonary airways, physiological fluid-structure interaction problems that also involve the airways' liquid lining.

  15. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  16. A Finite Element Method for Free-Surface Flows of Incompressible Fluids in Three Dimensions, Part II: Dynamic Wetting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.A.; Cairncross, R.A.; Rao, R.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Schunk, P.R.

    1999-01-29

    To date, few researchers have solved three-dimensional free-surface problems with dynamic wetting lines. This paper extends the free-surface finite element method described in a companion paper [Cairncross, R.A., P.R. Schunk, T.A. Baer, P.A. Sackinger, R.R. Rao, "A finite element method for free surface flows of incompressible fluid in three dimensions, Part I: Boundary-Fitted mesh motion.", to be published (1998)] to handle dynamic wetting. A generalization of the technique used in two dimensional modeling to circumvent double-valued velocities at the wetting line, the so-called kinematic paradox, is presented for a wetting line in three dimensions. This approach requires the fluid velocity normal to the contact line to be zero, the fluid velocity tangent to the contact line to be equal to the tangential component of web velocity, and the fluid velocity into the web to be zero. In addition, slip is allowed in a narrow strip along the substrate surface near the dynamic contact line. For realistic wetting-line motion, a contact angle which varies with wetting speed is required because contact lines in three dimensions typically advance or recede a different rates depending upon location and/or have both advancing and receding portions. The theory is applied to capillary rise of static fluid in a corner, the initial motion of a Newtonian droplet down an inclined plane, and extrusion of a Newtonian fluid from a nozzle onto a moving substrate. The extrusion results are compared to experimental visualization. Subject Categories

  17. The effects of an epithelial barrier protective cationic aerosol on allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nair, P; Denis, S; Cancelliere, L; Radford, K; Efthimiadis, A; Rosano, M; Hanrahan, J

    2014-09-01

    Inhaled cationic airway lining modulator (iCALM) is a cationic aerosol therapy comprised of 1.29% calcium chloride dissolved in 0.9% isotonic saline that enhances the biophysical barrier function of the airway lining fluid and primes the host defense response. It's ability to attenuate bronchitis caused by inhaled particles was investigated using an allergen-inhalation model in a proof-of-concept study. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial of 6 mild atopic steroid-naïve asthmatic subjects, 3 doses of iCALM were well tolerated and they attenuated allergen-induced increase in sputum eosinophils, and levels of IL-5, MCP-1 and eotaxin. This study provides an opportunity to investigate the role of enhancing epithelial barrier to decrease airway inflammation provoked by inhaled particles in a variety of airway diseases.

  18. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  19. Path-integral and Ornstein-Zernike study of quantum fluid structures on the crystallization line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesé, Luis M.

    2016-03-01

    Liquid neon, liquid para-hydrogen, and the quantum hard-sphere fluid are studied with path integral Monte Carlo simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike pair equation on their respective crystallization lines. The results cover the whole sets of structures in the r-space and the k-space and, for completeness, the internal energies, pressures and isothermal compressibilities. Comparison with experiment is made wherever possible, and the possibilities of establishing k-space criteria for quantum crystallization based on the path-integral centroids are discussed. In this regard, the results show that the centroid structure factor contains two significant parameters related to its main peak features (amplitude and shape) that can be useful to characterize freezing.

  20. Path-integral and Ornstein-Zernike study of quantum fluid structures on the crystallization line.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M

    2016-03-01

    Liquid neon, liquid para-hydrogen, and the quantum hard-sphere fluid are studied with path integral Monte Carlo simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike pair equation on their respective crystallization lines. The results cover the whole sets of structures in the r-space and the k-space and, for completeness, the internal energies, pressures and isothermal compressibilities. Comparison with experiment is made wherever possible, and the possibilities of establishing k-space criteria for quantum crystallization based on the path-integral centroids are discussed. In this regard, the results show that the centroid structure factor contains two significant parameters related to its main peak features (amplitude and shape) that can be useful to characterize freezing. PMID:26957169

  1. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  2. Imaging coexisting fluid domains in biomembrane models coupling curvature and line tension.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Tobias; Hess, Samuel T; Webb, Watt W

    2003-10-23

    Lipid bilayer membranes--ubiquitous in biological systems and closely associated with cell function--exhibit rich shape-transition behaviour, including bud formation and vesicle fission. Membranes formed from multiple lipid components can laterally separate into coexisting liquid phases, or domains, with distinct compositions. This process, which may resemble raft formation in cell membranes, has been directly observed in giant unilamellar vesicles. Detailed theoretical frameworks link the elasticity of domains and their boundary properties to the shape adopted by membranes and the formation of particular domain patterns, but it has been difficult to experimentally probe and validate these theories. Here we show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging using two dyes preferentially labelling different fluid phases directly provides a correlation between domain composition and local membrane curvature. Using freely suspended membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles, we are able to optically resolve curvature and line tension interactions of circular, stripe and ring domains. We observe long-range domain ordering in the form of locally parallel stripes and hexagonal arrays of circular domains, curvature-dependent domain sorting, and membrane fission into separate vesicles at domain boundaries. By analysing our observations using available membrane theory, we are able to provide experimental estimates of boundary tension between fluid bilayer domains. PMID:14574408

  3. Influence of in line monitored fluid bed granulation process parameters on the stability of Ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2015-12-30

    Ethinylestradiol (EE) as a highly active and low dosed compound is prone to oxidative degradation. The stability of the drug substance is therefore a critical parameter that has to be considered during drug formulation. Beside the stability of the drug substance, granule particle size and moisture are critical quality attributes (CQA) of the fluid bed granulation process which influence the tableting ability of the resulting granules. Both CQA should therefore be monitored during the production process by process analytic technology (PAT) according to ICH Q8. This work focusses on the effects of drying conditions on the stability of EE in a fluid-bed granulation process. We quantified EE degradation products 6-alpha-hydroxy-EE, 6-beta-hydroxy-EE, 9(11)-dehydro-EE and 6-oxo-EE during long time storage and accelerated conditions. PAT-tools that monitor granule particle size (Spatial filtering technology) and granule moisture (Microwave resonance technology) were applied and compared with off-line methods. We found a relevant influence of residual granule moisture and thermic stress applied during granulation on the storage stability of EE, whereas no degradation was found immediately after processing. Hence we conclude that drying parameters have a relevant influence on long term EE stability.

  4. Colonization of CF patients' upper airways with S. aureus contributes more decisively to upper airway inflammation than P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Janhsen, Wibke Katharina; Arnold, Christin; Hentschel, Julia; Lehmann, Thomas; Pfister, Wolfgang; Baier, Michael; Böer, Klas; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Mainz, Jochen Georg

    2016-10-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients' airways, inflammatory processes decisively contribute to remodeling and pulmonary destruction. The aims of this study were to compare upper airway (UAW) inflammation in the context of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in a longitudinal setting, and to examine further factors influencing UAW inflammation. Therefore, we analyzed soluble inflammatory mediators in noninvasively obtained nasal lavage (NL) of CF patients together with microbiology, medication, and relevant clinical parameters. NL, applying 10 mL of isotonic saline per nostril, was serially performed in 74 CF patients (326 samples). Concentrations of the inflammatory mediators' interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and its anti-protease TIMP-1 were quantified by bead-based multiplexed assay, neutrophil elastase (NE) via ELISA. Culture-based microbiology of the upper and lower airways (LAW), as well as serological and clinical findings, were compiled. Our results indicate that UAW colonization with S. aureus significantly impacts the concentration of all measured inflammatory mediators in NL fluid except TIMP-1, whereas these effects were not significant for P. aeruginosa. Patients with S. aureus colonization of both the UAW and LAW showed significantly increased concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP-9, and slightly elevated concentrations of NE in NL fluid compared to non-colonized patients. This work elaborates a survey on S. aureus' virulence factors that may contribute to this underestimated pathology. Serial assessment of epithelial lining fluid by NL reveals that colonization of the UAW with S. aureus contributes more to CF airway inflammatory processes than hitherto expected. PMID:27377929

  5. Line shape in a free-jet hypersonic expansion investigated by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suas-David, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Benidar, Abdessamad; Kassi, Samir; Georges, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Experiments are carried out for spectroscopic studies using hypersonic jet of carbon monoxide seeded in argon as a carrier gas. Probing of this jet using cavity ring-down spectroscopy revealed a double peak structure for various absorption lines. Flow field simulation using computational fluid dynamics is used to understand the shape of such lines integrated over line of sight. Absorption contribution from warmer non-isentropic part of the jet, owing to its transverse velocity variation, is found responsible for those line shapes.

  6. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  7. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  8. Possibility of modification of the Rayleigh line in a nonequilibrium fluid with a constant shear velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Debendranath; Sood, A. K.

    1984-11-01

    We show that the recent prediction of the García-Colín and Velasco

    [Phys. Rev. A 26 2187 (1982)]
    regarding the modification of the Rayleigh line, in the scattering of light from a fluid kept under a constant shear veloity gradient, is incorrect. A correct application of fluctuating hydrodynamics is shown to predict no such change.

  9. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  10. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:27334278

  11. Liquid Therapy Delivery Models Using Microfluidic Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Waisman, Dan; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2013-11-01

    The propagation and break-up of viscous and surfactant-laden liquid plugs in the lungs is an active area of research in view of liquid plug installation in the lungs to treat a host of different pulmonary conditions. This includes Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome (IRDS) the primary cause of neonatal death and disability. Until present, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to low-viscosity Newtonian fluids along a single bifurcation. However, these fluids reflect poorly the actual liquid medication therapies used to treat pulmonary conditions. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of liquid plugs in the airway tree using microfluidic models spanning three or more generations of the bronchiole tree. Our approach allows the dynamics of plug propagation and break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one scale in vitro model, as a function of fluid rheology, trailing film dynamics and bronchial tree geometry. Understanding these dynamics are a first and necessary step to deliver more effectively boluses of liquid medication to the lungs while minimizing the injury caused to epithelial cells lining the lungs from the rupture of such liquid plugs.

  12. LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of clarithromycin, rifampicin and their main metabolites in horse plasma, epithelial lining fluid and broncho-alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Stefan; Peters, Jette; Venner, Monica; Siegmund, Werner

    2011-04-28

    Clarithromycin (CLA) is a well established macrolide antibiotic which is frequently used in therapy of airway diseases in foals. It is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 resulting in the antimicrobial active metabolite 14-hydroxyclarithromycin (OH-CLA). Rifampicin (RIF) is often comedicated to prevent resistance and augment therapy. RIF is a known inducer for metabolizing enzymes and transporter proteins. Therefore, comedication might bare the risks of pharmacokinetic drug interactions which were investigated in a clinical trial. As no adequate method to determine CLA, RIF and their main metabolites OH-CLA and 25-O-desacetylrifampicin (DAc-RIF) were described so far, we developed a selective and sensitive assay to measure concentrations of all four substances simultaneously in plasma, epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and broncho-alveolar cells (BAC) of foals. Drugs were measured after extraction with methyl tert-butyl ether using roxithromycin as internal standard and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for detection. The chromatography was done isocratically using 25mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 4)/acetonitrile (45%/55%, flow rate 200μl/min). The MS/MS analysis was performed in the positive ion mode (m/z transitions: CLA, 748.5-590.1; OH-CLA, 764.1-606.1; RIF, 823.1-791.2; DAc-RIF, 781.1-749.1 and 837.3-679.2 for the internal standard). The method was validated according to selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effects and stability. The validation ranges for all substances were 2.5-25 for the low and 25-250ng/ml for the high validation range. The described assay was shown to be valid and successfully applied to measure disposition of CLA, OH-CLA, RIF and DAc-RIF in plasma, ELF and BAC of foals in a clinical trial.

  13. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  14. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  15. On-line fast response device and method for measuring dissolved gas in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder Kumar

    2011-01-11

    A method and device for the measurement of dissolved gas within a fluid. The fluid, substantially a liquid, is pumped into a pipe. The flow of the fluid is temporally restricted, creating one or more low pressure regions. A measurement indicative of trapped air is taken before and after the restriction. The amount of dissolved air is calculated from the difference between the first and second measurements. Preferably measurements indicative of trapped air is obtained from one or more pressure transducers, capacitance transducers, or combinations thereof. In the alternative, other methods such as those utilizing x-rays or gamma rays may also be used to detect trapped air. Preferably, the fluid is a hydraulic fluid, whereby dissolved air in the fluid is detected.

  16. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us to simultaneously measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the on-line water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δD reliability. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δD and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed into a copper tube, attached to the line and after system stabilisation is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain δD and δ18O isotopic composition of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5‰ for δD and 0.4‰ for δ18O for water measurement for an extended range (-210 to 0‰ for δD and -27 to 0‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique.

  17. Development of Nozzle System for Oil-on-Water Droplet Metalworking Fluid and Its Application to Practical Production Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Itoigawa, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Niwa, Kosaburo

    A new nozzle system which consists of a discharge nozzle and supply equipment has developed for environmental friendly metalworking fluid, called oil-on-water droplet metalworking fluid. This system provides excellent cutting performances in terms of roughness on finished surfaces, burr dimensions and cutting force in both aluminum alloy and stainless steel milling. As its application to practical use, the system has been employed for grooving process in the production line of engine main bearings which was conventionally machined under dry condition. It has been shown that the developed system can improved the machining performances in terms of machining error and tool life. The improvement for the machining error leads to significant reduction in the rejection of defective parts in the production line and more than twofold increase in tool life is obtained.

  18. Gaining fluid bed process understanding by in-line particle size analysis.

    PubMed

    Närvänen, Tero; Lipsanen, Tanja; Antikainen, Osmo; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-03-01

    Different process phenomena and process failure modes could be monitored using the in-line particle size data measured by spatial filtering technique (SFT). In addition to the real-time granule growth monitoring, other events, such as the blocking of filter bags and the distributor plate, could be observed. SFT was used off-line, at-line and in-line in 14 differently manufactured granulation batches. No significant fouling occurred during the manufacturing due to the appropriate positioning of the probe. The off-line SFT results correlated well (R(2) = 0.97) with the sieve analysis results. It was also found that size segregation influenced both the in-line and at-line particle size results during the fluidization: in-line method underestimated and at-line method overestimated the final particle size.

  19. In-line monitoring of particle size in a fluid bed granulator: investigations concerning positioning and configuration of the sensor.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2014-05-15

    According to the ICH Q8 guideline, analytic technologies (PAT) are important tools for characterization and optimization of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Particle size as a critical quality attribute for granules is therefore an important parameter that should be monitored during the fluid bed granulation process. This work focusses on optimizing position and configuration of an SFT-sensor for the in-line measurement of particle size distribution in a Glatt GPCG 3 fluid bed granulator. As model-substances, different grades of microcrystalline cellulose were used. The in-line measured particle size and particle rate in the sensor were evaluated. A sensor position in the deceleration zone of the granulator was found to be promising for in-line particle size measurement. Most reliable data were generated in this position when the probe was placed in a distance of 11cm from the chamber wall to avoid bias by the inlet air stream. No major influence of rotation angle of the probe was found in this position. Furthermore, an entire fluid bed granulation process was successfully monitored with the sensor installed in the optimized setting.

  20. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... efforts to assist with breathing have failed. A hollow needle or tube can be inserted into the ...

  1. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  2. Liquid plug propagation in flexible microchannels: A small airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Fujioka, H.; Bian, S.; Torisawa, Y.; Huh, D.; Takayama, S.; Grotberg, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of wall flexibility on the plug propagation and the resulting wall stresses in small airway models with experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimentally, a flexible microchannel was fabricated to mimic the flexible small airways using soft lithography. Liquid plugs were generated and propagated through the microchannels. The local wall deformation is observed instantaneously during plug propagation with the maximum increasing with plug speed. The pressure drop across the plug is measured and observed to increase with plug speed, and is slightly smaller in a flexible channel compared to that in a rigid channel. A computational model is then presented to model the steady plug propagation through a flexible channel corresponding to the middle plane in the experimental device. The results show qualitative agreements with experiments on wall shapes and pressure drops and the discrepancies bring up interesting questions on current field of modeling. The flexible wall deforms inward near the plug core region, the deformation and pressure drop across the plug increase with the plug speed. The wall deformation and resulting stresses vary with different longitudinal tensions, i.e., for large wall longitudinal tension, the wall deforms slightly, which causes decreased fluid stress and stress gradients on the flexible wall comparing to that on rigid walls; however, the wall stress gradients are found to be much larger on highly deformable walls with small longitudinal tensions. Therefore, in diseases such as emphysema, with more deformable airways, there is a high possibility of induced injuries on lining cells along the airways because of larger wall stresses and stress gradients.

  3. Indirect on-line determination of Newtonian fluid viscosity based on numerical flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, C.; Dantan, Ph.; Flaud, P.

    2003-01-01

    A new indirect method of determining the viscosity of a Newtonian fluid flowing in a tube with a geometrical singularity is proposed. Due to this singularity, the shape of the dimensionless velocity profiles is closely correlated with the Reynolds number of the flow. Newtonian fluid flows were simulated numerically with various Reynolds numbers. Based on the results of these calculations, an abacus was plotted showing the relationship between the dimensionless velocity and the dimensionless viscosity. On the other hand, dimensionless velocities were also obtained by measuring velocity profiles on a hydrodynamic bench with an ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. These experimental values were plotted on the abacus and the viscosity of the actual fluid was thus determined. Comparisons were made with viscometer measurements in order to assess the accuracy of the method and its range of validity. This method is of great potential interest for application to industrial plans when it is necessary to know the viscosity of a fluid undergoing a transformation without interrupting the process by taking fluid samples.

  4. Active degassing of mantle-derived fluid: A geochemical study along the Vulture line, southern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Martelli, M.; Nuccio, P. M.; Paternoster, M.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of a geochemical study of gas emissions along a NE-SW transect in southern Italy in order to test the hypothesis that the region around Monte Vulture is affected by degassing of mantle-derived fluids through a lithospheric discontinuity. We also investigated lavas from the Monte Vulture volcano displaying 3He/4He (up to ~ 6.0 Ra) and Sr isotopes that are consistent with an origin in mantle that has had minimal pollution from subducted Adriatic slab. Similar 3He/4He in fluids from around Mt. Vulture indicate that the deep volcanic system is still degassing. Mantle-derived He occurs in fluids along the length of the Vulture line, reinforcing the hypothesis that it is a deep tectonic discontinuity along which mantle fluids and/or melts advect to the surface. The CO2/3He ratios are highly variable (2.7 × 108-2.15 × 1011) in response to processes such as gas dissolution into aquifers, addition of crustal gases and degassing fractionation.

  5. The "limiting line" in mixed subsonic and supersonic flow of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Hsue-Shen

    1944-01-01

    It is well known that the vorticity for any fluid element is constant if the fluid is non-viscous and the change of state of the fluid is isentropic. When a solid body is placed in a uniform stream, the flow far ahead of the body is irrotational. Then if the flow is further assumed to be isentropic, the vorticity will be zero over the whole filed of flow. In other words, the flow is irrotational. For such flow over a solid body, it is shown by Theodorsen that the solid body experiences no resistance. If the fluid has a small viscosity, its effect will be limited in the boundary layer over the solid body and the body will have a drag due to the skin friction. This type of essentially isentropic irrotational flow is generally observed for a streamlined body placed in a uniform stream, if the velocity of the stream is kept below the so-called "critical speed." At the critical speed or rather at a certain value of the ratio of the velocity of the undisturbed flow and the corresponding velocity of sound, shock waves appear. This phenomenon is called the "compressibility bubble." Along a shock wave, the change of state of the fluid is no longer isentropic, although still adiabatic. This results in an increase in entropy of the fluid and generally introduces vorticity in an originally irrotational flow. The increase in entropy of the fluid is, of course, the consequence of changing part of the mechanical energy into heat energy. In other words, the part of fluid affected by the shock wave has a reduced mechanical energy. Therefore, with the appearance of shock waves, the wake of the streamline body is very much widened, and the drag increases drastically. Furthermore, the accompanying change in the pressure distribution over the body changes the aerodynamic moment acting on it and in the case of an airfoil decreases the lift force. All these consequences of the breakdown of isentropic irrotational flow are generally undesirable in applied aerodynamics. Its occurrence

  6. Antioxidant airway responses following experimental exposure to wood smoke in man

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biomass combustion contributes to the production of ambient particulate matter (PM) in rural environments as well as urban settings, but relatively little is known about the health effects of these emissions. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize airway responses in humans exposed to wood smoke PM under controlled conditions. Nineteen healthy volunteers were exposed to both wood smoke, at a particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration of 224 ± 22 μg/m3, and filtered air for three hours with intermittent exercise. The wood smoke was generated employing an experimental set-up with an adjustable wood pellet boiler system under incomplete combustion. Symptoms, lung function, and exhaled NO were measured over exposures, with bronchoscopy performed 24 h post-exposure for characterisation of airway inflammatory and antioxidant responses in airway lavages. Results Glutathione (GSH) concentrations were enhanced in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after wood smoke exposure vs. air (p = 0.025), together with an increase in upper airway symptoms. Neither lung function, exhaled NO nor systemic nor airway inflammatory parameters in BAL and bronchial mucosal biopsies were significantly affected. Conclusions Exposure of healthy subjects to wood smoke, derived from an experimental wood pellet boiler operating under incomplete combustion conditions with PM emissions dominated by organic matter, caused an increase in mucosal symptoms and GSH in the alveolar respiratory tract lining fluids but no acute airway inflammatory responses. We contend that this response reflects a mobilisation of GSH to the air-lung interface, consistent with a protective adaptation to the investigated wood smoke exposure. PMID:20727160

  7. M-line spectroscopy on mid-infrared Si photonic crystals for fluid sensing and chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Lavchiev, V M; Jakoby, B; Hedenig, U; Grille, Th; Kirkbride, J M R; Ritchie, G A D

    2016-01-11

    The presented work demonstrates the design and characterization of Si-based photonic crystal waveguides operating as an evanescent wave absorption sensor in the mid-IR range λ = 5-6 µm. The photonic crystal structure is fabricated in a Si slab upon a thin Si(3)N(4)/TEOS/Si(3)N(4) membrane. M-line spectroscopy is used to verify the presence of guided waves. Different fillings of the photonic crystal holes have been realized to avoid sample residuals in the holes and, at the same time, to obtain spectral tuning of the structures by modification of the refractive index contrast with the photonic background. The chip displays sensitivity to fluid droplets in two-prism experiments. The output signal is quantitatively related to the fluid's absorption coefficient thereby validating the experimental method. PMID:26832257

  8. Human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells cause an anti-cancer effect on breast cancer cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghafarzadeh, M; Eatemadi, A; Fakhravar, Z

    2016-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) have the ability to self-renew, and multipotent differentiation into three germ layer cells. We obtained 5 ml amniotic fluid from ten 16-20 week pregnant women undergoing amniocentesis. hAFSCs were isolated from all samples, co-cultured with T47D breast cancer cell line and characterized using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. After 3, 4 and 5 days, T47D and HSFCs viability were evaluated with MTT assay. After 5 days of co-culture T47D cells viability were decreased. Our findings showed that hAFSCs can release soluble factors in cell culture, causing an efficient anticancer effect. PMID:27262812

  9. Interfacing supercritical fluid reaction apparatus with on-line liquid chromatography: monitoring the progress of a synthetic organic reaction performed in supercritical fluid solution.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Edward D; Li, Ben; Guo, Wei; Liu, Jing Y

    2015-04-01

    An interface has been developed that connects a supercritical fluid reaction (SFR) vessel directly on-line to a liquid chromatograph. The combined SFR-LC system has enabled the progress of the esterification reaction between phenol and benzoyl chloride to synthesize phenyl benzoate in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solution to be dynamically monitored. This was achieved by the periodic SFR-LC analysis of samples directly withdrawn from the esterification reaction mixture. Using the series of SFR-LC analysis results obtained for individual esterification reactions, the reaction progress profile for each esterification reaction was obtained by expressing the measured yield of phenyl benzoate as a function of reaction time. With reaction temperature fixed at 75°C, four sets (n=3) of SFR-LC reaction progress profiles were obtained at four different SFR pressures ranging from 13.79 to 27.58 MPa. The maximum SFR yield obtained for phenyl benzoate using a standard set of reactant concentrations was 85.2% (R.S.D. 4.2%) when the reaction was performed at 13.79 MPa for 90 min. In comparison, a phenyl benzoate yield of less than 0.3% was obtained using the same standard reactant concentrations after 90 min reaction time at 75°C using either: heptane, ethyl acetate or acetonitrile as conventional organic reaction solvents.

  10. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  11. The emergency airway.

    PubMed

    Goon, Serena S H; Stephens, Robert C M; Smith, Helen

    2009-12-01

    The 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario is a nightmare for all clinicians who manage airways. Cricothyroidotomy is one of several emergency airway management techniques. Cricothyroidotomy is a short-term solution which provides oxygenation, not ventilation, and is not a definitive airway. Although there are tests which can help predict whether an intubation will be difficult, they are not always good predictors. As the can't intubate, can't ventilate scenario is rare, cricothyroidotomy is an unfamiliar procedure to many. In this situation, expert help must be called for early on. In the meantime, it is vital that all other simple airway manoeuvres have been attempted, such as good positioning of the patient with head tilt and chin lift, and use of airway adjuncts like the oral (Guedel) airway or nasopharyngeal airway, and the laryngeal mask airway. However, if attempts to secure the airway are unsuccessful, there may be no other option than to perform a cricothyroidotomy. It is a difficult decision to make, but with increasing hypoxia, it is essential that one oxygenates the patient. Cricothyroidotomy provides an opening in the pace between the anterior inferior border of the thyroid cartilage and the anterior superior border of the cricoid cartilage, allowing access to the airway below the glottis. The anatomical considerations are important when performing this procedure (Ellis, 2009), and there are other scenarios when it is used. It is not without consequence, as with any procedure.

  12. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  13. Endogenous nitrogen oxides and bronchodilator S-nitrosothiols in human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, B; Reilly, J; Drazen, J M; Fackler, J; Ramdev, P; Arnelle, D; Mullins, M E; Sugarbaker, D J; Chee, C; Singel, D J

    1993-01-01

    Recent discoveries suggesting essential bioactivities of nitric oxide (NO.) in the lung are difficult to reconcile with the established pulmonary cytotoxicity of this common air pollutant. These conflicting observations suggest that metabolic intermediaries may exist in the lung to modulate the bioactivity and toxicity of NO.. We report that S-nitrosothiols (RS-NO), predominantly the adduct with glutathione, are present at nano- to micromolar concentrations in the airways of normal subjects and that their levels vary in different human pathophysiologic states. These endogenous RS-NO are long-lived, potent relaxants of human airways under physiological O2 concentrations. Moreover, RS-NO form in high concentrations upon administration of NO. gas. Nitrite (10-20 microM) is found in airway lining fluid in concentrations linearly proportional to leukocyte counts, suggestive of local NO. metabolism. NO. itself was not detected either free in solution or in complexes with transition metals. These observations may provide insight into the means by which NO. is packaged in biological systems to preserve its bioactivity and limit its potential O2-dependent toxicity and suggest an important role for NO. in regulation of airway luminal homeostasis. PMID:8248198

  14. Effects of hydroxymethanesulfonate on airway function in subjects with asthma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R.; Aris, R.M.; Christian, D.

    1989-06-30

    The organic ion hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMSA) has been measured in micro-molecular concentrations in acidic fogs in southern California. HMSA is a stable adduct in fogs with a pH range of 3-5, but it is likely to dissociate at pH 6.6, the pH of the human airways fluid lining. It was hypothesized that HMSA may have a specific bronchoconstrictor effect because HMSA may dissociate in the airway lumen generating SO{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}O, both of which have bronchoconstrictor potential. In order to determine whether HMSA has such an effect, a total of 19 subjects with mild to moderate asthma were studied in an exposure chamber in which freely breathing and exercising subjects inhaled simulated fogs containing HMSA at a concentration (1000 micro M) higher than the ambient levels for 1 hour. The results indicated no significant bronchoconstrictor effect for acute exposures of HMSA.

  15. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  16. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  17. The use of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells as the feeder layer to establish human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yung-Kwei; Huang, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Chiu-Hsiang; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Jen; Shaw, S W Steven

    2015-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells that have the potential to differentiate into the three germ layers and possibly all tissues of the human body. To fulfil the clinical potentials for cell-based therapy, banks of hESC lines that express different combinations of the major histocompatibility genes should be established, preferably without exposing such cells to animal cells and proteins. In this study, we tested human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) as feeder cells to support the growth of hESCs. Our results indicated that mitomycin-treated AFMSCs were able to support the newly established hESC lines CGLK-1 and CGLK-2. The hESC colonies cultured on AFMSCs expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-4, Nanog and Sox-2, which are markers for undifferentiated hESCs. Chromosomal analyses of both hESC lines, CGLK-1 and CGLK-2, which were cultured on AFMSC feeders for 22 and 14 passages, respectively, were confirmed to be normal karyotypes (46, XX). The ability of AFMSCs as feeder cells to maintain the undifferentiated growth and pluripotency of hESCs was confirmed by in vivo formation of teratomas derived on AFMSC hESCs in severe combined immune-compromised mice. The use of AFMSCs for feeder cells to culture hESCs has several advantages, in that AFMSCs are not tumourigenic and can be expanded extensively with a short doubling time.

  18. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  19. a Numerical Study of Unsteady Fluid Flow in In-Line and Staggered Tube Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, S. B.; Spalding, D. B.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the results of numerical calculations for transient flow in in-line-square and rotated-square tube banks with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2:1, in the Reynolds number range of 30-3000. Transient-periodic behaviour is induced by the consideration of two or more modules, with a sinusoidal span-wise perturbation being applied in the upstream module. There is a triode-like effect, whereby the downstream response to the stimulus is amplified, and there is a net gain in the crosswise flow component. When an appropriate feedback mechanism is provided, a stable transient behaviour is obtained, with alternate vortices being shed from each cylinder. Flow visualization studies of the results of the calculations are presented together with quantitative details of pressure drop, lift, drag and heat transfer. For the staggered bank, a wake-switching or Coanda effect was observed as the serpentine-shaped wake attached to alternate sides of the downstream cylinder. The induced response is independent of the amplitude and frequency of the applied disturbance, including the case of spontaneous behaviour with no excitation mechanism. For the in-line case where each cylinder is in the shadow of the previous one, the motion is less pronounced; however, a shear-layer instability associated with the alternating spin of shed vortices was observed. In this case, the response was found to be somewhat dependent on the frequency of the applied disturbance, and a transient motion could not be induced spontaneously in the absence of an explicit feedback mechanism. Calculated Strouhal numbers were in fair agreement with experimental data: for the staggered geometry, they had values of between 0.26 and 0.35, or from -21 to +6% higher than measured values, while for the in-line geometry, the Strouhal numbers ranged between 0.09 and 0.12, or about 20-40% lower than experimental values.

  20. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  1. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound. PMID:25567545

  2. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Brix, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls. Method Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal cavity at three time points: baseline, within 15 minutes after being exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol in an exposure chamber and four hours after exposure termination. A total of 19 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. Furthermore, at baseline and during the exposure session, participants rated the perceived intensity, valence and levels of symptoms and autonomic recordings were obtained. Results The physiological and psychophysical measurements during the n-butanol exposure session verified a specific response in MCS individuals only. However, MCS subjects and healthy controls displayed similar upper airway inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05) at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences. Conclusion We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via excessive upper airway inflammatory processes. PMID:26599866

  3. HIF-1 expression is associated with CCL2 chemokine expression in airway inflammatory cells: implications in allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation in asthmatic patients is complex and characterized by cellular infiltrates and activity of many cytokines and chemokines. Both the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and chemokine CCL2 have been shown to play pivotal roles in allergic airway inflammation. The interrelationship between these two factors is not known. We hypothesized that the expression of HIF-1 and CCL2 may be correlated and that the expression of CCL2 may be under the regulation of HIF-1. Several lines of evidence are presented to support this hypothesis. Methods The effects of treating wild-type OVA (ovalbumin)-sensitized/challenged mice with ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB), which upregulate HIF, on CCL2 expression, were determined. Mice conditionally knocked out for HIF-1β was examined for their ability to mount an allergic inflammatory response and CCL2 expression in the lung after intratracheal exposure to ovalbumin. The association of HIF-1α and CCL2 levels was also measured in endobronchial biopsies and bronchial fluid of asthma patients after challenge. Results We show that both HIF-1α and CCL2 were upregulated during an OVA (ovalbumin)-induced allergic response in mice. The levels of HIF-1α and CCL2 were significantly increased following treatment with a pharmacological agent which upregulates HIF-1α, ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB). In contrast, the expression levels of HIF-1α and CCL2 were decreased in the lungs of mice that have been conditionally knocked out for ARNT (HIF-1β) following sensitization with OVA when compared to levels in wild type mice. In asthma patients, the levels of HIF-1α and CCL2 increased after challenge with the allergen. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 expression is regulated, in part, by HIF-1 in the lung. These findings also demonstrate that both CCL2 and HIF-1 are implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:22823210

  4. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Robert A; Noordhoek, Roseanna

    2010-03-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon frequently encounters and manages difficult airways. Knowledge of and calm progression by practitioner and staff through different means to ventilate and manage a difficult airway are crucial. Practitioners should become comfortable with different types of alternative or rescue airways in order to intervene quickly in case of emergent or unanticipated airway compromise.

  5. Improving the safety of remote site emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wijesuriya, Julian; Brand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    . We suggest that this should be the gold standard of airway resource provision and is in line with NAP4 recommendations.

  6. Safer fluid prescribing at North Bristol Trust: Bringing practice in line with NICE Guidance with a redesign of the fluid prescription chart

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Johanna; Bull, Thomas; Paul, Daniel; Reynolds, Emily; Nishimura, Aimi; Lloyd, Jessica; Jetley, Amanda; Davies, Mari; Eisenhauer, Helen; Maggs, Daniel; Clapham, Sorcha; Trivedi, Kaushali; Hair, Robert; Plumb, Benjamin; Plumb, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) released new fluid guidelines following data suggesting 20% of patients receiving fluids suffer adversely (2013). This quality improvement group assessed fluid prescribing in a tertiary teaching centre and introduced a new fluid- prescribing chart to align practice with NICE recommendations. Notes and corresponding fluid prescription charts were reviewed for evidence of (1) indication, (2) co-morbidities, and (3) further management as surrogate markers of safe prescribing in accordance with NICE. Overall, the data showed practice fell short and prompted a redesign of the Trust fluid prescription chart. Three different variations of the chart were issued consecutively using a PDSA method (plan, do, study, act) over a 6-month period. They all included indication, co-morbidities and further management plans as constant design features. Suggestions from interested parties were incorporated and an educational programme was implemented to promote awareness. Prior to our intervention, an indication for fluids was documented in 26% of notes, it took an average of 4.6 minutes to find co-morbidities, and further management plans were rarely documented. Following the new prescription chart, an indication was recorded in 72% of cases, co-morbidities noted on 63% of charts with 93.1% accuracy, and further management documented in 100% of cases. The new fluid prescription chart encourages prescribers to incorporate NICE recommendations when prescribing fluids. The new fluid prescription design has since been rolled out Trust wide. PMID:26734333

  7. Upper airway segmentation and measurement in MRI using fuzzy connectedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; McDonough, Joe M.; Arens, Raanan

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to build a computerized system for the delineation of upper airway structures via MRI and to evaluate its effectiveness for routine clinical use in aiding diagnosis of upper airway disorders in children. We use two MRI protocols, axial T1 and T2, to gather information about different aspects of the airway and its surrounding soft tissue structures including adenoid, tonsils, tongue and soft palate. These images are processed and segmented to compute the architectural parameters of the airway such as its surface description, volume, central (medial) line, and cross-sectional areas at planes orthogonal to the central line. We have built a software package based on 3DVIEWNIX and running on a 450 MHz Pentium PC under Linux system (and on a Sun workstation under Unix) for the various operations of visualization, segmentation, registration, prefiltering, interpolation, standardization, and quantitative analysis of the airway. The system has been tested utilizing 40 patient studies. For every study, the system segmented and displayed a smooth 3D rendition of the airway, its central line and a plot of the cross-sectional area of the airway orthogonal to the central line as a function of the distance from one end of the central line. The tests indicate 97% precision and accuracy for segmentation. The mean time taken per study is about 4 minutes for the airway. This includes operator interaction time and processing time. This method provides a robust and fast means of assessing the airway size, shape, and places of restriction, as well as providing a structural data set suitable for use in modeling studies of airflow and mechanics.

  8. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  9. Modeling In Vivo Interactions of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Pulmonary Alveolar Lining Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary; Schwander, Stephan; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products may result in widespread human inhalation exposures. Due to their high surface area per unit mass, inhaled ENMs interact with multiple components of the pulmonary system, and these interactions affect their ultimate fate in the body. Modeling of ENM transport and clearance in vivo has traditionally treated tissues as well-mixed compartments, without consideration of nanoscale interaction and transformation mechanisms. ENM agglomeration, dissolution and transport, along with adsorption of biomolecules, such as surfactant lipids and proteins, cause irreversible changes to ENM morphology and surface properties. The model presented in this article quantifies ENM transformation and transport in the alveolar air to liquid interface and estimates eventual alveolar cell dosimetry. This formulation brings together established concepts from colloidal and surface science, physics, and biochemistry to provide a stochastic framework capable of capturing essential in vivo processes in the pulmonary alveolar lining layer. The model has been implemented for in vitro solutions with parameters estimated from relevant published in vitro measurements and has been extended here to in vivo systems simulating human inhalation exposures. Applications are presented for four different ENMs, and relevant kinetic rates are estimated, demonstrating an approach for improving human in vivo pulmonary dosimetry. PMID:26240755

  10. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of fluids along the cameroon volcanic line, cameroon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanyileke, G.Z.; Kusakabe, M.; Evans, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Results of the chemical and isotopic analysis of the water and gases discharged from volcanic crater lakes and soda springs located along the Cameroon Volcanic Line were used to characterize and infer their genetic relationships. Variations in the solute compositions of the waters indicate the dominant influence of silicate hydrolysis. Na+ (40-95%) constitutes the major cation in the springs while Fe2+ + Mg2+ (70%) dominate in the CO2-rich lakes. The principal anion is HCO3 (>90%), except in the coastal springs where Cl predominates. Lakes Nyos and Monoun have Fe-Mg-Ca-HCO3 type signatures; the soda springs are essentially Na-HCO3 type, while all other lakes show similar ionic compositions to dilute surface waters. Dissolved gases show essentially CO2 (>90%), with small amounts of Ar and N2, while CH4 constitutes the principal component in the non-gassy lakes. Active volcanic gases are generally absent, except in the Lobe spring with detectable H2S. Stable isotope ratio evidence indicates that the bicarbonate waters are essentially of meteoric origin. CO2 (??13C = -2 to -8???) and He (3He/4He = 1 to 5.6Ra) infer a mantle contribution to the total CO2. CH4 has a biogenic source, while Ar and N2 are essentially atmospheric in origin, but mixing is quite common.

  11. On-line preconcentration of fluorescent derivatives of catecholamines in cerebrospinal fluid using flow-gated capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyang; Gong, Maojun

    2016-06-10

    Flow-gated capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with microdialysis has become an important tool for in vivo bioanalytical measurements because it is capable of performing rapid and efficient separations of complex biological mixtures thus enabling high temporal resolution in chemical monitoring. However, the limit of detection (LOD) is often limited to a micro- or nano-molar range while many important target analytes have picomolar or sub-nanomolar levels in brain and other tissues. To enhance the capability of flow-gated CE for catecholamine detection, a novel and simple on-line sample preconcentration method was developed exclusively for fluorescent derivatives of catecholamines that were fluorogenically derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) in the presence of cyanide. The effective preconcentration coupled with the sensitive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection lowered the LOD down to 20pM for norepinephrine (NE) and 50pM for dopamine (DA) at 3-fold of S/N ratio, and the signal enhancement was estimated to be over 100-fold relative to normal injection when standard analytes were dissolved in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). The basic focusing principle is novel since the sample plug contains borate while the background electrolyte (BGE) is void of borate. This strategy took advantage of the complexation between diols and borate, through which one negative charge was added to the complex entity. The sample derivatization mixture was electrokinetically injected into a capillary via the flow-gated injection, and then NE and DA derivatives were selectively focused to a narrow zone by the reversible complexation. Separation of NE and DA derivatives was executed by incoming surfactants of cholate and deoxycholate mixed in the front BGE plug. This on-line preconcentration method was finally applied to the detection of DA in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via microdialysis and on-line derivatization. It is anticipated that the method would

  12. Inertial and interceptional deposition of fibers in a bifurcating airway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Asgharian, B; Anjilvel, S

    1996-01-01

    A computer model of a three-dimensional bifurcating airway was constructed in which the parent and daughter airways had different lengths but equal diameters. A diameter of 0.6 cm was chosen for the airways based on the third generation of Weibel's symmetric lung model. Different bifurcation angles of 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees were studied. Airflow fields in the airway were obtained by a finite-element method (FIDAP, Fluid Dynamics International, Evanston, IL) for Reynolds numbers of 500 and 1000, assuming uniform parent inlet velocities. The equations of motion for fiber transport in the airways were obtained, and deposition by the combined mechanisms of impaction and interception was incorporated. A computer code was developed that utilized the flow field data and calculated fiber transport in the airways using the equations of motion for fibers. Deposition efficiency was obtained by simulating a large number of fibers of various sizes. Fiber entering the daughter airways tended to orient themselves parallel to the flow. A site of enhanced deposition (or hot spot) was observed at the carina. The dominant parameter for the deposition was the fiber Stokes number. Flow Reynolds number and airway bifurcation angle were also found to affect the deposition.

  13. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  14. Using computational fluid dynamics to calculate the stimulus to the lateral line of a fish in still water.

    PubMed

    Rapo, Mark A; Jiang, Houshuo; Grosenbaugh, Mark A; Coombs, Sheryl

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the first computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of viscous flow due to a small sphere vibrating near a fish, a configuration that is frequently used for experiments on dipole source localization by the lateral line. Both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) meshes were constructed, reproducing a previously published account of a mottled sculpin approaching an artificial prey. Both the fish-body geometry and the sphere vibration were explicitly included in the simulations. For comparison purposes, calculations using potential flow theory (PFT) of a 3-D dipole without a fish body being present were also performed. Comparisons between the 2-D and 3-D CFD simulations showed that the 2-D calculations did not accurately represent the 3-D flow and therefore did not produce realistic results. The 3-D CFD simulations showed that the presence of the fish body perturbed the dipole source pressure field near the fish body, an effect that was obviously absent in the PFT calculations of the dipole alone. In spite of this discrepancy, the pressure-gradient patterns to the lateral line system calculated from 3-D CFD simulations and PFT were similar. Conversely, the velocity field, which acted on the superficial neuromasts (SNs), was altered by the oscillatory boundary layer that formed at the fish's skin due to the flow produced by the vibrating sphere (accounted for in CFD but not PFT). An analytical solution of an oscillatory boundary layer above a flat plate, which was validated with CFD, was used to represent the flow near the fish's skin and to calculate the detection thresholds of the SNs in terms of flow velocity and strain rate. These calculations show that the boundary layer effects can be important, especially when the height of the cupula is less than the oscillatory boundary layer's Stokes viscous length scale. PMID:19411543

  15. Intranasal curcumin attenuates airway remodeling in murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Subhashini; Dash, D; Singh, Rashmi

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin, phytochemical present in turmeric, rhizome of Curcuma longa, a known anti-inflammatory molecule with variety of pharmacological activities is found effective in murine model of chronic asthma characterized by structural alterations and airway remodeling. Here, we have investigated the effects of intranasal curcumin in chronic asthma where animals were exposed to allergen for longer time. In the present study Balb/c mice were sensitized by an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) and subsequently challenged with 2% OVA in aerosol twice a week for five consecutive weeks. Intranasal curcumin (5mg/kg) was administered from days 21 to 55, an hour before every nebulization and inflammatory cells recruitment, levels of IgE, EPO, IL-4 and IL-5 were found suppressed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Intranasal curcumin administration prevented accumulation of inflammatory cells to the airways, structural alterations and remodeling associated with chronic asthma like peribronchial and airway smooth muscle thickening, sloughing off of the epithelial lining and mucus secretion in ovalbumin induced murine model of chronic asthma.

  16. Sensitivity to ozone: could it be related to an individual's complement of antioxidants in lung epithelium lining fluid?

    PubMed

    Kelly, F J; Mudway, I S

    1997-08-01

    Ozone, though not a free radical species, mediates its toxic effects through free radical reactions as a consequence of its high redox potential. Upon inspiration the first physical interface encountered by ozone is a thin layer of aqueous material, the epithelium lining fluid (ELF) which overlays, and is partially derived from, the underlying pulmonary epithelium. ELF is the first physical interface encountered by ozone and the majority of its primary actions are confined to this compartment. ELF contains a range of antioxidants, including the small molecular weight antioxidants: uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AH2) and reduced glutathione (GSH). These compounds are present in large quantities and display high intrinsic reactivities toward ozone, consistent with their role as sacrificial substrates in this setting. In this paper we examine the concept that antioxidants, in ELF, represent the first tier of defence against the oxidizing effects of ozone. Since the concentration of these antioxidants appears to differ between individuals, we propose that these protective substances may dictate, in part, an individual's sensitivity to oxidizing air pollutants such as ozone.

  17. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  18. Prostaglandin E2 protects lower airways against bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Hartney, John M; Coggins, Kenneth G; Tilley, Stephen L; Jania, Leigh A; Lovgren, Alysia Kern; Audoly, Laurent P; Koller, Beverly H

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), similar to beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, can protect airways from bronchoconstriction and resulting increase in airway resistance induced by a number of agents, including cholinergic receptor agonists and antigen. We examined the impact of sustained alterations in PGE2 pathways on changes in airway resistance. Genetic methods were utilized to alter PGE2 metabolism and signal transduction in the murine lung. PGE2 levels were elevated by generating mice lacking 15-hydroxyprostaglandin (Hpgd-/-), the major catabolic enzyme of PGE2, and by generating a transgenic line in which mouse PGE2 synthase (Ptges) expression is driven by a human lung-specific promoter, hSP-C. Conversely, to determine the impact of loss of PGE2 on airway reactivity, we examined mice lacking this synthase (Ptges-/-) and receptors that mediate the actions of PGE2, particularly the PGE2 EP2 receptor (Ptger2). Diminished capacity to produce and respond to PGE2 did not alter the response of mice to cholinergic stimuli. In contrast, the responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation was dramatically altered in animals with elevated PGE2 levels. The Hpgd-/- and hSP-C-Ptges transgenic lines both showed attenuated airway responsiveness to methacholine as measured by lung resistance. Thus, whereas compromise of the Ptges/PGE2/Ptger2 pathway does not alter airway responsiveness, genetic modulation that elevates PGE2 levels in the lung attenuates airway responsiveness. PMID:16113047

  19. Indirect airway challenges.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; O'Connor, B; Anderson, S D; Chung, F; Cockcroft, D W; Dahlén, B; DiMaria, G; Foresi, A; Hargreave, F E; Holgate, S T; Inman, M; Lötvall, J; Magnussen, H; Polosa, R; Postma, D S; Riedler, J

    2003-06-01

    Indirect challenges act by causing the release of endogenous mediators that cause the airway smooth muscle to contract. This is in contrast to the direct challenges where agonists such as methacholine or histamine cause airflow limitation predominantly via a direct effect on airway smooth muscle. Direct airway challenges have been used widely and are well standardised. They are highly sensitive, but not specific to asthma and can be used to exclude current asthma in a clinic population. Indirect bronchial stimuli, in particular exercise, hyperventilation, hypertonic aerosols, as well as adenosine, may reflect more directly the ongoing airway inflammation and are therefore more specific to identify active asthma. They are increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and to assess specific problems in patients with known asthma, e.g. exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, evaluation before scuba diving. Direct bronchial responsiveness is only slowly and to a modest extent, influenced by repeated administration of inhaled steroids. Indirect challenges may reflect more closely acute changes in airway inflammation and a change in responsiveness to an indirect stimulus may be a clinically relevant marker to assess the clinical course of asthma. Moreover, some of the indirect challenges, e.g. hypertonic saline and mannitol, can be combined with the assessment of inflammatory cells by induction of sputum.

  20. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  1. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  2. Early airway infection, inflammation, and lung function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Carlin, J; Olinsky, A; Robertson, C; Grimwood, K

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the relation between lower airway infection and inflammation, respiratory symptoms, and lung function in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective study of children with CF aged younger than 3 years, diagnosed by a newborn screening programme. All were clinically stable and had testing as outpatients. Subjects underwent bronchial lavage (BL) and lung function testing by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique under general anaesthesia. BL fluid was cultured and analysed for neutrophil count, interleukin 8, and neutrophil elastase. Lung function was assessed by forced expiratory volume in 0.5, 0.75, and 1 second. Results: Thirty six children with CF were tested on 54 occasions. Lower airway infection shown by BL was associated with a 10% reduction in FEV0.5 compared with subjects without infection. No relation was identified between airway inflammation and lung function. Daily moist cough within the week before testing was reported on 20/54 occasions, but in only seven (35%) was infection detected. Independent of either infection status or airway inflammation, those with daily cough had lower lung function than those without respiratory symptoms at the time of BL (mean adjusted FEV0.5 195 ml and 236 ml respectively). Conclusions: In young children with CF, both respiratory symptoms and airway infection have independent, additive effects on lung function, unrelated to airway inflammation. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of airway obstruction in these young patients. PMID:12244003

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of upper airways from MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchet, Diane; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-03-01

    Under the framework of clinical respiratory investigation, providing accurate modalities for morpho-functional analysis is essential for diagnosis improvement, surgical planning and follow-up. This paper focuses on the upper airways investigation and develops an automated approach for 3D mesh reconstruction from MDCT acquisitions. In order to overcome the difficulties related to the complex morphology of the upper airways and to the image gray level heterogeneity of the airway lumens and thin bony septa, the proposed 3D reconstruction methodology combines 2D segmentation and 3D surface regularization approaches. The segmentation algorithm relies on mathematical morphology theory and provides airway lumen robust discrimination from the surrounding tissues, while preserving the connectivity relationship between the different anatomical structures. The 3D regularization step uses an energy-based modeling in order to achieve a smooth and well-fitted 3D surface of the upper airways. An accurate 3D mesh representation of the reconstructed airways makes it possible to develop specific clinical applications such as virtual endoscopy, surgical planning and computer assisted intervention. In addition, building up patient-specific 3D models of upper airways is highly valuable for the study and design of inhaled medication delivery via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and penetration of ceftazidime and avibactam into epithelial lining fluid in thigh- and lung-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Johanna; Melchers, Maria J; van Mil, Anita C; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Lagarde, Claudia M; Nichols, Wright W; Mouton, Johan W

    2015-04-01

    Ceftazidime and the β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam constitute a new, potentially highly active combination in the battle against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. To determine possible clinical use, it is important to know the pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds related to each other in plasma and the different compartments of infection in experimentally infected animals and in humans. We used a neutropenic murine thigh infection model and lung infection model to study pharmacokinetics in plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Mice were infected with ca. 10(6) CFU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa intramuscularly into the thigh or intranasally to cause pneumonia and were given 8 different (single) subcutaneous doses of ceftazidime and avibactam in various combined concentrations, ranging from 1 to 128 mg/kg of body weight in 2-fold increases. Concomitant samples of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were taken at up to 12 time points until 6 h after administration. Pharmacokinetics of both compounds were linear and dose proportional in plasma and ELF and were independent of the infection type, with estimated half-lives (standard deviations [SD]) in plasma of ceftazidime of 0.28 (0.02) h and of avibactam of 0.24 (0.04) h and volumes of distribution of 0.80 (0.14) and 1.18 (0.34) liters/kg. The ELF-plasma (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) ratios (standard errors [SE]) were 0.24 (0.03) for total ceftazidime and 0.27 (0.03) for unbound ceftazidime; for avibactam, the ratios were 0.20 (0.02) and 0.22 (0.02), respectively. No pharmacokinetic interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam was observed. Ceftazidime and avibactam showed linear plasma pharmacokinetics that were independent of the dose combinations used or the infection site in mice. Assuming pharmacokinetic similarity in humans, this indicates that similar dose ratios of ceftazidime and avibactam could be used for different types and sites of infection. PMID

  5. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  6. Interaction with epithelial cells modifies airway macrophage response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca N; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Duncan, Kelly E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-03-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell-Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell-derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3.

  7. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Rebecca N.; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.; Duncan, Kelly E.

    2015-01-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell–Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell–derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell–Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell–derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3. PMID:25054807

  8. Intrabronchial Microdialysis: Effects of Probe Localization on Tissue Trauma and Drug Penetration into the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid.

    PubMed

    Rottbøll, Lisa Amanda Holm; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Barington, Kristiane; Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Friis, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Recent intrabronchial microdialysis data indicate that the respiratory epithelium is highly permeable to drugs. Of concern is whether intrabronchial microdialysis disrupts the integrity of the respiratory epithelium and thereby alters drug penetration into the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of intrabronchial microdialysis on the integrity of the bronchial epithelium. Microdialysis sampling in PELF in proximal (n = 4) and distal bronchi (n = 4) was performed after intravenous inulin and florfenicol administration in anaesthetized pigs. Inulin was used as a marker molecule of permeability of the epithelium, and florfenicol was used as test drug. Bronchial tissue was examined by histopathology (distal and proximal bronchi) and gene expression analysis (RT-qPCR, proximal bronchi) at the termination of the experiment (6.5 hr). The microdialysis probe caused overt tissue trauma in distal bronchi, whereas no histopathological lesions were observed in proximal bronchi. A moderate up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1B, IL6 and acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A was seen in proximal bronchi surrounding the microdialysis probes suggesting initiation of an inflammatory response. The observed up-regulation is considered to have limited impact on drug penetration during short-term studies. Inulin penetrated the respiratory epithelium in both proximal and distal bronchi without any correlation to histopathological lesions. Likewise, florfenicol penetration into PELF was unaffected by bronchial histopathology. However, this independency of pathology on drug penetration may not be valid for other antibiotics. We conclude that short-term microdialysis drug quantification can be performed in proximal bronchi without disruption of tissue integrity.

  9. High Interstitial Fluid Pressure Is Associated with Tumor-Line Specific Vascular Abnormalities in Human Melanoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Trude G.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Leinaas, Marit N.; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is highly elevated in many solid tumors. High IFP has been associated with low radiocurability and high metastatic frequency in human melanoma xenografts and with poor survival after radiation therapy in cervical cancer patients. Abnormalities in tumor vascular networks have been identified as an important cause of elevated tumor IFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor IFP and the functional and morphological properties of tumor vascular networks. Materials and Methods A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanomas growing in dorsal window chambers in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as preclinical tumor models. Functional and morphological parameters of the vascular network were assessed from first-pass imaging movies and vascular maps recorded after intravenous bolus injection of 155-kDa tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors using a Millar catheter. Angiogenic profiles of A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP cells were obtained with a quantitative PCR array. Results High IFP was associated with low growth rate and low vascular density in A-07-GFP tumors, and with high growth rate and high vascular density in R-18-GFP tumors. A-07-GFP tumors showed chaotic and highly disorganized vascular networks, while R-18-GFP tumors showed more organized vascular networks with supplying arterioles in the tumor center and draining venules in the tumor periphery. Furthermore, A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP cells differed substantially in angiogenic profiles. A-07-GFP tumors with high IFP showed high geometric resistance to blood flow due to high vessel tortuosity. R-18-GFP tumors with high IFP showed high geometric resistance to blood flow due to a large number of narrow tumor capillaries. Conclusions High IFP in A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanoma xenografts was primarily a consequence of high blood flow resistance caused by tumor-line specific vascular abnormalities. PMID

  10. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  11. Motorcycle exhaust particles induce airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in BALB/C mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2004-06-01

    A number of large studies have reported that environmental pollutants from fossil fuel combustion can cause deleterious effects to the immune system, resulting in an allergic reaction leading to respiratory tract damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP), a major pollutant in the Taiwan urban area, on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in laboratory animals. BALB/c mice were instilled intratracheally (i.t.) with 1.2 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg of MEP, which was collected from two-stroke motorcycle engines. The mice were exposed 3 times i.t. with MEP, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness were sequentially analyzed. We found that MEP would induce airway and pulmonary inflammation characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung. In addition, MEP treatment enhanced BALF interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine levels and serum IgE production. Bronchial response measured by unrestrained plethysmography with methacholine challenge showed that MEP treatment induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in BALB/c mice. The chemical components in MEP were further fractionated with organic solvents, and we found that the benzene-extracted fraction exerts a similar biological effect as seen with MEP, including airway inflammation, increased BALF IL-4, serum IgE production, and induction of AHR. In conclusion, we present evidence showing that the filter-trapped particles emitted from the unleaded-gasoline-fueled two-stroke motorcycle engine may induce proinflammatory and proallergic response profiles in the absence of exposure to allergen.

  12. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry.

  13. Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

  14. Managing upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Innes, M H

    A complete respiratory obstruction can lead to death in 3 minutes. The first and constant duty of the nurse aider is to check that the person is breathing by looking, listening and feeling. Partial obstruction is no less serious than complete obstruction. The nurse aider, in any situation, should assess the problem and attempt to overcome the airway obstruction using the measures described. PMID:1490067

  15. Modeling the Nonlinear Motion of the Rat Central Airways.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, G; Rona, A; Hainsworth, S V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in volumetric medical imaging techniques allowed the subject-specific modeling of the bronchial flow through the first few generations of the central airways using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a reliable CFD prediction of the bronchial flow requires modeling of the inhomogeneous deformation of the central airways during breathing. This paper addresses this issue by introducing two models of the central airways motion. The first model utilizes a node-to-node mapping between the discretized geometries of the central airways generated from a number of successive computed tomography (CT) images acquired dynamically (without breath hold) over the breathing cycle of two Sprague-Dawley rats. The second model uses a node-to-node mapping between only two discretized airway geometries generated from the CT images acquired at end-exhale and at end-inhale along with the ventilator measurement of the lung volume change. The advantage of this second model is that it uses just one pair of CT images, which more readily complies with the radiation dosage restrictions for humans. Three-dimensional computer aided design geometries of the central airways generated from the dynamic-CT images were used as benchmarks to validate the output from the two models at sampled time-points over the breathing cycle. The central airway geometries deformed by the first model showed good agreement to the benchmark geometries within a tolerance of 4%. The central airway geometry deformed by the second model better approximated the benchmark geometries than previous approaches that used a linear or harmonic motion model.

  16. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes.

  17. Modeling the Nonlinear Motion of the Rat Central Airways.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, G; Rona, A; Hainsworth, S V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in volumetric medical imaging techniques allowed the subject-specific modeling of the bronchial flow through the first few generations of the central airways using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a reliable CFD prediction of the bronchial flow requires modeling of the inhomogeneous deformation of the central airways during breathing. This paper addresses this issue by introducing two models of the central airways motion. The first model utilizes a node-to-node mapping between the discretized geometries of the central airways generated from a number of successive computed tomography (CT) images acquired dynamically (without breath hold) over the breathing cycle of two Sprague-Dawley rats. The second model uses a node-to-node mapping between only two discretized airway geometries generated from the CT images acquired at end-exhale and at end-inhale along with the ventilator measurement of the lung volume change. The advantage of this second model is that it uses just one pair of CT images, which more readily complies with the radiation dosage restrictions for humans. Three-dimensional computer aided design geometries of the central airways generated from the dynamic-CT images were used as benchmarks to validate the output from the two models at sampled time-points over the breathing cycle. The central airway geometries deformed by the first model showed good agreement to the benchmark geometries within a tolerance of 4%. The central airway geometry deformed by the second model better approximated the benchmark geometries than previous approaches that used a linear or harmonic motion model. PMID:26592166

  18. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    PubMed

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained. PMID:22558834

  19. Airway gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jane C; Alton, Eric W F W

    2005-01-01

    Given both the accessibility and the genetic basis of several pulmonary diseases, the lungs and airways initially seemed ideal candidates for gene therapy. Several routes of access are available, many of which have been refined and optimized for nongene drug delivery. Two respiratory diseases, cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency, are relatively common; the single gene responsible has been identified and current treatment strategies are not curative. This type of inherited disease was the obvious initial target for gene therapy, but it has become clear that nongenetic and acquired diseases, including cancer, may also be amenable to this approach. The majority of preclinical and clinical studies in the airway have involved viral vectors, although for diseases such as CF, likely to require repeated application, non-viral delivery systems have clear advantages. However, with both approaches a range of barriers to gene expression have been identified that are limiting success in the airway and alveolar region. This chapter reviews these issues, strategies aimed at overcoming them, and progress into clinical trials with non-viral vectors in a variety of pulmonary diseases.

  20. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  1. Causes of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway.

  2. MATURE CYSTIC FIBROSIS AIRWAY NEUTROPHILS SUPPRESS T-CELL FUNCTION: EVIDENCE FOR A ROLE OF ARGINASE 1, BUT NOT PROGRAMMED DEATH-LIGAND 1

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Laval, Julie; Forrest, Osric A.; Preininger, Marcela; Brown, Milton R.; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Tangpricha, Vin; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, and while T cells with appropriate antigen specificity are present in draining lymph nodes, they are conspicuously absent from the lumen. To account for this absence, we hypothesized that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), recruited massively into the CF airway lumen and actively exocytosing primary granules, also suppress T-cell function therein. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1), which exerts T-cell suppression at a late step, was expressed bimodally on CF airway PMNs, delineating PD-L1hi and PD-L1lo subsets, while healthy control (HC) airway PMNs were uniformly PD-L1hi. Blood PMNs incubated in CF airway fluid lost PD-L1 over time, and in coculture, antibody blockade of PD-L1 failed to inhibit the suppression of T-cell proliferation by CF airway PMNs. In contrast with PD-L1, arginase 1 (Arg1), which exerts T-cell suppression at an early step, was uniformly high on CF and HC airway PMNs. However, arginase activity was high in CF airway fluid and minimal in HC airway fluid, consistent with the fact that Arg1 activation requires primary granule exocytosis, which occurs in CF, but not HC, airway PMNs. In addition, Arg1 expression on CF airway PMNs correlated negatively with lung function and positively with arginase activity in CF airway fluid. Finally, combined treatment with arginase inhibitor and arginine rescued the suppression of T-cell proliferation by CF airway fluid. Thus, Arg1 and PD-L1 are dynamically modulated upon PMN migration into human airways, and, Arg1, but not PD-L1, contributes to early PMN-driven T-cell suppression in CF, likely hampering resolution of infection and inflammation. PMID:25926674

  3. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ambroxol on Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Taube, Christian; Kitamura, Kenichi; Hirano, Astushi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Ambroxol is used in COPD and asthma to increase mucociliary clearance and regulate surfactant levels, perhaps through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. To determine the role and effect of ambroxol in an experimental model of asthma, BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by 3 days of challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung cell composition and histology, and cytokine and protein carbonyl levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined. Ambroxol was administered either before the first OVA challenge or was begun after the last allergen challenge. Cytokine production levels from lung mononuclear cells (Lung MNCs) or alveolar macrophages (AM) were also determined. Administration of ambroxol prior to challenge suppressed AHR, airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and reduced inflammation in subepithelial regions. When given after challenge, AHR was suppressed but without effects on eosinophil numbers. Levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were decreased when the drug was given prior to challenge; when given after challenge, increased levels of IL-10 and IL-12 were detected. Decreased levels of protein carbonyls were detected in BAL fluid following ambroxol treatment after challenge. In vitro, ambroxol increased levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 from Lung MNCs and AM, whereas IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 production was not altered. Taken together, ambroxol was effective in preventing AHR and airway inflammation through upregulation of Th1 cytokines and protection from oxidative stress in the airways. PMID:27340385

  4. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  5. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  6. Submucosal gland secretions in airways from cystic fibrosis patients have normal [Na+] and pH but elevated viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Sujatha; Joo, Nam Soo; Reitz, Bruce; Wine, Jeffrey J.; Verkman, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Fluid and macromolecule secretion by submucosal glands in mammalian airways is believed to be important in normal airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An in situ fluorescence method was applied to measure the ionic composition and viscosity of freshly secreted fluid from airway glands. Fragments of human large airways obtained at the time of lung transplantation were mounted in a humidified perfusion chamber and the mucosal surface was covered by a thin layer of oil. Individual droplets of secreted fluid were microinjected with fluorescent indicators for measurement of [Na+], [Cl−], and pH by ratio imaging fluorescence microscopy and viscosity by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. After carbachol stimulation, 0.1–0.5 μl of fluid accumulated in spherical droplets at gland orifices in ≈3–5 min. In gland fluid from normal human airways, [Na+] was 94 ± 8 mM, [Cl−] was 92 ± 12 mM, and pH was 6.97 ± 0.06 (SE, n = 7 humans, more than five glands studied per sample). Apparent fluid viscosity was 2.7 ± 0.3-fold greater than that of saline. Neither [Na+] nor pH differed in gland fluid from CF airways, but viscosity was significantly elevated by ≈2-fold compared to normal airways. These results represent the first direct measurements of ionic composition and viscosity in uncontaminated human gland secretions and indicate similar [Na+], [Cl−], and pH to that in the airway surface liquid. The elevated gland fluid viscosity in CF may be an important factor promoting bacterial colonization and airway disease. PMID:11427704

  7. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining in fish cell lines and primary cultures from several tissues and species, including rainbow trout coelomic fluid and milt.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Mikhaeil, Michael S; Lee, Lucy E J; Pham, Phuc H; Bols, Niels C

    2015-04-01

    Cell lines and primary cultures from several teleost tissues and species were stained for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal), revealing four general outcomes. (1) For long-standing fish cell lines that can be considered immortal, little or no SA β-Gal staining was observed, regardless of the culture conditions. (2) For a new walleye cell line from the bulbus arteriosus (WEBA), most cells stained for SA β-Gal even after 40 passages. This suggested that high SA β-Gal activity was a unique property of WEBA, perhaps reflecting their endothelial character, rather than cellular senescence. (3) For cell lines developed from the walleye caudal fin and from somatic cells in rainbow trout coelomic fluid, no SA β-Gal staining was observed in the earliest cultures to over 70 passages later. This suggested that cells from these anatomical sites do not undergo senescence in vitro. (4) By contrast, for cell lines developed from the walleye brain and from somatic cells in rainbow trout milt, most cells in the early-stage cultures stained for SA β-Gal, but as these were developed into cell lines, SA β-Gal-negative cells became dominant. This suggested that if cellular senescence occurred in vitro, this happened early in these cultures and subsequently a few SA β-Gal-negative cells went onto to form the cell line. Overall, the presence of SA β-Gal-positive cells in cultures could be interpreted in several ways, whereas their absence predicted that in these cultures, cells would proliferate indefinitely.

  8. Culture of mouse amniotic fluid-derived cells on irradiated STO feeders results in the generation of primitive endoderm cell lines capable of self-renewal in vitro.

    PubMed

    Babic, Aleksandar M; Jang, Sunyoung; Nicolov, Eugenia; Voicu, Horatiu; Luckey, Chance J

    2013-01-01

    The cells present in amniotic fluid (AF) are currently used for prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies but are also a potential source of cells for cell therapy. To better characterize putative progenitor cell populations present in AF, we used culture conditions that support self-renewal to determine if these promoted the generation of stable cell lines from AF-derived cells (AFC). Cells isolated from E11.5 mouse were cultured on irradiated STO fibroblast feeder layers in human embryonic germ cell derivation conditions. The cultures grew multicellular epithelial colonies that could be repropagated from single cells. Reverse transcription semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction of established cell lines revealed that they belonged to the extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn) expressing high levels of Gata6, Gata4, Sox17, Foxa2 and Sox7 mRNA. Hierarchical clustering based on the whole transcriptome expression profile of the AFC lines (AFCL) shows significant correlation between transcription profiles of AFCL and blastocyst-derived XEN, an ExEn cell line. In vitro differentiation of AFCL results in the generation of cells expressing albumin and α-fetoprotein (AFP), while intramuscular injection of AFCL into immunodeficient mice produced AFP-positive tumors with primitive endodermal appearance. Hence, E11.5 mouse AF contains cells that efficiently produce XEN lines. These AF-derived XEN lines do not spontaneously differentiate into embryonic-type cells but are phenotypically stable and have the capacity for extensive expansion. The lack of requirement for reprogramming factors to turn AF-derived progenitor cells into stable cell lines capable of massive expansion together with the known ability of ExEn to contribute to embryonic tissue suggests that this cell type may be a candidate for banking for cell therapies. PMID:24060676

  9. Surgery of the airway: historic notes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joel D

    2016-03-01

    Prior to the 20(th) century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20(th) century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection.

  10. Surgery of the airway: historic notes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the 20th century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20th century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection. PMID:26981261

  11. Glandular Proteome Identifies Antiprotease Cystatin C as a Critical Modulator of Airway Hydration and Clearance.

    PubMed

    Evans, T Idil Apak; Joo, Nam Soo; Keiser, Nicholas W; Yan, Ziying; Tyler, Scott R; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Yulong; Hsiao, Jordy J; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wright, Michael E; Wine, Jeffrey J; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-04-01

    Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel lead to viscous secretions from submucosal glands that cannot be properly hydrated and cleared by beating cilia in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. The mechanisms by which CFTR, and the predominant epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), control the hydration and clearance of glandular secretions remain unclear. We used a proteomics approach to characterize the proteins contained in CF and non-CF submucosal gland fluid droplets and found that differentially regulated proteases (cathepsin S and H) and their antiprotease (cystatin C) influenced the equilibration of fluid on the airway surface and tracheal mucociliary clearance (MCC). Contrary to prevailing models of airway hydration and clearance, cystatin C, or raising the airway surface liquid (ASL) pH, inhibited cathepsin-dependent ENaC-mediated fluid absorption and raised the height of ASL, and yet decreased MCC velocity. Importantly, coupling of both CFTR and ENaC activities were required for effective MCC and for effective ASL height equilibration after volume challenge. Cystatin C-inhibitable cathepsins controlled initial phases of ENaC-mediated fluid absorption, whereas CFTR activity was required to prevent ASL dehydration. Interestingly, CF airway epithelia absorbed fluid more slowly owing to reduced cysteine protease activity in the ASL but became abnormally dehydrated with time. Our findings demonstrate that, after volume challenge, pH-dependent protease-mediated coupling of CFTR and ENaC activities are required for rapid fluid equilibration at the airway surface and for effective MCC. These findings provide new insights into how glandular fluid secretions may be equilibrated at the airway surface and how this process may be impaired in CF. PMID:26334941

  12. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Rancourt, Raymond C. Veress, Livia A. Ahmad, Aftab Hendry-Hofer, Tara B. Rioux, Jacqueline S. Garlick, Rhonda B. White, Carl W.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  13. Intra-operative on-line discrimination of kidney cancer from normal tissue by IR ATR spectroscopy of extracellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urboniene, V.; Velicka, M.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.; Steiner, G.

    2016-03-01

    Determination of cancerous and normal kidney tissues during partial, simple or radical nephrectomy surgery was performed by using differences in the IR absorption spectra of extracellular fluid taken from the corresponding tissue areas. The samples were prepared by stamping of the kidney tissue on ATR diamond crystal. The spectral measurements were performed directly in the OR during surgery for 58 patients. It was found that intensities of characteristic spectral bands of glycogen (880-1200 cm-1) in extracellular fluid are sensitive to the type of the tissue and can be used as spectral markers of tumours. Characteristic spectral band of lactic acid (1730 cm-1) - product of the anaerobic glycolysis, taking place in the cancer cells is not suitable for use as a spectral marker of cancerous tissue, since it overlaps with the band of carbonyl stretch in phospholipids and fatty acids. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis of the spectra show that the spectra of healthy and tumour tissue films can be reliably separated into two groups. On the other hand, possibility to differentiate between tumours of different types and grades remains in question. While the fluid from highly malignant G3 tumour tissue contains highly pronounced glycogen spectral bands and can be well separated from benign and G1 tumours by principal component analysis, the variations between spectra from sample to sample prevent from obtaining conclusive results about the grouping between different tumour types and grades. The proposed method is instant and can be used in situ and even in vivo.

  14. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  15. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  16. Computational Flow Modeling of Human Upper Airway Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylavarapu, Goutham

    Computational modeling of biological systems have gained a lot of interest in biomedical research, in the recent past. This thesis focuses on the application of computational simulations to study airflow dynamics in human upper respiratory tract. With advancements in medical imaging, patient specific geometries of anatomically accurate respiratory tracts can now be reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) or Computed Tomography (CT) scans, with better and accurate details than traditional cadaver cast models. Computational studies using these individualized geometrical models have advantages of non-invasiveness, ease, minimum patient interaction, improved accuracy over experimental and clinical studies. Numerical simulations can provide detailed flow fields including velocities, flow rates, airway wall pressure, shear stresses, turbulence in an airway. Interpretation of these physical quantities will enable to develop efficient treatment procedures, medical devices, targeted drug delivery etc. The hypothesis for this research is that computational modeling can predict the outcomes of a surgical intervention or a treatment plan prior to its application and will guide the physician in providing better treatment to the patients. In the current work, three different computational approaches Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Flow-Structure Interaction (FSI) and Particle Flow simulations were used to investigate flow in airway geometries. CFD approach assumes airway wall as rigid, and relatively easy to simulate, compared to the more challenging FSI approach, where interactions of airway wall deformations with flow are also accounted. The CFD methodology using different turbulence models is validated against experimental measurements in an airway phantom. Two case-studies using CFD, to quantify a pre and post-operative airway and another, to perform virtual surgery to determine the best possible surgery in a constricted airway is demonstrated. The unsteady

  17. Airway Injury from Initiating Ventilation in Preterm Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Pillow, J. Jane; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Nitsos, Ilias; Jobe, Alan H.

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants exposed to ventilation are at risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and persistent lung disease in childhood. We report where injury occurred within the lung following brief ventilation at birth. Preterm sheep (129d gestation) were ventilated with an escalating VT to 15mL/kg by 15 min to injure the lungs, with the placental circulation intact (Fetal) or after delivery (Newborn). Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for 2h 45min, while Newborn lambs were maintained with gentle ventilatory support for the same period. The control group was not ventilated. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were analysed. In both Fetal and Newborn lambs, ventilation caused bronchial epithelial disruption in medium-sized airways. Egr-1, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1β mRNA increased in lung tissue from Fetal and Newborn lambs. Egr-1, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNA were induced in mesenchymal cells surrounding small airways, whereas IL-1β mRNA localized to the epithelium of medium/small airways. Ventilation caused loss of HSP70 mRNA from the bronchial epithelium, but induced mRNA in smooth muscle surrounding large airways. HSP70 protein decreased in lung tissue and increased in BALF with ventilation. Initiation of ventilation induced a stress response and inflammatory cytokines in small and medium-sized airways. PMID:19816239

  18. Effect of simulated microgravity on nitric oxide synthase activity of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Yang, Xiao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    It is well known that microgravity could induce bone loss. However, the mechanism remains poorly understood. Osteocytes are extremely sensitive to fluid shear stress, even more than osteobleasts. The effect of simulated microgravity on osteocytes in response to fluid shear was investigated in this study in order to see if the mechanosensibility of osteocytes changed under simulated microgravity. The osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, was cultured and divided into four groups, including control (CON), control and shear (CONS), rotary (RT), rotary and shear (RTS). In RT and RTS, the cells were cultured in the rotary cell culture system to simulate microgravity condition. After 5 days, the cells in RTS and CONS were subjected to flow shear for 15 min. Then nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the cells was measured using assay kit. The results showed that NOS activity in respond to fluid shear decreased significantly in RTS compared with CONS. In addition, there was significant difference in NOS activity between CONS and CON while no significant difference between RTS and RT. These indicates that the mechanosensibility of osteocytes decreased under simulated microgravity and this maybe the partly causes of the poor effect of exercise to counter microgravity-induced-bone loss. However, further research need to be done to support this finding.

  19. NIR spectroscopic method for the in-line moisture assessment during drying in a six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous tablet production line: Validation of quantifying abilities and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Arruabarrena, Julen; de Beer, Jacques; Hellings, Mario; Van Den Kerkhof, Tom; Burggraeve, Anneleen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the thorough validation of an in-line NIR based moisture quantification method in the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line (ConsiGma™ 25, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium). The moisture assessment ability of an FT-NIR spectrometer (Matrix™-F Duplex, Bruker Optics Ltd, UK) equipped with a fiber-optic Lighthouse Probe™ (LHP, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium) was investigated. Although NIR spectroscopy is a widely used technique for in-process moisture determination, a minority of NIR spectroscopy methods is thoroughly validated. A moisture quantification PLS model was developed. Twenty calibration experiments were conducted, during which spectra were collected at-line and then regressed versus the corresponding residual moisture values obtained via Karl Fischer measurements. The developed NIR moisture quantification model was then validated by calculating the accuracy profiles on the basis of the analysis results of independent in-line validation experiments. Furthermore, as the aim of the NIR method is to replace the destructive, time-consuming Karl Fischer titration, it was statistically demonstrated that the new NIR method performs at least as good as the Karl Fischer reference method. PMID:25124155

  20. NIR spectroscopic method for the in-line moisture assessment during drying in a six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous tablet production line: Validation of quantifying abilities and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Arruabarrena, Julen; de Beer, Jacques; Hellings, Mario; Van Den Kerkhof, Tom; Burggraeve, Anneleen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the thorough validation of an in-line NIR based moisture quantification method in the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line (ConsiGma™ 25, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium). The moisture assessment ability of an FT-NIR spectrometer (Matrix™-F Duplex, Bruker Optics Ltd, UK) equipped with a fiber-optic Lighthouse Probe™ (LHP, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium) was investigated. Although NIR spectroscopy is a widely used technique for in-process moisture determination, a minority of NIR spectroscopy methods is thoroughly validated. A moisture quantification PLS model was developed. Twenty calibration experiments were conducted, during which spectra were collected at-line and then regressed versus the corresponding residual moisture values obtained via Karl Fischer measurements. The developed NIR moisture quantification model was then validated by calculating the accuracy profiles on the basis of the analysis results of independent in-line validation experiments. Furthermore, as the aim of the NIR method is to replace the destructive, time-consuming Karl Fischer titration, it was statistically demonstrated that the new NIR method performs at least as good as the Karl Fischer reference method.

  1. Transient motion of mucus plugs in respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Parsa; Hu, Yingying; Helenbrook, Brian; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Airway closure occurs in lung diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, or emphysema which have an excess of mucus that forms plugs. The reopening process involves displacement of mucus plugs in the airways by the airflow of respiration. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid with a yield stress; therefore its behavior can be approximated by a Bingham fluid constitutive equation. In this work the reopening process is approximated by simulation of a transient Bingham fluid plug in a 2D channel. The governing equations are solved by an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method through an in-house code. The constitutive equation for the Bingham fluid is implemented through a regularization method. The effects of the yield stress on the flow features and wall stresses are discussed with applications to potential injuries to the airway epithelial cells which form the wall. The minimum driving pressure for the initiation of the motion is computed and its value is related to the mucus properties and the plug shape. Supported by HL84370 and HL85156.

  2. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems using laser absorption spectroscopy: Application to stalagmites from Borneo and Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Fleitmann, Dominik; Nele Meckler, Anna; Leuenberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Speleothems are recognised as key continental archives for paleoclimate reconstructions. They contain fluid inclusions representing past drip water trapped in the calcite structure. Speleothem can be precisely dated and therefore the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of fluid inclusions constitute powerful proxies for paleotemperature or to investigate changes in the moisture source over several interglacial-glacial cycles. To liberate fluid inclusion water and to analyse its isotopic composition, a new online extraction method developed at Bern is used. The principle can be summarised as follows: Prior to crushing, the sample is placed into a copper tube, fixed to the line previously heated to 140° C and flushed with a nitrogen and standard water mixture. Thereafter, the speleothem sample is crushed using a simple hydraulic crushing device and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by the nitrogen-standard water mixture flow to a Picarro L1102-i isotopic liquid water and water vapor analyser. The measuring principle is based on wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Reproducibility of standard water measurements is typically better than 1.5 o for δD and 0.4 o for δ18O. With this method, we successfully analysed δD and δ18O isotopic composition of a stalagmite from Northern Borneo (tropical West Pacific) covering almost two glacial-interglacial cycles from MIS 12 to early MIS 9 (460-330 ka) as well as recent samples from Switzerland and Borneo. These results are used in combination with calcite δ18O to reconstruct paleotemperature. Currently, we are measuring a stalagmite from Milandre cave (Jura, Switzerland) covering the Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas cold phase and the Holocene.

  3. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  4. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  5. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  6. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  7. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  8. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  9. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  10. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-01-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale. PMID:23729842

  11. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-07-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  12. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea.

  13. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction.

  14. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  15. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  16. Ciliated neurons lining the central canal sense both fluid movement and pH through ASIC3.

    PubMed

    Jalalvand, Elham; Robertson, Brita; Wallén, Peter; Grillner, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c) cells are found in all vertebrates but their function has remained elusive. We recently identified one type of laterally projecting CSF-c cell in lamprey spinal cord with neuronal properties that expresses GABA and somatostatin. We show here that these CSF-c neurons respond to both mechanical stimulation and to lowered pH. These effects are most likely mediated by ASIC3-channels, since APETx2, a specific antagonist of ASIC3, blocks them both. Furthermore, lowering of pH as well as application of somatostatin will reduce the locomotor burst rate. The somatostatin receptor antagonist counteracts the effects of both a decrease in pH and of somatostatin. Lateral bending movement imposed on the spinal cord, as would occur during natural swimming, activates CSF-c neurons. Taken together, we show that CSF-c neurons act both as mechanoreceptors and as chemoreceptors through ASIC3 channels, and their action may protect against pH-changes resulting from excessive neuronal activity. PMID:26743691

  17. Ciliated neurons lining the central canal sense both fluid movement and pH through ASIC3

    PubMed Central

    Jalalvand, Elham; Robertson, Brita; Wallén, Peter; Grillner, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c) cells are found in all vertebrates but their function has remained elusive. We recently identified one type of laterally projecting CSF-c cell in lamprey spinal cord with neuronal properties that expresses GABA and somatostatin. We show here that these CSF-c neurons respond to both mechanical stimulation and to lowered pH. These effects are most likely mediated by ASIC3-channels, since APETx2, a specific antagonist of ASIC3, blocks them both. Furthermore, lowering of pH as well as application of somatostatin will reduce the locomotor burst rate. The somatostatin receptor antagonist counteracts the effects of both a decrease in pH and of somatostatin. Lateral bending movement imposed on the spinal cord, as would occur during natural swimming, activates CSF-c neurons. Taken together, we show that CSF-c neurons act both as mechanoreceptors and as chemoreceptors through ASIC3 channels, and their action may protect against pH-changes resulting from excessive neuronal activity. PMID:26743691

  18. A Mixture Reflecting Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Profiles Detected in Human Follicular Fluid Significantly Affects Steroidogenesis and Induces Oxidative Stress in a Female Human Granulosa Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Pavine L C; Wade, Mike; Goodyer, Cindy; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Brominated flame retardants are incorporated into consumer products to prevent flame propagation. These compounds leach into the domestic environment, resulting in chronic exposure. Pregnancy failure is associated with high levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a major class of brominated flame retardants, in human follicular fluid, raising serious questions regarding their impact on female fertility. Our goal was to elucidate the effects of a mixture of PBDEs, similar to the profile found in human follicular fluid, on an immortalized human granulosa cell line, the KGN cell line. We showed that cell viability was altered and oxidative stress was induced as reflected by increased reactive oxygen species formation at 100 μM of the PBDE mixture. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that PBDE treatments of 1, 5, and 20 μM altered the expression of several genes involved in the reactive oxygen species signaling pathway. Significant dose-dependent reductions in progesterone and estradiol levels in the culture medium were measured after PBDE treatment; in parallel, the expression of genes involved in estradiol metabolism, namely CYP1A1, was up-regulated by 5 and 20 μM of the PBDE mixture. Treatment with 20 μM PBDE also increased the expression and secretion of the proinflammatory factor, IL-6, into the KGN cell culture medium. Our results demonstrate that PBDEs can alter human granulosa cell functions by inducing oxidative stress and disrupting steroidogenesis. These results indicate that PBDEs may be detrimental to ovarian functions and thus may adversely affect female reproductive health after chronic exposure. PMID:27219277

  19. The effect of viscoelasticity on the stability of a pulmonary airway liquid layer

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The lungs consist of a network of bifurcating airways that are lined with a thin liquid film. This film is a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid possessing viscoelastic characteristics. Surface tension induces flows within the layer, which may cause the lung’s airways to close due to liquid plug formation if the liquid film is sufficiently thick. The stability of the liquid layer is also influenced by the viscoelastic nature of the liquid, which is modeled using the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation or as a Jeffreys fluid. To examine the role of mucus alone, a single layer of a viscoelastic fluid is considered. A system of nonlinear evolution equations is derived using lubrication theory for the film thickness and the film flow rate. A uniform film is initially perturbed and a normal mode analysis is carried out that shows that the growth rate g for a viscoelastic layer is larger than for a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. Closure occurs if the minimum core radius, Rmin(t), reaches zero within one breath. Solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations reveal that Rmin normally decreases to zero faster with increasing relaxation time parameter, the Weissenberg number We. For small values of the dimensionless film thickness parameter ε, the closure time, tc, increases slightly with We, while for moderate values of ε, ranging from 14% to 18% of the tube radius, tc decreases rapidly with We provided the solvent viscosity is sufficiently small. Viscoelasticity was found to have little effect for ε>0.18, indicating the strong influence of surface tension. The film thickness parameter ε and the Weissenberg number We also have a significant effect on the maximum shear stress on tube wall, max(τw), and thus, potentially, an impact on cell damage. Max(τw) increases with ε for fixed We, and it decreases with increasing We for small We provided the solvent viscosity parameter is sufficiently

  20. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of airway allergic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelium lining the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human IgE receptor, CD23 (Fc'RII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monola...

  1. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  2. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  3. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  4. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid imbalance; Hypernatremia - fluid imbalance; Hypokalemia - fluid imbalance; Hyperkalemia - fluid imbalance ... of sodium or potassium is present as well. Medicines can also affect fluid balance. The most common ...

  5. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  6. On-line supercritical fluid extraction/enzymatic hydrolysis of vitamin a esters: a new simplified approach for the determination of vitamins a and e in food.

    PubMed

    Turner, C; King, J W; Mathiasson, L

    2001-02-01

    An on-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE)/enzymatic hydrolysis procedure using immobilized lipase has been developed for the determination of vitamin A in dairy and meat products. Several lipases were tried, of which Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica type B) showed the highest activity toward retinyl palmitate. There was no observed activity with alpha-tocopheryl acetate. When pressure, temperature, modifiers, flow rate, extraction time, and water content were varied, high vitamin A recovery was obtained in milk powder. Collected extracts were analyzed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and fluorescence detection without additional sample cleanup. The procedure gave reliable values of vitamin A as well as of vitamin E in other food items such as infant formula, minced pork and beef meat, and low- and high-fat liver paste. The described method is faster and more automated than conventional methods based on liquid-liquid extraction, or SFE using off-line saponification, for vitamin A and E determination. Results obtained with the new method did not differ significantly from those obtained with the other two methods mentioned above.

  7. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  8. On locating the obstruction in the human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, S.

    2013-11-01

    The fluid dynamical properties of the air flow in the human upper airway (UA) are not fully understood at present due to the three-dimensional, patient-specific complex geometry of the airway, flow transition from laminar to turbulent and flow-structure interaction during the breathing cycle. One of the major challenges to surgeons is determining the location of the UA obstruction before performing corrective surgeries. It is quite difficult at present to experimentally measure the instantaneous velocity and pressure at specific points in the human airway. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) can predict all the flow properties and resolve all its relevant length- and time-scales. We developed a DNS solver with lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and used it to investigate the flow in two patient-specific UAs reconstructed from CT scan data. Inspiration and expiration flows through these two airways are studied and compared. Pressure gradient-time signals at different locations in the UAs are used to determine the location of the obstruction. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  9. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  10. Laryngo-tracheal ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway placement.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A; Cattano, Davide

    2014-12-01

    Waveform capnography was recommended as the most reliable method to confirm correct endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway placements. However, capnography may be unreliable during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and during low flow states. It may lead to an unnecessary removal of a well-placed endotracheal tube, re-intubation and interruption of chest compressions. Real-time upper airway (laryngo-tracheal) ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube placement was shown to be very useful in cadaveric models and during emergency intubation. Tracheal ultrasonography does not interrupt chest compressions and is not affected by low pulmonary flow or airway obstruction, but is limited by ultrasonography scattering and acoustic artifacts generated in air - mucosa interfaces. Sonographic upper airway assessment emerges as a rapid and easily available method to predict difficult intubation, to assess the laryngeal and hypopharyngeal size and visualize the position of the laryngeal mask airway in situ. This study demonstrates that the replacement of air with saline in endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway cuffs and the use of the contrast agents enables detection of cuffs in the airway. It also allows visualization of the surrounding structures or tissues as the ultrasound beam can be transmitted through the fluid - filled cuffs without being reflected from air - mucosal interfaces. PMID:26672974

  11. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  12. Composition of nasal airway surface liquid in cystic fibrosis and other airway diseases determined by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Vanthanouvong, V; Kozlova, I; Johannesson, M; Nääs, E; Nordvall, S L; Dragomir, A; Roomans, G M

    2006-04-01

    The ionic composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) in healthy individuals and in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been debated. Ion transport properties of the upper airway epithelium are similar to those of the lower airways and it is easier to collect nasal ASL from the nose. ASL was collected with ion exchange beads, and the elemental composition of nasal fluid was determined by X-ray microanalysis in healthy subjects, CF patients, CF heterozygotes, patients with rhinitis, and with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In healthy subjects, the ionic concentrations were approximately isotonic. In CF patients, CF heterozygotes, rhinitis, and PCD patients, [Na] and [Cl] were significantly higher compared when compared with those in controls. [K] was significantly higher in CF and PCD patients compared with that in controls. Severely affected CF patients had higher ionic concentrations in their nasal ASL than in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. Female CF patients had higher levels of Na, Cl, and K than male patients. As higher salt concentrations in the ASL are also found in other patients with airway diseases involving chronic inflammation, it appears likely that inflammation-induced epithelial damage is important in determining the ionic composition of the ASL. PMID:16586482

  13. Postnatal Exposure History and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Miller, Lisa A.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O3) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O3 exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O3 biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5–8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O3, HDMA, and HDMA+O3) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O3. However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O3–exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O3 exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  14. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  15. Respiratory Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James

    2005-11-01

    This brief overview of our groups activities includes liquid plug propagation in single and bifurcating tubes, a subject which pertains to surfactant delivery, liquid ventilation, pulmonary edema, and drowning. As the plug propagates, a variety of flow patterns may emerge depending on the parameters. It splits unevenly at airway bifurcations and can rupture, which reopens the airway to gas flow. Both propagation and rupture may damage the underlying airway wall cells. Another topic is surfactant dynamics and flow in a model of an oscillating alveolus. The analysis shows a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration time periods and the sorption parameter. Vortices, single and multiple, may be achieved, as well as a saddle point configuration. Potential applications are pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. Finally, capillary instabilities which cause airway closure, and strategies for stabilization, will be presented. This involves the core-annular flow of a liquid-lined tube, where the core (air) is forced to oscillate axially. The stabilization mechanism is similar to that of a reversing butter knife, where the core shear wipes the growing liquid bulge, from the Rayleigh instability, back on to the tube wall during the main tidal volume stroke, but allows it to grow back as the stroke and shear turn around.

  16. Inspiratory and expiratory aerosol deposition in the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Verbanck, S; Kalsi, H S; Biddiscombe, M F; Agnihotri, V; Belkassem, B; Lacor, C; Usmani, O S

    2011-02-01

    Aerosol deposition efficiency (DE) in the extrathoracic airways during mouth breathing is currently documented only for the inspiratory phase of respiration, and there is a need for quantification of expiratory DE. Our aim was to study both inspiratory and expiratory DE in a realistic upper airway geometry. This was done experimentally on a physical upper airway cast by scintigraphy, and numerically by computational fluid dynamic simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier?Stokes (RANS) method with a k-? SST turbulence model coupled with a stochastic Lagrangian approach. Experiments and simulations were carried out for particle sizes (3 and 6 μm) and flow rates (30 and 60 L/min) spanning the ranges of Stokes (Stk) and Reynolds (Re) number pertinent to therapeutic and environmental aerosols. We showed that inspiratory total deposition data obtained by scintigraphy fell onto a previously published deposition curve representative of a range of upper airway geometries. We also found that expiratory and inspiratory DE curves were almost identical. Finally, DE in different compartments of the upper airway model showed a very different distribution pattern of aerosol deposition during inspiration and expiration, with preferential deposition in oral and pharyngeal compartments, respectively. These compartmental deposition patterns were very consistent and only slightly dependent on particle size or flow rate. Total deposition for inspiration and expiration was reasonably well-mimicked by the RANS simulation method we employed, and more convincingly so in the upper range of the Stk and Re number. However, compartmental deposition patterns showed discrepancies between experiments and RANS simulations, particularly during expiration.

  17. Rapid clearance of xanthines from airway and pulmonary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Kroell, F.K.; Karlsson, J.A.; Nilsson, E.; Ryrfeldt, A.; Persson, C.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The airway and pulmonary fate of two antiasthma xanthines was examined in a guinea pig perfused lung preparation where the airway mechanics and airway microvascular perfusion are maintained at near normal values. 14C-theophylline or 14C-enprofylline was infused for 10, 30, and 300 s into the pulmonary artery of the guinea pig isolated lung. The radioactivity increased rapidly (within 10 s) in tracheobronchial as well as in lung tissue, confirming that the large airway microcirculation was well supplied also by the perfusion. The effluent concentrations of total 3H and 14C radioactivity at the onset, during, and after intrapulmonary infusion of 14C-labeled xanthines and 3H-sucrose were closely associated, suggesting that the xanthines, like sucrose, largely distributed in extracellular fluid and were not taken up by the tissues. No metabolites of enprofylline or theophylline could be detected in the lung tissue or lung effluent, suggesting that xanthines are not biotransformed by the guinea pig lung. After intratracheal instillation of 14C-theophylline, the peak radioactivity in the lung effluent appeared in the second 15-s fraction after instillation, and after 10 and 60 min, 68.1 +/- 4.7% and 86.9 +/- 8.4%, respectively, of the given dose had appeared in the lung effluent. The present data suggest a mainly extracellular distribution and a rapid clearance of xanthines from the lung and airway tissues. The rapid disappearance of topical theophylline may explain the lack of success of inhalation therapy with this drug.

  18. Synthetic double-stranded RNA enhances airway inflammation and remodelling in a rat model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Satoshi; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Takayama, Koji; Okayasu, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Kimitake; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Sumi, Yuki; Martin, James G; Inase, Naohiko

    2011-10-01

    Respiratory viral infections are frequently associated with exacerbations of asthma. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) produced during viral infections may be one of the stimuli for exacerbation. We aimed to assess the potential effect of dsRNA on certain aspects of chronic asthma through the administration of polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), synthetic dsRNA, to a rat model of asthma. Brown Norway rats were sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged three times to evoke airway remodelling. The effect of poly I:C on the ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and structural changes was assessed from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histological findings. The expression of cytokines and chemokines was evaluated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR and ELISA. Ovalbumin-challenged animals showed an increased number of total cells and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with PBS-challenged controls. Ovalbumin-challenged animals treated with poly I:C showed an increased number of total cells and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with those without poly I:C treatment. Ovalbumin-challenged animals showed goblet cell hyperplasia, increased airway smooth muscle mass, and proliferation of both airway epithelial cells and airway smooth muscle cells. Treatment with poly I:C enhanced these structural changes. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, the expression of interleukins 12 and 17 and of transforming growth factor-β(1) in ovalbumin-challenged animals treated with poly I:C was significantly increased compared with those of the other groups. Double-stranded RNA enhanced airway inflammation and remodelling in a rat model of bronchial asthma. These observations suggest that viral infections may promote airway remodelling.

  19. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management.

  20. Feasibility of on-line supercritical fluid extraction of steroids from aqueous-based matrices with analysis via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ashraf-khorassani, M; Taylor, L T

    2000-11-01

    The solubility of testosterone, boldenone, androstenone, etiocholanolone, and epitestosterone are measured in pure supercritical CO2. Testosterone exhibited the highest solubility in supercritical CO2. The solubility of all steroids except epitestosterone increased by one order of magnitude with increasing pressure from 100 to 400 atm. Epitestosterone had the lowest solubility in supercritical CO2 and its solubility was not affected by pressure. The extraction efficiency of steroids from an aqueous saline environment exceeded 95%. Because of the partial solubility of water in supercritical CO2, the addition of a moisture trap after the aqueous vessel is necessary to prevent the plugging and deterioration of the gas chromatographic (GC) column. It is demonstrated that on-line supercritical fluid extraction-GC-mass spectrometry is feasible for the quantitative extraction and analysis of steroids from both saline and urine solutions. However, it is determined that the adsorbent vessel filled with Hydromatrix is not sufficient to trap all the moisture, and after 3 to 4 extractions, the GC column efficiency lowered. PMID:11105770

  1. Penetration of GS4071, a novel influenza neuraminidase inhibitor, into rat bronchoalveolar lining fluid following oral administration of the prodrug GS4104.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, E J; Bidgood, A; Cundy, K C

    1997-01-01

    GS4071 is a novel potent inhibitor of influenza neuraminidase (Ki < 1 nM) with low (< 5%) oral bioavailability in animals. An ethyl ester prodrug of GS4071, GS4104, has exhibited good oral bioavailability in rat, mouse, and dog models and is currently being developed for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. Since influenza virus replicates primarily in the surface epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, the ability of the prodrug to deliver GS4071 to the bronchoalveolar lining fluid (BALF) following an oral dose of GS4104 should be an important indicator of its potential efficacy. In the present study, we determined the concentration-time profiles of GS4071 in the BALF and plasma of rats following oral administration of GS4104. The BALF was sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage with endogenous urea as a dilution marker. The concentration of GS4071 in BALF reached a peak at 2 h (1 h after the plasma peak) and declined at a slower rate than plasma levels, suggesting slow clearance of drug from the lung acini. The ratios of the area-under-the-curve (AUC) values of GS4071 in BALF to those in plasma were 1.05 for AUC from 0 to 6 h (AUC(0-6)) and 1.51 for AUC(0-infinity), indicating significant penetration of the parent drug into the lower respiratory tracts of rats following oral administration of the prodrug. No unchanged GS4104 was detected in BALF. PMID:9303391

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction as an on-line clean-up technique for determination of riboflavin vitamins in food samples by capillary electrophoresis with fluorimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Zougagh, Mohammed; Ríos, Angel

    2008-08-01

    An automatic method for the separation and determination of riboflavin (RF) vitamins (RF, flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide) in food samples (chicken liver, tablet and powder milk) is proposed. The method is based on the on-line coupling of a supercritical fluid extractor (SFE) with a continuous flow-CE system with guided optical fiber fluorimetric detection (CF-CE-FD). The whole SFE-CF-CE-FD arrangement allowed the automatic treatment of food samples (clean-up of the sample followed by the extraction of the analytes), and the direct introduction of a small volume of the extracted plug to the CE-FD system for the determination of RF vitamins. Fluorescence detection introduced an appropriated sensitivity and contributed to avoid interferences of nonfluorescent polar compounds coming from the matrix samples in the extracted plug. Electrophoretic responses were linear within the 0.05-1 microg/g range, whereas the detection limits of RF vitamins were in the 0.036-0.042 microg/g range. The proposed arrangement opens up interesting prospects for the direct determination of polar analytes in complex samples with a good throughput and high level of automation.

  3. Efficient drug delivery to alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial lining fluid following pulmonary administration of liposomal ciprofloxacin in rats with pneumonia and estimation of its antibacterial effects.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-10-01

    The efficacy of pulmonary administration of liposomal ciprofloxacin (CPFX) in pneumonia was evaluated. In brief, the pharmacokinetics following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX (particle size, 1,000 nm; dose, 200 microg/kg) were examined in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced pneumonia as an experimental pneumonia model. Furthermore, the antibacterial effects of liposomal CPFX against the pneumonic causative organisms were estimated by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. The time-courses of the concentration of CPFX in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX to rats with pneumonia were markedly higher than that following the administration of free CPFX (200 microg/kg). The time course of the concentrations of CPFX in plasma following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX was markedly lower than that in AMs and ELF. These results indicate that pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX was more effective in delivering CPFX to AMs and ELF compared with free CPFX, and it avoids distribution of CPFX to the blood. According to PK/PD analysis, the liposomal CPFX exhibited potent antibacterial effects against the causative organisms of pneumonia. This study indicates that pulmonary administration of CPFX could be an effective technique for the treatment of pneumonia.

  4. Distribution characteristics of clarithromycin and azithromycin, macrolide antimicrobial agents used for treatment of respiratory infections, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of clarithromycin (CAM) and azithromycin (AZM), macrolide antimicrobial agents, in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In the in vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of CAM and AZM in ELF and AMs following oral administration (50 mg/kg) to rats were markedly higher than those in plasma, and the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma of CAM and AZM were 12 and 2.2, and the AUC ratios of AMs/ELF were 37 and 291, respectively. In the in vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers were greater than the apical-to-basolateral transport. MDR1 substrates reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM. In the in vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular concentrations of CAM and AZM in cultured AMs (NR8383) were greater than the extracellular concentrations. The uptake of CAM and AZM by NR8383 was inhibited by ATP depletors. These data suggest that the high distribution of CAM and AZM to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by the AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms.

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  6. Task 2: Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Semi-annual report, April 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This activity will result in a commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed an SFE field-portable method for quantitatively extracting organic pollutants (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], total petroleum hydrocarbons [TPHs]) from soils and sludges under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding. FT-IR is a detector that can yield quantitative and compound-class information for organic pollutants and is excellent for survey uses, since virtually all organic compound classes can be monitored. A laboratory prototype SFE-FT-IR instrument has been developed at the EERC and the University of North Dakota (UND) Department of Chemistry. The commercial instrument will be field-portable (requiring only generator electricity) and able to extract and measure organic pollutants from soils and sludges, identify the compound classes present, and provide quantitative or semiquantitative results at detection limits relevant to regulatory needs (e.g., parts per million). The SFE-FT-IR approach is particularly advantageous for very hazardous samples (e.g., determination of organics in solids contaminated with radioactive components), since SFE-FT-IR analysis generates no waste solvents. The instrument will also be configured to allow collection of {open_quotes}positive{close_quotes} extracts for analysis by other confirmatory (e.g., gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy [GC-MS]) methods.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact.

  9. Lung function and airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    Two studies report genome-wide association studies for lung function, using cross-sectional spirometric measurements in healthy individuals. They identify six genetic loci newly associated to natural variation in lung function, which may have implications for the related airway diseases of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:20037613

  10. Host-Integration of a Tissue-Engineered Airway Patch: Two-Year Follow-Up in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dally, Iris; Friedel, Godehard; Walles, Heike; Walles, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Different bioengineering techniques have been applied repeatedly for the reconstruction of extensive airway defects in the last few years. While short-term surgical success is evident, there is a lack of long-term results in patients. Here, we report the case of a young male who received a 5×2 cm bioartificial airway patch for tracheoesophageal reconstruction focusing on clinical defect healing and histomorphological tissue reorganization 2.5 years after surgery. We generated bioartificial airway tissue using a cell-free biological vascularized scaffold that was re-endothelialized and reseeded with the recipient's autologous primary cells and we implanted it into the recipient's left main bronchus. To investigate host-integration 2.5 years after the implantation, we obtained biopsies of the implant and adjacent tracheal tissue and processed these for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The early postoperative course was uneventful and the transplanted airway tissue was integrated into the host. 2.5 years after transplantation, a bronchoscopy confirmed the scar-free reconstruction of the former airway defect. Histological work-up documented respiratory airway mucosa lining the bronchial reconstruction, making it indistinguishable from native airway mucosa. After transplantation, our bioartificial airway tissue provided perfect airway healing, with no histological evidence of tissue dedifferentiation. PMID:25316325

  11. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D E; Wiener-Kronish, J P

    1991-09-01

    For clinicians involved in airway management, a plan of action for dealing with the difficult airway or a failed intubation should be developed well in advance of encountering a patient in whom intubation is not routine. When difficulty is anticipated, the equipment necessary for performing a difficult intubation should be immediately available. It also is prudent to have a surgeon skilled in performing a tracheotomy and a criothyroidotomy stand by. The intubation should be attempted in the awake state, preferably using the fiberoptic bronchoscope. The more challenging situation is when the difficult airway is confronted unexpectedly. After the first failed attempt at laryngoscopy, head position should be checked and the patient ventilated with oxygen by mask. A smaller styletted tube and possibly a different laryngoscope blade should be selected for a second attempt at intubation. The fiberoptic bronchoscope and other equipment for difficult intubation should be obtained. A second attempt should then be made. If this is unsuccessful, the patient should be reoxygenated, and assistance including a skilled anesthesiologist and surgeon should be summoned. On a third attempt, traction to the tongue can be applied by an assistant, a tube changer could be used to enter the larynx, or one of the other special techniques previously described can be used. If this third attempt fails, it may be helpful to have a physician more experienced in airway management attempt intubation after oxygen has been administered to the patient. If all attempts are unsuccessful, then invasive techniques to secure the airway will have to be performed. PMID:1934950

  12. Fluid-line math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandelman, A.; Nelson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified mathematical model simulates large hydraulic systems on either analog or digital computers. Models of pumps, servoactuators, reservoirs, accumulators, and valves are connected generating systems containing six hundred elements.

  13. [Supraglottic airways in infants and children].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kai

    2013-04-01

    The development of the LMA-Classic™ revolutionized anaesthesia practice as its wide-spread use led to the establishment of a unique form of airway management, the "supraglottic airway management", besides the existing classical airway management with the face mask or endotracheal tube. Today, 25 years later, along with the original prototype of supraglottic airways quite a few numbers of different devices exist that can be used to secure the airway "above the glottis". After initially primarily marketing adult sizes many suppliers offer paediatric sizes nowadays. However, the scientific evidence in terms of superiority or at a least equality to the original LMA-Classic( of any of these airway devices must be considered insufficient except for the LMA-ProSeal™. Consequently, the routine use of these devices outside controlled clinical studies must be considered questionable. The following article aims at providing a critical appraisal of currently available supraglottic airway devices for neonates and infants. PMID:23633256

  14. Laryngeal mask airway: uses in anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Pinosky, M

    1996-06-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA), developed in 1983, is a new device to assist in the management of the pediatric and adult airway. In 1991, the Food and Drug Administration gave its approval for use of the LMA in the United States. The LMA is reusable and appears to provide cost-effective airway management in numerous situations. The LMA is simple to use, atraumatic to insert, and helpful in overcoming an obstructed airway. Its role in management of the difficult airway and the traumatic airway is still evolving. This review will introduce the LMA to the nonanesthesiologist and review for the anesthesiologist the origins of the LMA, its physical structure, the technical aspects of insertion, problems with aspiration, its role in the difficult airway, and experience with the pediatric population.

  15. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  16. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid in naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in multisource commingled feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, K D; Apley, M D; Li, M; Gehring, R; Harhay, D M; Lubbers, B V; White, B J; Capik, S F; KuKanich, B; Riviere, J E; Tessman, R K

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether an association exists between individual pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment outcome when feeder cattle were diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and treated with gamithromycin (Zactran(®) ) at the label dose and (ii) whether there was a stronger association between treatment outcome and gamithromycin concentration in plasma or in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) effect compartment. The study design was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial utilizing three groups of 60 (362-592 lb) steers/bulls randomly allocated within origin to sham injection or gamithromycin mass medication. Cattle were evaluated daily for signs of BRD by a veterinarian blinded to treatment. Animals meeting the BRD case definition were enrolled and allocated to a sample collection scheme consisting of samples for bacterial isolation (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and nasopharyngeal swabs) and gamithromycin concentration determination (PELF and plasma). Gamithromycin susceptibility of M. haemolytica (n = 287) and P. multocida (n = 257) were determined using broth microdilution with frozen panels containing gamithromycin at concentrations from 0.03 to 16 μg/mL. A two-compartment plasma pharmacokinetic model with an additional compartment for gamithromycin in PELF was developed using rich data sets from published and unpublished studies. The sparse data from our study were then fit to this model using nonlinear mixed effects modeling to estimate individual parameter values. The resulting parameter estimates were used to simulate full time-concentration profiles for each animal in this study. These profiles were analyzed using noncompartmental methods so that PK/PD indices (AUC24 /MIC, AUC∞ /MIC, CMAX /MIC) could be calculated for plasma and PELF (also T>MIC) for each individual. The calculated PK/PD indices were indicative that for both M. haemolytica and P. multocida a higher drug

  18. Targeting TSLP With shRNA Alleviates Airway Inflammation and Decreases Epithelial CCL17 in a Murine Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lien; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium defends the invasion from microorganisms and regulates immune responses in allergic asthma. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) from inflamed epithelium promotes maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) to prime Th2 responses via CCL17, which induces chemotaxis of CD4+ T cells to mediate inflammation. However, few studies have investigated the regulation of epithelial CCL17. In this study, we used shRNA against TSLP to clarify the role of TSLP in the airway inflammation and whether TSLP affects the airway inflammation via epithelial CCL17. Specific shTSLP was delivered by lentivirus and selected by the knockdown efficiency. Allergic mice were intratracheally pretreated with the lentivirus and followed by intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) challenges. The sera antibody levels, airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and CCL17 expressions in lungs were determined. In vivo, TSLP attenuation reduced the AHR, decreased the airway inflammation, inhibited the maturations of DCs, and suppressed the migration of T cells. Furthermore, the expression of CCL17 was particularly decreased in bronchial epithelium. In vitro, CCL17 induction was regulated by TSLP. In conclusion, TSLP might coordinate airway inflammation partially via CCL17-mediated responses and this study provides the vital utility of TSLP to develop the therapeutic approach in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27138176

  19. Sampling the Airway: Improving the Predictive and Toxicological Value of Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a relatively simple technique to obtain biological material in the form of BAL fluid (BALF) from airways of humans and laboratory animals. Numerous predictive biomarkers of pulmonary injury and diseases can be detected in BALF which aid in diagnosi...

  20. Fluid Mechanics of Capillary-Elastic Instabilities in Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the closure and reopening of lung airways due to surface tension forces, coupled with airway elasticity. Airways are liquid-lined, flexible tubes and closure of airways can occur by a Rayleigh instability of the liquid lining, or an instability of the elastic support for the airway as the surface tension of the air-liquid interface pulls the tube shut, or both. Regardless of the mechanism, the airway is closed because the liquid lining has created a plug that prevents axial gas exchange. In the microgravity environment, surface tension forces dominate lung mechanics and would lead to more prevalent, and more uniformly distributed air-way closure, thereby creating a potential for respiratory problems for astronauts. Once closed the primary option for reopening an airway is by deep inspiration. This maneuver will pull the flexible airways open and force the liquid plug to flow distally by the incoming air stream. Airway reopening depends to a large extent on this plug flow and how it may lead to plug rupture to regain the continuity of gas between the environment and the alveoli. In addition to mathematical modeling of plug flows in liquid-lined, flexible tubes, this work has involved benchtop studies of propagating liquid plugs down tube networks that mimic the human airway tree. We have extended the work to involve animal models of liquid plug propagation in rat lungs. The liquid is radio-opaque and x-ray video imaging is used to ascertain the movement and distribution of the liquid plugs so that comparisons to theory may be made. This research has other uses, such as the delivery of liquids or drugs into the lung that may be used for surfactant replacement therapy or for liquid ventilation.

  1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator trafficking modulates the barrier function of airway epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    LeSimple, Pierre; Liao, Jie; Robert, Renaud; Gruenert, Dieter C; Hanrahan, John W

    2010-04-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an integral membrane glycoprotein which functions as an anion channel and influences diverse cellular processes. We studied its role in the development of epithelial tightness by expressing wild-type (WT-CFTR) or mutant (Delta F508-CFTR) CFTR in human airway epithelial cell monolayers cultured at the air-liquid interface. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged WT or Delta F508 constructs were expressed in the CF bronchial cell line CFBE41o(-) using adenoviruses, and the results were compared with those obtained using CFBE41o(-) lines stably complemented with wild-type or mutant CFTR. As predicted, GFP-Delta WT-CFTR reached the apical membrane whereas GFP-F508-CFTR was only detected intracellularly. Although CFTR expression would be expected to reduce transepithelial resistance (TER), expressing GFP-CFTR significantly increased the TER of CFBE41o(-) monolayers whilst GFP-Delta F508-CFTR had no effect. Similar results were obtained with cell lines stably overexpressing Delta F508-CFTR or WT-CFTR. Preincubating Delta F508-CFTR monolayers at 29 degrees C reduced mannitol permeability and restored TER, and the effect on TER was reversible during temperature oscillations. Expression of GFP-Delta F508-CFTR or GFP-WT-CFTR in a cell line already containing endogenous WT-CFTR (Calu-3) did not alter TER. The CFTR- and temperature-dependence of TER were not affected by the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)172 or low-chloride medium; therefore the effect of CFTR on barrier function was unrelated to its ion channel activity. Modulation of TER was blunted but not eliminated by genistein, implying the involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation and other mechanisms. Modulation of CFTR trafficking was correlated with an increase in tight junction depth. The results suggest that CFTR trafficking is required for the normal organisation and function of tight junctions. A reduction in barrier function caused by endoplasmic reticulum

  2. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  3. Origins of and implementation concepts for upper airway stimulation therapy for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl M D, Kingman P; Baskin M D, Jonathan; Lance M D, Colleen; Ponsky M D, Diana; Weidenbecher M D, Mark; Strohl B A, Madeleine; Yamauchi M D, Motoo

    2016-07-01

    Upper airway stimulation, specifically hypoglossal (CN XII) nerve stimulation, is a new, alternative therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome who cannot tolerate positive airway pressure, the first-line therapy for symptomatic patients. Stimulation therapy addresses the cause of inadequate upper airway muscle activation for nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this report is to outline the development of this first-in-class therapy and its clinical implementation. Another practical theme is assessment of the features for considering a surgically implanted device and the insight as to how both clinical and endoscopic criteria increase the likelihood of safe and durable outcomes for an implant and how to more generally plan for management of CPAP-intolerant patients. A third theme is the team building required among sleep medicine and surgical specialties in the provision of individualized neurostimulation therapy. PMID:27424823

  4. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  5. UPPER AIRWAY BLOCKS FOR AWAKE DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Pintaric, Tatjana Stopar

    2016-03-01

    Airway anesthesia is pivotal for successful awake intubation provided either topically or by blocks. Airway blocks are considered technically more difficult to perform and carry a higher risk of complications. However, in experienced hands, they can be useful as they provide excellent intubating conditions. For complete upper airway anesthesia, bilateral glossopharyngeal and superior laryngeal nerve blocks with translaryngeal injection are required. Superior laryngeal nerve block and translaryngeal injection can be performed easily, safely and with a high success rate in patients with normal anatomy. In those with difficult landmarks, ultrasound can be of assistance. For the superior laryngeal nerve block, other targets than the nerve itself must be established to make the technique consistently successful, easy to teach, learn and perform. The same applies to the translaryngeal injection, where the use of ultrasound is necessary for correct midline identification. Intraoral glossopharyngeal nerve block is also safe and easy to perform, but associated with long lasting discomfort. Bilateral extraoral peristyloid approach should be discouraged since inadvertent blocks of the closely adjacent vagus nerve cannot be prevented in this location. A safe and easy method of blocking the distal portions of the glossopharyngeal nerve for awake intubation is therefore required. PMID:27276778

  6. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  7. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  8. Computational analysis of microbubble flows in bifurcating airways: role of gravity, inertia, and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zielinski, Rachel; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2014-10-01

    Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy for patients with severe lung disorders, the microbubble flows generated during ventilation generate hydrodynamic stresses, including pressure and shear stress gradients, which damage the pulmonary epithelium. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics to investigate how gravity, inertia, and surface tension influence both microbubble flow patterns in bifurcating airways and the magnitude/distribution of hydrodynamic stresses on the airway wall. Direct interface tracking and finite element techniques were used to simulate bubble propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled bifurcating airway. Computational solutions of the full incompressible Navier-Stokes equation were used to investigate how inertia, gravity, and surface tension forces as characterized by the Reynolds (Re), Bond (Bo), and Capillary (Ca) numbers influence pressure and shear stress gradients at the airway wall. Gravity had a significant impact on flow patterns and hydrodynamic stress magnitudes where Bo > 1 led to dramatic changes in bubble shape and increased pressure and shear stress gradients in the upper daughter airway. Interestingly, increased pressure gradients near the bifurcation point (i.e., carina) were only elevated during asymmetric bubble splitting. Although changes in pressure gradient magnitudes were generally more sensitive to Ca, under large Re conditions, both Re and Ca significantly altered the pressure gradient magnitude. We conclude that inertia, gravity, and surface tension can all have a significant impact on microbubble flow patterns and hydrodynamic stresses in bifurcating airways.

  9. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  10. Neonatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection May Aggravate Adulthood Allergic Airways Disease in Association with IL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Jiang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Lijia; Wang, Qinghong; Luo, Zhengxiu; Liu, Enmei; Fu, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that some bacteria colonization or infections in early-life increased the risk for subsequent asthma development. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which early-life bacterial infection increases this risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neonatal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection on the development of adulthood asthma, and to explore the possible mechanism. A non-lethal S. pneumoniae lung infection was established by intranasal inoculation of neonatal (1-week-old) female mice with D39. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin in adulthood to induce allergic airways disease (AAD). Twenty-four hours later, the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected to assess AAD. Neonatal S. pneumoniae infection exacerbated adulthood hallmark features of AAD, with enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness and increased neutrophil recruitment into the airways, increased Th17 cells and interleukin (IL)-17A productions. Depletion of IL-17A by i.p. injection of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody reduced neutrophil recruitment into the airways, alleviated airway inflammation and decreased airway hyperresponsiveness. Furthermore, IL-17A depletion partially restored levels of inteferon-γ, but had no effect on the release of IL-5 or IL-13. Our data suggest that neonatal S. pneumoniae infection may promote the development of adulthood asthma in association with increased IL-17A production. PMID:25816135

  11. Fisetin, a bioactive flavonol, attenuates allergic airway inflammation through negative regulation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Goh, Fera Y; Upton, Nadine; Guan, Shouping; Cheng, Chang; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Sethi, Gautam; Leung, Bernard P; Wong, W S Fred

    2012-03-15

    Persistent activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been associated with the development of asthma. Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring bioactive flavonol, has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activity. We hypothesized that fisetin may attenuate allergic asthma via negative regulation of the NF-κB activity. Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin developed airway inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was assessed for total and differential cell counts, and cytokine and chemokine levels. Lung tissues were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion, and the expression of inflammatory biomarkers. Airway hyperresponsiveness was monitored by direct airway resistance analysis. Fisetin dose-dependently inhibited ovalbumin-induced increases in total cell count, eosinophil count, and IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. It attenuated ovalbumin-induced lung tissue eosinophilia and airway mucus production, mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, chitinase, IL-17, IL-33, Muc5ac and inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung tissues, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fisetin blocked NF-κB subunit p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity in the nuclear extracts from lung tissues of ovalbumin-challenged mice. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, fisetin repressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Our findings implicate a potential therapeutic value of fisetin in the treatment of asthma through negative regulation of NF-κB pathway.

  12. Peripheral intravenous line (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peripheral intravenous line is a small, short plastic catheter that is placed through the skin into a vein, ... or foot, but occasionally in the head. A peripheral intravenous line is used to give fluids and ...

  13. Influenza A virus (H1N1) increases airway epithelial cell secretion by up-regulation of potassium channel KCNN4.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Taryn; Ching, John C H; Zhou, Yan; Loewen, Matthew E

    2013-09-01

    Influenza infects the epithelial cells lining the airways. Normally epithelial cells move solutes through ion channels to create the osmotic drive to hydrate the airways. Viral alteration of this process could explain, in part, the fluid imbalance in the lungs and the resulting pulmonary edema that occurs during severe influenza infections. Using western blot and RT-qPCR, we measured ion channel and cytokine expression in the Calu3 airway cell line after infection with influenza virus (H1N1) for 48 h. We simultaneously measured chloride and potassium channel function by means of a short-circuit current (I(sc)) produced in an Ussing chamber. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10, viral M1 protein and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was observed 24h post-infection, despite a lack of measurable change in Isc. However, we observed a decreased secretory response in cAMP- and calcium-induced Isc 48 h post-infection. This correlated with a decrease in CFTR and KCNN4 protein levels. Interestingly, a viral dose of an MOI 0.6 revealed an increased secretory response that correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. This increased secretory response seemed to be primarily driven through KCNN4. We detected an increase in KCNN4 mRNA and protein, while CFTR function and expression remained unchanged. Furthermore, inhibition of the KCNN4-stimulated I(sc) with TRAM-34, a specific inhibitor, ameliorated the response, implicating KCNN4 as the main driving force behind the secretory phenotype.

  14. Nrf2 protects against airway disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hye-Youn; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a ubiquitous master transcription factor that regulates antioxidant response elements (AREs)-mediated expression of antioxidant enzyme and cytoprotective proteins. In the unstressed condition, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) suppresses cellular Nrf2 in cytoplasm and drives its proteasomal degradation. Nrf2 can be activated by diverse stimuli including oxidants, pro-oxidants, antioxidants, and chemopreventive agents. Nrf2 induces cellular rescue pathways against oxidative injury, abnormal inflammatory and immune responses, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Application of Nrf2 germ-line mutant mice has identified an extensive range of protective roles for Nrf2 in experimental models of human disorders in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, airway, kidney, brain, circulation, and immune or nerve system. In the lung, lack of Nrf2 exacerbated toxicity caused by multiple oxidative insults including supplemental respiratory therapy (e.g., hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation), cigarette smoke, allergen, virus, bacterial endotoxin and other inflammatory agents (e.g., carrageenin), environmental pollution (e.g., particles), and a fibrotic agent bleomycin. Microarray analyses and bioinformatic studies elucidated functional AREs and Nrf2-directed genes that are critical components of signaling mechanisms in pulmonary protection by Nrf2. Association of loss of function with promoter polymorphisms in NRF2 or somatic and epigenetic mutations in KEAP1 and NRF2 has been found in cohorts of patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome or lung cancer, which further supports the role for NRF2 in these lung diseases. In the current review, we address the role of Nrf2 in airways based on emerging evidence from experimental oxidative disease models and human studies.

  15. Cigarette smoke causes acute airway disease and exacerbates chronic obstructive lung disease in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Conlon, Thomas M; Ballester Lopez, Carolina; Seimetz, Michael; Bednorz, Mariola; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Weissmann, Norbert; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates a strong link between postnatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and increased respiratory morbidity in young children. However, how CS induces early onset airway disease in young children, and how it interacts with endogenous risk factors, remains poorly understood. We, therefore, exposed 10-day-old neonatal wild-type and β-epithelial sodium ion channel (β-ENaC)-transgenic mice with cystic fibrosis-like lung disease to CS for 4 days. Neonatal wild-type mice exposed to CS demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), which was accompanied by increased levels of Mmp12 and Cxcl1 BALF from β-ENaC-transgenic mice contained greater numbers of macrophages, which did not increase following acute CS exposure; however, there was significant increase in airway neutrophilia compared with filtered air transgenic and CS-exposed wild-type controls. Interestingly, wild-type and β-ENaC-transgenic mice demonstrated epithelial airway and vascular remodeling following CS exposure. Morphometric analysis of lung sections revealed that CS exposure caused increased mucus accumulation in the airway lumen of neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice compared with wild-type controls, which was accompanied by an increase in the number of goblet cells and Muc5ac upregulation. We conclude that short-term CS exposure 1) induces acute airway disease with airway epithelial and vascular remodeling in neonatal wild-type mice; and 2) exacerbates airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and mucus plugging in neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice with chronic lung disease. Our results in neonatal mice suggest that young children may be highly susceptible to develop airway disease in response to tobacco smoke exposure, and that adverse effects may be aggravated in children with underlying chronic lung diseases. PMID:27448665

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce eosinophilic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Liang; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hau-Inh; Liao, Huang-Shen; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2015-10-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been widely used in industry. The metal composition of PM2.5 might contribute to the higher prevalence of asthma. To investigate the effects of ZnO NPs on allergic airway inflammation, mice were first exposed to different concentrations of ZnO NPs (0.1 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg) or to a combination of ZnO NPs and chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) by oropharyngeal aspiration on day 0 and day 7 and then were sacrificed 5 days later. The subsequent time course of airway inflammation in the mice after ZnO NPs exposure was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14. To further determine the role of zinc ions, ZnCl2 was also administered. The inflammatory cell count, cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung histopathology were examined. We found significant neutrophilia after exposure to high-dose ZnO NPs on day 1 and significant eosinophilia in the BALF at 7 days. However, the expression levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 increased significantly after 24h of exposure to only ZnO NPs and then decreased gradually. These results suggested that ZnO NPs could cause eosinophilic airway inflammation in the absence of allergens.

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus infection increases chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Song, Weifeng; Yu, Zhihong; Doran, Stephen F; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Steele, Chad; Garantziotis, Stavros; Matalon, Sadis

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) damages airway and alveolar epithelia resulting in acute lung injury and reactive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine. However, little is known about the effect of preexisting respiratory disease on Cl2-induced lung injury. By using a murine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection model, we found that preexisting RSV infection increases Cl2 (187 ppm for 30 min)-induced lung inflammation and airway AHR at 24 h after exposure (5 days after infection). RSV infection and Cl2 exposure synergistically induced oxygen desaturation and neutrophil infiltration and increased MCP-1, MIP-1β, IL-10, IFN-γ, and RANTES concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In contrast, levels of type 2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13) were not significantly affected by either RSV infection or Cl2 exposure. Cl2 exposure, but not RSV infection, induced AHR to methacholine challenge as measured by flexiVent. Moreover, preexisting RSV infection amplified BALF levels of hyaluronan (HA) and AHR. The Cl2-induced AHR was mitigated by treatment with inter-α-trypsin inhibitor antibody, which inhibits HA signaling, suggesting a mechanism of HA-mediated AHR from exacerbated oxidative injury. Our results show for the first time that preexisting RSV infection predisposes the lung to Cl2-induced injury. These data emphasize the necessity for further research on the effects of Cl2 in vulnerable populations and the development of appropriate treatments.

  18. Gas transport in branched airways during high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, P W; Haselton, F R; Seybert, J R

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of high-frequency ventilation (HFV) is presented based on the physical convective exchange process that occurs due to the irreversibility of gas velocity profiles in oscillatory flow through the bronchial airways. Mass transport during the convective exchange process can be characterized by a convective exchange length, LE, which depends only on the irreversibility of bronchial velocity profiles and can be measured by the experimental technique of photographic flow visualization in bronchial tree models. Using the exchange length and the molecular diffusivity, a simple model of overall bronchial mass transfer is developed. The model allows a prediction of the mean gas concentration profiles along the airways, the site of maximum mass transfer resistance, and overall flow rate of the gas of interest in or out of the lung as functions of the parameters of HFV. The results predicted by the model agree with the limited experimental data available for animals and humans. For normal unassisted ventilation, total bronchial cross-sectional area around the 15th Weibel bronchial generation is predicted to be the single most important parameter in controlling the total gas transport rate along the airways. For the breathing of room air, values of the respiratory quotient around 0.78 are predicted, which are insensitive to VT and f. The model represents a fruitful combination of fluid mechanical theory and experiment with physiologic data to yield new and deeper insight into the operation of the human respiratory system during HFV and normal breathing.

  19. Obesity and upper airway control during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Susheel P.; Squier, Samuel; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P.; Smith, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms linking obesity with upper airway dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea are reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is due to alterations in upper airway anatomy and neuromuscular control. Upper airway structural alterations in obesity are related to adipose deposition around the pharynx, which can increase its collapsibility or critical pressure (Pcrit). In addition, obesity and, particularly, central adiposity lead to reductions in resting lung volume, resulting in loss of caudal traction on upper airway structures and parallel increases in pharyngeal collapsibility. Metabolic and humoral factors that promote central adiposity may contribute to these alterations in upper airway mechanical function and increase sleep apnea susceptibility. In contrast, neural responses to upper airway obstruction can mitigate these mechanical loads and restore pharyngeal patency during sleep. Current evidence suggests that these responses can improve with weight loss. Improvements in these neural responses with weight loss may be related to a decline in systemic and local pharyngeal concentrations of specific inflammatory mediators with somnogenic effects. PMID:19875707

  20. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  1. Airway obstruction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Alexandra K; Mosquera, Ricardo; Colasurdo, Giuseppe N; Jon, Cindy K; Clements, Roya M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is the failure of the autonomic system to control adequate ventilation while asleep with preserved ventilatory response while awake. We report a case of a patient with CCHS who presented with intrathoracic and extrathoracic airway obstruction after tracheostomy tube decannulation and phrenic nerve pacer placement. Nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) revealed hypoxia, hypercapnia and obstructive sleep apnoea, which required bilevel positive airway pressure titration. Airway endoscopy demonstrated tracheomalacia and paretic true vocal cords in the paramedian position during diaphragmatic pacing. Laryngeal electromyography demonstrated muscular electrical impulses that correlated with diaphragmatic pacer settings. Thus, we surmise that the patient's upper and lower airway obstruction was secondary to diaphragmatic pacer activity. Thorough airway evaluation, including NPSG and endoscopy, may help identify the side effects of diaphragmatic pacing, such as airway obstruction, in patients with CCHS.

  2. Effects of irrigation fluid in shoulder arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surbhi; Manjuladevi, M; Vasudeva Upadhyaya, KS; Kutappa, AM; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Arpana, J

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Extravasation of irrigation fluid used in shoulder arthroscopy can lead to life-threatening airway and systemic complications. This study was conducted to assess the effect of irrigation fluid absorption on measurable anthropometric parameters and to identify whether these parameters predict airway/respiratory compromise. Methods: Thirty six American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status one or two patients aged 15–60 years undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under general anaesthesia were recruited. Measured variables preoperatively (baseline) and at the end of surgery were neck, chest, midarm and midthigh circumferences, weight, haemoglobin and serum sodium. Temperature, endotracheal tube cuff pressure, airway pressure, duration of surgery, amount of irrigation fluid and intravenous fluid used were also noted. Measured parameters were correlated with the duration of surgery and the amount of irrigation fluid used. Results: Postoperatively, the changes in variables showed a significant increase in the mean values (cm) for neck, chest, midarm and midthigh circumference (mean ± standard deviation: 2.35 ± 1.9, P < 0.001; 2.9 ± 3.88 cm, P < 0.001; 3.28 ± 2.44, P < 0.001 and 0.39 ± 0.71, P = 0.002, respectively) and weight (kg) (1.17 ± 1.24, P < 0.001). The post-operative haemoglobin (g/dL) levels decreased significantly (0.89 ± 1.23, P < 0.001) as compared to the baseline. No significant change was found in the serum sodium levels (P = 0.92). No patient experienced airway/respiratory compromise. Conclusion: Regional and systemic absorption of irrigation fluid in arthroscopic shoulder surgery is reflected in the degree of change in the measured anthropometric variables. However, this change was not significant enough to cause airway/respiratory compromise. PMID:27053783

  3. Contribution of upper airway geometry to convective mixing.

    PubMed

    Jayaraju, Santhosh T; Paiva, Manuel; Brouns, Mark; Lacor, Chris; Verbanck, Sylvia

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the axial dispersive effect of the upper airway structure (comprising mouth cavity, oropharynx, and trachea) on a traversing aerosol bolus. This was done by means of aerosol bolus experiments on a hollow cast of a realistic upper airway model (UAM) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in the same UAM geometry. The experiments showed that 50-ml boluses injected into the UAM dispersed to boluses with a half-width ranging from 80 to 90 ml at the UAM exit, across both flow rates (250, 500 ml/s) and both flow directions (inspiration, expiration). These experimental results imply that the net half-width induced by the UAM typically was 69 ml. Comparison of experimental bolus traces with a one-dimensional Gaussian-derived analytical solution resulted in an axial dispersion coefficient of 200-250 cm(2)/s, depending on whether the bolus peak and its half-width or the bolus tail needed to be fully accounted for. CFD simulations agreed well with experimental results for inspiratory boluses and were compatible with an axial dispersion of 200 cm(2)/s. However, for expiratory boluses the CFD simulations showed a very tight bolus peak followed by an elongated tail, in sharp contrast to the expiratory bolus experiments. This indicates that CFD methods that are widely used to predict the fate of aerosols in the human upper airway, where flow is transitional, need to be critically assessed, possibly via aerosol bolus simulations. We conclude that, with all its geometric complexity, the upper airway introduces a relatively mild dispersion on a traversing aerosol bolus for normal breathing flow rates in inspiratory and expiratory flow directions.

  4. Acid aspiration-induced airways hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Gilman B; Leclair, Timothy R; von Reyn, Jessica; Larrabee, Yuna C; Cloutier, Mary E; Irvin, Charles G; Bates, Jason H T

    2009-12-01

    The role of gastroesophageal reflux and micro-aspiration as a trigger of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma is controversial. The role of acid reflux and aspiration as a direct cause of AHR in normal subjects is also unclear. We speculated that aspiration of a weak acid with a pH (1.8) equivalent to the upper range of typical gastric contents would lead to AHR in naive mice. We further speculated that modest reductions in aspirate acidity to a level expected during gastric acid suppression therapy (pH 4.0) would impede aspiration-induced AHR. BALB/c female mice were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane and allowed to aspirate 75 microl of saline with HCl (pH 1.8, 4.0, or 7.4) or underwent sham aspiration. Mice were re-anesthetized 2 or 24 h later, underwent tracheostomy, and were coupled to a mechanical ventilator. Forced oscillations were used to periodically measure respiratory impedance (Zrs) following aerosol delivery of saline and increasing doses of methacholine to measure for AHR. Values for elastance (H), airways resistance (R(N)), and tissue damping (G) were derived from Zrs. Aspirate pH of 1.8 led to a significant overall increase in peak R(N), G, and H compared with pH 4.0 and 7.4 at 2 and 24 h. Differences between pH 7.4 and 4.0 were not significant. In mice aspirating pH 1.8 compared with controls, airway lavage fluid contained more neutrophils, higher protein, and demonstrated higher permeability. We conclude that acid aspiration triggers an acute AHR, driven principally by breakdown of epithelial barrier integrity within the airways. PMID:19797689

  5. Contribution of upper airway geometry to convective mixing.

    PubMed

    Jayaraju, Santhosh T; Paiva, Manuel; Brouns, Mark; Lacor, Chris; Verbanck, Sylvia

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the axial dispersive effect of the upper airway structure (comprising mouth cavity, oropharynx, and trachea) on a traversing aerosol bolus. This was done by means of aerosol bolus experiments on a hollow cast of a realistic upper airway model (UAM) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in the same UAM geometry. The experiments showed that 50-ml boluses injected into the UAM dispersed to boluses with a half-width ranging from 80 to 90 ml at the UAM exit, across both flow rates (250, 500 ml/s) and both flow directions (inspiration, expiration). These experimental results imply that the net half-width induced by the UAM typically was 69 ml. Comparison of experimental bolus traces with a one-dimensional Gaussian-derived analytical solution resulted in an axial dispersion coefficient of 200-250 cm(2)/s, depending on whether the bolus peak and its half-width or the bolus tail needed to be fully accounted for. CFD simulations agreed well with experimental results for inspiratory boluses and were compatible with an axial dispersion of 200 cm(2)/s. However, for expiratory boluses the CFD simulations showed a very tight bolus peak followed by an elongated tail, in sharp contrast to the expiratory bolus experiments. This indicates that CFD methods that are widely used to predict the fate of aerosols in the human upper airway, where flow is transitional, need to be critically assessed, possibly via aerosol bolus simulations. We conclude that, with all its geometric complexity, the upper airway introduces a relatively mild dispersion on a traversing aerosol bolus for normal breathing flow rates in inspiratory and expiratory flow directions. PMID:18818384

  6. Role of selective blocking of bradykinin receptor subtypes in attenuating allergic airway inflammation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    El-Kady, Mohamed M; Girgis, Zarif I; Abd El-Rasheed, Eman A; Shaker, Olfat; Attallah, Magdy I; Soliman, Ahmed A

    2016-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the potential role of bradykinin antagonists (R-715; bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist and icatibant; bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist) in treatment of allergic airway inflammation in comparison to dexamethasone and montelukast. R-715 as dexamethasone significantly decreased peribronchial leukocyte infiltration, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) albumin and interleukin 1β as well as serum OVA-specific IgE level. Also, R-715 like montelukast significantly decreased BALF cell count (total and eosinophils). Icatibant showed negative results. The current findings suggest that selective bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists may have the therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27321873

  7. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  8. AIRWAY VISUALIZATION: EYES SEE WHAT MIND KNOWS.

    PubMed

    Sorbello, Massimiliano; Frova, Giulio; Zdravković, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Airway management is basic for anesthesia practice, and sometimes it can represent a really dramatic scenario for both the patient and the physicians. Laryngoscopy has been the gold standard of airway visualization for more than 60 years, showing its limitations and failure rates with time. New technology has made available an opportunity to move the physician's eye inside patient airways thanks to video laryngoscopy and video assisted airway management technique. Undoubtedly, we have entered a new era of high resolution airway visualization and different approach in airway instrumentation. Nevertheless, each new technology needs time to be tested and considered reliable, and pitfalls and limitations may come out with careful and long lasting analysis, so it is probably not the right time yet to promote video assisted approach as a new gold standard for airway visualization, despite the fact that it certainly offers some new prospects. In any case, whatever the visualization approach, no patient dies because of missed airway visualization or failed intubation, but due to failed ventilation, which remains without doubt the gold standard of any patient safety goal and airway management technique.

  9. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  10. Sequential Stenting for Extensive Malignant Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Tei, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant airway stenosis extending from the bronchial bifurcation to the lower lobar orifice was treated with airway stenting. We herein examine the effectiveness of airway stenting for extensive malignant airway stenosis. Methods: Twelve patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis underwent placement of a silicone Dumon Y stent (Novatech, La Ciotat, France) at the tracheal bifurcation and a metallic Spiral Z-stent (Medico’s Hirata, Osaka, Japan) at either distal side of the Y stent. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the sequential placement of these silicone and metallic stents in these 12 patients. Results: The primary disease was lung cancer in eight patients, breast cancer in two patients, tracheal cancer in one patient, and thyroid cancer in one patient. The median survival period after airway stent placement was 46 days. The Hugh–Jones classification and performance status improved in nine patients after airway stenting. One patient had prolonged hemoptysis and died of respiratory tract hemorrhage 15 days after the treatment. Conclusion: Because the initial disease was advanced and aggressive, the prognosis after sequential airway stent placement was significantly poor. However, because respiratory distress decreased after the treatment in most patients, this treatment may be acceptable for selected patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis. PMID:25273272

  11. Physical principle of airway design in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Son, Taeho; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    From an engineering perspective, lungs are natural microfluidic devices that extract oxygen from air. In the bronchial tree, airways branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. It is generally accepted that in conducting airways, which air passes on the way to the acinar airways from the atmosphere, the reduction ratio of diameter is closely related to the minimization of viscous dissipation. Such a principle is formulated as the Hess-Murray law. However, in acinar airways, where oxygen transfer to alveolae occurs, the diameter reduction with progressive generations is more moderate than in conducting airways. Noting that the dominant transfer mechanism in acinar airways is diffusion rather than advection, unlike conducting airways, we construct a mathematical model for oxygen transfer through a series of acinar airways. Our model allows us to predict the optimal airway reduction ratio that maximizes the oxygen transfer in a finite airway volume, thereby rationalizing the observed airway reduction ratio in acinar airways.

  12. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  13. Uterine fluid proteins and egg quality characteristics for 2 commercial and 2 heritage laying hen lines in response to manipulation of dietary calcium and vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Rathgeber, Bruce M; Thompson, Kristen L; Macisaac, Janice

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of eggs from 2 selected commercial strains of laying hens and 2 unselected lines of chickens fed diets with different combinations of Ca and vitamin D and relate it to the profile of uterine proteins and ultrastructure of the shell. A group of 4 chickens was housed in each of 24 cages. The group consisted of one representative from each of the following breeds: Lohmann LSL- Lite, Lohmann Classic-Brown, Fayoumi, and Light Sussex. Six dietary combinations of Ca and vitamin D(3) (3.35%, 2,500 IU; 4.10%, 2,500 IU (control); 4.85%, 2,500 IU; 3.35%, 200 IU; 4.10%, 200 IU; and 4.85%, 200 IU) were randomly assigned to 4 replicate cages for 2 treatment periods (26-29 and 56-59 wk of age). Data were analyzed as a split-plot design with cage as the main plot and hen as the subplot. Egg quality traits were different (P < 0.0001) between commercial and heritage breeds. Lohmann Brown had stronger shells with higher specific gravity compared with other breeds. Both commercial and heritage birds responded to a drop in vitamin D3 level by marked reduction in shell thickness. The SDS-PAGE profiles of uterine fluid samples revealed a decrease (P < 0.05) in 200-, 150-, 116-, and ≤6.5-kDa proteins, whereas proteins with molecular weight (MW) of 80, 55, 52, 45, 42, and 28 kDa increased with bird age. A 36- and 52-kDa protein band was most intense for Fayoumi compared with other breeds. Ultrastructural characteristics showed flattened and deeply etched mammillary caps for Lohmann Brown and the presence of type A and type B bodies between mammillary cones in eggshells from Fayoumi and Lohmann Lite. The negative correlation between ultrastructural characteristics, which decrease with bird age, and the 116-kDa uterine protein band could provide insight into reduced eggshell quality as hens age. PMID:23960126

  14. Immunomodulation of airway epithelium cell activation by mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1α and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR.

  15. Coronaviruses and the human airway: a universal system for virus-host interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Hulda R; Dijkman, Ronald

    2016-02-06

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are large RNA viruses that infect the human respiratory tract. The emergence of both Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Middle East Respiratory syndrome CoVs as well as the yearly circulation of four common CoVs highlights the importance of elucidating the different mechanisms employed by these viruses to evade the host immune response, determine their tropism and identify antiviral compounds. Various animal models have been established to investigate HCoV infection, including mice and non-human primates. To establish a link between the research conducted in animal models and humans, an organotypic human airway culture system, that recapitulates the human airway epithelium, has been developed. Currently, different cell culture systems are available to recapitulate the human airways, including the Air-Liquid Interface (ALI) human airway epithelium (HAE) model. Tracheobronchial HAE cultures recapitulate the primary entry point of human respiratory viruses while the alveolar model allows for elucidation of mechanisms involved in viral infection and pathogenesis in the alveoli. These organotypic human airway cultures represent a universal platform to study respiratory virus-host interaction by offering more detailed insights compared to cell lines. Additionally, the epidemic potential of this virus family highlights the need for both vaccines and antivirals. No commercial vaccine is available but various effective antivirals have been identified, some with potential for human treatment. These morphological airway cultures are also well suited for the identification of antivirals, evaluation of compound toxicity and viral inhibition.

  16. An analysis of pollutant gas transport and absorption in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, J B; Sheth, B V; Mockros, L F

    1990-05-01

    A mathematical model of ozone absorption, or for any soluble gas that has similar transport properties, is developed for a branching network of liquid-lined cylinders. In particular, we investigate specific flow regimes for finite length tubes where boundary layer phenomena and entrance effects exist in high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe) number airways. The smaller airways which have lower Reynolds and Peclet number flows are modelled by incorporating the detailed analysis found in [10] and modifying it for airways which have alveolated surfaces. We also consider a reacting gas and treat specific regimes where the reaction front is located at the air-liquid interface, within the liquid or at the liquid-tissue interface. Asymptotic methods are used in regions of the tracheobronchial tree where Pe much less than 1 and Pe much greater than 1. In addition, the fact that the radial transport parameter gamma much less than 1 for this toxin, and others such as nitrous oxides, is employed to simplify the analysis. The ozone concentrations, airway absorption and tissue dose are examined as a function of airway generation for several values of the governing parameters. The general result is a maximal dosing in airway generations 17 to 18 that is much larger (up to an order of magnitude) than the predictions of previous theories.

  17. Interleukin-10 inhibits antigen-induced cellular recruitment into the airways of sensitized mice.

    PubMed Central

    Zuany-Amorim, C; Hailé, S; Leduc, D; Dumarey, C; Huerre, M; Vargaftig, B B; Pretolani, M

    1995-01-01

    This report examines the effect of recombinant murine (rm) IL-10 on antigen-induced cellular recruitment into the airways of sensitized Balb/c mice. The intranasal instillation of 10 micrograms ovalbumin induced an early (6-24 h) increase in the number of neutrophils, and a late rise (24-96 h) in that of eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and bronchial tissue. A single intranasal instillation of 0.01-0.1 microgram of rmIL-10, administered concurrently with ovalbumin, but not 1 or 3 h thereafter, dose-dependently inhibited both airway neutrophilia and eosinophilia. This phenomenon was suppressed by treating the sensitized mice with 1 mg/mouse of a neutralizing anti-IL-10 mAb, which increased significantly ovalbumin-induced neutrophil and eosinophil accumulation in the BAL fluid. These results suggest that antigen stimulation may trigger the in vivo generation of IL-10, which, in turn, participates in the leukocyte infiltration into the airways. rmIL-10 also reduced TNF-alpha release in the BAL fluid observed 1 and 3 h after antigen challenge. Furthermore, the intranasal instillation of an anti-TNF-alpha antiserum to sensitized mice markedly reduced ovalbumin-induced neutrophil and eosinophil accumulation in the BAL fluid. These findings indicate that leukocyte infiltration into the airways of antigen-challenged mice is regulated by IL-10. Furthermore, inhibition of TNF-alpha production by rmIL-10 suggests that allergic airway inflammation and TNF-alpha formation are parallel events in this model. Images PMID:7769104

  18. Airway hyperresponsiveness in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Langdeau, J B; Turcotte, H; Bowie, D M; Jobin, J; Desgagné, P; Boulet, L P

    2000-05-01

    It has been suggested that high-level training could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), but the comparative effects of different sports on airway function remains to be determined. We evaluated 150 nonsmoking volunteers 18 to 55 yr of age; 100 athletes divided into four subgroups of 25 subjects each according to the predominant estimated hydrocaloric characteristic of ambient air inhaled during training: dry air (DA), cold air (CA), humid air (HA) and a mixture of dry and humid air (MA), and 50 sedentary subjects. Each subject had a respiratory questionnaire, a methacholine challenge, allergy skin-prick tests, and heart rate variability recording for evaluation of parasympathetic tone. The athletes had a 49% prevalence of AHR (PC(20) < 16 mg/ml), with a mean PC(20) of 16.9 mg/ml, compared with 28% (PC(20): 35.4) in sedentary subjects (p = 0.009). The prevalence (%) of AHR and mean PC(20) (mg/ml) varied as followed in the four subgroups of athletes: DA: 32% and 30.9; CA: 52% and 15.8; HA: 76% and 7.3; and MA: 32% and 21.5 (p = 0.002). The estimated parasympathetic tone was higher in athletes (p < 0.001), but this parameter showed only a weak correlation with PC(20) (r = -0.17, p = 0.04). This study has shown a significantly higher prevalence of AHR in athletes than in the control group because of the higher prevalence in the CA and HA groups. Parasympathetic activity may act as modulator of airway responsiveness, but the increased prevalence of AHR in our athlete population may be related to the type and possibly the content of inhaled air during training.

  19. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  20. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  1. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD.

    PubMed

    Bidan, Cécile M; Veldsink, Annemiek C; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD.

  2. Athletic Trainers' Knowledge Regarding Airway Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor; Roman, Christopher; Mata, Heather Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research suggests that knowledge gaps regarding the appropriate use of airway adjuncts exist among various health care practitioners, and that knowledge is especially limited within athletic training. Objective: To determine the relationship between perceived knowledge (PK) and actual knowledge (AK) of airway adjunct use and the…

  3. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  4. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  10. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  11. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  12. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  13. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  14. Correction of defective CFTR/ENaC function and tightness of cystic fibrosis airway epithelium by amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Annalucia; Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Diana, Anna; Paracchini, Valentina; Di Gioia, Sante; Seia, Manuela; Casavola, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Conese, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, with most of the mortality given by the lung disease. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hAMSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine in the field of lung disease; however, their potential as therapeutics for CF lung disease has not been fully explored. In the present study, hAMSCs were analysed in co-cultures on Transwell filters with CF immortalized airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line) at different ratios to exploit their potency to resume basic defects associated with CF. The results show that F-actin content was increased in co-cultures as compared with CF cells and actin was reorganized to form stress fibres. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that co-cultures had a tendency of increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 at the intercellular borders, paralleled by a decrease in dextran permeability, suggestive of more organized tight junctions (TJs). Spectrofluorometric analysis of CFTR function demonstrated that hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures resumed chloride transport, in line with the appearance of the mature Band C of CFTR protein by Western blotting. Moreover, hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures, at a 1:5 ratio, showed a decrease in fluid absorption, as opposed to CFBE cell monolayers that displayed a great rate of fluid resorption from the apical side. Our data show that human amniotic MSCs can be used in co-culture with CF respiratory epithelial cells to model their engraftment into the airways and have the potential to resume a tight epithelium with partial correction of the CF phenotype.

  15. Correction of defective CFTR/ENaC function and tightness of cystic fibrosis airway epithelium by amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Annalucia; Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Diana, Anna; Paracchini, Valentina; Di Gioia, Sante; Seia, Manuela; Casavola, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Conese, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, with most of the mortality given by the lung disease. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hAMSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine in the field of lung disease; however, their potential as therapeutics for CF lung disease has not been fully explored. In the present study, hAMSCs were analysed in co-cultures on Transwell filters with CF immortalized airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line) at different ratios to exploit their potency to resume basic defects associated with CF. The results show that F-actin content was increased in co-cultures as compared with CF cells and actin was reorganized to form stress fibres. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that co-cultures had a tendency of increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 at the intercellular borders, paralleled by a decrease in dextran permeability, suggestive of more organized tight junctions (TJs). Spectrofluorometric analysis of CFTR function demonstrated that hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures resumed chloride transport, in line with the appearance of the mature Band C of CFTR protein by Western blotting. Moreover, hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures, at a 1:5 ratio, showed a decrease in fluid absorption, as opposed to CFBE cell monolayers that displayed a great rate of fluid resorption from the apical side. Our data show that human amniotic MSCs can be used in co-culture with CF respiratory epithelial cells to model their engraftment into the airways and have the potential to resume a tight epithelium with partial correction of the CF phenotype. PMID:24894806

  16. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  17. Airway fires during surgery: Management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Navaid; Ansar, Farrukh; Baig, Mirza Shahzad; Abbas, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airway fires pose a serious risk to surgical patients. Fires during surgery have been reported for many years with flammable anesthetic agents being the main culprits in the past. Association of airway fires with laser surgery is well-recognized, but there are reports of endotracheal tube fires ignited by electrocautery during pharyngeal surgery or tracheostomy or both. This uncommon complication has potentially grave consequences. While airway fires are relatively uncommon occurrences, they are very serious and can often be fatal. Success in preventing such events requires a thorough understanding of the components leading to a fire (fuel, oxidizer, and ignition source), as well as good communication between all members present to appropriately manage the fire and ensure patient safety. We present a case of fire in the airway during routine adenotonsillectomy. We will review the causes, preventive measures, and brief management for airway fires. PMID:27006554

  18. Airway fires during surgery: Management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Navaid; Ansar, Farrukh; Baig, Mirza Shahzad; Abbas, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airway fires pose a serious risk to surgical patients. Fires during surgery have been reported for many years with flammable anesthetic agents being the main culprits in the past. Association of airway fires with laser surgery is well-recognized, but there are reports of endotracheal tube fires ignited by electrocautery during pharyngeal surgery or tracheostomy or both. This uncommon complication has potentially grave consequences. While airway fires are relatively uncommon occurrences, they are very serious and can often be fatal. Success in preventing such events requires a thorough understanding of the components leading to a fire (fuel, oxidizer, and ignition source), as well as good communication between all members present to appropriately manage the fire and ensure patient safety. We present a case of fire in the airway during routine adenotonsillectomy. We will review the causes, preventive measures, and brief management for airway fires. PMID:27006554

  19. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  20. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-01-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom’s 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists’ difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  1. A computational study of the respiratory airflow characteristics in normal and obstructed human airways.

    PubMed

    Sul, Bora; Wallqvist, Anders; Morris, Michael J; Reifman, Jaques; Rakesh, Vineet

    2014-09-01

    Obstructive lung diseases in the lower airways are a leading health concern worldwide. To improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of lower airways, we studied airflow characteristics in the lung between the 8th and the 14th generations using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, where we compared normal and obstructed airways for a range of breathing conditions. We employed a novel technique based on computing the Pearson׳s correlation coefficient to quantitatively characterize the differences in airflow patterns between the normal and obstructed airways. We found that the airflow patterns demonstrated clear differences between normal and diseased conditions for high expiratory flow rates (>2300ml/s), but not for inspiratory flow rates. Moreover, airflow patterns subjected to filtering demonstrated higher sensitivity than airway resistance for differentiating normal and diseased conditions. Further, we showed that wall shear stresses were not only dependent on breathing rates, but also on the distribution of the obstructed sites in the lung: for the same degree of obstruction and breathing rate, we observed as much as two-fold differences in shear stresses. In contrast to previous studies that suggest increased wall shear stress due to obstructions as a possible damage mechanism for small airways, our model demonstrated that for flow rates corresponding to heavy activities, the wall shear stress in both normal and obstructed airways was <0.3Pa, which is within the physiological limit needed to promote respiratory defense mechanisms. In summary, our model enables the study of airflow characteristics that may be impractical to assess experimentally.

  2. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  3. Nucleotide release by airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Sesma, Juliana I; Seminario, Lucia; Esther, Charles R; Kreda, Silvia M

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic events regulating the airways' innate defenses are initiated by the release of purines from the epithelium, which occurs constitutively and is enhanced by chemical or mechanical stimulation. While the external triggers have been reviewed exhaustively, this chapter focuses on current knowledge of the receptors and signaling cascades mediating nucleotide release. The list of secreted purines now includes ATP, ADP, AMP and nucleotide sugars, and involves at least three distinct mechanisms reflecting the complexity of airway epithelia. First, the constitutive mechanism involves ATP translocation to the ER/Golgi complex as energy source for protein folding, and fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the plasma membrane. Second, goblet cells package ATP with mucins into granules, which are discharged in response to P2Y(2)R activation and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. Finally, non-mucous cells support a regulated mechanism of ATP release involving protease activated receptor (PAR)-elicited G(12/13) activation, leading to the RhoGEF-mediated exchange of GDP for GTP on RhoA, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Together, these pathways provide fine tuning of epithelial responses regulated by purinergic signaling events. PMID:21560042

  4. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bandla, Preetam; Huang, Jingtao; Karamessinis, Laurie; Kelly, Andrea; Pepe, Michelle; Samuel, John; Brooks, Lee; Mason, Thornton. A.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading declines with age. The epidemiology of obstructive sleep apnea suggests that sex hormones play a role in modulating upper airway function. Sex hormones increase gradually during puberty, from minimally detectable to adult levels. We hypothesized that the upper airway response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with increasing pubertal Tanner stage in males but remained stable during puberty in females. Design: Upper airway dynamic function during sleep was measured over the course of puberty. Participants: Normal subjects of Tanner stages 1 to 5. Measurements: During sleep, maximal inspiratory airflow was measured while varying the level of nasal pressure. The slope of the upstream pressure-flow relationship (SPF) was measured. Results: The SPF correlated with age and Tanner stage. However, the relationship with Tanner stage became nonsignificant when the correlation due to the mutual association with age was removed. Females had a lower SPF than males. Conclusions: In both sexes, the upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with age rather than degree of pubertal development. Thus, changes in sex hormones are unlikely to be a primary modulator of upper airway function during the transition from childhood to adulthood. Although further studies of upper airway structural changes during puberty are needed, we speculate that the changes in upper airway function with age are due to the depressant effect of age on ventilatory drive, leading to a decrease in upper airway neuromotor tone. Citation: Bandla P; Huang J; Karamessinis L; Kelly A; Pepe M; Samuel J; Brooks L; Mason TA; Gallagher PR; Marcus CL. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep. SLEEP 2008;31(4):534-541. PMID:18457241

  5. Correlation among regional ventilation, airway resistance and particle deposition in normal and severe asthmatic lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2012-11-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are performed to investigate flow characteristics and quantify particle deposition with normal and severe asthmatic lungs. Continuity and Navier-Stokes equations are solved with unstructured meshes and finite element method; a large eddy simulation model is adopted to capture turbulent and/or transitional flows created in the glottis. The human airway models are reconstructed from CT volumetric images, and the subject-specific boundary condition is imposed to the 3D ending branches with the aid of an image registration technique. As a result, several constricted airways are captured in CT images of severe asthmatic subjects, causing significant pressure drop with high air speed because the constriction of airways creates high flow resistance. The simulated instantaneous velocity fields obtained are then employed to track transport and deposition of 2.5 μm particles. It is found that high flow resistance regions are correlated with high particle-deposition regions. In other words, the constricted airways can induce high airway resistance and subsequently increase particle deposition in the regions. This result may be applied to understand the characteristics of deposition of pharmaceutical aerosols or bacteria. This work was supported in part by NIH grants R01-HL094315 and S10-RR022421.

  6. Noninvasive detection of airway constriction in awake guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Tidal volume measured by the barometric method is very sensitive to increases in compression and expansion of alveolar gas, such as would be expected to occur during airway narrowing or closure. By comparing a barometric method tidal volume signal (VT') with a reference tidal volume (VT) obtained with a head-out pressure plethysmograph, a simple index related to gas compressibility effects was calculated (VT/VT'). Changes in this index were compared with decreases in dynamic compliance (Cdyn) during histamine aerosol challenge of 15 Charles River Hartley guinea pigs. Decreases in VT/VT' occurred during all aerosol challenges and were correlated with decreases in Cdyn. Decreases in VT/VT' were most marked at Cdyn values of less than 50% of base line. At Cdyn of less than 15% of base line, VT' was 3.1-4.8 times the VT reference signal. No increase in total pulmonary resistance was noted, and Cdyn and VT/VT' returned to base line after histamine exposure was stopped. The authors conclude that gas compressibility effects become substantial during histamine-induced airway constriction in the guinea pig and that the VT/VT' ratio appears to provide a simple noninvasive method of detecting these changes.

  7. Pegylation of Antimicrobial Peptides Maintains the Active Peptide Conformation, Model Membrane Interactions, and Antimicrobial Activity while Improving Lung Tissue Biocompatibility following Airway Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Beck, Konrad; Fox, Marc A.; Ulaeto, David; Clark, Graeme C.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential, particularly for localized infections such as those of the lung. Here we show that airway administration of a pegylated AMP minimizes lung tissue toxicity while nevertheless maintaining antimicrobial activity. CaLL, a potent synthetic AMP (KWKLFKKIFKRIVQRIKDFLR) comprising fragments of LL-37 and cecropin A peptides, was N-terminally pegylated (PEG-CaLL). PEG-CaLL derivatives retained significant antimicrobial activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s] 2- to 3-fold higher than those of CaLL) against bacterial lung pathogens even in the presence of lung lining fluid. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that conformational changes associated with the binding of CaLL to model microbial membranes were not disrupted by pegylation. Pegylation of CaLL reduced AMP-elicited cell toxicity as measured using in vitro lung epithelial primary cell cultures. Further, in a fully intact ex vivo isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) model, airway-administered PEG-CaLL did not result in disruption of the pulmonary epithelial barrier, whereas CaLL caused an immediate loss of membrane integrity leading to pulmonary edema. All AMPs (CaLL, PEG-CaLL, LL-37, cecropin A) delivered to the lung by airway administration showed limited (<3%) pulmonary absorption in the IPRL with extensive AMP accumulation in lung tissue itself, a characteristic anticipated to be beneficial for the treatment of pulmonary infections. We conclude that pegylation may present a means of improving the lung biocompatibility of AMPs designed for the treatment of pulmonary infections. PMID:22430978

  8. Fluid handling equipment: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Devices and techniques used in fluid-handling and vacuum systems are described. Section 1 presents several articles on fluid lines and tubing. Section 2 describes a number of components such as valves, filters, and regulators. The last section contains descriptions of a number of innovative fluid-handling systems.

  9. Ambroxol suppresses influenza-virus proliferation in the mouse airway by increasing antiviral factor levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Yao, D F; Ohuchi, M; Ide, M; Yano, M; Okumura, Y; Kido, H

    2002-05-01

    The protective effect of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent which has antioxidant properties and stimulates the release of pulmonary surfactant, against influenza-virus proliferation in the airway was investigated in mice. Ambroxol or the vehicle was administered intraperitoneally twice a day for 5-7 days to mice shortly after intranasal infection with a lethal dose of influenza A/Aichi/68 (H3N2) virus, and the survival rate, virus titre and levels of factors regulating virus proliferation in the airway fluid were analysed. Ambroxol significantly suppressed virus multiplication and improved the survival rate of mice. The effect of ambroxol reached a peak at 10 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), higher doses being less effective. Ambroxol stimulated the release of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication, such as pulmonary surfactant, mucus protease inhibitor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-A and IgG, although it stimulated the release of a trypsin-type protease that potentiates virus proliferation. In addition, ambroxol transiently suppressed release of the cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-12, into airway fluid. Although ambroxol had several negative effects on the host defence system, overall it strikingly increased the concentrations of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication in the airway.

  10. Patterns and dynamics of airway colonisation in mechanically-ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Berdal, J-E; Bjørnholt, J; Blomfeldt, A; Smith-Erichsen, N; Bukholm, G

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns and dynamics of the microbiota in the airways of ventilated patients. Seventy-four mechanically-ventilated patients were recruited consecutively, and oropharyngeal, tracheal and bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid specimens were collected 48 h after intubation, and every 72 h thereafter until the patient was extubated or a total of five sample sets had been collected. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) pathogens were identified, quantified and genotyped. Microbial findings were highly correlated both between airway locations and over time when samples were taken no more than 72 h apart. If no VAP pathogen was present in the oral flora, it was unlikely to be found in a lower airway sample; i.e., the positive predictive value of the oropharyngeal sample was 0.73 (95% CI 0.67-0.80), and the negative predictive value was 0.95 (95% CI 0.92-0.99). Colonisation with Enterobacteriacae, non-fermentative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus was monoclonal in the airways and over time, whereas colonisation with microbes normally found in the oropharynx, i.e., Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, was polyclonal. When antibiotics were used, the chance of recovering VAP pathogens from all sampling sites was reduced three-fold. No correlation was observed between a bacterial count of > or =10(4) CFU/mL in BAL fluid and chest X-rays compatible with VAP.

  11. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  12. Small particles disrupt postnatal airway development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongYoub; Wallis, Chris; Schelegle, Edward S.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Plopper, Charles G.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Kumfer, Ben; Kennedy, Ian M.; Chan, Jackie K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of epidemiologic studies associate air pollution exposure in children with decreased lung function development. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of exposure to combustion-generated fine [230 and 212 nm number mean aerodynamic particle diameter (NMAD)] to ultrafine (73 nm NMAD) particles differing in elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon content on postnatal airway development in rats. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed from postnatal day 7 through 25, and lung function and airway architecture were evaluated 81 days of age. In a separate group of rats, cell proliferation was examined after a single particle exposure at 7 days of age. Early life exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particles altered distal airway architecture and resulted in subtle changes in lung mechanics. Early life exposure to 212 nm high OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture but did alter lung mechanics in a manner suggestive of central airway changes. In contrast, early life exposure to 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture or mechanics. A single 6-h exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particle decreased airway cell proliferation, whereas 212 nm high OC/EC particles increased it and 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not. The early life exposure to ultrafine, high OC/EC particles results in persistent alterations in distal airway architecture that is characterized by an initial decrease in airway cell proliferation. PMID:20634362

  13. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  14. Fluid fertilizers. [Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    The use of fertilizer in the United States has increased spectacularly in the past 20 years. In 1981 plant nutrient use (N + P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ + K/sub 2/O) totaled 23.5 million short tons - compared with only 7.5 million tons in 1960 (table 2). Nutrient use doubled from 1960 to 1970 and tripled from 1960 to 1981. In 1981 fluid nutrient use (mixtures plus nitrogen solutions) totaled 4.1 million tons, more than doubling since 1970 and increasing from 6.3% to 17.5% of the total nutrient use since 1960. Fluid mixtures (NPK) use in 1981 totaled 1.8 million tons of nutrients - about 17% of total mixed fertilizers or 7.5% of total nutrients used. The proportion of total fertilizer nutrients applied in fluid from increases greatly if anhydrous ammonia is included. The 4.6 million tons of nitrogen applied as anhydrous ammonia in 1981 increases total fluid nutrients to 8.1 million tons - 34.5% of the total nutrients applied in the United States. Fluid fertilizer use has grown nearly twice as fast as total fertilizer use, averaging more than 15% per year increase between 1960 and 1970, and an 11% increase between 1960 and 1980. A large part of this increase occurred during the introductory stages of the new product form and was aided by rapid advances in technology.

  15. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  17. Role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and an inhibitory effect of erythromycin on IL-8 release in the airways of patients with chronic airway diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, K; Sonoda, F; Kobayashi, S; Iwagaki, A; Nagatake, T; Matsushima, K; Matsumoto, K

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate of the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemotactic cytokine, in the continuous neutrophil accumulation in the airways of patients with chronic airway disease (CAD) and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, we investigated the cell population, IL-8 levels, IL-1 beta levels, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activities, and neutrophil elastase (NE) activities of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids in 17 CAD patients (with P. aeruginosa infections [CAD+PA], n = 9; without any bacterial infections [CAD-PA], n = 8) and 8 normal volunteers. We found significant elevations of neutrophil numbers, IL-8/albumin ratios, and NE/albumin ratios in BAL fluids from CAD patients, in the following rank order: CAD+PA > CAD-PA > normal volunteers. IL-1 beta/albumin ratios were elevated only in CAD+PA, while no TNF bioactivity was detected in BAL fluids. The neutrophil numbers correlated significantly with the IL-8/albumin ratios and NE/albumin ratios in the BAL fluids of CAD patients. When anti-human IL-8 immunoglobulin G was used for neutralizing neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) activities in BAL fluids, the mean reduction rate of NCF activities in CAD+PA patients was significantly higher than that in CAD-PA patients. We also evaluated the effects of low-dose, long-term erythromycin therapy in BAL fluids from three CAD+PA and two CAD-PA patients. Treatment with erythromycin caused significant reductions of neutrophil numbers, IL-8/albumin ratios, and NE/albumin ratios in BAL fluids from these patients. To elucidate the mechanism of erythromycin therapy, we also examined whether erythromycin suppressed IL-8 production by human alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. We demonstrated a moderate inhibitory effect of erythromycin on IL-8 production in Pseudomonas-stimulated neutrophils but not in alveolar macrophages. Our data support the view that persistent P. aeruginosa infection enhances IL-8 production and IL-8-derived NCF activity, causing neutrophil

  18. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  19. Gene Transfer by Guanidinium-Cholesterol Cationic Lipids into Airway Epithelial Cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Peuchmaur, Michel; Leclerc, Tony; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Lehn, Pierre

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic vectors represent an attractive alternative approach to viral vectors for gene transfer, in particular into airway epithelial cells for lung-directed gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Having recently found that guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipids are efficient reagents for gene transfer into mammalian cell lines in vitro, we have investigated their use for gene delivery into primary airway epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained indicate that the lipid bis (guanidinium)-tren-cholesterol (BGTC) can be used to transfer a reporter gene into primary human airway epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, liposomes composed of BGTC and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) are efficient for gene delivery to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo. Transfected cells were detected both in the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands. In addition, the transfection efficiency of BGTC/DOPE liposomes in vivo was quantitatively assessed by using the luciferase reporter gene system.

  20. In Vitro Modeling of RSV Infection and Cytopathogenesis in Well-Differentiated Human Primary Airway Epithelial Cells (WD-PAECs).

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Lindsay; Villenave, Remi; Guo-Parke, Hong; Douglas, Isobel; Shields, Michael D; Power, Ultan F

    2016-01-01

    The choice of model used to study human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is extremely important. RSV is a human pathogen that is exquisitely adapted to infection of human hosts. Rodent models, such as mice and cotton rats, are semi-permissive to RSV infection and do not faithfully reproduce hallmarks of RSV disease in humans. Furthermore, immortalized airway-derived cell lines, such as HEp-2, BEAS-2B, and A549 cells, are poorly representative of the complexity of the respiratory epithelium. The development of a well-differentiated primary pediatric airway epithelial cell models (WD-PAECs) allows us to simulate several hallmarks of RSV infection of infant airways. They therefore represent important additions to RSV pathogenesis modeling in human-relevant tissues. The following protocols describe how to culture and differentiate both bronchial and nasal primary pediatric airway epithelial cells and how to use these cultures to study RSV cytopathogenesis. PMID:27464691

  1. Extravascular fibrin, plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitors, and airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Scott S.; Norton, Ryan J.; Rinaldi, Lisa M.; Bates, Jason H.T.; Sobel, Burton E.; Irvin, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness are not yet fully elucidated. One of the manifestations of airway inflammation is leakage of diverse plasma proteins into the airway lumen. They include fibrinogen and thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to form fibrin, a major component of thrombi. Fibrin inactivates surfactant. Surfactant on the airway surface maintains airway patency by lowering surface tension. In this study, immunohistochemically detected fibrin was seen along the luminal surface of distal airways in a patient who died of status asthmaticus and in mice with induced allergic airway inflammation. In addition, we observed altered airway fibrinolytic system protein balance consistent with promotion of fibrin deposition in mice with allergic airway inflammation. The airways of mice were exposed to aerosolized fibrinogen, thrombin, or to fibrinogen followed by thrombin. Only fibrinogen followed by thrombin resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with controls. An aerosolized fibrinolytic agent, tissue-type plasminogen activator, significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic airway inflammation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of fibrinogen and thrombin and their accumulation on the airway surface can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15232617

  2. Therapeutic bronchoscopic interventions for malignant airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dalar, Levent; Özdemir, Cengiz; Abul, Yasin; Karasulu, Levent; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Akbaş, Ayşegül; Altın, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no definitive consensus about the factors affecting the choice of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of malignant airway obstruction. The present study defines the choice of the interventional bronchoscopic modality and analyzes the factors influencing survival in patients with malignant central airway obstruction. Totally, over 7 years, 802 interventional rigid bronchoscopic procedures were applied in 547 patients having malignant airway obstruction. There was a significant association between the type of stent and the site of the lesion in the present study. Patients with tracheal involvement and/or involvement of the main bronchi had the worst prognosis. The sites of the lesion and endobronchial treatment modality were independent predictors of survival in the present study. The selection of different types of airway stents can be considered on the base of site of the lesion. Survival can be estimated based on the site of the lesion and endobronchial brochoscopic modality used. PMID:27281104

  3. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  6. Virtual Airway Skills Trainer (VAST) Simulator

    PubMed Central

    DEMIREL, Doga; YU, Alexander; HALIC, Tansel; SANKARANARAYANAN, Ganesh; RYASON, Adam; SPINDLER, David; BUTLER, Kathryn L.; CAO, Caroline; PETRUSA, Emil; MOLINA, Marcos; JONES, Dan; DE, Suvranu; DEMOYA, Marc; JONES, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of Virtual Airway Skill Trainer (VAST) tasks. The simulated tasks are a part of two main airway management techniques; Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) and Cricothyroidotomy (CCT). ETI is a simple nonsurgical airway management technique, while CCT is the extreme surgical alternative to secure the airway of a patient. We developed identification of Mallampati class, finding the optimal angle for positioning pharyngeal/mouth axes tasks for ETI and identification of anatomical landmarks and incision tasks for CCT. Both ETI and CCT simulators were used to get physicians’ feedback at Society for Education in Anesthesiology and Association for Surgical Education spring meetings. In this preliminary validation study, total 38 participants for ETI and 48 for CCT performed each simulation task and completed pre and post questionnaires. In this work, we present the details of the simulation for the tasks and also the analysis of the collected data from the validation study. PMID:27046559

  7. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  8. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  9. Airway clearance therapy: finding the evidence.

    PubMed

    Volsko, Teresa A

    2013-10-01

    Disease processes can impair ciliary function, alter secretion production and mucus rheology, and interfere with the cough reflex. Airway clearance therapy has been a cornerstone of therapy aimed at minimizing the devastating effects of airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation due to mucus stasis on the conducting airways and lung parenchyma. Although challenges to performing clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of airway clearance therapeutic modalities exist, resources are available in the literature. In addition to device evaluations and original clinical research, the expert opinion, systematic reviews, and evidence-based practice guidelines can be found. These tools can be used to develop protocols and pathways to guide our practice. Monitoring and reporting patient, process, and financial outcomes are essential steps germane to the implementation of evidence-based care.

  10. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  11. Accurate airway segmentation based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qier; Kitsaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel airway segmentation method based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut. Airway segmentation is an important step in analyzing chest CT volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis, asthma diagnosis, and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3-D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite challenging. Several researchers have proposed automated algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However these methods failed to detect the peripheral bronchi branches. They caused a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach that permits more accurate extraction of complex bronchial airway region. Our method are composed of three steps. First, the Hessian analysis is utilized for enhancing the line-like structure in CT volumes, then a multiscale cavity-enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure from the previous enhanced result. In the second step, we utilize the support vector machine (SVM) to construct a classifier for removing the FP regions generated. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is utilized to connect all of the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. We applied this method to sixteen cases of 3D chest CT volumes. The results showed that the branch detection rate of this method can reach about 77.7% without leaking into the lung parenchyma areas.

  12. Airway obstruction secondary to rhinoscleroma during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, W B; Peskind, S P; Bressler, K L; Crockett, D M

    1995-11-01

    Dyspnea is a fairly common complaint during pregnancy. However, if one excludes allergic nasal congestion of pregnancy, upper airway obstruction is a distinctly uncommon cause of dyspnea in the pregnant patient. Three cases of laryngeal rhinoscleroma in pregnant women requiring tracheostomy for airway management are reported. All three delivered healthy infants vaginally. Postpartum, two of the three were successfully decannulated, while the third became pregnant again before decannulation was accomplished. Treatment options and a review of the literature are presented.

  13. Near-field and far-field sound radiation from a line-driven fluid-loaded infinite flat plate having periodic and non-periodic attached rib stiffeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.

    1992-03-01

    The far-field and near-field solutions for the radiated acoustic pressure from a line-driven fluid-loaded, rib-stiffened thin elastic plate have been obtained. The plate has been configured to have two sets of rib-stiffeners, though the formulation given may be extended to include additional rib-stiffener sets. The stiffeners composing a given set are identical and are spaced periodically with distance l. However, one set of stiffeners is shifted by an amount from the other set. In this manner, portions of the plate may be configured with repeating sections having non-periodic rib spacing. The stiffeners exert reactive forces upon the plate, but not angular moments. Fluid loading is included on the upper surface of the plate while the lower surface is unloaded, except for a time harmonic line force applied normal to the lower surface. Expressions are derived, for the special case of periodic inter-rib spacing, which give the wavenumbers at which the magnitude of the wavenumber response obtains relative maximum and minimum values. For a stiffened plate, it is seen that excitation frequencies below coincidence generate large magnitude supersonic wavenumber components.

  14. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  15. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  16. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  17. Taste Receptors in Upper Airway Immunity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ryan M; Lee, Robert J; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors are well known for their role in communicating information from the tongue to the brain about nutritional value or potential toxicity of ingested substances. More recently, it has been shown that taste receptors are expressed in other locations throughout the body, including the airway, gastrointestinal tract, brain and pancreas. The roles of some 'extraoral' taste receptors are largely unknown, but emerging research suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are capable of sensing bacteria and modulating innate immunity. This chapter focuses on the role of bitter and sweet taste receptors in human airway innate immunity and their clinical relevance to rhinosinusitis. The bitter taste receptor T2R38 expressed in sinonasal cilia detects bitter bacterial quorum-sensing molecules and activates a nitric oxide-dependent innate immune response; moreover, there are polymorphisms in T2R38 that underlie susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Bitter and sweet receptors in sinonasal solitary chemosensory cells control secretion of antimicrobial peptides in the upper airway and may have a profound impact on airway infections in patients with CRS and diabetes. Future research on taste receptors in the airway has enormous potential to expand our understanding of host-pathogen immune interactions and provide novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27466851

  18. Inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes potentiate airway fibrosis in murine allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P; Tewksbury, Earl W; Moss, Owen R; Cesta, Mark F; Wong, Brian A; Bonner, James C

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are gaining increasing attention due to possible health risks from occupational or environmental exposures. This study tested the hypothesis that inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) would increase airway fibrosis in mice with allergic asthma. Normal and ovalbumin-sensitized mice were exposed to a MWCNT aerosol (100 mg/m(3)) or saline aerosol for 6 hours. Lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis were examined by histopathology, clinical chemistry, ELISA, or RT-PCR for cytokines/chemokines, growth factors, and collagen at 1 and 14 days after inhalation. Inhaled MWCNT were distributed throughout the lung and found in macrophages by light microscopy, but were also evident in epithelial cells by electron microscopy. Quantitative morphometry showed significant airway fibrosis at 14 days in mice that received a combination of ovalbumin and MWCNT, but not in mice that received ovalbumin or MWCNT only. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice that did not inhale MWCNT had elevated levels IL-13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 in lung lavage fluid, but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA. In contrast, unsensitized mice that inhaled MWCNT had elevated PDGF-AA, but not increased levels of TGF-beta1 and IL-13. This suggested that airway fibrosis resulting from combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation requires PDGF, a potent fibroblast mitogen, and TGF-beta1, which stimulates collagen production. Combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation also synergistically increased IL-5 mRNA levels, which could further contribute to airway fibrosis. These data indicate that inhaled MWCNT require pre-existing inflammation to cause airway fibrosis. Our findings suggest that individuals with pre-existing allergic inflammation may be susceptible to airway fibrosis from inhaled MWCNT.

  19. Exposure to welding fumes and lower airway infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Reetika; Periselneris, Jimstan; Lanone, Sophie; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Melton, Geoffrey; Palmer, Keith T.; Andujar, Pascal; Antonini, James M.; Cohignac, Vanessa; Erdely, Aaron; Jose, Ricardo J.; Mudway, Ian; Brown, Jeremy; Grigg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Welders are at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanism for this association is not known. The capacity of pneumococci to adhere to and infect lower airway cells is mediated by host-expressed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR). Objective We sought to assess the effect of mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF) on PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection to human airway cells in vitro and on pneumococcal airway infection in a mouse model. Methods The oxidative potential of MS-WF was assessed by their capacity to reduce antioxidants in vitro. Pneumococcal adhesion and infection of A549, BEAS-2B, and primary human bronchial airway cells were assessed by means of quantitative bacterial culture and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU). After intranasal instillation of MS-WF, mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung CFU values were determined. PAFR protein levels were assessed by using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and PAFR mRNA expression was assessed by using quantitative PCR. PAFR was blocked by CV-3988, and oxidative stress was attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. Results: MS-WF exhibited high oxidative potential. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells MS-WF increased pneumococcal adhesion and infection and PAFR protein expression. Both CV-3988 and N-acetylcysteine reduced MS-WF–stimulated pneumococcal adhesion and infection of airway cells. MS-WF increased mouse lung PAFR mRNA expression and increased BALF and lung pneumococcal CFU values. In MS-WF–exposed mice CV-3988 reduced BALF CFU values. Conclusions Hypersusceptibility of welders to pneumococcal pneumonia is in part mediated by the capacity of welding fumes to increase PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection of lower airway cells. PMID:26277596

  20. Inhaled Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Potentiate Airway Fibrosis in Murine Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Tewksbury, Earl W.; Moss, Owen R.; Cesta, Mark F.; Wong, Brian A.; Bonner, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are gaining increasing attention due to possible health risks from occupational or environmental exposures. This study tested the hypothesis that inhaled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) would increase airway fibrosis in mice with allergic asthma. Normal and ovalbumin-sensitized mice were exposed to a MWCNT aerosol (100 mg/m3) or saline aerosol for 6 hours. Lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis were examined by histopathology, clinical chemistry, ELISA, or RT-PCR for cytokines/chemokines, growth factors, and collagen at 1 and 14 days after inhalation. Inhaled MWCNT were distributed throughout the lung and found in macrophages by light microscopy, but were also evident in epithelial cells by electron microscopy. Quantitative morphometry showed significant airway fibrosis at 14 days in mice that received a combination of ovalbumin and MWCNT, but not in mice that received ovalbumin or MWCNT only. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice that did not inhale MWCNT had elevated levels IL-13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung lavage fluid, but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA. In contrast, unsensitized mice that inhaled MWCNT had elevated PDGF-AA, but not increased levels of TGF-β1 and IL-13. This suggested that airway fibrosis resulting from combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation requires PDGF, a potent fibroblast mitogen, and TGF-β1, which stimulates collagen production. Combined ovalbumin sensitization and MWCNT inhalation also synergistically increased IL-5 mRNA levels, which could further contribute to airway fibrosis. These data indicate that inhaled MWCNT require pre-existing inflammation to cause airway fibrosis. Our findings suggest that individuals with pre-existing allergic inflammation may be susceptible to airway fibrosis from inhaled MWCNT. PMID:18787175

  1. Influenza A infection enhances antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in young but not aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, Janette M.; Gillespie, Virginia L.; Srivastava, Kamal; Li, Xiu-Min; Busse, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although morbidity and mortality rates from asthma are highest in patients > 65 years of age, the effect of older age on airway inflammation in asthma is not well established. Objective To investigate age-related differences in the promotion of allergic inflammation after influenza A viral respiratory infection on antigen specific IgE production, antigen-induced airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness in mice. Methods To accomplish this objective, the following model system was used. Young (six-week) and aged (18-month) BALB/c mice were first infected with a non-lethal dose of influenza virus A (H/HK×31). Mice were then ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized during the acute-infection (3-days post inoculation) and then chronically underwent challenge to the airways with OVA. Forty-eight hours after the final OVA-challenge, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) cellular and cytokine profile, antigen-specific IgE and IgG1, and lung tissue inflammation were measured. Results Age-specific differences were noted on the effect of a viral infection, allergic sensitization, airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Serum OVA-specific IgE was significantly increased in only the aged mice infected with influenza virus. Despite greater morbidity (e.g. weight loss and sickness scores) during the acute infection in the 18-month old mice that were OVA-sensitized there was little effect on the AHR and BALF cellular differential. In contrast, BALF neutrophils and AHR increased, but eosinophils decreased in 6-week mice that were OVA-sensitized during an acute influenza infection. Conclusion With increased age in a mouse model, viral infection prior to antigen sensitization affects the airway and systemic allergic response differently. These differences may reflect distinct phenotypic features of allergic inflammation in older patients with asthma PMID:25039815

  2. Reversibility and reproducibility of histamine induced plasma leakage in nasal airways.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, C; Baumgarten, C R; Pipkorn, U; Alkner, U; Persson, C G

    1989-01-01

    Plasma exudation is one cardinal factor in airways defence and inflammation. In inflammatory airway diseases such as rhinitis and asthma, however, plasma leakage may also have a pathogenetic role. Experimental data from animals indicate that highly sensitive, active, and reversible processes regulate the vascular and mucosal permeability to macromolecules. With the use of a nasal lavage model for the recovery of liquids on the mucosal surface the effect of histamine on the macromolecular permeability of the airway endothelial-epithelial barriers was studied in normal subjects. The concentrations of albumin, kinins, and N-alpha-beta-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl esterase (TAME) in nasal lavage fluid were measured and nasal symptoms assessed by a scoring technique. The reproducibility of three repeated challenges with 30 minute intervals on the same day was studied in 12 subjects and compared with the same procedure (three challenges) on a different day. Sneezing decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) after the first histamine challenge but was maintained thereafter. Otherwise, the mean values for symptoms and for markers of vascular leakage were very similar both for the three challenges in the same session and for the two challenge sessions on a different day. Sneezing, blockage, and secretions were associated with increased concentrations of TAME esterase (maximum 9000 cpm/ml), kinins (1.4 ng/ml), and albumin (0.3 g/l) in lavage fluid. Both the symptoms and the measures of plasma exudation were reversible and reproducible in the three repeat histamine challenges and at two challenge sessions on different days. These findings support the view that non-injurious, active processes regulate the inflammatory flow of macromolecules across airways endothelial-epithelial barriers. The present experimental approach would be suitable for studies of the modulatory effects of inflammatory stimulus induced plasma leakage and symptoms in human airways. PMID:2648641

  3. Pulmonary fluid flow challenges for experimental and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B; Forest, M Gregory; Grotberg, James B

    2014-12-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  4. Pulmonary Fluid Flow Challenges for Experimental and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory; Grotberg, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  5. The origin of fluids and gases in the DFDP-2B borehole, New Zealand; insight from on-line mud gas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathewson, Loren; Wiersberg, Thomas; Niedermann, Samuel; Erzinger, Joerg; Menzies, Catriona; Toy, Virginia; Zimmer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to improve our understanding of the Alpine Fault Zone, a tectonically active fault system in New Zealand known to rupture in large events, by deep scientific drilling. The borehole DFDP-2B approached the Alpine Fault at depth, reaching a final depth of 892 m. During drilling, gas was extracted from returning drilling mud and changes in the gas composition were tracked by mass spectrometry (N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CH4, He, and H2), gas chromatography (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, i/n-C4H10), and alpha-spectrometry for 222Rn. The rapid formation of mud wall cake seals the borehole from fluid inflow along the borehole; hence formation-derived gases enter mostly at the drill bit during drilling. Gas was sampled for offline analyses on noble gas and stable isotopes to complement the dataset. Apart from an atmospheric input, the gases in drilling mud derive from the pore space of rock, crushed at the drill bit, and from permeable layers intersected by the borehole. OLGA thus may provide information on fluid origins, flow rates and paths, fluid-rock interactions along these paths, and the permeability structure of the faulted rock mass. The principle formation-derived gases found in drilling mud during drilling of DFDP-2 were CO2 (≤1.7 vol.-%), H2 (<2.5 vol.-%), and CH4 (≤0.18 vol.-%), with minor contributions of He. Zones of enhanced gas concentrations and high radon activity are interpreted to reflect intervals of active fluid flow through highly fractured and faulted rock. Air-corrected 3He/4He values of samples from 236m (0.68 Ra), 610m (1.03 Ra) and 707m (0.63 Ra) show mantle helium contributions similar to those measured in hot springs along the Alpine Fault, e.g. Fox River (0.64 Ra), Copland (0.42 Ra), Lower Wanganui (0.81 Ra). CH4/C2H6 (~20) and δ13C of methane (-31.7 ‰ PDB) underpin a thermogenic origin of hydrocarbons at depths below 600m, while mixing with biogenic gas is indicated at shallower depth (δ13C of methane= -46.7

  6. Selective quantitative bioanalysis of proteins in biological fluids by on-line immunoaffinity chromatography-protein digestion-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoos, Johannes S; Sudergat, Hilke; Hoelck, Jens-Peter; Stahl, Mark; de Vlieger, Jon S B; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Lingeman, Henk; Irth, Hubertus

    2006-01-18

    A quantitative method for the determination of proteins in complex biological matrices has been developed based on the selectivity of antibodies for sample purification followed by proteolytic digestion and quantitative mass spectrometry. An immunosorbent of polyclonal anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies immobilized on CNBR agarose is used in the on-line mode for selective sample pretreatment. Next, the purified sample is trypsin digested to obtain protein specific peptide markers. Subsequent analysis of the peptide mixture using a desalination procedure and a separation step coupled, on-line to an ion-trap mass spectrometer, reveals that this method enables selective determination of proteins in biological matrices like diluted human plasma. This approach enhances substantially the selectivity compared to common quantitative analysis executed with immunoassays and colorimetry, fluorimetry or luminescence detection. Hyphenation of the immunoaffinity chromatography with on-line digestion and chromatography-mass spectrometry is performed and a completely on-line quantification of the model protein BSA in bovine and human urine was established. A detection limit of 170 nmol/l and a quantification limit of 280 nmol/l is obtained using 50 microl of either standard or spiked biological matrix. The model system allows fully automated absolute quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins in biological matrices without time-consuming labeling procedures.

  7. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF‐β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Rachel E.; Shaw, Nicole C.; Berry, Luke J.; Hart, Prue H.; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D‐deficient or ‐replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five‐micron sections from formalin‐fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)‐β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D‐deficient and ‐replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF‐β signaling pathway molecules. Eight‐week‐old adult vitamin D‐deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D‐deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D‐deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF‐β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D‐deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D‐deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D‐deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease. PMID:24760528

  8. Neutralizing inhibitors in the airways of naïve ferrets do not play a major role in modulating the virulence of H3 subtype influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Job, Emma R; Pizzolla, Angela; Nebl, Thomas; Short, Kirsty R; Deng, Yi-Mo; Carolan, Louise; Laurie, Karen L; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Many insights regarding the pathogenesis of human influenza A virus (IAV) infections have come from studies in mice and ferrets. Surfactant protein (SP)-D is the major neutralizing inhibitor of IAV in mouse airway fluids and SP-D-resistant IAV mutants show enhanced virus replication and virulence in mice. Herein, we demonstrate that sialylated glycoproteins, rather than SP-D, represent the major neutralizing inhibitors against H3 subtype viruses in airway fluids from naïve ferrets. Moreover, while resistance to neutralizing inhibitors is a critical factor in modulating virus replication and disease in the mouse model, it does not appear to be so in the ferret model, as H3 mutants resistant to either SP-D or sialylated glycoproteins in ferret airway fluids did not show enhanced virulence in ferrets. These data have important implications for our understanding of pathogenesis and immunity to human IAV infections in these two widely used animal models of infection. PMID:27110707

  9. Management of airway complications of burns in children.

    PubMed

    Vivori, E; Cudmore, R E

    1977-12-01

    Children who have been exposed to smoke in a confined space or who have soot or burns, however minimal, on the face should be admitted to hospital. Respiratory distress may be delayed, but if it is progressive the patient should be curarised, intubated, and mechanically ventilated. Unless ventilation continues for 48 hours, followed by 24 hours' spontaneous respiration against a positive airway pressure, stridor and pulmonary oedema may recur. An endotracheal tube small enough to allow a leak between it and the oedematous mucosa must be passed to prevent laryngeal damage and subsequent subglottic stenosis. High humidity of inspired gases keeps secretions fluid and the endotracheal tube patent. A high oxygen concentration compensates for deficient oxygen uptake and transport caused by pulmonary lesions and the presence of poisonous compounds interfering with oxygen transport. Dexamethasone to minimise cerebral oedema and antibiotics to reduce the incidence of chest infections should be given. PMID:589269

  10. Full Airway Drainage by Fiber Bronchoscopy Through Artificial Airway in the Treatment of Occult Traumatic Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Zhong Yan; Zhang, Shao Yang; Yu, Wen Qiao; Huang, Fang-Fang

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of full airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway in the treatment of traumatic atelectasis with occult manifestations. From May 2006 to May 2011, 40 cases of occult traumatic atelectasis were enrolled into our prospective study. Group A (n = 18) received drainage by nasal bronchoscope; group B underwent airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway (n = 22). The effects of treatment were evaluated by the incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung abscess, and the average length of hospital stay. Compared with nasal fiber-optic treatment, airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway reduced the incidence of ARDS (p = 0.013) and lung abscess (p = 0.062) and shortened the mean length of stay (p = 0.018). Making the decision to create an artificial airway timely and carry out lung lavage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway played a significant role in the treatment of occult traumatic atelectasis. PMID:27011511

  11. Full Airway Drainage by Fiber Bronchoscopy Through Artificial Airway in the Treatment of Occult Traumatic Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Zhong Yan; Zhang, Shao Yang; Yu, Wen Qiao; Huang, Fang-Fang

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of full airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway in the treatment of traumatic atelectasis with occult manifestations. From May 2006 to May 2011, 40 cases of occult traumatic atelectasis were enrolled into our prospective study. Group A (n = 18) received drainage by nasal bronchoscope; group B underwent airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway (n = 22). The effects of treatment were evaluated by the incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung abscess, and the average length of hospital stay. Compared with nasal fiber-optic treatment, airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway reduced the incidence of ARDS (p = 0.013) and lung abscess (p = 0.062) and shortened the mean length of stay (p = 0.018). Making the decision to create an artificial airway timely and carry out lung lavage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway played a significant role in the treatment of occult traumatic atelectasis.

  12. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  13. FLUID SELECTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stinson, W.J.

    1958-09-16

    A valve designed to selectively sample fluids from a number of sources is described. The valve comprises a rotatable operating lever connected through a bellows seal to a rotatable assembly containing a needle valve, bearings, and a rotational lock. The needle valve is connected through a flexible tube to the sample fluid outlet. By rotating the lever the needle valve is placed over . one of several fluid sources and locked in position so that the fluid is traasferred through the flexible tubing and outlet to a remote sampling system. The fluids from the nonselected sources are exhausted to a waste line. This valve constitutes a simple, dependable means of selecting a sample from one of several scurces.

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is involved in airway epithelial wound repair.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Katherine R; Maniak, Peter J; O'Grady, Scott M

    2010-11-01

    The role of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial wound repair was investigated using normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and a human airway epithelial cell line (Calu-3) of serous gland origin. Measurements of wound repair were performed using continuous impedance sensing to determine the time course for wound closure. Control experiments showed that the increase in impedance corresponding to cell migration into the wound was blocked by treatment with the actin polymerization inhibitor, cytochalasin D. Time lapse imaging revealed that NHBE and Calu-3 cell wound closure was dependent on cell migration, and that movement occurred as a collective sheet of cells. Selective inhibition of CFTR activity with CFTR(inh)-172 or short hairpin RNA silencing of CFTR expression produced a significant delay in wound repair. The CF cell line UNCCF1T also exhibited significantly slower migration than comparable normal airway epithelial cells. Inhibition of CFTR-dependent anion transport by treatment with CFTR(inh)-172 slowed wound closure to the same extent as silencing CFTR protein expression, indicating that ion transport by CFTR plays a critical role in migration. Moreover, morphologic analysis of migrating cells revealed that CFTR inhibition or silencing significantly reduced lamellipodia protrusion. These findings support the conclusion that CFTR participates in airway epithelial wound repair by a mechanism involving anion transport that is coupled to the regulation of lamellipodia protrusion at the leading edge of the cell.

  15. Potential and limitations of on-line comprehensive reversed phase liquid chromatography×supercritical fluid chromatography for the separation of neutral compounds: An approach to separate an aqueous extract of bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Sarrut, Morgan; Corgier, Amélie; Crétier, Gérard; Le Masle, Agnès; Dubant, Stéphane; Heinisch, Sabine

    2015-07-10

    On-line comprehensive Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography×Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (RPLCxSFC) was investigated for the separation of complex samples of neutral compounds. The presented approach aimed at overcoming the constraints involved by such a coupling. The search for suitable conditions (stationary phases, injection solvent, injection volume, design of interface) are discussed with a view of ensuring a good transfer of the compounds between both dimensions, thereby allowing high effective peak capacity in the second dimension. Instrumental aspects that are of prime importance in on-line 2D separations, were also tackled (dwell volume, extra column volume and detection). After extensive preliminary studies, an on-line RPLCxSFC separation of a bio-oil aqueous extract was carried out and compared to an on-line RPLCxRPLC separation of the same sample in terms of orthogonality, peak capacity and sensitivity. Both separations were achieved in 100min. For this sample and in these optimized conditions, it is shown that RPLCxSFC (with Hypercarb and Acquity BEH-2EP as stationary phases in first and second dimension respectively) can generate a slightly higher peak capacity than RPLCxRPLC (with Hypercarb and Acquity CSH phenyl-hexyl as stationary phases in first and second dimension respectively) (620 vs 560). Such a result is essentially due to the high degree of orthogonality between RPLC and SFC which may balance for lesser peak efficiency obtained with SFC as second dimension. Finally, even though current limitations in SFC instrumentation (i.e. large extra-column volume, large dwell volume, no ultra-high pressure) can be critical at the moment for on-line 2D-separations, RPLCxSFC appears to be a promising alternative to RPLCxRPLC for the separation of complex samples of neutral compounds.

  16. Basolateral Cl channels in primary airway epithelial cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2007-06-01

    Salt and water absorption and secretion across the airway epithelium are important for maintaining the thin film of liquid lining the surface of the airway epithelium. Movement of Cl across the apical membrane involves the CFTR Cl channel; however, conductive pathways for Cl movement across the basolateral membrane have been little studied. Here, we determined the regulation and single-channel properties of the Cl conductance (G(Cl)) in airway surface epithelia using epithelial cultures from human or bovine trachea and freshly isolated ciliated cells from the human nasal epithelium. In Ussing chamber studies, a swelling-activated basolateral G(Cl) was found, which was further stimulated by forskolin and blocked by N-phenylanthranilic acid (DPC) = sucrose > flufenamic acid = niflumic acid = glibenclamide > CdCl(2) = 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) = DIDS = ZnCl(2) > tamoxifen > 4,4'-dinitro-2,2'-stilbene-disulfonate disodium salt (DNDS). In whole cell patch-clamp experiments, three types of G(Cl) were identified: 1) a voltage-activated, DIDS- (but not Cd-) blockable and osmosensitive G(Cl); 2) an inwardly rectifying, hyperpolarization-activated and Cd-sensitive G(Cl); and 3) a forskolin-activated, linear G(Cl), which was insensitive to Cd and DIDS. In cell-attached patch-clamp recordings, the basolateral pole of isolated ciliated cells expressed three types of Cl channels: 1) an outwardly rectifying, swelling-activated Cl channel; 2) a strongly inwardly rectifying Cl channel; and 3) a forskolin-activated, low-conductance channel. We propose that, depending on the driving force for Cl across the apical membrane, basolateral Cl channels confine Cl(-) secretion or support transcellular Cl(-) absorption.

  17. On locating the obstruction in the upper airway via numerical simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The fluid dynamical properties of the air flow in the upper airway (UA) are not fully understood at present due to the three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific complex geometry of the airway, flow transition from laminar to turbulent and flow-structure interaction during the breathing cycle. It is quite difficult at present to experimentally measure the instantaneous velocity and pressure at specific points in the human airway. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) can predict all the flow properties and resolve all its relevant length- and time-scales. We developed a DNS solver with the state-of-the-art lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and used it to investigate the flow in two patient-specific UAs reconstructed from CT scan data. Inspiration and expiration flows through these two airways are studied. The time-averaged first spatial derivative of pressure (pressure gradient), ∂p/∂z, is used to locate the region of the UA obstruction. But the time-averaged second spatial derivative, ∂2p/∂z2, is used to pinpoint the exact location of the obstruction. The present results show that the DNS-LBM solver can be used to obtain accurate flow details in the UA and is a powerful tool to locate its obstruction. PMID:24389271

  18. Methyl Protodioscin from the Roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Inhibiting Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lim, Hun Jai; Lee, Chan Woo; Son, Kun-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to find pharmacologically active compound against airway inflammation from the roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis. The 70% ethanol extract of the roots of A. cochinchinensis (ACE) was found to inhibit IL-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) and the major constituent, methyl protodioscin (MP), also strongly inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α from A549 cells at 10-100 μM. This downregulating effect of proinflammatory cytokine production was found to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun activation pathway. When examined on an in vivo model of airway inflammation in mice, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury, ACE, and MP significantly inhibited cell infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by the oral treatment at doses of 100-400 mg/kg and 30-60 mg/kg, respectively. MP also inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lung tissue. All of these findings provide scientific evidence supporting the role of A. cochinchinensis as a herbal remedy in treating airway inflammation and also suggest a therapeutic value of MP on airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:26379748

  19. Influence of Asian Dust Particles on Immune Adjuvant Effects and Airway Inflammation in Asthma Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kurai, Jun; Watanabe, Masanari; Tomita, Katsuyuki; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki Sano Akira; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Objective An Asian dust storm (ADS) contains airborne particles that affect conditions such as asthma, but the mechanism of exacerbation is unclear. The objective of this study was to compare immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation induced by airborne particles collected on ADS days and the original ADS soil (CJ-1 soil) in asthma model mice. Methods Airborne particles were collected on ADS days in western Japan. NC/Nga mice were co-sensitized by intranasal instillation with ADS airborne particles and/or Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), and with CJ-1 soil and/or Df for 5 consecutive days. Df-sensitized mice were stimulated with Df challenge intranasally at 7 days after the last Df sensitization. At 24 hours after challenge, serum allergen specific antibody, differential leukocyte count and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured, and airway inflammation was examined histopathologically. Results Co-sensitization with ADS airborne particles and Df increased the neutrophil and eosinophil counts in BALF. Augmentation of airway inflammation was also observed in peribronchiolar and perivascular lung areas. Df-specific serum IgE was significantly elevated by ADS airborne particles, but not by CJ-1 soil. Levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 were higher in BALF in mice treated with ADS airborne particles. Conclusion These results suggest that substances attached to ADS airborne particles that are not in the original ADS soil may play important roles in immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation. PMID:25386753

  20. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  1. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  2. Sputum Leucine-Rich Alpha-2 Glycoprotein as a Marker of Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Serada, Satoshi; Hattori, Noboru; Nomura, Shintaro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Yokoyama, Akihito; Naka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways, but an ideal biomarker that accurately reflects ongoing airway inflammation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of sputum leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein (LRG) as a new biomarker for airway inflammation in asthma. Methods We obtained induced sputum samples from patients with asthma (N = 64) and healthy volunteers (N = 22) and measured LRG concentration by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model mice were used to investigate the mechanism of LRG production during airway inflammation. The LRG concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from mice were determined by ELISA and mouse lung sections were stained with anti-LRG antibody and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent. Results Sputum LRG concentrations were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.00686). Consistent with patients’ data, BALF LRG levels in asthma model mice were significantly higher than in control mice (p = 0.00013). Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from asthma model mice revealed that LRG was intensely expressed in a subpopulation of bronchial epithelial cells, which corresponded with PAS-positive mucus producing cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that sputum LRG is a promising biomarker of local inflammation in asthma. PMID:27611322

  3. [Effects of carbocisteine on airway inflammation and related events in SO2-exposed rats].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Okamura, T; Masumoto, Y; Tachiiri, T; Momo, K

    2001-01-01

    Airway inflammation leads to secretion of abnormal mucous glycoprotein and ciliary injury. To investigate the possible usefulness of carbocisteine against airway inflammation and events related to it, we conducted a study in SO2-exposed rats of the effects of carbocisteine and ambroxol, as an active control drug, on components of mucous glycoprotein (fucose, sialic acid and protein) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); on infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells in BALF; on tracheal and bronchial-ciliary lesions; and on cAMP levels in tracheal and alveolar tissues. Carbocisteine inhibited or improved all SO2-induced changes tested, and dosages of 125 and 250 mg/kg b.i.d. reduced fucose, sialic acid and protein contents, inflammatory cells (as markers of inflammation), free radicals, and elastase activity in BALF, and suppressed the development of ciliary lesions of the tracheal and bronchial mucosa, while ambroxol (10 mg/kg b.i.d.) showed no such effects. In addition, carbocisteine improved cAMP levels in the tracheal and alveolar tissues. These results indicate that carbocisteine is able to prevent the development of inflammation-related respiratory disease in this rat model, and that this remission of airway inflammation may be associated with carbocisteine-induced normalization of cAMP levels in tracheal and alveolar tissues as well as with its mucoregulant and anti-inflammatory effects. In conclusion, carbocisteine has a unique mucoregulant action and inhibits SO2-induced airway inflammation in a manner different from that of ambroxol.

  4. Methyl Protodioscin from the Roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Inhibiting Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lim, Hun Jai; Lee, Chan Woo; Son, Kun-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to find pharmacologically active compound against airway inflammation from the roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis. The 70% ethanol extract of the roots of A. cochinchinensis (ACE) was found to inhibit IL-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) and the major constituent, methyl protodioscin (MP), also strongly inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α from A549 cells at 10–100 μM. This downregulating effect of proinflammatory cytokine production was found to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun activation pathway. When examined on an in vivo model of airway inflammation in mice, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury, ACE, and MP significantly inhibited cell infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by the oral treatment at doses of 100–400 mg/kg and 30–60 mg/kg, respectively. MP also inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lung tissue. All of these findings provide scientific evidence supporting the role of A. cochinchinensis as a herbal remedy in treating airway inflammation and also suggest a therapeutic value of MP on airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:26379748

  5. Engineered silica nanoparticles act as adjuvants to enhance allergic airway disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increase in production and use of engineered nanoparticles (NP; ≤ 100 nm), safety concerns have risen about the potential health effects of occupational or environmental NP exposure. Results of animal toxicology studies suggest that inhalation of NP may cause pulmonary injury with subsequent acute or chronic inflammation. People with chronic respiratory diseases like asthma or allergic rhinitis may be even more susceptible to toxic effects of inhaled NP. Few studies, however, have investigated adverse effects of inhaled NP that may enhance the development of allergic airway disease. Methods We investigated the potential of polyethylene glycol coated amorphous silica NP (SNP; 90 nm diameter) to promote allergic airway disease when co-exposed during sensitization with an allergen. BALB/c mice were sensitized by intranasal instillation with 0.02% ovalbumin (OVA; allergen) or saline (control), and co-exposed to 0, 10, 100, or 400 μg of SNP. OVA-sensitized mice were then challenged intranasally with 0.5% OVA 14 and 15 days after sensitization, and all animals were sacrificed a day after the last OVA challenge. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected, and pulmonary tissue was processed for histopathology and biochemical and molecular analyses. Results Co-exposure to SNP during OVA sensitization caused a dose-dependent enhancement of allergic airway disease upon challenge with OVA alone. This adjuvant-like effect was manifested by significantly greater OVA-specific serum IgE, airway eosinophil infiltration, mucous cell metaplasia, and Th2 and Th17 cytokine gene and protein expression, as compared to mice that were sensitized to OVA without SNP. In saline controls, SNP exposure did cause a moderate increase in airway neutrophils at the highest doses. Conclusions These results suggest that airway exposure to engineered SNP could enhance allergen sensitization and foster greater manifestation of allergic airway disease upon

  6. Measles: an epidemic of upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Manning, S C; Ridenour, B; Brown, O E; Squires, J

    1991-09-01

    Between October 1989 and August 1990, Dallas County experienced an 11-month epidemic of measles. Of 995 cases of pediatric measles diagnosed in the outpatient department of Children's Medical Center, 108 patients were admitted and 34 of these demonstrated significant upper airway obstruction at the time of admission. Airway problems ranged from mild inspiratory stridor with nasal flaring to frank obstruction and arrest in the emergency room, requiring intubation. Eight of the 34 airway patients were eventually diagnosed with bacterial tracheitis on the basis of endoscopic findings and culture results. The remaining patients had pictures more consistent with viral laryngotracheitis, but all patients were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent possible progression to bacterial tracheitis. A total of nine patients overall required intubation for airway obstruction and all were successfully extubated. Large outbreaks of measles are becoming common again in populations of urban poor--largely unvaccinated children. The disease in these populations tends to occur at a younger age and may be more aggressive with more associated complications. Physicians must keep in mind the possibility of upper airway obstruction in a significant proportion of these patients. Early diagnosis on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms, endoscopy, and radiographs is the key to timely appropriate management.

  7. Kinins, airway obstruction, and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a term that implies symptoms that are present in many organs, some of which are potentially fatal. The pathogenic process can either be IgE-dependent or non-IgE-dependent; the latter circumstance may be referred to as anaphylactoid. Bradykinin is frequently responsible for the manifestations of IgE-independent reactions. Blood levels may increase because of overproduction; diseases such as the various forms of C1 inhibitor deficiency (hereditary or acquired) or hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor are examples in this category. Blood levels may also increase because of an abnormality in bradykinin metabolism; the angioedema due to ACE inhibitors is a commonly encountered example. Angioedema due to bradykinin has the potential to cause airway obstruction and asphyxia as well as severe gastrointestinal symptoms simulating an acute abdomen. Formation of bradykinin in plasma is a result of a complex interaction among proteins such as factor XII, prekallikrein, and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) resulting in HK cleavage and liberation of bradykinin. These proteins also assemble along the surface of endothelial cells via zinc-dependent interactions with gC1qR, cytokeratin 1, and u-PAR. Endothelial cell expression (or secretion) of heat-shock protein 90 or prolylcarboxypeptidase can activate the prekallikrein-HK complex to generate bradykinin in the absence of factor XII, however factor XII is then secondarily activated by the kallikrein that results. Bradykinin is destroyed by carboxypeptidase N and angiotensin-converting enzyme. The hypotension associated with IgE-dependent anaphylaxis maybe mediated, in part, by massive proteolytic digestion of HK by kallikreins (tissue or plasma-derived) or other cell-derived kininogenases. PMID:20519882

  8. Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D.; Garofalo, R.P.; Casola, A.

    2007-11-10

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

  9. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  10. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  11. Airway Management in Croup and Epiglottitis

    PubMed Central

    Crumley, Roger L.

    1977-01-01

    Treatment techniques for airway obstruction in croup and epiglottitis are reviewed in the medical literature. Series totaling 295 nasotracheal intubations, and 591 tracheostomies were reviewed. There were two deaths attributable to airway complications in 126 patients in whom nasotracheal intubation was carried out. In three patients subglottic granulation tissue and subglottic stenoses developed from short-term nasotracheal intubation. There were no subglottic stenoses or tracheal stenoses reported in the 591 tracheostomies. From this review, it would seem feasible to use nasotracheal intubation for short-term airway treatment in croup and epiglottitis. The increasing occurrence of laryngeal and tracheal complications with long-term intubation suggests that tracheostomy be considered in such cases. PMID:349884

  12. MicroRNA in United Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin-Hao; Callejas-Díaz, Borja; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of united airway diseases (UAD) has received increasing attention in recent years. Sustained and increased inflammation is a common feature of UAD, which is inevitably accompanied with marked gene modification and tight gene regulation. However, gene regulation in the common inflammatory processes in UAD remains unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA), a novel regulator of gene expression, has been considered to be involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although there are an increasing number of studies of miRNAs in inflammatory upper and lower airway diseases, few miRNAs have been identified that directly link the upper and lower airways. In this article, therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies available in order to improve the understanding of the roles of miRNAs in the interaction and pathogenesis of UAD. PMID:27187364

  13. Distribution characteristics of telithromycin, a novel ketolide antimicrobial agent applied for treatment of respiratory infection, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The distribution characteristics of telithromycin (TEL), a novel ketolide antimicrobial agent, in lung epithelial fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of TEL in ELF and AMs following oral administration of TEL solution (50 mg/4 mL/kg) to rats were markedly higher than in plasma, and areas under drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma and AMs/plasma were 2.4 and 65.3, respectively. In vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of TEL through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers was greater than apical-to-basolateral transport. Rhodamine123 and verapamil, MDR1 substrates, reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of TEL. In vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular equilibrated concentration of TEL in cultured AMs (NR8383) was approximately 40 times the extracellular concentration. The uptake of TEL by NR8383 was inhibited by rotenone and FCCP, ATP depletors and was temperature-dependent. These data suggest that the high distribution of TEL to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms.

  14. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  15. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  16. [Modern airway management--current concepts for more patient safety].

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Arnd

    2009-04-01

    Effective and safe airway management is one of the core skills among anaesthesiologists and all physicians involved in acute care medicine. However, failure in airway management is still the most frequent single incidence with the highest impact on patient's morbidity and mortality known from closed claims analyses. The anaesthesiologist has to manage the airway in elective patients providing a high level of safety with as little airway injury and interference with the cardio-vascular system as possible. Clinical competence also includes the management of the expected and unexpected difficult airway in different clinical environments. Therefore, it is the anaesthesiologist's responsibility not only to educate and train younger residents, but also all kinds of medical personnel involved in airway management, e.g. emergency physicians, intensive care therapists or paramedics. Modern airway devices, strategies and educational considerations must fulfill these sometimes diverse and large range requirements. Supraglottic airway devices will be used more often in the daily clinical routine. This is not only due the multiple advantages of these devices compared to the tracheal tube, but also because of the new features of some supraglottic airways, which separate the airway from the gastric track and give information of the pharyngeal position. For the event of a difficult airway, new airway devices and concepts should be trained and applied in daily practice.

  17. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  2. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  3. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  4. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  7. Aerosol exposure of pigs to viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 induces antibodies in bronchoalveolar lining fluids and serum, and protects against homologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Ganter, M; Petzoldt, K

    1995-11-01

    A dose-defined nose-only inhalation system for pigs was used to study the immunogenic and protective potentials of a single aerosol application of viable or killed Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9. Respiratory volumes were measured for each pig to calculate inhaled individual doses. Eight pigs inhaled 107 CFU A. pleuropneumoniae CVI 13261 reference strain for serotype 9. Another eight pigs received an identical dose of killed actinobacilli. After three weeks the pigs and nonexposed controls were challenged with 108 CFU of the homologous strain by aerosol. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) in pigs was performed during the experiment to obtain lavage samples for assessment of local antibodies. Isotype-specific antibody responses in serum and BAL fluids were measured by ELISAs based on whole-cell antigens. The protective efficacy of aerosol immunization was evaluated by clinical and post-mortem examinations. The controls developed fever and severe pleuropneumonia, whereas previously exposed pigs had less fever and less extensive gross pulmonary lesions. After the first aerosol exposure pulmonary IgM, and IgG antibodies reactive with A. pleuropneumoniae increased significantly in both aerosol exposed groups. IgA in BALF and serum concentrations of each Ig class were significantly increased in the group exposed to viable bacteria when compared to the non-exposed controls. After aerosol challenge a pronounced increase of systemic and pulmonary IgA, IgM, and IgG antibodies was detected in both exposure groups. Aerosol application of whole-cell A. pleuropneumoniae bacterins induced similar protective effects against aerosol challenge infection as administration of an identical dose of viable bacteria. Inhalation of A. pleuropneumoniae may lead to asymptomatic carriers in some pigs that could spread the disease under field conditions.

  8. Composition and Predicted Metabolic Capacity of Upper and Lower Airway Microbiota of Healthy Dogs in Relation to the Fecal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Personett, Alexa R.; Grobman, Megan E.; Rindt, Hansjorg; Reinero, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    The upper and lower airways of healthy humans are reported to harbor stable and consistent bacterial populations, and the composition of these communities is altered in individuals affected with several respiratory diseases. Data regarding the presence of airway microbiota in other animals are scant and a better understanding of the composition and metabolic function of such bacterial populations is essential for the development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic modalities for use in both veterinary and human medicine. Based on targeted next-generation sequencing of feces and samples collected at multiple levels of the airways from 16 healthy female dogs, we demonstrate that canine airways harbor a topographically continuous microbiota with increasing relative abundance of proteobacterial species from the upper to lower airways. The lung-associated microbiota, as assessed via bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), was the most consistent between dogs and was dominated by three distinct taxa, two of which were resolved to the species level and one to the level of family. The gene content of the nasal, oropharyngeal, and lung-associated microbiota, predicted using the Phylogenetic Investigations into Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt) software, provided information regarding the glyoxylate and citrate cycle metabolic pathways utilized by these bacterial populations to colonize such nutrient-poor, low-throughput environments. These data generated in healthy subjects provide context for future analysis of diseased canine airways. Moreover, as dogs have similar respiratory anatomy, physiology, and immune systems as humans, are exposed to many of the same environmental stimuli, and spontaneously develop similar respiratory diseases, these data support the use of dogs as a model species for prospective studies of the airway microbiota, with findings translatable to the human condition. PMID:27136381

  9. Identification of genes differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency that alter lung pathophysiology and inflammation in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Troy, Niamh M; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Kicic, Anthony; Zosky, Graeme R

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with asthma risk. Vitamin D deficiency may enhance the inflammatory response, and we have previously shown that airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness is increased in vitamin D-deficient mice. In this study, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency would exacerbate house dust mite (HDM)-induced inflammation and alterations in lung structure and function. A BALB/c mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was established by dietary manipulation. Responsiveness to methacholine, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, mucus cell metaplasia, lung and airway inflammation, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed. Gene expression patterns in mouse lung samples were profiled by RNA-Seq. HDM exposure increased inflammation and inflammatory cytokines in BAL, baseline airway resistance, tissue elastance, and ASM mass. Vitamin D deficiency enhanced the HDM-induced influx of lymphocytes into BAL, ameliorated the HDM-induced increase in ASM mass, and protected against the HDM-induced increase in baseline airway resistance. RNA-Seq identified nine genes that were differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency in the lungs of HDM-treated mice. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that protein expression of midline 1 (MID1) and adrenomedullin was differentially regulated such that they promoted inflammation, while hypoxia-inducible lipid droplet-associated, which is associated with ASM remodeling, was downregulated. Protein expression studies in human bronchial epithelial cells also showed that addition of vitamin D decreased MID1 expression. Differential regulation of these genes by vitamin D deficiency could determine lung inflammation and pathophysiology and suggest that the effect of vitamin D deficiency on HDM-induced allergic airways disease is complex.

  10. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epithelial anion and fluid secretion, their regulation, and how these processes are altered in CF disease to account for organ-specific secretory phenotypes. PMID:22675668

  11. Complexity, Temporal Stability, and Clinical Correlates of Airway Bacterial Community Composition in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Mary P.; Zain, Nur Masirah M.; Bruce, Kenneth D.; Lock, Karen; Walker, Woolf; Jones, Graeme; Daniels, Thomas W. V.; Lucas, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease characterized by abnormalities in ciliary function, leading to compromised airway clearance and chronic bacterial infection of the upper and lower airways. The compositions of these infections and the relationships between their characteristics and disease presentation are poorly defined. We describe here the first systematic culture-independent evaluation of lower airway bacteriology in PCD. Thirty-three airway samples (26 from sputum, 7 from bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluid) were collected from 24 PCD patients aged 4 to 73 years. 16S rRNA quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing were used to determine the bacterial loads and community compositions of the samples. Bacterial loads, which ranged from 1.3 × 104 to 5.2 × 109 CFU/ml, were positively correlated with age (P = 0.002) but not lung function. An analysis of ∼7,000 16S rRNA sequences per sample identified bacterial species belonging to 128 genera. The concurrently collected paired samples showed high bacterial community similarity. The mean relative abundance of the dominant genera was 64.5% (standard deviation [SD], 24.5), including taxa reported through standard diagnostic microbiology (members of the genera Pseudomonas, Haemophilus, and Streptococcus) and those requiring specific ex vivo growth conditions (members of the genera Prevotella and Porphyromonas). The significant correlations observed included a positive relationship between Pseudomonas aeruginosa relative abundance and age and a negative relationship between P. aeruginosa relative abundance and lung function. Members of the genus Ralstonia were also found to contribute substantially to the bacterial communities in a number of patients. Follow-up samples from a subset of patients revealed high levels of bacterial community temporal stability. The detailed microbiological characterization presented here provides a basis for the reassessment of the clinical management of PCD airway infections

  12. Complexity, temporal stability, and clinical correlates of airway bacterial community composition in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geraint B; Carroll, Mary P; Zain, Nur Masirah M; Bruce, Kenneth D; Lock, Karen; Walker, Woolf; Jones, Graeme; Daniels, Thomas W V; Lucas, Jane S

    2013-12-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease characterized by abnormalities in ciliary function, leading to compromised airway clearance and chronic bacterial infection of the upper and lower airways. The compositions of these infections and the relationships between their characteristics and disease presentation are poorly defined. We describe here the first systematic culture-independent evaluation of lower airway bacteriology in PCD. Thirty-three airway samples (26 from sputum, 7 from bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluid) were collected from 24 PCD patients aged 4 to 73 years. 16S rRNA quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing were used to determine the bacterial loads and community compositions of the samples. Bacterial loads, which ranged from 1.3 × 10(4) to 5.2 × 10(9) CFU/ml, were positively correlated with age (P = 0.002) but not lung function. An analysis of ∼7,000 16S rRNA sequences per sample identified bacterial species belonging to 128 genera. The concurrently collected paired samples showed high bacterial community similarity. The mean relative abundance of the dominant genera was 64.5% (standard deviation [SD], 24.5), including taxa reported through standard diagnostic microbiology (members of the genera Pseudomonas, Haemophilus, and Streptococcus) and those requiring specific ex vivo growth conditions (members of the genera Prevotella and Porphyromonas). The significant correlations observed included a positive relationship between Pseudomonas aeruginosa relative abundance and age and a negative relationship between P. aeruginosa relative abundance and lung function. Members of the genus Ralstonia were also found to contribute substantially to the bacterial communities in a number of patients. Follow-up samples from a subset of patients revealed high levels of bacterial community temporal stability. The detailed microbiological characterization presented here provides a basis for the reassessment of the clinical management of PCD airway

  13. Interleukin-8 in airway inflammation in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nocker, R E; Schoonbrood, D F; van de Graaf, E A; Hack, C E; Lutter, R; Jansen, H M; Out, T A

    1996-02-01

    We have investigated whether IL-8 is present in airway secretions from patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to obtain information on its possible role in airway inflammation in obstructive airways disease. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from 11 clinically stable patients with asthma the levels of IL-8 were increased compared to 10 healthy subjects (median: controls 21.5 pg/ml, asthma 244 pg/ml: p < 0.005). In the patients with asthma the levels of IL-8 correlated with the percentage neutrophils in the BALF (r = 0.81; p < 0.001) and with a parameter of the permeability of the respiratory membrane, the quotient (alpha 2-macroglobulin in BALF)/(alpha 2-macroglobulin in serum) (r = 0.66; p < 0.025). In the sputum sol phase of 9 patients with symptomatic asthma the levels of IL-8 were lower than in 9 patients with COPD (asthma: 6.4 ng/ml; COPD: 16.3 ng/ml; p < 0.02) and significantly correlated with those of neutrophilic myeloperoxidase (MPO; r = 0.85; p < 0.005). The increased levels of IL-8 in the airway secretions from both patients with asthma and COPD may be markers of an ongoing inflammatory process, which is more pronounced in patients with COPD. In patients with asthma the strong correlation between the levels of IL-8 and the percentage neutrophils and/or the levels of MPO points to a role of IL-8 in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the airway lumen.

  14. Anti-CD69 monoclonal antibody treatment inhibits airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-ying; Dai, Yu; Wang, Jiao-li; Yang, Xu-yan; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) are principle pathological manifestations of asthma. Cluster of differentiation 69 (CD69) is a well-known co-stimulatory factor associated with the activation, proliferation as well as apoptosis of immune cells. This study aims to examine the effect of anti-CD69 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the pathophysiology of a mouse model of asthma. Methods: A murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation was used in this study. Briefly, mice were injected with 20 μg chicken OVA intraperitoneally on Days 0 and 14, followed by aerosol provocation with 1% (0.01 g/ml) OVA on Days 24, 25, and 26. Anti-CD69 mAb or isotype IgG was injected intraperitoneally after OVA challenge; dexamethasone (DXM) was administrated either before or after OVA challenge. AHR, mucus production, and eosinophil infiltration in the peribronchial area were examined. The levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were also assayed as indices of airway inflammation on Day 28 following OVA injection. Results: Pretreatment with DXM together with anti-CD69 mAb treatment after OVA provocation completely inhibited AHR, eosinophil infiltration and mucus overproduction, and significantly reduced BALF IL-5. However, treatment with DXM alone after OVA challenge only partially inhibited AHR, eosinophil infiltration and mucus overproduction, and did not diminish BALF IL-5. Treatment with either DXM or anti-CD69 mAb did not alter the concentration of BALF GM-CSF. Conclusions: Anti-CD69 mAb treatment inhibits established airway inflammation as effectively as DXM pretreatment. This study provides a potential alternative therapeutic opportunity for the clinical management of asthma and its exacerbation. PMID:26160720

  15. Temporal Changes in Glutaredoxin 1 and Protein S-Glutathionylation in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Kanako; Nagai, Katsura; Suzuki, Masaru; Inomata, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, involving oxidative stress. Upon oxidative stress, glutathione covalently binds to protein thiols to protect them against irreversible oxidation. This posttranslational modification, known as protein S-glutathionylation, can be reversed by glutaredoxin 1 (Glrx1) under physiological condition. Glrx1 is known to increase in the lung tissues of a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. However, the temporal relationship between levels of Glrx1, protein S-glutathionylation, and glutathione in the lungs with allergic airway inflammation is not clearly understood. Methods BALB/c mice received 3 aerosol challenges with ovalbumin (OVA) following sensitization to OVA. They were sacrificed at 6, 24, 48, or 72 h, or 8 days (5 mice per group), and the levels of Glrx1, protein S-glutathionylation, glutathione, and 25 cytokines/chemokines were evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and/or lung tissue. Results Levels of Glrx1 in BALF were significantly elevated in the OVA 6 h (final challenge) group compared to those in the control, with concurrent increases in protein S-glutathionylation levels in the lungs, as well as total glutathione (reduced and oxidized) and oxidized glutathione in BALF. Protein S-glutathionylation levels were attenuated at 24 h, with significant increases in Glrx1 levels in lung tissues at 48 and 72 h. Glrx1 in alveolar macrophages was induced after 6 h. Glrx1 levels concomitantly increased with Th2/NF-κB-related cytokines and chemokines in BALF. Conclusions The temporal relationships of Glrx1 with protein S-glutathionylation, glutathione, and cytokines/chemokines were observed as dynamic changes in lungs with allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that Glrx1 and protein–SSG redox status may play important roles in the development of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25874776

  16. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children.

  17. The effect of ozone on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, A.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to the development of exaggerated bronchoconstrictor responses since a persistent link has been noted between pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. In these studies guinea pigs were exposed to 2.0 ppm ozone for 4 hours, then immediately sacrificed or allowed to breathe filtered air for up to 14 days. Following ozone exposure there was an immediate massive neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophils in lung digest dropped to control values within 3-12 hours post-ozone but remained elevated in BAL fluid for 3 days. There was probable eosinophil degranulation within the first 24 hours post-ozone. Guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to vigal stimulation through 3 days post-ozone. Although they were also hyperresponsive to ACh, responses to MCh were unchanged. Neuronal M[sub 2] receptors were dysfunctional through 3 days post-ozone. There was resolution of inflammation, airway responsiveness, and neuronal M[sub 2] receptor function by 14 days post-exposure. This investigation has (1) confirmed an immediate lung inflammation following acute ozone exposure; (2) established that cells in BAL give a distorted reflection of inflammatory events in lung digest; (3) demonstrated that ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness is at least partially due to efferent cholinergic mechanisms without functional changes of muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle; (4) shown that ACh may not be an appropriate agent to test ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness; and (5) demonstrated that inhibitory neuronal M[sub 2] receptors are dysfunctional following ozone exposure. There was close linkage between these events, suggesting that they may be causally related. This investigation proposes a specific mechanism, dysfunction of neuronal M[sub 2] receptors, by which inflammatory cells could cause airway hyperresponsiveness following acute ozone exposure.

  18. Intratracheal myriocin enhances allergen‐induced Th2 inflammation and airway hyper‐responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Edukulla, Ramakrishna; Rehn, Kira Lee; Liu, Bo; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Hershey, Gurjit K.; Wang, Yui Hsi; Lewkowich, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ceramide is the central substrate of sphingolipid metabolism and plays a key role in cellular signal transduction pathways, regulating apoptosis, differentiation, and chemotaxis. Alterations in airway ceramide levels are observed in multiple pulmonary diseases and recent human genetic association studies have linked dysregulation of sphingolipid regulatory genes with asthma pathogenesis. Methods Utilizing myriocin, a potent inhibitor of sphingolipid synthesis, we evaluated the immune regulatory role of de novo ceramide generation in vitro and in vivo. Intratracheal myriocin was administered alone or during house dust mite sensitization (HDM) of BALB/C mice and airway hyper‐responsiveness (AHR) was evaluated by invasive plethysmography followed by bronchial lavage (BAL) cytology and cytokine quantification. Results Myriocin inhibits and HDM exposure activates de novo ceramide synthesis in bone marrow‐derived dendritic cells. Mice receiving intratracheal myriocin developed a mild airway neutrophilic infiltrate without inducing a significant increase in AHR. CXCL1 was elevated in the BAL fluid of myriocin‐treated mice while the neutrophilic chemotactic factors anaphylatoxin C5a, leukotriene B4, and IL‐17 were unaffected. HDM treatment combined with myriocin led to a dramatic enhancement of AHR (63% increase over HDM alone, p < 0.001) and increased granulocyte pulmonary infiltrates versus HDM or myriocin alone. Elevated Th2 T cell counts and Th2 cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL13, CCL17) were observed in mice treated with combined HDM/myriocin compared to HDM alone. Myriocin‐treated pulmonary CD11c+ cells stimulated with HDM secreted significantly more CXCL1 than cells stimulated with HDM alone while HDM stimulated airway epithelial cells showed no change in CXCL1 secretion following myriocin treatment. Conclusions Intratracheal myriocin, likely acting via ceramide synthesis inhibition, enhances allergen‐induced airway inflammation

  19. [Anticholinergic drugs in the therapy of obstructive airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Windt, Roland

    2011-04-01

    The anticholinergic effects from botanical preparations of the deadly nightshade family have been used for hundreds of years for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. Nowadays, derivatives of the plant alkaloids with quaternary ammonium structure, ipratropium bromide and tiotropium bromide, are used, which retain the bronchodilator properties of the parent compounds but are much safer since they are poorly absorbed across biologic membranes. They are the bronchodilators of choice in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, ipratropium is considered a second-line agent in the treatment of asthma as the bronchodilatory effects seen with ipratropium are less than those seen with beta-adrenergic drugs. Tiotropium is only approved for use in COPD. Though, a recent study provides some evidence that this agent may be an alternative to long-acting beta agonists as an add-on therapy to inhaled glucocorticoids for asthma.

  20. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Case reports of persistent airways hyperreactivity following high-level irritant exposures.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S M; Weiss, M A; Bernstein, I L

    1985-07-01

    Two individuals developed an asthma-like illness after a single exposure to high levels of an irritating aerosol, vapor, fume, or smoke. Symptoms developed within a few hours. A consistent physiologic accompaniment was airways hyperreactivity, with the two subjects showing positive methacholine challenge tests. No documented preexisting respiratory illness was identified, nor did subjects relate past respiratory complaints. Respiratory symptoms and airways hyperreactivity persisted for at least four years after the incident. The incriminated etiologic agents all shared a common characteristic of being irritant in nature. Bronchial biopsy specimens showed an airways inflammatory response. This report suggests that acute high-level irritant exposures may produce an asthma-like syndrome in some individuals, with long-term sequelae and chronic airways disease. Nonimmunologic mechanisms seems to be operative in the pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  1. Exploring the context of the lung proteome within the airway mucosa following allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Fehniger, Thomas E; Sato-Folatre, José-Gabriel; Malmström, Johan; Berglund, Magnus; Lindberg, Claes; Brange, Charlotte; Lindberg, Henrik; Marko-Varga, György

    2004-01-01

    The lung proteome is a dynamic collection of specialized proteins related to pulmonary function. Many cells of different derivations, activation states, and levels of maturity contribute to the changing environment, which produces the lung proteome. Inflammatory cells reacting to environmental challenge, for example from allergens, produce and secrete proteins which have profound effects on both resident and nonresident cells located in airways, alveoli, and the vascular tree which provides blood cells to the parenchyma alveolar bed for gas exchange. In an experimental model of allergic airway inflammation, we have compared control and allergen challenged lung compartments to determine global protein expression patterns using 2D-gel electrophoresis and subsequent spot identification by MS/MS mass spectrometry. We have then specifically isolated the epithelial mucosal layer, which lines conducting airways, from control and allergen challenged lungs, using laser capture technology and performed proteome identification on these selected cell samples. A central component of our investigations has been to contextually relate the histological features of the dynamic pulmonary environment to the changes in protein expression observed following challenge. Our results provide new information of the complexity of the submucosa/epithelium interface and the mechanisms behind the transformation of airway epithelium from normal steady states to functionally activated states. PMID:15113108

  2. Establishment of a Reverse Genetics System for Studying Human Bocavirus in Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Luo, Yong; Shen, Weiran; Lei-Butters, Diana C. M.; Chen, Aaron Yun; Li, Yi; Tang, Liang; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Engelhardt, John F.; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) has been identified as one of the etiological agents of wheezing in young children with acute respiratory-tract infections. In this study, we have obtained the sequence of a full-length HBoV1 genome (including both termini) using viral DNA extracted from a nasopharyngeal aspirate of an infected patient, cloned the full-length HBoV1 genome, and demonstrated DNA replication, encapsidation of the ssDNA genome, and release of the HBoV1 virions from human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The HBoV1 virions generated from this cell line-based production system exhibits a typical icosahedral structure of approximately 26 nm in diameter, and is capable of productively infecting polarized primary human airway epithelia (HAE) from the apical surface. Infected HAE showed hallmarks of lung airway-tract injury, including disruption of the tight junction barrier, loss of cilia and epithelial cell hypertrophy. Notably, polarized HAE cultured from an immortalized airway epithelial cell line, CuFi-8 (originally derived from a cystic fibrosis patient), also supported productive infection of HBoV1. Thus, we have established a reverse genetics system and generated the first cell line-based culture system for the study of HBoV1 infection, which will significantly advance the study of HBoV1 replication and pathogenesis. PMID:22956907

  3. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed.

  4. Anaesthesia and airway management in mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Belani, Kumar G; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Bruce, Iain A; Hack, Henrik; Harmatz, Paul R; Jones, Simon; Rowe, Richard; Solanki, Guirish A; Valdemarsson, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    This paper provides a detailed overview and discussion of anaesthesia in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their anaesthetic management, including emergency airway issues. MPS represents a group of rare lysosomal storage disorders associated with an array of clinical manifestations. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. Typical anaesthetic problems include airway obstruction after induction or extubation, intubation difficulties or failure [can't intubate, can't ventilate (CICV)], possible emergency tracheostomy and cardiovascular and cervical spine issues. Because of the high anaesthetic risk, the benefits of a procedure in patients with MPS should always be balanced against the associated risks. Therefore, careful evaluation of anaesthetic risk factors should be made before the procedure, involving evaluation of airways and cardiorespiratory and cervical spine problems. In addition, information on the specific type of MPS, prior history of anaesthesia, presence of cervical instability and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint are important and may be pivotal to prevent complications during anaesthesia. Knowledge of these risk factors allows the anaesthetist to anticipate potential problems that may arise during or after the procedure. Anaesthesia in MPS patients should be preferably done by an experienced (paediatric) anaesthetist, supported by a multidisciplinary team (ear, nose, throat surgeon and intensive care team), with access to all necessary equipment and support.

  5. Nasal Airway Resistance: Its Measurement and Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lyle H.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of regulation of nasal airway resistance (Rn). Describes methods of calculating Rn by measuring pressure-flow relationship. Data are presented on improved methods for measuring Rn and effects for expiratory and inspiratory Rn after topical application of phenylephrine nasal decongestant spray. (Author/SA)

  6. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5810 Airway connector. (a) Identification. An... tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in § 868.9....

  7. Severe upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    PubMed

    Bonekat, H William; Hardin, Kimberly A

    2003-10-01

    Few disorders may manifest with predominantly sleep-related obstructive breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder, varies in severity and is associated with significant cardiovascular and neurocognitive morbidity. It is estimated that between 8 and 18 million people in the United States have at least mild OSA. Although the exact mechanism of OSA is not well-delineated, multiple factors contribute to the development of upper airway obstruction and include anatomic, mechanical, neurologic, and inflammatory changes in the pharynx. OSA may occur concomitantly with asthma. Approximately 74% of asthmatics experience nocturnal symptoms of airflow obstruction secondary to reactive airways disease. Similar cytokine, chemokine, and histologic changes are seen in both disorders. Sleep deprivation, chronic upper airway edema, and inflammation associated with OSA may further exacerbate nocturnal asthma symptoms. Allergic rhinitis may contribute to both OSA and asthma. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard treatment for OSA. Treatment with CPAP therapy has also been shown to improve both daytime and nighttime peak expiratory flow rates in patients with concomitant OSA and asthma. It is important for allergists to be aware of how OSA may complicate diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. A thorough sleep history and high clinical suspicion for OSA is indicated, particularly in asthma patients who are refractory to standard medication treatments.

  8. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin; Nielsen, Mads; Edula, Goutham; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2010-03-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 manually segmented images extracted from 15 different subjects and shown to give accurate results, with 37% less errors than the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) algorithm and 62% less than a similar graph cut method without coupled surfaces. Common measures of airway wall thickness such as the Interior Area (IA) and Wall Area percentage (WA%) was measured by the proposed method on a total of 723 CT scans from a lung cancer screening study. These measures were significantly different for participants with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) compared to asymptomatic participants. Furthermore, reproducibility was good as confirmed by repeat scans and the measures correlated well with the outcomes of pulmonary function tests, demonstrating the use of the algorithm as a COPD diagnostic tool. Additionally, a new measure of airway wall thickness is proposed, Normalized Wall Intensity Sum (NWIS). NWIS is shown to correlate better with lung function test values and to be more reproducible than previous measures IA, WA% and airway wall thickness at a lumen perimeter of 10 mm (PI10).

  9. Reproducibility of airway wall thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Owsijewitsch, Michael; de Hoop, Bartjan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2010-03-01

    Airway remodeling and accompanying changes in wall thickness are known to be a major symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), associated with reduced lung function in diseased individuals. Further investigation of this disease as well as monitoring of disease progression and treatment effect demand for accurate and reproducible assessment of airway wall thickness in CT datasets. With wall thicknesses in the sub-millimeter range, this task remains challenging even with today's high resolution CT datasets. To provide accurate measurements, taking partial volume effects into account is mandatory. The Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) method has been shown to be inappropriate for small airways1,2 and several improved algorithms for objective quantification of airway wall thickness have been proposed.1-8 In this paper, we describe an algorithm based on a closed form solution proposed by Weinheimer et al.7 We locally estimate the lung density parameter required for the closed form solution to account for possible variations of parenchyma density between different lung regions, inspiration states and contrast agent concentrations. The general accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated using basic tubular software and hardware phantoms. Furthermore, we present results on the reproducibility of the algorithm with respect to clinical CT scans, varying reconstruction kernels, and repeated acquisitions, which is crucial for longitudinal observations.

  10. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. COLCHICINE DECREASES AIRWAY HYPERACTIVITY AFTER PHOSGENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phosgene (COCl(2)) exposure affects an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung, which can be reduced in an animal model by pretreatment with colchicine. Inflammation in the respiratory tract can be associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity. We tested the hypotheses...

  12. Difficult airway in Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Packiasabapathy, Senthil; Chandiran, Ravindran; Batra, Ravinder K; Agarwala, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome involving multiple system abnormalities. The most consistently present components include facial deformity, mental retardation, and Hirschsprung disease. We report the anesthetic management of a case of Mowat-Wilson syndrome, with a difficult airway, who underwent Duhamel's procedure and colostomy closure. PMID:27687363

  13. Volatile Organic Compounds Contribute to Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Jang, An-Soo; Choi, Inseon-S; Koh, Young-Il

    2007-01-01

    Background Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in concentrations found in both the work and home environments may influence lung function. We investigated the prevalence of airway responsiveness in workers exposed to VOCs. Methods We used allergic skin tests, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness testing and questionnaires to study twenty exposed workers and twenty-seven control subjects. Atopy was defined as a reactor who showed >3+ response to one or more allergens on the skin prick tests. Airway hyperresponsiveness (BRindex) was defined as log [% fall of FEV1/ log (last concentration of methacholine) +10]. Results The VOC exposed workers, in comparison with the control subjects, tended to have a higher BRindex (1.19±0.07 vs. 1.15±0.08, respectively). Workers exposed to VOCs with atopy or smoker, as compared with the workers exposed to VOCs with non-atopy and who were non-smokers and the control subjects with non-atopy and who were non-smokers, had a significantly higher BRindex (1.20±0.05 vs. 1.14±0.06 vs. 1.10±0.03, respectively p<0.05). The BRindex was not correlated with atopy, the smoking status or the duration of VOC exposure. Conclusions These findings suggest that VOCs may act as a contributing factor of airway hyperresponsiveness in workers exposed to VOCs. PMID:17427638

  14. MUC5AC mucin release from human airways in vitro: effects of indomethacin and Bay X1005.

    PubMed Central

    Roger, P; Gascard, J P; Bara, J; de Montpreville, V T; Brink, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased secretion of mucus is a hallmark of many respiratory diseases and contributes significantly to the airflow limitation experienced by many patients. While the current pharmacological approach to reducing mucus and sputum production in patients is limited, clinical studies have suggested that drugs which inhibit the cyclooxygenase and/or 5-lipoxygenase enzymatic pathways may reduce secretory activity in patients with airway disease. AIM: This study was performed to investigate the effects of indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and Bay x 1005 (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor) on MUC5AC release from human airways in vitro. METHODS: An immunoradiometric assay was used to determine the quantities of MUC5AC present in the biological fluids derived from human airways in vitro. The measurements were made with a mixture of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; PM8) of which the 21 M1 MAb recognized a recombinant M1 mucin partially encoded by the MUC5AC gene. RESULTS: The quantities of MUC5AC detected in the biological fluids derived from human bronchial preparations were not modified after treatment with indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and/or an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathway (BAY x 1005). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathways play little or no role in the release of MUC5AC from human airways. PMID:11324902

  15. [Quality assurance in airway management: education and training for difficult airway management].

    PubMed

    Kaminoh, Yoshiroh

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory problem is one of the main causes of death or severe brain damage in perioperative period. Three major factors of respiratory problem are esophageal intubation, inadequate ventilation, and difficult airway. The wide spread of pulse oximeter and capnograph reduced the incidences of esophageal intubation and inadequate ventilation, but the difficult airway still occupies the large portion in the causes of adverse events during anesthesia. "Practice guideline for management of the difficult airway" was proposed by American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) in 1992 and 2002. Improvement of knowledge, technical skills, and cognitive skills are necessary for the education and training of the difficult airway management. "The practical seminar of difficult airway management (DAM practical seminar)" has been cosponsored by the Japanese Association of Medical Simulation (JAMS) in the 51 st and 52 nd annual meetings of Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists and the 24th annual meeting of Japanese Society for Clinical Anesthesia. The DAM practical seminar is composed of the lecture session for ASA difficult airway algorithm, the hands-on training session for technical skills, and the scenario-based training session for cognitive skills. Ninty six Japanese anesthesiologists have completed the DAM practical seminar in one year. "The DAM instructor course" should be immediately prepared to organize the seminar more frequently. PMID:16440705

  16. Silymarin attenuates airway inflammation induced by cigarette smoke in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Diandian; Xu, Dan; Wang, Tao; Shen, Yongchun; Guo, Shujin; Zhang, Xue; Guo, Lingli; Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Lian; Wen, Fuqiang

    2015-04-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS), which increases inflammation and oxidative stress, is a major risk factor for the development of COPD. In this study, we investigated the effects of silymarin, a polyphenolic flavonoid isolated from the seeds and fruits of milk thistle, on CS-induced airway inflammation and oxidative stress in mice and the possible mechanisms. BALB/c mice were exposed to CS for 2 h twice daily, 6 days per week for 4 weeks. Silymarin (25, 50 mg/kg·day) was administered intraperitoneally 1 h before CS exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was acquired for cell counting and the detection of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Lung tissue was collected for histological examination, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. The phosphorylation of ERK and p38 was evaluated by Western blotting. Pretreatment with silymarin significantly attenuated CS-induced thickening of the airway epithelium, peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, and lumen obstruction. The numbers of total cells, macrophages, and neutrophils, along with the MPO activity (a marker of neutrophil accumulation) in BALF, were remarkably decreased by silymarin in CS-exposed mice (all p<0.05). In addition, silymarin pretreatment dampened the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 in BALF. High-dose silymarin (50 mg/kg·day) administration also prevented CS-induced elevation in MDA levels and decrease in SOD activities (p<0.05). Furthermore, the CS-induced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 was also attenuated by silymarin (p<0.05). These results suggest that silymarin attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke. The anti-inflammatory effect might partly act through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway.

  17. Towards numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; White, Susan M.; Huang, Shao-Ching; Mallya, Sanjay; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low pressure loads incurred during breathing. The numerical simulation with patient-specific upper airway model can provide assistance for diagnosis and treatment assessment. The eventual goal of this research is the development of numerical tool for air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with OSA. This tool is expected to capture collapse of the airway in respiratory flow conditions, as well as the effects of various treatment protocols. Here, we present our ongoing progress toward this goal. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the air-tissue interface in the complex patient-specific airway geometries. For the structure simulation, a cut-cell FEM is used. Non-linear Green strains are used for properly resolving the large tissue displacements in the soft palate structures. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled. Preliminary results will be shown, including flow simulation inside the 3D rigid upper airway of patients with OSA, and several validation problem for the fluid-structure coupling.

  18. Estimation of airway obstruction using oximeter plethysmograph waveform data

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald H; Spiro, David M; Desmond, Renee' A; Hagood, James S

    2005-01-01

    Background Validated measures to assess the severity of airway obstruction in patients with obstructive airway disease are limited. Changes in the pulse oximeter plethysmograph waveform represent fluctuations in arterial flow. Analysis of these fluctuations might be useful clinically if they represent physiologic perturbations resulting from airway obstruction. We tested the hypothesis that the severity of airway obstruction could be estimated using plethysmograph waveform data. Methods Using a closed airway circuit with adjustable inspiratory and expiratory pressure relief valves, airway obstruction was induced in a prospective convenience sample of 31 healthy adult subjects. Maximal change in airway pressure at the mouthpiece was used as a surrogate measure of the degree of obstruction applied. Plethysmograph waveform data and mouthpiece airway pressure were acquired for 60 seconds at increasing levels of inspiratory and expiratory obstruction. At each level of applied obstruction, mean values for maximal change in waveform area under the curve and height as well as maximal change in mouth pressure were calculated for sequential 7.5 second intervals. Correlations of these waveform variables with mouth pressure values were then performed to determine if the magnitude of changes in these variables indicates the severity of airway obstruction. Results There were significant relationships between maximal change in area under the curve (P < .0001) or height (P < 0.0001) and mouth pressure. Conclusion The findings suggest that mathematic interpretation of plethysmograph waveform data may estimate the severity of airway obstruction and be of clinical utility in objective assessment of patients with obstructive airway diseases. PMID:15985171

  19. Airway-Resident Memory CD8 T Cells Provide Antigen-Specific Protection against Respiratory Virus Challenge through Rapid IFN-γ Production.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Sean R; Wilson, Jarad J; Wang, Hong; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2015-07-01

    CD8 airway resident memory T (TRM) cells are a distinctive TRM population with a high turnover rate and a unique phenotype influenced by their localization within the airways. Their role in mediating protective immunity to respiratory pathogens, although suggested by many studies, has not been directly proven. This study provides definitive evidence that airway CD8 TRM cells are sufficient to mediate protection against respiratory virus challenge. Despite being poorly cytolytic in vivo and failing to expand after encountering Ag, airway CD8 TRM cells rapidly express effector cytokines, with IFN-γ being produced most robustly. Notably, established airway CD8 TRM cells possess the ability to produce IFN-γ faster than systemic effector memory CD8 T cells. Furthermore, naive mice receiving intratracheal transfer of airway CD8 TRM cells lacking the ability to produce IFN-γ were less effective at controlling pathogen load upon heterologous challenge. This direct evidence of airway CD8 TRM cell-mediated protection demonstrates the importance of these cells as a first line of defense for optimal immunity against respiratory pathogens and suggests they should be considered in the development of future cell-mediated vaccines.

  20. Postnatal growth of tracheobronchial airways of Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongYoub; Srirama, Praveen K; Wallis, Christopher; Wexler, Anthony S

    2011-01-01

    Rats are widely used for the studies of pulmonary toxicology in both juveniles and adults. To facilitate such studies, investigators have developed models of lung architecture based on manual or computerized airway measurements. However, postnatal growth of conducting airways of rat lungs has never been reported. In this paper, we present conducting airway architecture statistics for male Sprague–Dawley rat lungs at ages 15, 28, 40, and 81 days by analyzing CT images from airway silicon casts. Detailed branching characteristics and intersubject variance are presented. This study shows that (i) airway growth in diameter and length is not linear with age, (ii) growth of airway length is faster than that of diameter during the 15–81-day postnatal period, and (iii) asymmetry in airway diameter (ratio of major to minor daughter diameter) increases with age. PMID:21534951

  1. [Clinical basics of supraglottic airway management in paediatric anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kai

    2013-04-01

    The low invasiveness and simplicity of use of the LMA-Classic™ contributed substantially to the supraglottic airway management acquiring a special role in the anaesthesia care of neonates and children. Due to the introduction of new supraglottic airway devices and the expansion of indications, this form of airway management has a predominant role in paediatric anaesthesia in many institutions nowadays. As securing the airway "above the glottis" differs substantially in some aspects from securing the airway using the endotracheal tube it is mandatory to acknowledge special aspects in routine clinical practice in order to avoid complications. The following article describes basic aspects of supraglottic airway management in paediatric anaesthesia and illustrates, where possible, the available scientific evidence in the use of different supraglottic airway devices in this regard. PMID:23633257

  2. [Airway Management in a Patient with Forestier's Disease].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuriko; Echigo, Noriyuki; Akata, Mariko; Yokoyama, Kaori; Takasugi, Naoya; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-04-01

    Airway management in a patient with Forestier's disease can be challenging clinically because this disease may cause not only dysphagia but also airway obstruction due to the compression of the pharynx and esophagus caused by the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament. We report our anesthetic management in a patient with Forestier's disease. Meanwhile, we studied the causes of difficult airway and the most suitable airway device for a patient with this disease from a standpoint of anatomy of upper airway. Our study indicated the possibility that the most suitable airway device differed depending on the actual location of the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and that more prudent airway management would be required if its lesion location extended to upper cervical spine. PMID:27188118

  3. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  4. Use of a home positive airway pressure device during intraoperative monitored anesthesia care for outpatient surgery.

    PubMed

    Borg, Lindsay; Walters, Tessa L; Siegel, Lawrence C; Dazols, John; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-08-01

    Perioperative positive airway pressure (PAP) is recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists for patients with obstructive sleep apnea, but a readily available and personalized intraoperative delivery system does not exist. We present the successful use of a patient's own nasal PAP machine in the operating room during outpatient foot surgery which required addition of a straight adaptor for oxygen delivery and careful positioning of the gas sampling line to permit end-tidal carbox dioxide monitoring. Home PAP machines may provide a potential alternative to more invasive methods of airway management for patients with obstructive sleep apnea under moderate sedation. PMID:27169990

  5. Use of a home positive airway pressure device during intraoperative monitored anesthesia care for outpatient surgery.

    PubMed

    Borg, Lindsay; Walters, Tessa L; Siegel, Lawrence C; Dazols, John; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-08-01

    Perioperative positive airway pressure (PAP) is recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists for patients with obstructive sleep apnea, but a readily available and personalized intraoperative delivery system does not exist. We present the successful use of a patient's own nasal PAP machine in the operating room during outpatient foot surgery which required addition of a straight adaptor for oxygen delivery and careful positioning of the gas sampling line to permit end-tidal carbox dioxide monitoring. Home PAP machines may provide a potential alternative to more invasive methods of airway management for patients with obstructive sleep apnea under moderate sedation.

  6. Small interfering RNAs targeted to interleukin-4 and respiratory syncytial virus reduce airway inflammation in a mouse model of virus-induced asthma exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Khaitov, Musa R; Shilovskiy, Igor P; Nikonova, Aleksandra A; Shershakova, Nadezda N; Kamyshnikov, Oleg Y; Babakhin, Alexander A; Zverev, Vitaly V; Johnston, Sebastian L; Khaitov, Rakhim M

    2014-07-01

    Asthma exacerbations are caused primarily by viral infections. Antisense and small interfering RNA (siRNA) technologies have gained attention as potential antiasthma and antiviral approaches. In this study we analyzed whether gene silencing of interleukin (IL)-4 expression and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replication by RNA interference is able to suppress allergen- and virus-induced responses in a mouse model of virus-induced asthma exacerbation. Knockdown efficacy of IL-4 siRNA molecules was analyzed in the human HEK293T cell line by cotransfection of six different siRNAs with a plasmid carrying mouse IL-4. The most potent siRNA was then used in a mouse model of RSV-induced asthma exacerbation. BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) and then infected 12 days later intranasally with RSV Long strain (1×10(6) TCID50/mouse), followed 1 day later by intranasal challenge with OVA for 3 days. Mice were pretreated intranasally three times with either siRNA to IL-4 or GFP control, 2 days before, and on the first two OVA challenge days. siRNAs to RSV or rhinovirus control were inoculated intranasally once, 3 hr before RSV infection. Combined anti-IL-4 and anti-RSV siRNAs were able to significantly reduce total cell counts and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, development of airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation and to downregulate IL-4 mRNA expression and RSV viral RNA, but to upregulate IFN-γ levels in lung tissues. We conclude that anti-helper T cells type 2 and antiviral siRNAs may constitute a new therapeutic approach for treatment of virus induced asthma exacerbations.

  7. Leptin enhances ICAM-1 expression, induces migration and cytokine synthesis, and prolongs survival of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Koketsu, Rikiya; Baba, Shintaro; Igarashi, Sayaka; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2015-10-15

    There is rising interest in how obesity affects respiratory diseases, since epidemiological findings indicate a strong relationship between the two conditions. Leptin is a potent adipokine produced mainly by adipocytes. It regulates energy storage and expenditure and also induces inflammation. Previous studies have shown that leptin is able to activate inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes and granulocytes, but little is known about its effect on lung structural cells. The present study investigated the effects of leptin on human airway epithelial cells by using human primary airway epithelial cells and a human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Flow cytometry showed enhanced ICAM-1 expression by both of those cells in response to leptin, and that effect was abrogated by dexamethasone or NF-κB inhibitor. Flow cytometry and quantitative PCR showed that airway epithelial cells expressed leptin receptor (Ob-R), whose expression level was downregulated by leptin itself. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated enhanced production of CCL11, G-CSF, VEGF, and IL-6 by BEAS-2B cells stimulated with leptin. Furthermore, transfection of Ob-R small interference RNA decreased the effect of leptin on CCL11 production as assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, leptin induced migration of primary airway epithelial cells toward leptin, suppressed BEAS-2B apoptosis induced with TNF-α and IFN-γ, and enhanced proliferation of primary airway epithelial cells. In summary, leptin was able to directly activate human airway epithelial cells by binding to Ob-R and by NF-κB activation, resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1 expression, induction of CCL11, VEGF, G-CSF, and IL-6 synthesis, induction of migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and enhancement of proliferation.

  8. Leptin enhances ICAM-1 expression, induces migration and cytokine synthesis, and prolongs survival of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Koketsu, Rikiya; Baba, Shintaro; Igarashi, Sayaka; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2015-10-15

    There is rising interest in how obesity affects respiratory diseases, since epidemiological findings indicate a strong relationship between the two conditions. Leptin is a potent adipokine produced mainly by adipocytes. It regulates energy storage and expenditure and also induces inflammation. Previous studies have shown that leptin is able to activate inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes and granulocytes, but little is known about its effect on lung structural cells. The present study investigated the effects of leptin on human airway epithelial cells by using human primary airway epithelial cells and a human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Flow cytometry showed enhanced ICAM-1 expression by both of those cells in response to leptin, and that effect was abrogated by dexamethasone or NF-κB inhibitor. Flow cytometry and quantitative PCR showed that airway epithelial cells expressed leptin receptor (Ob-R), whose expression level was downregulated by leptin itself. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated enhanced production of CCL11, G-CSF, VEGF, and IL-6 by BEAS-2B cells stimulated with leptin. Furthermore, transfection of Ob-R small interference RNA decreased the effect of leptin on CCL11 production as assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, leptin induced migration of primary airway epithelial cells toward leptin, suppressed BEAS-2B apoptosis induced with TNF-α and IFN-γ, and enhanced proliferation of primary airway epithelial cells. In summary, leptin was able to directly activate human airway epithelial cells by binding to Ob-R and by NF-κB activation, resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1 expression, induction of CCL11, VEGF, G-CSF, and IL-6 synthesis, induction of migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and enhancement of proliferation. PMID:26276826

  9. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  10. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems.

  11. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  12. Fluid relief and check valve

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, K.L.; Lord, S.C.; Murray, I.

    1986-07-17

    A passive fluid pressure relief and check valve allows the relief pressure to be slaved to a reference pressure independently of the exhaust pressure. The pressure relief valve is embodied by a submerged vent line in a sealing fluid, the relief pressure being a function of the submerged depth. A check valve is embodied by a vertical column of fluid (the maximum back pressure being a function of the height of the column of fluid). The pressure is vented into an exhaust system which keeps the exhaust out of the area providing the reference pressure.

  13. Pim1 kinase protects airway epithelial cells from cigarette smoke-induced damage and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M; Heijink, I H; Gras, R; den Boef, L E; Reinders-Luinge, M; Pouwels, S D; Hylkema, M N; van der Toorn, M; Brouwer, U; van Oosterhout, A J M; Nawijn, M C

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is the main risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and can induce airway epithelial cell damage, innate immune responses, and airway inflammation. We hypothesized that cell survival factors might decrease the sensitivity of airway epithelial cells to CS-induced damage, thereby protecting the airways against inflammation upon CS exposure. Here, we tested whether Pim survival kinases could protect from CS-induced inflammation. We determined expression of Pim kinases in lung tissue, airway inflammation, and levels of keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and several damage-associated molecular patterns in bronchoalveolar lavage in mice exposed to CS or air. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were treated with CS extract (CSE) in the presence or absence of Pim1 inhibitor and assessed for loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, induction of cell death, and release of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). We observed increased expression of Pim1, but not of Pim2 and Pim3, in lung tissue after exposure to CS. Pim1-deficient mice displayed a strongly enhanced neutrophilic airway inflammation upon CS exposure compared with wild-type controls. Inhibition of Pim1 activity in BEAS-2B cells increased the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced cell viability upon CSE treatment, whereas release of HSP70 was enhanced. Interestingly, we observed release of S100A8 but not of double-strand DNA or HSP70 in Pim1-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls upon CS exposure. In conclusion, we show that expression of Pim1 protects against CS-induced cell death in vitro and neutrophilic airway inflammation in vivo. Our data suggest that the underlying mechanism involves CS-induced release of S100A8 and KC. PMID:24816488

  14. Diagnostic significance of nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled air from the airways in allergic rhinitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Krzych-Fałta, Edyta; Samoliński, Bolesław K; Zalewska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the human body is very important due its physiological regulation of the following functions of airways: modulation of ciliary movement and maintenance of sterility in sinuses. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic significance of NO concentrations in exhaled air from the upper and lower airways in patients diagnosed with allergic rhinitis (AR). Material and methods The subjects included in the study were a group of 30 people diagnosed with sensitivity to environmental allergens and a control group consisting of 30 healthy subjects. The measurement of NO in the air exhaled from the lower and upper airways was performed using an on-line method by means of Restricted Exhaled Breath (REB), as well as using the measurement procedure (chemiluminescence) set out in the guidelines prepared in 2005 by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society. Results In the late phase of the allergic reaction, higher values of the level of exhaled NO concentration from the lower airways were observed in the groups of subjects up to the threshold values of 25.17 ppb in the group of subjects with year-round allergic rhinitis and 21.78 ppb in the group with diagnosed seasonal allergic rhinitis. The difference in the concentration of NO exhaled from the lungs between the test group and the control group in the 4th h of the test was statistically significant (p = 0.045). Conclusions Exhaled NO should be considered as a marker of airway inflammation. It plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of allergy. PMID:27279816

  15. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  16. [The detection of biphasic reactivity of the airway by astograph].

    PubMed

    Ohe, Masashi; Kishi, Fujiya; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    Dose-related curves of the airway responses to Methacholine by Astograph are frequently biphasic. That is, respiratory resistance (Rrs) increases slowly at first and rapidly after that. We proposed (-dGrs/dt)/Grs obtained by using Astograph as an index of dynamic property of the airway, which we suggested was related to a coefficient of the contraction or dilatation of the airway. Grs represents respiratory conductance. By calculating (-dGrs/dt)/Grs, we found that biphasic dose-related curves were composed of the slow and subsequently rapid contraction of the airways. And by mathematical analysis, we found that all segments of the airway contracted simultaneously at a uniform velocity. The combination of slow and rapid contraction explains three types of the airway responses, that is, the monophasic reactivity of the airway with slow contraction, the monophasic reactivity of the airway with rapid contraction and the biphasic reactivity of the airway with slow and subsequently rapid contraction. We found that the frequency of the monophasic reactivity of the airway with slow contraction was significantly higher in patients with COPD than in healthy subjects or in patients with mild asthma. But there was no significant difference in (-dGrs/dt)/Grs values among healthy subjects, patients with mild asthma and patients with COPD.

  17. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  18. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  19. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  20. Using Drugs to Probe the Variability of Trans-Epithelial Airway Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Kendra; Cassidy, Diane; Kerr, Barry; Land, Stephen C.; Mehta, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Background Precision medicine aims to combat the variability of the therapeutic response to a given medicine by delivering the right medicine to the right patient. However, the application of precision medicine is predicated on a prior quantitation of the variance of the reference range of normality. Airway pathophysiology provides a good example due to a very variable first line of defence against airborne assault. Humans differ in their susceptibility to inhaled pollutants and pathogens in part due to the magnitude of trans-epithelial resistance that determines the degree of epithelial penetration to the submucosal space. This initial ‘set-point’ may drive a sentinel event in airway disease pathogenesis. Epithelia differentiated in vitro from airway biopsies are commonly used to model trans-epithelial resistance but the ‘reference range of normality’ remains problematic. We investigated the range of electrophysiological characteristics of human airway epithelia grown at air-liquid interface in vitro from healthy volunteers focusing on the inter- and intra-subject variability both at baseline and after sequential exposure to drugs modulating ion transport. Methodology/Principal Findings Brushed nasal airway epithelial cells were differentiated at air-liquid interface generating 137 pseudostratified ciliated epithelia from 18 donors. A positively-skewed baseline range exists for trans-epithelial resistance (Min/Max: 309/2963 Ω·cm2), trans-epithelial voltage (-62.3/-1.8 mV) and calculated equivalent current (-125.0/-3.2 μA/cm2; all non-normal, P<0.001). A minority of healthy humans manifest a dramatic amiloride sensitivity to voltage and trans-epithelial resistance that is further discriminated by prior modulation of cAMP-stimulated chloride transport. Conclusions/Significance Healthy epithelia show log-order differences in their ion transport characteristics, likely reflective of their initial set-points of basal trans-epithelial resistance and sodium

  1. Small airways function of silica-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Chia, K S; Ng, T P; Jeyaratnam, J

    1992-01-01

    Small airways obstruction may be present for many years before chronic airway obstruction becomes evident. Several spirometric indices, especially flow rates at low lung volumes, may reflect the status of small airways. Time domain indices, by using moments analysis of the volume time spirogram, have also been shown to be sensitive indicators of small airways obstruction. In this study, we have applied the various spirometric indices as well as time domain indices to a group of granite quarry workers without radiographic evidence of silicosis or physiological evidence of obstruction to the larger airways. The aim was to evaluate small airways function in relation to dust exposure in subjects with normal ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second to the forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and normal FVC. The volume-time spirograms of 140 quarry workers were digitized using an electronic digitizer connected to a microcomputer where flow and time domain indices were computed. The workers were divided into three exposure groups based on their occupational history. With adjustment for age, height, and smoking status, all the time domain indices showed significant small airways obstruction with increasing dust exposure. Smokers had greater degree of airways obstruction than the non-smokers, with a similar trend of increase in small airways obstruction in relation to higher exposure. Our present study suggests that small airways obstruction is present among silica exposed workers in the absence of radiological evidence of silicosis and large airways obstruction. There was also evidence of increasing small airways obstruction in higher dust exposure group. Our study also suggests that time domain indices are more sensitive to small airways obstruction.

  2. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases. PMID:25618456

  3. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases.

  4. Elimination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia from the airways of mice with allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus conidia can exacerbate asthma symptoms. Phagocytosis of conidia is a principal component of the host antifungal defense. We investigated whether allergic airway inflammation (AAI) affects the ability of phagocytic cells in the airways to internalize the resting fungal spores. Methods Using BALB/c mice with experimentally induced AAI, we tested the ability of neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells to internalize A. fumigatus conidia at various anatomical locations. We used light microscopy and differential cell and conidium counts to determine the ingestion potential of neutrophils and macrophages present in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). To identify phagocyte-conidia interactions in conducting airways, conidia labeled with tetramethylrhodamine-(5-(and-6))-isothiocyanate were administered to the oropharyngeal cavity of mice. Confocal microscopy was used to quantify the ingestion potential of Ly-6G+ neutrophils and MHC II+ antigen-presenting cells located in the intraepithelial and subepithelial areas of conducting airways. Results Allergen challenge induced transient neutrophil recruitment to the airways. Application of A. fumigatus conidia at the acute phase of AAI provoked recurrent neutrophil infiltration, and consequently increased the number and the ingestion potential of the airway neutrophils. In the absence of recurrent allergen or conidia provocation, both the ingestion potential and the number of BAL neutrophils decreased. As a result, conidia were primarily internalized by alveolar macrophages in both AAI and control mice at 24 hours post-inhalation. Transient influx of neutrophils to conducting airways shortly after conidial application was observed in mice with AAI. In addition, the ingestion potential of conducting airway neutrophils in mice with induced asthma exceeded that of control mice. Although the number of neutrophils subsequently decreased, the ingestion capacity remained elevated in AAI mice, even at 24

  5. Interleukin-33 from Monocytes Recruited to the Lung Contributes to House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Hiroki; Takahashi, Koichiro; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Kato, Go; Kurata, Keigo; Kimura, Shinya; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-33 (IL-33) activates group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), resulting in T-helper-2 inflammation in bronchial asthma. Airway epithelial cells were reported as sources of IL-33 during apoptosis and necrosis. However, IL-33 is known to be from sources other than airway epithelial cells such as leukocytes, and the mechanisms of IL-33 production and release are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of IL-33 production by monocytes in airway inflammation. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with a house dust mite (HDM) preparation. Airway inflammation was assessed by quantifying inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) levels in lung. Immunohistochemistry for IL-33 in lung sections was also performed. Ly6c, CD11b, and CD11c expression was examined by flow cytometry. Clodronate liposomes were used in the HDM-airway inflammation model to deplete circulating monocytes. Results The IL-33, but not IL-25 or TSLP, level in lung homogenates was markedly increased in HDM mice compared to control mice. IL-33-positive cells in the lungs were identified using immunohistochemistry and were increased in areas surrounding bronchi and vasculature. Furthermore, IL-33 levels were increased in mononuclear cells derived from lungs of HDM mice compared to controls. The expression of Ly6c in mononuclear cells was significantly higher in HDM mice than in controls. Treatment with clodronate liposomes led to inhibition of not only inflammatory cells in BAL fluid, airway hyper reactivity and Th2 cytokines in lung, but also IL-33 in lung. Conclusion IL-33 from monocytes recruited to the lung may contribute to the pathogenesis of HDM-induced airway inflammation. PMID:27310495

  6. Do Airway Epithelium Air–Liquid Cultures Represent the In Vivo Airway Epithelium Transcriptome?

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Anna; Tilley, Ann E.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells cultured in vitro at the air–liquid interface (ALI) form a pseudostratified epithelium that forms tight junctions and cilia, and produces mucin. These cells are widely used in models of differentiation, injury, and repair. To assess how closely the transcriptome of ALI epithelium matches that of in vivo airway epithelial cells, we used microarrays to compare the transcriptome of human large airway epithelial cells cultured at the ALI with the transcriptome of large airway epithelium obtained via bronchoscopy and brushing. Gene expression profiling showed that global gene expression correlated well between ALI cells and brushed cells, but with some differences. Gene expression patterns mirrored differences in proportions of cell types (ALIs have higher percentages of basal cells, whereas brushed cells have higher percentages of ciliated cells), that is, ALI cells expressed higher levels of basal cell–related genes, and brushed cells expressed higher levels of cilia-related genes. Pathway analysis showed that ALI cells had increased expression of cell cycle and proliferation genes, whereas brushed cells had increased expression of cytoskeletal organization and humoral immune response genes. Overall, ALI cells provide a good representation of the in vivo airway epithelial transcriptome, but for some biologic questions, the differences between in vitro and in vivo environments need to be considered. PMID:20525805

  7. Are new supraglottic airway devices, tracheal tubes and airway viewing devices cost-effective?

    PubMed

    Slinn, Simon J; Froom, Stephen R; Stacey, Mark R W; Gildersleve, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a plethora of new airway devices has become available to the pediatric anesthetist. While all have the laudable intention of improving patient care and some have proven clinical benefits, these devices are often costly and at times claims of an advantage over current equipment and techniques are marginal. Supraglottic airway devices are used in the majority of pediatric anesthetics delivered in the U.K., and airway-viewing devices provide an alternative for routine intubation as well as an option in the management of the difficult airway. Yet hidden beneath the convenience of the former and the technology of the latter, the impact on basic airway skills with a facemask and the lack of opportunities to fine-tune the core skill of intubation represent an unrecognised and unquantifiable cost. A judgement on this value must be factored into the absolute purchase cost and any potential benefits to the quality of patient care, thus blurring any judgement on cost-effectiveness that we might have. An overall value on cost-effectiveness though not in strict monetary terms can then be ascribed. In this review, we evaluate the role of these devices in the care of the pediatric patient and attempt to balance the advantages they offer against the cost they incur, both financial and environmental, and in any quality improvement they might offer in clinical care. PMID:25370686

  8. Histamine-induced airway mucosal exudation of bulk plasma and plasma-derived mediators is not inhibited by intravenous bronchodilators.

    PubMed

    Svensson, C; Alkner, U; Pipkorn, U; Persson, C G

    1994-01-01

    Experimental data suggest the possibility that common bronchodilators, such as the xanthines and beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, may produce microvascular anti-permeability effects in the subepithelial microcirculation of the airways. In this study, we have examined the effect of bronchodilators given intravenously on exudation of different-sized plasma proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) and the generation of plasma-derived peptides (bradykinins) in human nasal airways challenged with histamine. In a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled and randomised trial, 12 normal volunteers were given i.v.infusions of terbutaline sulphate, theophylline and enprofylline to produce therapeutic drug levels. The effect of topical nasal provocation with histamine was closely followed by frequently nasal lavage with saline. The lavage fluid levels of albumin, fibrinogen and bradykinins increased significantly after each histamine provocation. The ratio of albumin-to-fibrinogen in plasma and the lavage fluid was 24 and 56, respectively, indicating that topical histamine provocation induced a largely non-sieved flux of macromolecules across the endothelial-epithelial barriers. The systemically administered drugs did not affect the nasal symptoms (sneezing, secretion and blockage), nor did they significantly reduce the levels of plasma proteins and plasma-derived mediators in the nasal lavage fluids. The present data suggest that systemic xanthines and beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, at clinically employed plasma levels, may not affect the microvascular (and epithelial) exudative permeability and the bradykinin forming capacity of human airways. PMID:8005188

  9. Silencing Nociceptor Neurons Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Burkett, Patrick R; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J F; Pascal, Maud A; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L; Tran, Johnathan V; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Bean, Bruce P; Levy, Bruce D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-07-15

    Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation, we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8(+) sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large-pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin- or house-dust-mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4(+) and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  10. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  11. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  12. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with {sup 3}H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers.

  13. Advances in upper airway cough syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Xu, Xianghuai; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-05-01

    Upper airway cough syndrome (UACS), previously referred to as postnasal drip syndrome, is one of the most common causes of chronic cough. However, the pathogenesis of UACS/postnasal drip syndrome remains unclear, and physicians in countries throughout the world have different definitions and ways of treating this disease. The various proposed pathogeneses of UACS include the early postnasal drip theory, subsequent chronic airway inflammation theory, and a recent sensory neural hypersensitivity theory. Additionally, some researchers suggest that UACS is a clinical phenotype of cough hypersensitivity syndrome. While the general principles involved in treating UACS are similar throughout the world, the specific details of treatment differ. This review summarizes the various definitions, pathogenic mechanisms, treatments, and other aspects of UACS, to aid clinicians in expanding their knowledge of how to diagnose and treat this syndrome.

  14. Pleomorphic adenoma causing acute airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, D; Papakostas, K; Karkanevatos, A; Coast, G J; Jackson, S R

    2000-08-01

    A case is reported of a pleomorphic adenoma of the minor salivary glands of the oral cavity presenting with acute airway obstruction. This is the first reported case to our knowledge of a mixed salivary tumour of the upper respiratory tract causing upper airway obstruction and acute respiratory failure. The patient had to be intubated and transferred to the intensive care unit. After an elective tracheostomy was performed, the adenoma was excised from its fibrous capsule. It was found to originate from the soft palate and occupied the parapharyngeal space. A high index of suspicion should be kept in order to diagnose tumours of the parapharyngeal space with unusual presentation. These tumours which are usually benign should be considered in the differential diagnosis from more common infectious or traumatic conditions and surgical morbidity should be minimal.

  15. Ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Che, Luanqing; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Zhou, Hongbin; Xia, Lixia; Tian, Baoping; Zhao, Yun; Liu, Juan; Wu, Yinfang; Wu, Yanping; Du, Jie; Li, Wen; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Shen, Huahao

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is a common environmental air pollutant leading to respiratory illness. The mechanisms regulating ozone-induced airway inflammation remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that ozone-triggered inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1 production regulate neutrophilic airway inflammation through IL-17A. Pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation was induced by extended (72 h) low-dose (0.7 ppm) exposure to ozone. IL-1 receptor 1 (Il1r1)−/−, Il17a−/− mice and the caspase-1 inhibitor acetyl-YVAD-chloromethylketone (Ac-YVAD-cmk) were used for in vivo studies. Cellular inflammation and protein levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF), cytokines, and IL-17A-producing γδT-cells, as well as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release, and inflammasome activation in lung macrophages were analyzed. Ozone-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation, accompanied an increased production of IL-1β, IL-18, IL-17A, Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and BALF protein in the lung. Ozone-induced IL-17A production was predominantly in γδT-cells, and Il17a-knockout mice exhibited reduced airway inflammation. Lung macrophages from ozone-exposed mice exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial ROS, enhanced cytosolic mtDNA, increased caspase-1 activation, and higher production of IL-1β. Il1r1-knockout mice or treatment with Ac-YVAD-cmk decreased the IL-17A production and subsequent airway inflammation. Taken together, we demonstrate that ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade. PMID:26739627

  16. Phosphodiesterase 4B is essential for TH2-cell function and development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Catherine Jin, S.-L.; Goya, Sho; Nakae, Susumu; Wang, Dan; Bruss, Matthew; Hou, Chiaoyin; Umetsu, Dale; Conti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling modulates functions of inflammatory cells involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are essential components of this pathway. Induction of the PDE4 isoform PDE4B is necessary for Toll-like receptor signaling in monocytes and macrophages and is associated with T cell receptor/CD3 in T cells; however, its exact physiological function in the development of allergic asthma remains undefined. Objectives We investigated the role of PDE4B in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and TH2-driven inflammatory responses. Methods Wild-type and PDE4B−/− mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin and AHR measured in response to inhaled methacholine. Airway inflammation was characterized by analyzing leukocyte infiltration and cytokine accumulation in the airways. Ovalbumin-stimulated cell proliferation and TH2 cytokine production were determined in cultured bronchial lymph node cells. Results Mice deficient in PDE4B do not develop AHR. This protective effect was associated with a significant decrease in eosinophils recruitment to the lungs and decreased TH2 cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Defects in T-cell replication, TH2 cytokine production, and dendritic cell migration were evident in cells from the airway-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, accumulation of the TH1 cytokine IFN-γ was not affected in PDE4B−/− mice. Ablation of the orthologous PDE4 gene PDE4A has no impact on airway inflammation. Conclusion By relieving a cAMP-negative constraint, PDE4B plays an essential role in TH2-cell activation and dendritic cell recruitment during airway inflammation. These findings provide proof of concept that PDE4 inhibitors with PDE4B selectivity may have efficacy in asthma treatment. PMID:21047676

  17. Effect of heparin and a low-molecular weight heparinoid on PAF-induced airway responses in neonatally immunized rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M.; Herd, C. M.; Page, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effect of an unfractionated heparin preparation, a low-molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172) and the polyanionic molecule polyglutamic acid against PAF-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary cell infiltration in neonatally immunized rabbits in vivo. 2. Exposure of neonatally immunized rabbits to aerosolized platelet activating factor (PAF) (80 micrograms ml-1 for 60 min) elicited an increase in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine 24 h and 72 h following challenge which was associated with an infiltration of inflammatory cells into the airways, as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). 3. A significant increase in the total numbers of cells recovered from BAL fluid was associated with significantly increased cell numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils and mononuclear cells 24 h following PAF exposure. The numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils in the airways remained elevated 72 h after challenge. 4. The intravenous administration of an unfractionated preparation of heparin (100 units kg-1) or Org 10172 (100 micrograms kg-1) 30 min prior to PAF exposure significantly inhibited the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by PAF, 24 h and 72 h following challenge. PAF-induced hyperresponsiveness was not significantly affected by prior intravenous administration of polyglutamic acid (100 micrograms kg-1). 5. The intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin (100 units kg-1), Org 10172 (100 micrograms kg-1) or polyglutamic acid (100 micrograms kg-1) 30 min prior to PAF exposure significantly inhibited the expected increase in total cell infiltration. 6. This study shows that unfractionated heparin and a low-molecular weight heparinoid, Org 10172, are capable of inhibiting both the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary cell infiltration induced by PAF in the rabbit. PMID:7693273

  18. Lipoxin A4 Stimulates Calcium-Activated Chloride Currents and Increases Airway Surface Liquid Height in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Mazen; Costello, Richard W.; McNally, Paul; Chiron, Raphaël; Harvey, Brian J.; Urbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl− secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA4 is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA4 are reported to be decreased in the airways of patients with CF. We have previously shown that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LXA4 produced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+. We have investigated, the effect of LXA4 on Cl− secretion and the functional consequences on ASL generation in bronchial epithelial cells obtained from CF and non-CF patient biopsies and in bronchial epithelial cell lines. We found that LXA4 stimulated a rapid intracellular Ca2+ increase in all of the different CF bronchial epithelial cells tested. In non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia, LXA4 stimulated whole-cell Cl− currents which were inhibited by NPPB (calcium-activated Cl− channel inhibitor), BAPTA-AM (chelator of intracellular Ca2+) but not by CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor). We found, using confocal imaging, that LXA4 increased the ASL height in non-CF and in CF airway bronchial epithelia. The LXA4 effect on ASL height was sensitive to bumetanide, an inhibitor of transepithelial Cl− secretion. The LXA4 stimulation of intracellular Ca2+, whole-cell Cl− currents, conductances and ASL height were inhibited by Boc-2, a specific antagonist of the ALX/FPR2 receptor. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence for a novel role of LXA4 in the stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ signalling leading to Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion and enhanced ASL height in non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia. PMID:22662206

  19. OH-radical specific addition to the antioxidant glutathione S-atom at the air-water interface - Relevance to the redox balance of the lung epithelial lining fluid and the causality of adverse health effects induced by air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Inhalation of oxidant pollutants upsets the redox balance (RB) of the lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) by triggering the formation of reactive OH-radicals therein. RB is deemed to be controlled by the equilibrium between the most abundant ELF protective antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and its putative disulfide GSSG oxidation product. The actual species produced from the oxidation of GSH initiated by ·OH in ELF interfacial layers exposed to air, i.e., under realistic ELF conditions, however, were never identified. Here we report the online electrospray mass spectrometric detection of sulfenate (GSO-), sulfinate (GSO2-) and sulfonate (GSO3-) on the surface of aqueous GSH solutions collided with ·OH(g). We show that these products arise from ·OH specific additions to S-atoms, rather than via H-abstraction from GS-H. The remarkable specificity of ·OH in interfacial water vis-a-vis its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during ·OH-GSH encounters at water interfaces. A non-specific systemic immune response to inhaled oxidants should be expected if they were initially converted into a common ·OH intermediate on the ELF (e.g., via fast Fenton chemistry) and oxidative stress signaled by the [GSH]/[GSOH] ratio.

  20. Airway hyperreactivity elicited by toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-albumin conjugate is not accompanied by airway eosinophilic infiltration in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Millecchia, L L; Frazer, D G; Fedan, J S

    1998-02-01

    Nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness is present in many patients with toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma; however, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of this hyperresponsiveness remain controversial. In the present study, we used a guinea pig model to investigate the association of TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness with eosinophilic airway infiltration, which is widely considered to play a key role in the development of allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness. Guinea pigs were sensitized by i.d. injections of 10 microl TDI on day 1 and day 6. Control animals received saline injections. Two weeks after the second injection, airway reactivity to inhaled methacholine and specific airway resistance (sRaw) was measured before and at several times after inhalation challenge with TDI-GSA (guinea pig serum albumin) conjugates. Eosinophils in the airways were detected using enzyme histochemistry and quantified using computer-assisted image analysis. TDI-specific IgG1 antibodies were found in the blood of TDI-sensitized animals. An immediate increase in sRaw was induced in these animals by TDI-GSA challenge; airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine was observed at 6 h and 18 h after TDI-GSA challenge. However, TDI-GSA challenge did not result in an elevation of eosinophils in the airways, compared with control animals. The results suggest that the development of TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is not dependent upon eosinophil infiltration in airways. PMID:9520137

  1. Distending Pressure Did Not Activate Acute Phase or Inflammatory Responses in the Airways and Lungs of Fetal, Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Rebecca Y.; Royse, Emily; Kemp, Matthew W.; Miura, Yuichiro; Noe, Andres; Jobe, Alan H.; Hillman, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation at birth causes airway injury and lung inflammation in preterm sheep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used clinically to transition preterm infants at birth. Objective To test if distending pressures will activate acute phase reactants and inflammatory changes in the airways of fetal, preterm lambs. Methods The head and chest of fetal lambs at 128±1 day GA were surgically exteriorized. With placental circulation intact, fetal lambs were then randomized to one of five 15 minute interventions: PEEP of 0, 4, 8, 12, or 16 cmH2O. Recruitment volumes were recorded. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for 30 min after the intervention. The twins of each 0 cmH2O animal served as controls. Fetal lung fluid (FLF), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), right mainstem bronchi and peripheral lung tissue were evaluated for inflammation. Results Recruitment volume increased from 0.4±0.04 mL/kg at 4 cmH2O to 2.4±0.3 mL/kg at 16 cmH2O. The lambs were surfactant deficient, and all pressures were below the opening inflection pressure on pressure-volume curve. mRNA expression of early response genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines did not increase in airway tissue or lung tissue at any pressure compared to controls. FLF and BAL also did not have increases in early response proteins. No histologic changes or Egr-1 activation was present at the pressures used. Conclusion Distending pressures as high as 16 cmH2O did not recruit lung volume at birth and did not increase markers of injury in the lung or airways in non-breathing preterm fetal sheep. PMID:27463520

  2. Benchmarks for time-domain simulation of sound propagation in soft-walled airways: steady configurations.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo R; Palaparthi, Anil; Smith, Simeon L

    2014-12-01

    Time-domain computer simulation of sound production in airways is a widely used tool, both for research and synthetic speech production technology. Speed of computation is generally the rationale for one-dimensional approaches to sound propagation and radiation. Transmission line and wave-reflection (scattering) algorithms are used to produce formant frequencies and bandwidths for arbitrarily shaped airways. Some benchmark graphs and tables are provided for formant frequencies and bandwidth calculations based on specific mathematical terms in the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation. Some rules are provided here for temporal and spatial discretization in terms of desired accuracy and stability of the solution. Kinetic losses, which have been difficult to quantify in frequency-domain simulations, are quantified here on the basis of the measurements of Scherer, Torkaman, Kucinschi, and Afjeh [(2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128(2), 828-838].

  3. Benchmarks for time-domain simulation of sound propagation in soft-walled airways: Steady configurations

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo R.; Palaparthi, Anil; Smith, Simeon L.

    2014-01-01

    Time-domain computer simulation of sound production in airways is a widely used tool, both for research and synthetic speech production technology. Speed of computation is generally the rationale for one-dimensional approaches to sound propagation and radiation. Transmission line and wave-reflection (scattering) algorithms are used to produce formant frequencies and bandwidths for arbitrarily shaped airways. Some benchmark graphs and tables are provided for formant frequencies and bandwidth calculations based on specific mathematical terms in the one-dimensional Navier–Stokes equation. Some rules are provided here for temporal and spatial discretization in terms of desired accuracy and stability of the solution. Kinetic losses, which have been difficult to quantify in frequency-domain simulations, are quantified here on the basis of the measurements of Scherer, Torkaman, Kucinschi, and Afjeh [(2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128(2), 828–838]. PMID:25480071

  4. Intranasal sirna targeting c-kit reduces airway inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Hui; Li, Ya-Ming; Wang, Sheng-Yu; Diao, Xin; Liu, Kai-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway inflammation caused by infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells that produce cytokines. Many studies have revealed that c-kit, a proto-oncogene, and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in the development of asthmatic inflammation. Intranasal small interference RNA (siRNA) nanoparticles targeting specific viral gene could inhibit airway inflammation. In this study, we assessed whether silencing of c-kit with intranasal small interference RNA could reduce inflammation in allergic asthma. A mouse model of experimental asthma was treated with intranasal administration of anti-c-kit siRNA to inhibit the expression of the c-kit gene. We assessed the inflammatory response in both anti-c-kit siRNA-treated and control mice. Local administration of siRNA effectively inhibited the expression of the c-kit gene and reduced airway mucus secretion and the infiltration of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, c-kit siRNA reduced the production of SCF, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-5, but had no effect on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) generation. These results show that intranasal siRNA nanoparticles targeting c-kit can decrease the inflammatory response in experimental allergic asthma.

  5. A numerical study of heat and water vapor transfer in MDCT-based human airway models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airways with minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditions for the 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, D a is the airway equivalent diameter, and [Formula: see text] is the tracheal equivalent diameter.

  6. Calcium-sensing receptor antagonists abrogate airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yarova, Polina L.; Stewart, Alecia L.; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A.; Lowe, Alexander P. P.; Freeman, Michelle; Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kita, Hirohito; Brennan, Sarah C.; Schepelmann, Martin; Davies, Thomas; Yung, Sun; Cholisoh, Zakky; Kidd, Emma J.; Ford, William R.; Broadley, Kenneth J.; Rietdorf, Katja; Chang, Wenhan; Khayat, Mohd E. Bin; Ward, Donald T.; Corrigan, Christopher J.; Ward, Jeremy P. T.; Kemp, Paul J.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation are fundamental hallmarks of allergic asthma that are accompanied by increases in certain polycations, such as eosinophil cationic protein. Levels of these cations in body fluids correlate with asthma severity. We show that polycations and elevated extracellular calcium activate the human recombinant and native calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), leading to intracellular calcium mobilization, cyclic adenosine monophosphate breakdown, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. These effects can be prevented by CaSR antagonists, termed calcilytics. Moreover, asthmatic patients and allergen-sensitized mice expressed more CaSR in ASMs than did their healthy counterparts. Indeed, polycations induced hyper-reactivity in mouse bronchi, and this effect was prevented by calcilytics and absent in mice with CaSR ablation from ASM. Calcilytics also reduced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice in vivo. These data show that a functional CaSR is up-regulated in asthmatic ASM and targeted by locally produced polycations to induce hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Thus, calcilytics may represent effective asthma therapeutics. PMID:25904744

  7. Inhalational exposure to dimethyl sulfate vapor followed by reactive airway dysfunction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Zamani, Nasim; Shiva, Hamidreza; Rezaei, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is an oily liquid used as a solvent, stabilizer, sulfonation agent, and catalyst. Exposure to DMS primarily happens in the workplace via inhalational contact and damages the upper and lower airways. Our manuscript reports a case of DMS-related reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS). The patient was a healthy 29-year-old man who was referred to our ER after accidental exposure to the vapor of DMS with the complaint of dyspnea, dry cough, photophobia, and hoarseness. His vital signs were normal except for a low-grade fever. Redness of the pharynx, conjunctivitis, and cholinergic signs and symptoms were present. Conservative management with O2 and fluid therapy was initiated. Twenty hours later, the patient became drowsy and his respiratory symptoms exacerbated; chest X-ray revealed haziness in the base of the right lung and prominence of the vessels of the lung hillum. After 1 week, the liver transaminases rose and C-reactive protein elevated (2+). The patient got better with conservative treatment and was discharged after 9 days; however, exertional dyspnea, wheezing, and thick white sputum persisted and therefore, reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS) related to DMS vapor was confirmed which was treated by prednisolone. Exertional dyspnea continued up to 10 months. Hoarseness lasted for 6 months. This case shows that DMS vapor inhalation can cause RADS especially in the chemical workers who continue working in the contaminated place despite the relatively good air conditioning. PMID:21461165

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Sihuangxiechai Decoction on Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xue Ping; Tao, En Xue; Feng, Zhan Qin; Yang, Zhao Lu; Zhang, Wei Fen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sihuangxiechai decoction on asthmatic Guinea pig model which was sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ovalbumin (OVA) and challenged by OVA inhalation to induce chronic airway inflammation. Differential cell counts of cytospins were performed after staining with Giemsa solution. The quantity of leukocytes and its classification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood were evaluated by blood cell analyzer and microscope. Histological analysis of the lung was performed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in BALF and serum were detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The total number of leukocytes in BALF and blood has no significant difference between Sihuangxiechaitang decoction treated group and dexamethasone (DXM) treated group but was significantly lower than those of asthma group. The percentage of eosinophils in lung tissues of sihuangxiechai decoction treated group was significantly lower than that of asthma group. The results demonstrated that the levels of IL-4 and TNF-α in the sihuangxiechai decoction treated group were significantly reduced compared with the asthma group. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that sihuangxiechai decoction has a protective effect on OVA-induced asthma in reducing airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a Guinea pig model and may be useful as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of bronchial asthma. PMID:25101137

  9. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis;