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Sample records for airway mucus hypersecretion

  1. Clinical significance of airway mucus hypersecretion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Pan-wen; Wen, Fu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is one of the most important features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airway mucus hypersecretion in COPD patients results in outcomes such as rapid decline of lung function, poor quality of life, and high rate of acute exacerbation, hospitalization and mortality. Nonpharmacologic treatments for airway mucus hypersecretion in COPD include smoking cessation and physical rehabilitation. Pharmacologic therapies include expectorants, mucolytics, methylxanthines, beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, anticholinergics, glucocorticoids, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, antioxidants, and antibiotics. Novel drugs with promising prospects are currently under clinical trials. PMID:27847895

  2. Kaempferol Inhibits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Mucus Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells And Ovalbumin-Sensitized Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is an important pathological feature of chronic airway diseases, such as asthma and pulmonary diseases. MUC5AC is a major component of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways. The initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated stress responses contributes to the pathogenesis of airway diseases. The present study investigated that ER stress was responsible for airway mucus production and this effect was blocked by the flavonoid kaempferol. Oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol suppressed mucus secretion and goblet cell hyperplasia observed in the bronchial airway and lung of BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). TGF-β and tunicamycin promoted MUC5AC induction after 72 h in human bronchial airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells, which was dampened by 20 μM kaempferol. Kaempferol inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress of airway epithelial cells through disturbing the activation of the ER transmembrane sensor ATF6 and IRE1α. Additionally, this compound demoted the induction of ER chaperones such as GRP78 and HSP70 and the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA by tunicamycin. The in vivo study further revealed that kaempferol attenuated the induction of XBP-1 and IRE1α in epithelial tissues of OVA-challenged mice. TGF-β and tunicamycin induced TRAF2 with JNK activation and such induction was deterred by kaempferol. The inhibition of JNK activation encumbered the XBP-1 mRNA splicing and MUC5AC induction by tunicamycin and TGF-β. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated asthmatic mucus hypersecretion through blocking bronchial epithelial ER stress via the inhibition of IRE1α-TRAF2-JNK activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting mucus hypersecretion-associated pulmonary diseases.

  3. Tbet Deficiency Causes T Helper Cell Dependent Airways Eosinophilia and Mucus Hypersecretion in Response to Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Nicholas; Schröder, Armin; Walton, Ross P.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of adaptive immune, particularly T cell, responses to human rhinoviruses (RV) is limited. Memory T cells are thought to be of a primarily T helper 1 type, but both T helper 1 and T helper 2 memory cells have been described, and heightened T helper 2/ lessened T helper 1 responses have been associated with increased RV-induced asthma exacerbation severity. We examined the contribution of T helper 1 cells to RV-induced airways inflammation using mice deficient in the transcription factor T-Box Expressed In T Cells (Tbet), a critical controller of T helper 1 cell differentiation. Using flow cytometry we showed that Tbet deficient mice lacked the T helper 1 response of wild type mice and instead developed mixed T helper 2/T helper 17 responses to RV infection, evidenced by increased numbers of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) and RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt), and interleukin-13 and interleukin-17A expressing CD4+ T cells in the lung. Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and interleukin-10 expressing T cell numbers were unaffected. Tbet deficient mice also displayed deficiencies in lung Natural Killer, Natural Killer T cell and γδT cell responses, and serum neutralising antibody responses. Tbet deficient mice exhibited pronounced airways eosinophilia and mucus production in response to RV infection that, by utilising a CD4+ cell depleting antibody, were found to be T helper cell dependent. RV induction of T helper 2 and T helper 17 responses may therefore have an important role in directly driving features of allergic airways disease such as eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion during asthma exacerbations. PMID:27683080

  4. Therapeutic approaches to mucus hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Yuta, Atsushi; Baraniuk, James N

    2005-05-01

    Mucolytic and related agents have been in use since prehistoric times. Although widely prescribed and used extensively in over-the-counter preparations, their efficacy and mechanisms of action remain in doubt. These agents belong to several distinct chemical classes. Mucolytic agents such as N-acetyl-cysteine are thiols with a free-sulfhydryl group. They are assumed to break disulfide bonds between gel-forming mucins and thus reduce mucus viscosity. Mucokinetic agents are thiols with a blocked sulfhydryl group. Expectorants such as guaifenesin increase mucus secretion. They may act as irritants to gastric vagal receptors, and recruit efferent parasympathetic reflexes that cause glandular exocytosis of a less viscous mucus mixture. Cough may be provoked. This combination may flush tenacious, congealed mucopurulent material from obstructed small airways and lead to a temporary improvement in dyspnea or the work of breathing. The roles of anticholinergic agents, DNase, and other drugs are also discussed with regard to their roles in reducing mucus production in rhinitis and other airway diseases.

  5. Lyn kinase represses mucus hypersecretion by regulating IL-13-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Yang, Xiaoqiong; Li, Yin; Wang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yun; Dai, Xi; Niu, Bin; Wu, Juan; Yuan, Xiefang; Xiong, Anjie; Liu, Zhigang; Zhong, Nanshan; Wu, Min; Li, Guoping

    2017-02-01

    In asthma, mucus hypersecretion is thought to be a prominent pathological feature associated with widespread mucus plugging. However, the current treatments for mucus hypersecretion are often ineffective or temporary. The potential therapeutic targets of mucus hypersecretion in asthma remain unknown. Here, we show that Lyn is a central effector of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) and mucous hypersecretion in asthma. In Lyn-transgenic mice (Lyn-TG) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice exposed to ovalbumin (OVA), Lyn overexpression attenuates mucus hypersecretion and ER stress. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) induced MUC5AC expression by enhancing ER stress in vitro. Lyn serves as a negative regulator of IL-13-induced ER stress and MUC5AC expression. We further find that an inhibitor of ER stress, which is likely involved in the PI3K p85α/Akt pathway and NFκB activity, blocked MUC5AC expression in Lyn-knockdown cells. Furthermore, PI3K/Akt signaling is required for IL-13-induced ER stress and MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells. The ER stress regulation of MUC5AC expression depends on NFκB in Lyn-knockdown airway epithelial cells. Our studies indicate not only a concept of mucus hypersecretion in asthma that involves Lyn kinase but also an important therapeutic candidate for asthma.

  6. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  7. TMEM16A mediates the hypersecretion of mucus induced by Interleukin-13

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiachen; Jiang, Youfan; Li, Li; Liu, Yanan; Tang, Hui; Jiang, Depeng

    2015-06-10

    Previous studies showed that the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC) was involved in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion induced by Interleukin-13 (IL-13). However, the mechanisms underlying the process were unknown. Recently, transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was identified as the channel underlying the CaCC current. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the TMEM16A channel is part of the mechanism underlying IL-13-induced mucus hypersecretion. We observed that both TMEM16A mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated after treatment with IL-13 in human bronchial epithelial 16 (HBE 16) cells, which correlated with an increase in mucus production. Additionally, mucus hypersecretion in rat airways was induced by intratracheal instillation of IL-13 and similar increases were observed in the expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in the bronchial epithelium. Niflumic acid (NA), a selective antagonist of CaCC, markedly blocked IL-13-induced mucin (MUC) 5AC mRNA and protein production in vivo and in vitro. Further investigation with HBE16 cells revealed that TMEM16A overexpression clearly promoted mucus production, IκBα phosphorylation, and p65 accumulation in the nucleus. The loss of TMEM16A resulted in inhibition of mucus production, and the TMEM16A-mediated production of MUC5AC was significantly blocked by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor. Therefore, the TMEM16A channel acts upstream of NF-κB in the regulation of mucus production. This is the first demonstration that the TMEM16A-NF-κB pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced mucus production, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanism of mucin overproduction. - Highlights: • TMEM16A acts as downstream events of IL-13 signaling pathway. • Established the link between TMEM16A and mucus hypersecretion. • NF-κB activation might be responsible for TMEM16A mediated mucus secretion.

  8. Airway mucus: From production to secretion.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatunji W; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Kim, Victor; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Christopher M

    2006-05-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a phenotype associated with multiple obstructive lung diseases. However, in spite of its nefarious reputation under pathologic conditions, there are significant benefits to having low levels of mucus present in the airways at baseline, such as the ability to trap and eliminate inhaled particles and to prevent desiccation of airway surfaces. Mucins are high-molecular-weight glycoproteins that are the chief components that render viscoelastic and gel-forming properties to mucus. Recent advances in animal models and in vitro systems have provided a wealth of information regarding the identification of the mucin genes that are expressed in the lungs, the signal transduction pathways that regulate the expression of these mucins, and the secretory pathways that mediate their release into the airways. In addition, the clinical and pathologic literature has corroborated many of the basic laboratory findings. As a result, mucin overproduction and hypersecretion are moving away from being markers of disease and toward being testable as functional components of lung disease processes.

  9. The role of airway mucus in pulmonary toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Cheng, P W

    1994-01-01

    Airway mucus is a complex airway secretion whose primary function as part of the mucociliary transport mechanism is to to serve as renewable and transportable barrier against inhaled particulates and toxic agents. The rheologic properties necessary for this function are imparted by glycoproteins, or mucins. Some respiratory disease states, e.g., asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchitis, are characterized by quantitative and qualitative changes in mucus biosynthesis that contribute to pulmonary pathology. Similar alterations in various aspects of mucin biochemistry and biophysics, leading to mucus hypersecretion and altered mucus rheology, result from inhalation of certain air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and cigarette smoke. The consequences of these pollutant-induced alterations in mucus biology are discussed in the context of pulmonary pathophysiology and toxicology. PMID:7925190

  10. Role of nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine in mucous cell metaplasia, hyperplasia and airway mucus formation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Wilder, Julie A.; Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Langley, Raymond J.; Singh, Shashi P.; Saeed, Ali Imran; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Gott, Katherine M.; Peña-Philippides, Juan Carlos; Harrod, Kevin S.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Buch, Shilpa; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway mucus hypersecretion is a key pathophysiological feature in number of lung diseases. Cigarette smoke/nicotine and allergens are strong stimulators of airway mucus; however, the mechanism of mucus modulation is unclear. Objectives Characterize the pathway by which cigarette smoke/nicotine regulates airway mucus and identify agents that decrease airway mucus. Methods IL-13 and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are implicated in airway mucus. We examined the role of IL-13 and GABAARs in nicotine-induced mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and A549 cells, and secondhand cigarette smoke and/or ovalbumin-induced mucus formation in vivo. Results Nicotine promotes mucus formation in NHBE cells; however, the nicotine-induced mucus formation is independent of IL-13 but sensitive to the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin (PIC). Airway epithelial cells express α7/α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and specific inhibition or knockdown of α7- but not α9/α10-nAChRs abrogates mucus formation in response to nicotine and IL-13. Moreover, addition of acetylcholine or inhibition of its degradation increases mucus in NHBE cells. Nicotinic but not muscarinic receptor antagonists block allergen or nicotine/cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus formation in NHBE cells and/or in mouse airways. Conclusions Nicotine-induced airway mucus formation is independent of IL-13 and α7-nAChRs are critical in airway mucous cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and mucus production in response to various pro-mucoid agents, including IL-13. In the absence of nicotine, acetylcholine may be the biological ligand for α7-nAChRs to trigger airway mucus formation. α7-nAChRs are downstream of IL-13 but upstream of GABAARα2 in the MUC5AC pathway. Acetylcholine and α-7-nAChRs may serve as therapeutic targets to control airway mucus. PMID:22578901

  11. Respiratory mucus hypersecretion really an innocent disorder. A 22-year mortality survey of 1061 working men

    SciTech Connect

    Annesi, I.; Kauffmann, F.

    1986-10-01

    The relation of chronic air-flow limitation and respiratory mucus hypersecretion to all causes of mortality was studied in a population of 1,061 men working in the Paris area, surveyed initially in 1960/1961, and followed for 22 yr. During this period, 369 deaths occurred; VC, FEV1, FEV1/H3, and FEV1/VC were significantly associated with mortality, even when age, smoking, occupational dust exposure, and chronic phlegm were taken into account. Besides the obstructive disorder, the hypersecretory disorder (chronic phlegm) was significantly associated with mortality. Controlling, using Cox's model, for age, FEV1/H3, smoking habits, and dust exposure, all factors associated with chronic mucus hypersecretion and mortality, showed that phlegm production remained significantly related to death (relative risk, = 1.35; p less than 0.01). Although relatively weak, this relationship is not negligible in terms of public health because of the high prevalence of chronic phlegm.

  12. Cortactin mediates elevated shear stress-induced mucin hypersecretion via actin polymerization in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2013-12-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a remarkable pathophysiological manifestation in airway obstructive diseases. These diseases are usually accompanied with elevated shear stress due to bronchoconstriction. Previous studies have reported that shear stress induces mucin5AC (MUC5AC) secretion via actin polymerization in cultured nasal epithelial cells. Furthermore, it is well known that cortactin, an actin binding protein, is a central mediator of actin polymerization. Therefore, we hypothesized that cortactin participates in MUC5AC hypersecretion induced by elevated shear stress via actin polymerization in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Compared with the relevant control groups, Src phosphorylation, cortactin phosphorylation, actin polymerization and MUC5AC secretion were significantly increased after exposure to elevated shear stress. Similar effects were found when pretreating the cells with jasplakinolide, and transfecting with wild-type cortactin. However, these effects were significantly attenuated by pretreating with Src inhibitor, cytochalasin D or transfecting cells with the specific small interfering RNA of cortactin. Collectively, these results suggest that elevated shear stress induces MUC5AC hypersecretion via tyrosine-phosphorylated cortactin-associated actin polymerization in cultured human airway epithelial cells.

  13. Mechanosensitive ATP Release Maintains Proper Mucus Hydration of Airways

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F.; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal auto-crine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  14. Mechanosensitive ATP release maintains proper mucus hydration of airways.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-06-11

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal autocrine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis.

  15. Determinants of prognosis of COPD in the elderly: mucus hypersecretion, infections, cardiovascular comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pistelli, R; Lange, P; Miller, D L

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, the authors update the present knowledge about three risk factors for the prognosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which may be particularly relevant in elderly people: mucus hypersecretion, respiratory infections, and cardiovascular comorbidity. Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common respiratory symptom in old age, the relevance of which is analysed on the basis of data collected during the first three rounds of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. In subjects aged > or = 65 yrs, CMH was a strong predictor of the incidence of respiratory infections in a 10-yr follow-up period and it was also a strong predictor of death from COPD (relative risk=2.5). However, CMH was associated with consistently lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) values, but not with an accelerated decline of FEV1 in this sample of an elderly population. Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are extremely common at all ages, mostly mild self-limiting illnesses at a young age, but severe often fatal illnesses in elderly people already affected by a chronic disease such as COPD. This paper summarises the present knowledge about aetiology, pathology, prognostic relevance, and prevention of ARI. Furthermore, the areas in which further research is needed are listed. Clinical cohort studies clearly support the relevance of cardiovascular comorbidity for the short-and long-term prognosis of elderly subjects affected by severe COPD. In this paper, the recently demonstrated association between particulate air pollution and cardiovascular events is reported to suggest the presence of an extremely susceptible cluster of elderly subjects in the population identified by the copresence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular comorbidity.

  16. Lyn regulates mucus secretion and MUC5AC via the STAT6 signaling pathway during allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Yin; Luo, Deyu; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Zhigang; Zhong, Nanshan; Wu, Min; Li, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    Hypersecretion of mucus is an important component of airway remodeling and contributes to the mucus plugs and airflow obstruction associated with severe asthma phenotypes. Lyn has been shown to down-regulate allergen-induced airway inflammation. However, the role of Lyn in mucin gene expression remains unresolved. In this study, we first demonstrate that Lyn overexpression decreased the mucus hypersecretion and levels of the muc5ac transcript in mice exposed to ovalbumin (OVA). Lyn overexpression also decreased the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the levels of IL-13 and IL-4 in OVA-challenged airways. Whereas Lyn knockdown increased the IL-4 or IL-13-induced MUC5AC transcript and protein levels in the human bronchial epithelial cell line, 16HBE, Lyn overexpression decreased IL-4- or IL-13-induced MUC5AC transcript and protein levels. Overexpression of Lyn also decreased the expression and phosphorylation of STAT6 in OVA-exposed mice, whereas Lyn knockdown increased STAT6 and MUC5AC levels in 16HBE cells. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that Lyn overexpression decreased the binding of STAT6 to the promoter region of Muc5ac in mice exposed to OVA. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that Lyn overexpression ameliorated airway mucus hypersecretion by down-regulating STAT6 and its binding to the MUC5AC promoter. PMID:28205598

  17. Role of Gallbladder Mucus Hypersecretion in the Evolution of Cholesterol Gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sum P.; Lamont, J. Thomas; Carey, Martin C.

    1981-01-01

    to cholesterol monohydrate crystals within 18 h. Control supersaturated hepatic bile could not be nucleated by the addition of other proteins, and was stable for days upon standing. These results suggest that the increase in cholesterol content of bile in cholesterolfed prairie dogs stimulates gallbladder mucus hypersecretion, and that gallbladder mucus gel is a nucleating agent for biliary cholesterol. Images PMID:7240416

  18. Relation of ventilatory impairment and of chronic mucus hypersecretion to mortality from obstructive lung disease and from all causes.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, P; Nyboe, J; Appleyard, M; Jensen, G; Schnohr, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation of ventilatory impairment and chronic mucus hypersecretion to death from all causes and death from obstructive lung disease (chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma) was studied in 13,756 men and women randomly selected from the general population of the City of Copenhagen. During the 10 year follow up 2288 subjects died. In 164 subjects obstructive lung disease was considered to be an underlying or a contributory cause of death (obstructive lung disease related death); in 73 subjects it was considered to be the underlying cause of death (obstructive lung disease death). Forced expiratory volume in one second, expressed as a percentage of the predicted value (FEV1% pred), and the presence of chronic phlegm were used to characterise ventilatory function and chronic mucus hypersecretion respectively. For mortality analysis the proportional hazards regression model of Cox was used; it included age, sex, pack years, inhalation habit, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and the presence or absence of asthma, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus as confounding factors. By comparison with subjects with an FEV1 of 80% pred or more, subjects with an FEV1 below 40% pred had increased risk of dying from all causes (relative risk (RR) = 5.0 for women, 2.7 for men), a higher risk of obstructive lung disease related death (RR = 57 for women, 34 for men), and a higher risk of obstructive lung disease death (RR = 101 for women, 77 for men). Chronic mucus hypersecretion was associated with only a slightly higher risk of death from all causes (RR = 1.1 for women, 1.3 for men). The association between chronic mucus hypersecretion and obstructive lung disease death varied with the level of ventilatory function, being weak in subjects with normal ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 80% pred the RR was 1.2), but more pronounced in subjects with reduced ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 40% pred the RR was 4.2). A similar though statistically non-significant trend was

  19. Dissecting genetics for chronic mucus hypersecretion in smokers with and without COPD

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Boezen, H. Marike; van den Berge, Maarten; Vonk, Judith M.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Barr, R. Graham; Burkart, Kirsten M.; Manichaikul, Ani; Pottinger, Tess D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Cho, Michael H.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Bossé, Yohan; Nickle, David C.; Paré, Peter D.; de Koning, Harry J.; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Zanen, Pieter; Smolonska, Joanna; Wijmenga, Ciska; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Groen, Harry J.M.; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Smoking is a notorious risk factor for chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH). CMH frequently occurs in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The question arises whether the same single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are related to CMH in smokers with and without COPD. Methods We performed two genome wide association studies on CMH under an additive genetic model in male heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) with COPD (n=849, 39.9% CMH) and without COPD (n=1,348, 25.4% CMH), followed by replication and meta-analysis in comparable populations, and assessment of the functional relevance of significantly associated SNPs. Results GWA analysis on CMH in COPD and non-COPD yielded no genome wide significance after replication. In COPD, our top SNP (rs10461985, p=5.43×10−5) was located in the GDNF-antisense gene that is functionally associated with the GDNF gene. Expression of GDNF in bronchial biopsies of COPD patients was significantly associated with CMH (p=0.007). In non-COPD, 4 SNPs had a p-value <10−5 in the meta-analysis, including a SNP (rs4863687) in the MAML3 gene, the T-allele showing modest association with CMH (p=7.57×10−6, OR=1.48) and with significantly increased MAML3 expression in lung tissue (p=2.59×10−12). Conclusions Our data suggest the potential for differential genetic backgrounds of CMH in individuals with and without COPD. PMID:25234806

  20. Aerosol Medications for Treatment of Mucus Clearance Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2015-06-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion and secretion retention can result from inflammation, irritation, stimulation, or mucus-producing tumors. Secretion clearance can be furthered hampered by ciliary dysfunction and by weakness or restrictive lung disease, leading to an ineffective cough. There are a number of different mucoactive medications that have been used to reduce hypersecretion, make secretions easier to transport, or increase the efficiency of cough or mucus clearance. In this paper, I review the pathophysiology of secretory hyper-responsiveness and mucus hypersecretion and discuss the different aerosol medications that can be used to augment secretion clearance.

  1. Transient motion of mucus plugs in respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Parsa; Hu, Yingying; Helenbrook, Brian; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Airway closure occurs in lung diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, or emphysema which have an excess of mucus that forms plugs. The reopening process involves displacement of mucus plugs in the airways by the airflow of respiration. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid with a yield stress; therefore its behavior can be approximated by a Bingham fluid constitutive equation. In this work the reopening process is approximated by simulation of a transient Bingham fluid plug in a 2D channel. The governing equations are solved by an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method through an in-house code. The constitutive equation for the Bingham fluid is implemented through a regularization method. The effects of the yield stress on the flow features and wall stresses are discussed with applications to potential injuries to the airway epithelial cells which form the wall. The minimum driving pressure for the initiation of the motion is computed and its value is related to the mucus properties and the plug shape. Supported by HL84370 and HL85156.

  2. IL-13–induced airway mucus production is attenuated by MAPK13 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Romero, Arthur G.; Patel, Dhara A.; Tucker, Jennifer; Roswit, William T.; Miller, Chantel A.; Heier, Richard F.; Byers, Derek E.; Brett, Tom J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Increased mucus production is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for pathogenic mucus production are largely undetermined. Accordingly, there are no specific and effective anti-mucus therapeutics. Here, we define a signaling pathway from chloride channel calcium-activated 1 (CLCA1) to MAPK13 that is responsible for IL-13–driven mucus production in human airway epithelial cells. The same pathway was also highly activated in the lungs of humans with excess mucus production due to COPD. We further validated the pathway by using structure-based drug design to develop a series of novel MAPK13 inhibitors with nanomolar potency that effectively reduced mucus production in human airway epithelial cells. These results uncover and validate a new pathway for regulating mucus production as well as a corresponding therapeutic approach to mucus overproduction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:23187130

  3. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Frederick L; Krahnke, Jason S; Kim, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus is part of the lung’s native immune function that traps particulates and microorganisms, enabling their clearance from the lung by ciliary transport and cough. Mucus hypersecretion and chronic productive cough are the features of the chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Overproduction and hypersecretion by goblet cells and the decreased elimination of mucus are the primary mechanisms responsible for excessive mucus in chronic bronchitis. Mucus accumulation in COPD patients affects several important outcomes such as lung function, health-related quality of life, COPD exacerbations, hospitalizations, and mortality. Nonpharmacologic options for the treatment of mucus accumulation in COPD are smoking cessation and physical measures used to promote mucus clearance. Pharmacologic therapies include expectorants, mucolytics, methylxanthines, beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, anticholinergics, glucocorticoids, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, antioxidants, and antibiotics. PMID:24493923

  4. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  5. THE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RAT: AN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF SULFUR DIOXIDE-INDUCED AIRWAYS DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airway obstruction, inflammation and mucus hypersecretion; features that capture bronchitis, emphysema and often asthma. However, current rodent models do not reflect this human disease. Because genetically predisp...

  6. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients. PMID:27595800

  7. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-09-06

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients.

  8. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Kerr, Sheena C; Dunican, Eleanor M; Daniel, Brian M; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V

    2015-02-25

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates.

  9. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  10. Automated detection of presence of mucus foci in airway diseases: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Ko, Jane; Godoy, Myrna C. B.

    2009-02-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is often characterized by partial or complete obstruction of airflow in the lungs. This can be due to airway wall thickening and retained secretions, resulting in foci of mucoid impactions. Although radiologists have proposed scoring systems to assess extent and severity of airway diseases from CT images, these scores are seldom used clinically due to impracticality. The high level of subjectivity from visual inspection and the sheer number of airways in the lungs mean that automation is critical in order to realize accurate scoring. In this work we assess the feasibility of including an automated mucus detection method in a clinical scoring system. Twenty high-resolution datasets of patients with mild to severe bronchiectasis were randomly selected, and used to test the ability of the computer to detect the presence or absence of mucus in each lobe (100 lobes in all). Two experienced radiologists independently scored the presence or absence of mucus in each lobe based on the visual assessment method recommended by Sheehan et al [1]. These results were compared with an automated method developed for mucus plug detection [2]. Results showed agreement between the two readers on 44% of the lobes for presence of mucus, 39% of lobes for absence of mucus, and discordant opinions on 17 lobes. For 61 lobes where 1 or both readers detected mucus, the computer sensitivity was 75.4%, the specificity was 69.2%, and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 79.3%. Six computer false positives were a-posteriori reviewed by the experts and reassessed as true positives, yielding results of 77.6% sensitivity, 81.8% for specificity, and 89.6% PPV.

  11. [Expression and role of sugar chains on airway mucus during the exacerbation of airway inflammation].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Inouye, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Human bronchial mucins, such as MUC5AC, have traditionally been defined as a family of high-molecular weight glycoproteins. Changes in the contents of sugar chains on MUC5AC are among the fundamental features in inflammatory respiratory disease. The changes have been shown to lead to unfavorable alterations in the viscosity of mucus, resulting in impairment of mucociliary transport, vulnerability to viral/bacterial infection as sugar chains play an important role in adhesion of some viruses and bacteria to the epithelium, and finally inflammatory cell infiltration in the airway. Recently, we found that expression of some glycosyltransferases associated with the contents and structure of sugar chains is regulated by phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase (PI-PL) C signaling in cells. L-Carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, normalized or balanced fucosylated and sialylated sugar chains, such as sialyl Lewis x through inhibition of PI-PL C signaling. We prepared MUC5AC fusion protein with tandem repeats associated with MUC5AC, and confirmed that L-carbocisteine inhibited the increases in viscosity associated with sialyl Lewis x expression levels. In addition, the clinical study (2008) noted that L-carbocisteine reduced the frequency of common colds and exacerbation of symptoms in patients with COPD. These favorable effects in patients may be due to normalization of sugar chain contents on mucins. We suggest that the inhibitory effect on infection of airway epithelial cells by rhinoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza viruses by treatment with L-carbocisteine may also be based on the regulation of sugar chain contents or structures on mucins.

  12. Autophagy is essential for ultrafine particle-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Ping-Li; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhou-Yang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhu, Chen; Cao, Chao; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Bei-Bei; Cormier, Stephania A; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Environmental ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is capable of inducing airway injury, while the detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate pivotal roles of autophagy in regulation of inflammation and mucus hyperproduction induced by PM containing environmentally persistent free radicals in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. PM was endocytosed by HBE cells and simultaneously triggered autophagosomes, which then engulfed the invading particles to form amphisomes and subsequent autolysosomes. Genetic blockage of autophagy markedly reduced PM-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, e.g. IL8 and IL6, and MUC5AC in HBE cells. Mice with impaired autophagy due to knockdown of autophagy-related gene Becn1 or Lc3b displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Interference of the autophagic flux by lysosomal inhibition resulted in accumulated autophagosomes/amphisomes, and intriguingly, this process significantly aggravated the IL8 production through NFKB1, and markedly attenuated MUC5AC expression via activator protein 1. These data indicate that autophagy is required for PM-induced airway epithelial injury, and that inhibition of autophagy exerts therapeutic benefits for PM-induced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, although they are differentially orchestrated by the autophagic flux.

  13. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  14. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Mediates Mucus Secretion in the Airway Submucosal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Yang, Yu-Mi; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Dong Min; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in airway epithelia and smooth muscle, plays an important role in airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that activation of PAR2 induces mucus secretion from the human airway gland and examined the underlying mechanism using the porcine and murine airway glands. The mucosa with underlying submucosal glands were dissected from the cartilage of tissues, pinned with the mucosal side up at the gas/bath solution interface of a physiological chamber, and covered with oil so that secretions from individual glands could be visualized as spherical bubbles in the oil. Secretion rates were determined by optical monitoring of the bubble diameter. The Ca2+-sensitive dye Fura2-AM was used to determine intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by means of spectrofluorometry. Stimulation of human tracheal mucosa with PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP) elevated intracellular Ca2+ and induced glandular secretion equal to approximately 30% of the carbachol response in the human airway. Porcine gland tissue was more sensitive to PAR2-AP, and this response was dependent on Ca2+ and anion secretion. When the mouse trachea were exposed to PAR2-AP, large amounts of secretion were observed in both wild type and ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant mice but there is no secretion from PAR-2 knock out mice. In conclusion, PAR2-AP is an agonist for mucus secretion from the airway gland that is Ca2+-dependent and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-independent. PMID:22916223

  15. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  16. Exogenous surfactant therapy and mucus rheology in chronic obstructive airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    Exogenous surfactant is a specialized biomaterial used for substitution of the lipoprotein mixture normally present in the lungs-pulmonary surfactant. Respiratory Distress Syndrome is a disease of preterm infants mainly caused by pulmonary immaturity as evidenced by a deficiency of mature lung surfactant. Pulmonary surfactant is known to stabilize small alveoli and prevent them from collapsing during expiration. However, apart from alveoli, surfactant also lines the narrow conducting airways of the tracheobronchial tree. This paper reviews the role of this surfactant in the airways and its effect on mucus rheology and mucociliary clearance. Its potential role as a therapeutic biomaterial in chronic obstructive airway diseases, namely asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis, are discussed. This paper also attempts to elucidate the exact steps in the pathogenic pathway of these diseases which could be reversed by supplementation of exogenous surfactant formulations. It is shown that there is great potential for the use of present day surfactants (which are actually formulated for use in Respiratory Disease Syndrome) as therapy in the aforementioned diseases of altered mucus viscoelasticity and mucociliary clearance. However, for improved effectiveness, specific surfactant formulations satisfying certain specific criteria should be tailor-made for the clinical condition for which they are intended. The properties required to be fulfilled by the optimal exogenous surfactant in each of the above clinical conditions are enumerated in this paper.

  17. Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis correlates to increasing chloride channel accessory 1 (hCLCA1) suggesting a pathway for up-regulation of airway mucus responses, in infant lungs

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Francisco J.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Rojas, Diego A.; Iturra, Pablo A.; Bustamante, Rebeca I.; Gallo, Myriam; Hananias, Karime; Vargas, Sergio L.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis is associated with increased airway mucus in infants during their primary Pneumocystis infection, and to severity of COPD in adults. The pathogenic mechanisms are under investigation. Interestingly, increased levels of hCLCA1 – a member of the calcium-sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins that drives mucus hypersecretion – have been associated with increased mucus production in patients diagnosed with COPD and in immunocompetent rodents with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis is highly prevalent in infants; therefore, the contribution of Pneumocystis to hCLCA1 expression was examined in autopsied infant lungs. Respiratory viruses that may potentially increase mucus, were also examined. hCLCA1 expression was measured using actin-normalized Western-blot, and the burden of Pneumocystis organisms was quantified by qPCR in 55 autopsied lungs from apparently healthy infants who died in the community. Respiratory viruses were diagnosed using RT-PCR for RSV, metapneumovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza viruses; and by PCR for adenovirus. hCLCA1 levels in virus positive samples were comparable to those in virus-negative samples. An association between Pneumocystis and increased hCLCA1 expression was documented (P=0.028). Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017). Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs. Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted. PMID:25379375

  18. Imaging of mucus clearance in the airways of living spontaneously breathing mice by optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Mario; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Hüttmann, Gereon; König, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mucus transport is essential to remove inhaled particles and pathogens from the lung. Impaired removal of mucus often results in worsening of lung diseases. To understand the mechanisms of mucus transport and to monitor the impact of therapeutic strategies, it is essential to visualize airways and mucus in living animals without disturbing transport processes by intubation or surgically opening the airways. We developed a custom-built optical coherence microscope (OCM) providing a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 1.5 µm with a field of view of 2 mm at up to 150 images/s. Images of the intact trachea and its mucus transport were recorded in anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice. NaCl solution (0.9% and 7%) or Lipopolysaccharide were applied intranasally. OCM resolved detailed structure of the trachea and enabled measuring the airway surface liquid (ASL) thickness through the tracheal wall. Without stimulation, the amount of ASL was only a few µm above the epithelium and remained constant. After intranasal application of 30 µl saline at different concentrations, an early fast cough-like fluid removal with velocities higher than 1 mm/s was observed that removed a high amount of liquid. The ASL thickness increased transiently and quickly returned to levels before stimulation. In contrast to saline, application of Lipopolysaccharide induced substantial mucus release and an additional slow mucus transport by ciliary beating (around 100 µm/s) towards the larynx was observed. In conclusion, OCM is appropriate unique tool to study mechanisms of mucus transport in the airways and effects of therapeutic interventions in living animals.

  19. Carbocisteine normalizes the viscous property of mucus through regulation of fucosylated and sialylated sugar chain on airway mucins.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Takayama, Goh; Inouye, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2010-09-01

    Almost all of fucose and sialic acid in mucus are found on the mucus glycoproteins (mucins), and these sugar components on mucins are known to be associated with the viscous property of mucus. We have reported some aspects of carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, correcting fucose and sialic acid contents in mucus. At present, carbocisteine's expectorant action of airway mucus is postulated to involve - the regulation of fucose and sialic acid contents on mucins. However little information is available about the relationship between the viscosity and sugar contents on mucins when treated with carbocisteine. To investigate further the mechanism behind the action of carbocisteine, the present study prepared MUC5AC fusion protein which has tandem repeat regions associated with MUC5AC, and evaluated the effects of carbocisteine on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced increases of mucus viscosity and sialyl-Lewis x-epitopes antigen, an antigen which consists of fucosylated and sialylated sugar chains on the MUC5AC fusion proteins. Carbocisteine inhibited the TNF-alpha-induced increases of the viscosity and sialyl-Lewis x-epitopes on MUC5AC fusion protein. These findings suggest that carbocisteine may normalize the viscosity of mucus through "balancing" of fucose and sialic acid contents on airway mucins.

  20. In vivo imaging of airway cilia and mucus clearance with micro-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kengyeh K.; Unglert, Carolin; Ford, Tim N.; Cui, Dongyao; Carruth, Robert W.; Singh, Kanwarpal; Liu, Linbo; Birket, Susan E.; Solomon, George M.; Rowe, Steven M.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated a 4 mm diameter rigid endoscopic probe to obtain high resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) images from the tracheal epithelium of living swine. Our common-path fiber-optic probe used gradient-index focusing optics, a selectively coated prism reflector to implement a circular-obscuration apodization for depth-of-focus enhancement, and a common-path reference arm and an ultra-broadbrand supercontinuum laser to achieve high axial resolution. Benchtop characterization demonstrated lateral and axial resolutions of 3.4 μm and 1.7 μm, respectively (in tissue). Mechanical standoff rails flanking the imaging window allowed the epithelial surface to be maintained in focus without disrupting mucus flow. During in vivo imaging, relative motion was mitigated by inflating an airway balloon to hold the standoff rails on the epithelium. Software implemented image stabilization was also implemented during post-processing. The resulting image sequences yielded co-registered quantitative outputs of airway surface liquid and periciliary liquid layer thicknesses, ciliary beat frequency, and mucociliary transport rate, metrics that directly indicate airway epithelial function that have dominated in vitro research in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but have not been available in vivo. PMID:27446685

  1. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B; Mullol, J; Marom, Z; Logun, C; Baraniuk, J; Kaliner, M A; Shelhamer, J H

    1991-03-01

    Possible roles of eosinophil (EO) products in modulating the release of mucus from airway explants were investigated. Cell- and membrane-free lysates from purified human EOs (1 to 20 x 10(5)) caused a dose-dependent release of respiratory glycoconjugates (RGC) from cultured feline tracheal explants. Crude extracts from isolated EO granules also stimulated RGC release, suggesting that a granular protein might be responsible. Three proteins derived from EO granules, EO-derived neurotoxin, EO cationic protein (ECP), and major basic protein (MBP) were separated by sequential sizing and affinity chromatography. ECP (0.025 to 25 micrograms/ml) caused a dose-dependent increase in RGC release from both feline and human airway explants and also stimulated the release of the serous cell-marker, lactoferrin, from human bronchial explants. EO-derived neurotoxin (0.025 to 50 micrograms/ml) failed to affect RGC release, whereas MBP (50 micrograms/ml) significantly inhibited RGC release from feline explants. Thus, ECP stimulates RGC and lactoferrin release from airway explants, whereas MBP inhibits RGC release.

  2. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal.

  3. Spatial organization of cilia tufts governs airways mucus transport: Application to severe asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelloufi, Mustapha Kamel; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Viallat, Annie

    2014-11-01

    We study the coupling between both density and spatial repartition of beating cilia tufts, and the coordinated transport of mucus in an in-vitro epithelial model. We use a fully differentiated model epithelium in air liquid interface (ALI) obtained from endo-bronchial biopsies from healthy subjects and patients with asthma. The asthma phenotype is known to persist in the model. Mucus transport is characterized by the trajectories and velocities of microscopic beads incorporated in the mucus layer. When the beating cilia tufts density is higher than dc = 11/100 × 100 μm2 a spherical spiral coordinated mucus transport is observed over the whole ALI chamber (radius = 6 mm). Below dc, local mucus coordinated transport is observed on small circular domains on the epithelium surface. We reveal that the radii of these domains scale with the beating cilia tufts density with a power 3.7. Surprisingly, this power law is independent on cilia beat frequency, concentration and rheological properties of mucus for healthy subject and patient with asthma. The rotating or linear mucus transport is related to dispersion of the cilia tufts on the epithelium surface. We show that impaired mucus transport observed in severe asthma model epithelia is due to a drastic lack and dysfunction of cilia tufts. The author acknowledges the support of the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under reference ANR-13-BSV5-0015-01.

  4. Prenatal secondhand cigarette smoke promotes Th2 polarization and impairs goblet cell differentiation and airway mucus formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Peña-Philippides, Juan C; Rir-Sima-ah, Jules; Mishra, Neerad C; Wilder, Julie A; Langley, Raymond J; Smith, Kevin R; Sopori, Mohan L

    2011-11-01

    Parental, particularly maternal, smoking increases the risk for childhood allergic asthma and infection. Similarly, in a murine allergic asthma model, prenatal plus early postnatal exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke (SS) exacerbates airways hyperreactivity and Th2 responses in the lung. However, the mechanism and contribution of prenatal versus early postnatal SS exposure on allergic asthma remain unresolved. To identify the effects of prenatal and/or early postnatal SS on allergic asthma, BALB/c dams and their offspring were exposed gestationally and/or 8-10 wk postbirth to filtered air or SS. Prenatal, but not postnatal, SS strongly increased methacholine and allergen (Aspergillus)-induced airway resistance, Th2 cytokine levels, and atopy and activated the Th2-polarizing pathway GATA3/Lck/ERK1/2/STAT6. Either prenatal and/or early postnatal SS downregulated the Th1-specific transcription factor T-bet and, surprisingly, despite high levels of IL-4/IL-13, dramatically blocked the allergen-induced mucous cell metaplasia, airway mucus formation, and the expression of mucus-related genes/proteins: Muc5ac, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors, and SAM pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor. Given that SS/nicotine exposure of normal adult mice promotes mucus formation, the results suggested that fetal and neonatal lung are highly sensitive to cigarette smoke. Thus, although the gestational SS promotes Th2 polarization/allergic asthma, it may also impair and/or delay the development of fetal and neonatal lung, affecting mucociliary clearance and Th1 responses. Together, this may explain the increased susceptibility of children from smoking parents to allergic asthma and childhood respiratory infections.

  5. Allergic airway inflammation induces a pro-secretory epithelial ion transport phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, P; Dai, L; Schatterny, J; Hirtz, S; Duerr, J; Mall, M A

    2010-12-01

    The airway epithelium is a central effector tissue in allergic inflammation and T-helper cell (Th) type 2-driven epithelial responses, such as mucus hypersecretion contribute to airflow obstruction in allergic airway disease. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Th2 cytokines also act as potent modulators of epithelial ion transport and fluid secretion, but the in vivo effect of allergic inflammation on airway ion transport remains unknown. We, therefore, induced allergic inflammation by intratracheal instillation of Aspergillus fumigatus extract or interleukin-13 in mice and determined effects on ion transport in native tracheal and bronchial tissues. We demonstrate that allergic inflammation enhanced basal Cl(-) secretion in both airway regions and inhibited epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-mediated Na(+) absorption and increased Ca²(+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in bronchi. Allergen-induced alterations in bronchial ion transport were associated with reduced transcript levels of α-, β- and γENaC, and were largely abrogated in signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)6(-/-) mice. Our studies demonstrate that Th2-dependent airway inflammation produced a pro-secretory ion transport phenotype in vivo, which was largely Stat6-dependent. These results suggest that Th2-mediated fluid secretion may improve airway surface hydration and clearance of mucus that is hypersecreted in allergic airway diseases such as asthma, and identify epithelial Stat6 signalling as a potential therapeutic target to promote mucus hydration and airway clearance.

  6. Clinical application of expectorant therapy in chronic inflammatory airway diseases (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, TING; ZHOU, XIANGDONG

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a significant clinical and pathological feature of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Its clinical presentations include recurrent coughing and phlegm. Airway mucus is closely associated with the occurrence, development and prognosis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases and critically affects the lung function, quality of life, hospitalization rate and mortality of patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Therefore, expectorant therapies targeting the potential mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion have been the focus of numerous studies. Conventional expectorants are mainly mucoactive medicines, including nausea-stimulating expectorants, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and proteases and nucleases. In addition, certain traditional Chinese herbal medicines and non-mucoactive agents, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists and macrolide antibiotics, have also shown expectorant effects. Several novel medicines for expectorant therapy have emerged, including cholesterol-lowering statins, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, stanozolol, surfactants, flavonoids, tachykinin receptor antagonists, protease inhibitors, cytokine antagonists and purinergic agonists. With the increasing number of multidisciplinary studies, the effectiveness of expectorant therapy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases has been confirmed. Therefore, the development of novel expectorants and the standardization of expectorant therapy are the direction and focus of future studies, thus benefiting patients who have a chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:24660026

  7. A comparison of a new mucolytic N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate with N-acetylcysteine: airway epithelial function and mucus changes in dog.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, R P; App, E M; De Sanctis, G T; Coffiner, M; Maes, P; Rubin, B K; King, M

    1995-12-01

    A newly synthesized mucolytic agent, N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate (Nacystelyn) was studied. Tracheal mucus velocity (TMV), transepithelial potential difference (PD), rheological properties, and ion content of collected airway secretions were evaluated in six healthy mongrel dogs after placebo, Nacystelyn (NAL) and acetylcysteine (NAC) metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols. Although TMV was increased and viscoelasticity decreased after both treatments, the treatment effect with NAL was significantly greater. Furthermore, NAL increased the negative PD and CI- content of secretions in the trachea, an effect not observed after NAC. Both compounds increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) on the frog palate at a concentration range similar to that approximated in dog airways. The increased mucociliary clearance could be partially explained by favourable rheological changes combined with stimulation of CBF. Since both compounds break disulfide bonds in mucus polymers, the greater change in mucus rheology and clearance rate after NAL, without change in water content, could be explained by the increase in CI- content. Nacystelyn appears to combine different modes of action which synergistically cause an increase in the clearance rate of airway secretions.

  8. Targeted epigenetic editing of SPDEF reduces mucus production in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Cano-Rodriquez, David; Winkle, Melanie; Gjaltema, Rutger A F; Goubert, Désirée; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Heijink, Irene H; Rots, Marianne G; Hylkema, Machteld N

    2017-03-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion contributes to the morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Reducing mucus production is crucial for improving patients' quality of life. The transcription factor SAM-pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor (SPDEF) plays a critical role in the regulation of mucus production and, therefore, represents a potential therapeutic target. This study aims to reduce lung epithelial mucus production by targeted silencing SPDEF using the novel strategy, epigenetic editing. Zinc fingers and CRISPR/dCas platforms were engineered to target repressors (KRAB, DNA methyltransferases, histone methyltransferases) to the SPDEF promoter. All constructs were able to effectively suppress both SPDEF mRNA and protein expression, which was accompanied by inhibition of downstream mucus-related genes [anterior gradient 2 (AGR2), mucin 5AC (MUC5AC)]. For the histone methyltransferase G9A, and not its mutant or other effectors, the obtained silencing was mitotically stable. These results indicate efficient SPDEF silencing and downregulation of mucus-related gene expression by epigenetic editing, in human lung epithelial cells. This opens avenues for epigenetic editing as a novel therapeutic strategy to induce long-lasting mucus inhibition.

  9. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from the human lung: role of the geometry of the airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Fausser, Christian; Pelca, Dominique; Merckx, Jacques; Flaud, Patrice

    2011-10-01

    Mucociliary clearance and cough are the two main natural mucus draining methods in the bronchial tree. If they are affected by a pathology, they can become insufficient or even ineffective, then therapeutic draining of mucus plays a critical role to keep mucus levels in the lungs acceptable. The manipulations of physical therapists are known to be very efficient clinically but they are mostly empirical since the biophysical mechanisms involved in these manipulations have never been studied. We develop in this work a model of mucus clearance in idealized rigid human bronchial trees and focus our study on the interaction between (1) tree geometry, (2) mucus physical properties and (3) amplitude of flow rate in the tree. The mucus is considered as a Bingham fluid (gel-like) which is moved upward in the tree thanks to its viscous interaction with air flow. Our studies point out the important roles played both by the geometry and by the physical properties of mucus (yield stress and viscosity). More particularly, the yield stress has to be overcome to make mucus flow. Air flow rate and yield stress determine the maximal possible mucus thickness in each branch of the tree at equilibrium. This forms a specific distribution of mucus in the tree whose characteristics are strongly related to the multi-scaled structure of the tree. The behavior of any mucus distribution is then dependent on this distribution. Finally, our results indicate that increasing air flow rates ought to be more efficient to drain mucus out of the bronchial tree while minimizing patient discomfort.

  10. 1,8-Cineol Reduces Mucus-Production in a Novel Human Ex Vivo Model of Late Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Müller, Janine; Brotzmann, Viktoria; Ebmeyer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as rhinosinusitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or bronchial asthma are strongly associated with overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus lining the epithelial airway surface. 1,8-cineol, the active ingredient of the pharmaceutical drug Soledum, is commonly applied for treating such inflammatory airway diseases. However, its potential effects on mucus overproduction still remain unclear.In the present study, we successfully established ex vivo cultures of human nasal turbinate slices to investigate the effects of 1,8-cineol on mucus hypersecretion in experimentally induced rhinosinusitis. The presence of acetyl-α-tubulin-positive cilia confirmed the integrity of the ex vivo cultured epithelium. Mucin-filled goblet cells were also detectable in nasal slice cultures, as revealed by Alcian Blue and Periodic acid-Schiff stainings. Treatment of nasal slice cultures with lipopolysaccharides mimicking bacterial infection as observed during late rhinosinusitis led to a significantly increased number of mucin-filled goblet cells. Notably, the number of mucin-filled goblet cells was found to be significantly decreased after co-treatment with 1,8-cineol. On a molecular level, real time PCR-analysis further showed 1,8-cineol to significantly reduce the expression levels of the mucin genes MUC2 and MUC19 in close association with significantly attenuated NF-κB-activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time a 1,8-cineol-dependent reduction of mucin-filled goblet cells and MUC2-gene expression associated with an attenuated NF-κB-activity in human nasal slice cultures. Our findings suggest that these effects partially account for the clinical benefits of 1,8-cineol-based therapy during rhinosinusitis. Therefore, topical application of 1,8-cineol may offer a novel therapeutic approach to reduce bacteria-induced mucus hypersecretion. PMID:26207629

  11. Ambroxol inhalation ameliorates LPS-induced airway inflammation and mucus secretion through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shui-juan; Jiang, Juan-xia; Ren, Qian-qian; Jia, Yong-liang; Shen, Jian; Shen, Hui-juan; Lin, Xi-xi; Lu, Hong; Xie, Qiang-min

    2016-03-15

    Ambroxol, a metabolite of bromhexine, is shown to exert several pharmacological activities, including secretolytic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. Oral and intravenous administration of ambroxol is useful for the airway inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about its potential in inhalation therapy for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mucous hypersecretion and inflammatory response. In the present study, we compared the pharmacological effects of ambroxol by inhalation with intravenous administration and preliminarily explored its mechanism of action. Our results demonstrated that ambroxol administered by inhalation inhibited MUC5AC expression, reduced glycosaminoglycan levels, enhanced the function of mucociliary clearance and promoted sputum excretion, suggesting that ambroxol increases expectoration of sputum by reducing its viscosity. Moreover, ambroxol significantly alleviated LPS-induced the influx of inflammatory cells and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk 1/2) expression in lung tissues, and inhibited increases in the mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, CCL-2 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), KC (keratinocyte cell protein) and interleukin (IL)-1β in lung tissues. The secretolytic and anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled ambroxol at a dose of 7.5 mg/ml was comparable to that of ambroxol at 20 mg/ml i.v. and dexamethasone at 0.5 mg/kg i.p. In addition, we found that ambroxol dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced increases in the mRNA expression of MUC5AC, TNF-α, and IL-1β in human bronchial epithelial cell (NCI-H292) by inhibiting the Erk signaling pathway. These results demonstrate the beneficial effects of ambroxol in inhalation therapy for the airway inflammatory diseases.

  12. Inflammatory mechanisms and treatment of obstructive airway diseases with neutrophilic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Phipps, Simon; Gibson, Peter G

    2009-10-01

    Obstructive airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major global health issues. Although considered as distinct diseases, airway inflammation is a key underlying pathophysiological process in asthma, COPD and bronchiectasis. Persistent neutrophilic airway inflammation (neutrophilic bronchitis) occurs with innate immune activation and is a feature of each of these airway diseases. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to neutrophilic bronchitis and few treatments are effective in reducing neutrophil accumulation in the airways. There is a similar pattern of inflammatory mediator release and toll like receptor 2 expression in asthma, COPD and bronchiectasis. We propose the existence of an active amplification mechanism, an effector arm of the innate immune system, involving toll like receptor 2, operating in persistent neutrophilic bronchitis. Neutrophil persistence in the airways can occur through a number of mechanisms such as impaired apoptosis, efferocytosis and mucus hypersecretion, all of which are impaired in airways disease. Impairment of neutrophil clearance results in a reduced ability to respond to bacterial infection. Persistent activation of airway neutrophils may result in the persistent activation of the innate immune system resulting in further airway insult. Current therapies are limited for the treatment of neutrophilic bronchitis; possible treatments being investigated include theophylline, statins, antagonists of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides have shown great promise in their ability to reduce airway inflammation, and can reduce airway neutrophils, levels of CXCL8 and neutrophil proteases in the airways. Studies also show improvements in quality of life and exacerbation rates in airways diseases.

  13. Early cystic fibrosis lung disease: Role of airway surface dehydration and lessons from preventive rehydration therapies in mice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Graeber, Simon Y; Stahl, Mirjam; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease starts in the first months of life and remains one of the most common fatal hereditary diseases. Early therapeutic interventions may provide an opportunity to prevent irreversible lung damage and improve outcome. Airway surface dehydration is a key disease mechanism in CF, however, its role in the in vivo pathogenesis and as therapeutic target in early lung disease remains poorly understood. Mice with airway-specific overexpression of the epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC-Tg) recapitulate airway surface dehydration and phenocopy CF lung disease. Recent studies in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration produces early mucus plugging in the absence of mucus hypersecretion, which triggers airway inflammation, promotes bacterial infection and causes early mortality. Preventive rehydration therapy with hypertonic saline or amiloride effectively reduced mucus plugging and mortality in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice. These results support clinical testing of preventive/early rehydration strategies in infants and young children with CF.

  14. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  15. The innate immune properties of airway mucosal surfaces are regulated by dynamic interactions between mucins and interacting proteins: the mucin interactome

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Amina A.; Wang, Tiffany; Li, Lily; Kesimer, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and asthma, are characterized by hypersecretion and poor clearance of mucus, which are associated with poor prognosis and mortality. Little is known about the relationship between the biophysical properties of mucus and its molecular composition. The mucins MUC5B and MUC5AC are traditionally believed to generate the characteristic biophysical properties of airway mucus. However, the contribution of hundreds of globular proteins to the biophysical properties of mucus is not clear. Approximately one-third of the total mucus proteome comprises distinct, multi-protein complexes centered around airway mucins. These complexes constitute a discrete entity we call the “mucin interactome”. The data suggest that while the majority of these proteins interact with mucins via electrostatic and weak interactions, some interact through very strong hydrophobic and/or covalent interactions. Using reagents that interfere with protein-protein interactions, the complexes can be disassembled, and mucus rheology can be dramatically altered. Using MUC5B-glutathione S-transferase (GST) and MUC5B-galectin-3 as a representative of these interactions, we provide evidence that individual mucin protein interactions can alter the biophysical properties of mucus and modulate the biological function of the protein. We propose that the key mechano- and bio-active functions of mucus depend on the dynamic interactions between mucins and globular proteins. These observations challenge the paradigm that mucins are the only molecules that confer biophysical properties of mucus. These observations may ultimately lead to a greater understanding of the system and guide the development of strategies for more effective interventions using better therapeutic agents. PMID:27072609

  16. Lyn mitigates mouse airway remodeling by downregulating the TGF-β3 isoform in house dust mite models.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoping; Fox, John; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Jun; Gao, George F; Jin, Yang; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Min

    2013-12-01

    Chronic airway remodeling is a serious consequence of asthma, which is caused by complex but largely unknown mechanisms. Despite versatile functions, the role of Lyn in chronic airway remodeling remains undefined. Using Lyn(-/-) mice, we show that continual exposure (for 8 wk) of house dust mite extracts induced a severe phenotype of chronic airway remodeling, including exacerbated mucus production, collagen deposition, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and elevated inflammation. Strikingly, a significant increase in TGF-β3 rather than TGF-β1 was observed in Lyn(-/-) mouse lungs compared with lungs in wild-type mice. Furthermore, TGF-β3 neutralizing Abs not only inhibited the expression of STAT6 and Smad2/3 but also decreased phosphorylation of Smad2 and NF-κB in Lyn(-/-) mouse lungs. In addition, both recombinant and adenoviral TGF-β3 significantly promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and intensified collagen I production and MUC5AC expression. Further examination of chronic asthma patients showed that a decreased Lyn correlated with the severity of airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion. Finally, Lyn may critically regulate airway remodeling by directly interacting with TGF-β3. Collectively, these findings revealed that Lyn regulates TGF-β3 isoform and modulates the development of airway remodeling, which may have therapeutic implications for severe chronic asthma.

  17. Clearance of a Mucus Plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Shiyao; Zheng, Ying; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-11-01

    Mucus plugging may occur in pulmonary airways in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. How to clear the mucus plug is essential and of fundamental importance. Mucus is known to have a yield stress and a mucus plug behaves like a solid plug when the applied stresses are below its yield stress τy. When the local stresses reaches τy, the plug starts to move and can be cleared out of the lung. It is then of great importance to examine how the mucus plug deforms and what is the minimum pressure required to initiate its movement. The present study used the finite element method (FEM) to study the stress distribution and deformation of a solid mucus plug under different pressure loads using ANSYS software. The maximum shear stress is found to occur near the rear transition region of the plug, which can lead to local yielding and flow. The critical pressure increases linearly with the plug length and asymptotes when the plug length is larger than the half channel width. Experimentally a mucus simulant is used to study the process of plug deformation and critical pressure difference required for the plug to propagate. Consistently, the fracture is observed to start at the rear transition region where the plug core connects the films. However, the critical pressure is observed to be dependent on not only the plug length but also the interfacial shape.

  18. IL-1ra Secreted by ATP-Induced P2Y2 Negatively Regulates MUC5AC Overproduction via PLCβ3 during Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Kim, Jiwook; Kim, Bokyoum; Kim, Joowon; Shin, Yusom; Kim, Judeok; Ryu, Siejeong; Yang, Yu-Mi; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Mucus secretion is often uncontrolled in many airway inflammatory diseases of humans. Identifying the regulatory pathway(s) of mucus gene expression, mucus overproduction, and hypersecretion is important to alleviate airway inflammation in these diseases. However, the regulatory signaling pathway controlling mucus overproduction has not been fully identified yet. In this study, we report that the ATP/P2Y2 complex secretes many cytokines and chemokines to regulate airway inflammation, among which IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) downregulates MUC5AC gene expression via the inhibition of Gαq-induced Ca(2+) signaling. IL-1ra inhibited IL-1α protein expression and secretion, and vice versa. Interestingly, ATP/P2Y2-induced IL-1ra and IL-1α secretion were both mediated by PLCβ3. A dominant-negative mutation in the PDZ-binding domain of PLCβ3 inhibited ATP/P2Y2-induced IL-1ra and IL-1α secretion. IL-1α in the presence of the ATP/P2Y2 complex activated the ERK1/2 pathway in a greater degree and for a longer duration than the ATP/P2Y2 complex itself, which was dramatically inhibited by IL-1ra. These findings suggest that secreted IL-1ra exhibits a regulatory effect on ATP/P2Y2-induced MUC5AC gene expression, through inhibition of IL-1α secretion, to maintain the mucus homeostasis in the airway. Therefore, IL-1ra could be an excellent modality for regulating inflamed airway microenvironments in respiratory diseases.

  19. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits.

  20. Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Protein Inhibition Attenuates Neutrophil-dominant Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Manni, Michelle L; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; Salmeron, Andres; Lora, Jose M; Kolls, Jay K; Alcorn, John F

    2017-02-24

    Atopic asthma is a prevalent respiratory disease that is characterized by inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The complexity of this heterogeneous disorder has commanded the need to better define asthma phenotypes based on underlying molecular mechanisms of disease. Although classically viewed as a type 2-regulated disease, type 17 helper T (Th17) cells are known to be influential in asthma pathogenesis, predominantly in asthmatics with neutrophilia and severe refractory disease. Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) chromatin adaptors serve as immunomodulators by directly regulating Th17 responses and Th17-mediated pathology in murine models of autoimmunity and infection. Based on this, we hypothesized that BET proteins may also play an essential role in neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease. Using a murine model of neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease, we demonstrate that BET inhibition limits pulmonary inflammation and alters the Th17-related inflammatory milieu in the lungs. In addition, inhibition of BET proteins improved lung function (specifically quasi-static lung compliance and tissue elastance) and reduced mucus production in airways. Overall, these studies show that BET proteins may have a critical role in asthma pathogenesis by altering type 17 inflammation, and thus interfering with BET-dependent chromatin signaling may provide clinical benefits to patients suffering from asthma.

  1. Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Protein Inhibition Attenuates Neutrophil-dominant Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Michelle L.; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; Salmeron, Andres; Lora, Jose M.; Kolls, Jay K.; Alcorn, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a prevalent respiratory disease that is characterized by inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The complexity of this heterogeneous disorder has commanded the need to better define asthma phenotypes based on underlying molecular mechanisms of disease. Although classically viewed as a type 2-regulated disease, type 17 helper T (Th17) cells are known to be influential in asthma pathogenesis, predominantly in asthmatics with neutrophilia and severe refractory disease. Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) chromatin adaptors serve as immunomodulators by directly regulating Th17 responses and Th17-mediated pathology in murine models of autoimmunity and infection. Based on this, we hypothesized that BET proteins may also play an essential role in neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease. Using a murine model of neutrophil-dominant allergic airway disease, we demonstrate that BET inhibition limits pulmonary inflammation and alters the Th17-related inflammatory milieu in the lungs. In addition, inhibition of BET proteins improved lung function (specifically quasi-static lung compliance and tissue elastance) and reduced mucus production in airways. Overall, these studies show that BET proteins may have a critical role in asthma pathogenesis by altering type 17 inflammation, and thus interfering with BET-dependent chromatin signaling may provide clinical benefits to patients suffering from asthma. PMID:28233801

  2. Treatment of disorders characterized by reversible airway obstruction in childhood: are anti-cholinergic agents the answer?

    PubMed

    Quizon, Annabelle; Colin, Andrew A; Pelosi, Umberto; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2012-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in the airways activates postjunctional muscarinic receptors present on smooth muscle, submucosal glands and blood vessels. This triggers bronchoconstriction, muscle hypertrophy, mucus secretion, and vasodilatation, respectively. The release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in lungs is induced by a variety of stimuli and downregulated by the inhibitory activity of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors via a feedback mechanism. Increased parasympathetic nerve activity occurs in a variety of airway diseases in childhood, including viral-induced wheeze and asthma. Common to these conditions are reversible airway obstruction, mucus hypersecretion, vasodilation and enhanced vascular permeability. In animal models of airway hyperreactivity similar findings of increased acetylcholine release resulting in enhanced supply of this neurotransmitter to the postjunctional smooth muscles, submucosal glands and airway vessels, were demonstrated. While the number and function of postjunctional muscarinic receptors in the airways are unchanged in such airway disorders, inhibitory activity on the parasympathetic nerves appears to be impaired. Specifically, M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction has been demonstrated in models of bronchial hyperreactivity induced by a variety of triggers, including viruses, atmospheric pollutants and allergens. The mechanisms leading to impairment of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptor function and their putative relevance to the pathogenesis and the treatment of airway disease in childhood are described. Finally, the available data on the activity of ipratropium bromide, a short-acting anticholinergic drug, in the most common pediatric airway disease are reported and the possible therapeutic efficacy of tiotropium bromide, a more recently introduced long-acting, selective anticholinergic compound, is discussed.

  3. Thick airway surface liquid volume and weak mucin expression in pendrin-deficient human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Yoo, Jee Eun; Namkung, Wan; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Kim, Kyubo; Kang, Joo Wan; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger whose mutations are known to cause hearing loss. However, recent data support the linkage between pendrin expression and airway diseases, such as asthma. To evaluate the role of pendrin in the regulation of the airway surface liquid (ASL) volume and mucin expression, we investigated the function and expression of pendrin and ion channels and anion exchangers. Human nasal epithelial cells were cultured from 16 deaf patients carrying pendrin mutations (DFNB4) and 17 controls. The cells were treated with IL-13 to induce mucus hypersecretion. Airway surface liquid thickness was measured and real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed targeting various transporters and MUC5AC. Anion exchanger activity was measured using a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Periodic acid-Schiff staining was performed on the cultured cells and inferior turbinate tissues. The ASL layer of the nasal epithelia from DFNB4 subjects was thicker than the controls, and the difference became more prominent following IL-13 stimulation. There was no difference in anion exchange activity after IL-13 treatment in the cells from DFNB4 patients, while it increased in the controls. Goblet cell metaplasia induced by IL-13 treatment seen in the controls was not observed in the DFNB4 cells. Furthermore, the periodic acid-Schiff staining-positive area was lesser in the inferior turbinate tissues from DFNB4 patients that those from controls. Pendrin plays a critical role in ASL volume regulation and mucin expression as pendrin-deficient airway epithelial cells are refractory to stimulation with IL-13. Specific blockers targeting pendrin in the airways may therefore have therapeutic potential in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26243215

  4. The non-neuronal cholinergic system as novel drug target in the airways.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Michael Paul

    2012-11-27

    The parasympathetic nervous system is a key regulator of the human organism involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders through cholinergic mechanisms. In the lungs, acetylcholine (ACh) released by vagal nerve endings stimulates muscarinic receptors thereby increasing airway smooth muscle tone. Contraction of airway smooth muscle cells leads to increased respiratory resistance and dyspnea. An additional branch of the cholinergic system is the non-neuronal cholinergic system expressed in nearly all cell types present in the airways. Activation of this system may contribute to an increased cholinergic tone in the lungs, inducing pathophysiological processes like inflammation, remodeling, mucus hypersecretion and chronic cough. Selective muscarinic receptor antagonists specifically inhibit acetylcholine at the receptor inducing bronchodilation in patients with obstructive airway diseases. This paper reviews preclinical pharmacological research activities on anticholinergics including experimental models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD. It discloses various options to follow up the non-neuronal cholinergic system as a novel drug target for the treatment of key aspects of obstructive airway diseases, in particular those of a chronic nature.

  5. New insights into the relationship between airway inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, A J; Brightling, C E; Green, R; Woltmann, G; Bradding, P; Pavord, I D

    2002-08-01

    Asthma is a condition characterized by variable airflow obstruction, airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation which is usually, but not invariably, eosinophilic. Current thoughts on the pathogenesis of asthma are focused on the idea that it is caused by an inappropriate response of the specific immune system to harmless antigens, particularly allergens such as cat dander and house dust mite, that result in Th2-mediated chronic inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and asthma is complex, with no good correlation between the severity of inflammation, at least as measured by the number of eosinophils, and the severity of asthma. In addition, there are a number of conditions, such as eosinophilic bronchitis and allergic rhinitis, in which there is a Th2-mediated inflammatory response, but no asthma, as measured by variable airflow obstruction or AHR. Bronchoconstriction can also occur without obvious airway inflammation, and neutrophilic inflammation can in some cases be associated with asthma. When we compared the immunopathology of eosinophilic bronchitis and asthma, the only difference we observed was that, in asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) was infiltrated by mast cells, suggesting that airway obstruction and AHR are due to an ASM mast cell myositis. This observation emphasizes that the features that characterize asthma, as opposed to bronchitis, are due to abnormalities in smooth muscle responsiveness, which could be intrinsic or acquired, and that inflammation is only relevant in that it leads to these abnormalities. It also emphasizes the importance of micro-localization as an organizing principle in physiological responses to airway inflammation. Thus, if inflammation is localized to the epithelium and lamina propria, then the symptoms of bronchitis (cough and mucus hypersecretion) result, and it is only if the ASM is involved -- for reasons that remain to be established -- that asthma occurs.

  6. Acquired CFTR Dysfunction in Chronic Bronchitis and Other Diseases of Mucus Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Raju, S. Vamsee; Solomon, George M.; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem accounting for more than 100,000 deaths and 750,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States alone. Though bronchodilators, inhaled steroids and other anti-inflammatory drugs can improve symptoms and reduce the risk of exacerbations, no therapies alter the natural history of the disease. This is the result of a number of factors including our poor understanding of the pathobiologic processes that drive specific COPD phenotypes, which has hindered drug development. Chronic bronchitis is perhaps the most clinically troublesome phenotype as most patients with COPD complain of cough and sputum production, and yet there are no effective treatments to target the mucus hypersecretion, accumulation and poor clearance that lead to these symptoms. Though it is well known that the absence of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane receptor (CFTR) is the cause of CF, the prototypical disease of impaired mucociliary clearance, emerging data strongly suggest cigarette smoke and its components can lead to acquired CFTR dysfunction. Findings in vitro, in animal models, as well smokers with and without COPD also exhibit acquired CFTR dysfunction, which is associated with chronic bronchitis. This abnormality is not only present in the airways but is also present in extrapulmonary organs, suggesting CFTR dysfunction may contribute to smoking related lung disease as well as commonly associated comorbidities in which CFTR has a role. The development of potent CFTR modulators for the treatment of CF has made these findings clinically relevant as they may also have a role in treating COPD and other diseases of mucus clearance. PMID:26857776

  7. Structure and Function of the Mucus Clearance System of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brenda M.; Button, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a defect in ion transport results in thick and dehydrated airway mucus, which is difficult to clear, making such patients prone to chronic inflammation and bacterial infections. Physiotherapy using a variety of airway clearance techniques (ACTs) represents a key treatment regime by helping clear the airways of thickened, adhered, mucus and, thus, reducing the impact of lung infections and improving lung function. This article aims to bridge the gap between our understanding of the physiological effects of mechanical stresses elicited by ACTs on airway epithelia and the reported effectiveness of ACTs in CF patients. In the first part of this review, the effects of mechanical stress on airway epithelia are discussed in relation to changes in ion transport and stimulation in airway surface layer hydration. The second half is devoted to detailing the most commonly used ACTs to stimulate the removal of mucus from the airways of patients with CF. PMID:23751214

  8. Nanoparticle diffusion in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Benjamin S.; Suk, Jung Soo; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    A major role of respiratory mucus is to trap inhaled particles, including pathogens and environmental particulates, to limit body exposure. Despite the tremendous health implications, how particle size and surface chemistry affect mobility in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease is not known. We prepared polymeric nanoparticles densely coated with low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) to minimize muco-adhesion, and compared their transport to that of uncoated particles in human respiratory mucus, which we collected from the endotracheal tubes of surgical patients with no respiratory comorbidities. We found that 100 and 200 nm diameter PEG-coated particles rapidly penetrated respiratory mucus, at rates exceeding their uncoated counterparts by approximately 15- and 35-fold, respectively. In contrast, PEG-coated particles ≥ 500 nm in diameter were sterically immobilized by the mucus mesh. Thus, even though respiratory mucus is a viscoelastic solid at the macroscopic level (as measured using a bulk rheometer), nanoparticles that are sufficiently small and muco-inert can penetrate the mucus as if it were primarily a viscous liquid. These findings help elucidate the barrier properties of respiratory mucus and provide design criteria for therapeutic nanoparticles capable of penetrating mucus to approach the underlying airway epithelium. PMID:23384790

  9. Hesperidin suppresses ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse allergic asthma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dajun; Ci, Xinxin; Chu, Xiao; Wei, Miaomiao; Hua, Shucheng; Deng, Xuming

    2012-02-01

    Hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside comprised of the flavanone hesperetin and the disaccharide rutinose, is a plentiful and inexpensive by-product of citrus cultivation. It has been reported to exert a wide range of pharmacological effects that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study, we attempt to determine whether hesperidin inhibits inflammatory mediators in the mouse allergic asthma model. Mice were sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) to induce chronic airway inflammation and airway remodeling. The administration of hesperidin significantly decreased the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared with the OVA-induced group of mice. In addition, hesperidin reduced OVA-specific IgE levels in serum. Hesperidin markedly alleviated the OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled methacholine. Based on lung histopathological studies using hematoxylin and eosin and alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff staining, hesperidin inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion compared with the OVA-induced group of mice. These findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of hesperidin in terms of its effects in a murine model of asthma.

  10. Pic, an autotransporter protein secreted by different pathogens in the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a potent mucus secretagogue.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Gutierrez-Jimenez, Javier; Garcia-Tovar, Carlos; Castro, Luis A; Salazar-Gonzalez, Hector; Cordova, Vanessa

    2010-10-01

    A hallmark of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) infection is a formation of biofilm, which comprises a mucus layer with immersed bacteria in the intestines of patients. While studying the mucinolytic activity of Pic in an in vivo system, rat ileal loops, we surprisingly found that EAEC induced hypersecretion of mucus, which was accompanied by an increase in the number of mucus-containing goblet cells. Interestingly, an isogenic pic mutant (EAEC Δpic) was unable to cause this mucus hypersecretion. Furthermore, purified Pic was also able to induce intestinal mucus hypersecretion, and this effect was abolished when Pic was heat denatured. Site-directed mutagenesis of the serine protease catalytic residue of Pic showed that, unlike the mucinolytic activity, secretagogue activity did not depend on this catalytic serine protease motif. Other pathogens harboring the pic gene, such as Shigella flexneri and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), also showed results similar to those for EAEC, and construction of isogenic pic mutants of S. flexneri and UPEC confirmed this secretagogue activity. Thus, Pic mucinase is responsible for one of the pathophysiologic features of the diarrhea mediated by EAEC and the mucoid diarrhea induced by S. flexneri.

  11. Epithelial tethering of MUC5AC-rich mucus impairs mucociliary transport in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonser, Luke R.; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The development of pathologic mucus, which is not readily cleared from the airways, is an important contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma. It is not clear how the major airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B are organized within the mucus gel or how this gel contributes to airway obstruction in asthma. Here, we demonstrated that mucus plugs from individuals with fatal asthma are heterogeneous gels with distinct MUC5AC- and MUC5B-containing domains. Stimulation of cultured human bronchial epithelial cells with IL-13, a key mediator in asthma, induced the formation of heterogeneous mucus gels and dramatically impaired mucociliary transport. Impaired transport was not associated with defects in ciliary function but instead was related to tethering of MUC5AC-containing mucus gel domains to mucus-producing cells in the epithelium. Replacement of tethered mucus with untethered mucus restored mucociliary transport. Together, our results indicate that tethering of MUC5AC-containing domains to the epithelium causes mucostasis and likely represents a major cause of mucus plugging in asthma. PMID:27183390

  12. Automated detection of mucus plugs within bronchial tree in MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Guiliguian, Diran; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2007-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases characterized by chronic airway inflammation, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary (COPD), result in abnormal bronchial wall thickening, lumen dilatation and mucus plugs. Multi-Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT) allows for assessment of these abnormalities, even in airways that are obliquely oriented to the scan plane. Chronic airway inflammation typically results in limitations of airflow, allowing for the accumulation of mucus, especially in the distal airways. In addition to obstructing airways, retained secretions make the airways prone to infection. Patients with chronic airway disease are clinically followed over time to assess disease progression and response to treatment. In this regard, the ability to obtain an automatic standardized method to rapidly and objectively assess the entire airway tree morphologically, including the extent of mucus plugging, would be of particular clinical value. We have developed a method to automatically detect the presence and location of mucus plugs within the peripheral airways. We first start with segmentation of the bronchial tree using a previously developed method. The skeleton-based tree structure is then computed and each terminal branch is individually extended using an adaptive threshold algorithm. We compute a local 2-dimensional model, based on airway luminal diameter and wall thickness. We then select a few points along the principal axis beyond the terminal branches, to extract 2D cross sections for correlation with a model of mucus plugging. Airway shape is validated with a correlation value, and the lumen distribution is analyzed and compared to the model. A high correlation indicates the presence of a mucus plug. We tested our method on 5 datasets containing a total of 40 foci of mucoid impaction. Preliminary results show sensitivity of 77.5% with a specificity of 98.2% and positive predictive value of 66%.

  13. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  14. Lung Gene Therapy with Highly Compacted DNA Nanoparticles that Overcome the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S.; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M.; Boylan, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Michael P.; Lai, Samuel K.; Guggino, William B.; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  15. Protective Roles for RGS2 in a Mouse Model of House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    George, Tresa; Bell, Matthew; Chakraborty, Mainak; Siderovski, David P.; Giembycz, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    The GTPase-accelerating protein, regulator of G-protein signalling 2 (RGS2) reduces signalling from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that signal via Gαq. In humans, RGS2 expression is up-regulated by inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) such that synergy is produced in combination. This may contribute to the superior clinical efficacy of ICS/LABA therapy in asthma relative to ICS alone. In a murine model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced airways inflammation, three weeks of intranasal HDM (25 μg, 3×/week) reduced lung function and induced granulocytic airways inflammation. Compared to wild type animals, Rgs2-/- mice showed airways hyperresponsiveness (increased airways resistance and reduced compliance). While HDM increased pulmonary inflammation observed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, there was no difference between wild type and Rgs2-/- animals. HDM-induced mucus hypersecretion was also unaffected by RGS2 deficiency. However, inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Rgs2-/- animals were significantly increased (57%) compared to wild type animals and this correlated with increased granulocyte (neutrophil and eosinophil) numbers. Likewise, cytokine and chemokine (IL4, IL17, IL5, LIF, IL6, CSF3, CXCLl, CXCL10 and CXCL11) release was increased by HDM exposure. Compared to wild type, Rgs2-/- animals showed a trend towards increased expression for many cytokines/chemokines, with CCL3, CCL11, CXCL9 and CXCL10 being significantly enhanced. As RGS2 expression was unaffected by HDM exposure, these data indicate that RGS2 exerts tonic bronchoprotection in HDM-induced airways inflammation. Modest anti-inflammatory and anti-remodelling roles for RGS2 are also suggested. If translatable to humans, therapies that maximize RGS2 expression may prove advantageous. PMID:28107494

  16. Mometasone Furoate Suppresses PMA-Induced MUC-5AC and MUC-2 Production in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Monthanapisut, Paopanga; Pattanacharoenchai, Napaporn

    2017-01-01

    Background Mucus hypersecretion from airway epithelium is a characteristic feature of airway inflammatory diseases. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) regulates mucin synthesis. Glucocorticoids including mometasone fuorate (MF) have been used to attenuate airway inflammation. However, effects of MF on mucin production have not been reported. Methods Effects of MF and budesonide (BUD) on the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)–induction of mucin and TNF-α in human airway epithelial cells (NCI-H292) were investigated in the present study. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with PMA (200 nM) for 2 hours. Subsequently, the cells were stimulated with MF (1–500 ng/mL) or BUD (21.5 ng/mL) for 8 hours. Dexamethasone (1 µg/mL) was used as the positive control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine MUC2 and MUC5AC mRNA levels. The level of total mucin, MUC2, MUC5AC, and TNF-α in culture supernatants were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results MF and BUD significantly suppressed MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in PMA-stimulated NCI-H292 cells. The inhibitory effects of the two steroid drugs were also observed in the production of total mucin, MUC2 and MUC5AC proteins, and TNF-α. Conclusion Our findings demonstrated that MF and BUD attenuated mucin and TNF-α production in PMA-induced human airway epithelial cells. PMID:28119748

  17. Mannitol-guided delivery of Ciprofloxacin in artificial cystic fibrosis mucus model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Tsifansky, Michael D; Shin, Sooyoung; Lin, Qingnuo; Yeo, Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Abnormal airway mucus presents a significant challenge for inhalational drug delivery. Recognizing the thick and tenacious airway mucus seen in the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients as a critical barrier to effective drug delivery, both into the mucus layer itself as well as across that layer to the underlying airway epithelium, we hypothesize that mannitol or NaCl can form inhalable drug carriers, improve drug penetration into the mucus, and ultimately enhance the drug's therapeutic effect. The objective of this study is to test whether mannitol and NaCl particles, as inhalable drug carriers, improve drug delivery into and enhance a drug's activity within a mucus-like material. Microparticles containing Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), an active ingredient, and either mannitol or NaCl were produced by spray-drying. Cipro encapsulated in mannitol particles (Cipro-mannitol) was significantly more effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) grown in artificial mucus (AM) than Cipro encapsulated in either NaCl particles (Cipro-NaCl) or in hydrophobic particles consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), albumin, and lactose (Cipro-DAL). The relatively high antibacterial effectiveness of Cipro-mannitol was not due to the effect of mannitol on bacteria or on Cipro. Rather, the unique performance of the mannitol-based particles in AM is attributable to its ability to increase local water content in the AM and enhance drug penetration into it. Mannitol is a promising excipient for inhalable microparticles that facilitate the drug delivery into the CF mucus.

  18. N-acetylcysteine enhances cystic fibrosis sputum penetration and airway gene transfer by highly compacted DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suk, Jung Soo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Trehan, Kanika; Tang, Benjamin C; Schneider, Craig S; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Boyle, Michael P; Zeitlin, Pamela L; Lai, Samuel K; Cooper, Mark J; Hanes, Justin

    2011-11-01

    For effective airway gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF), inhaled gene carriers must first penetrate the hyperviscoelastic sputum covering the epithelium. Whether clinically studied gene carriers can penetrate CF sputum remains unknown. Here, we measured the diffusion of a clinically tested nonviral gene carrier, composed of poly-l-lysine conjugated with a 10 kDa polyethylene glycol segment (CK(30)PEG(10k)). We found that CK(30)PEG(10k)/DNA nanoparticles were trapped in CF sputum. To improve gene carrier diffusion across sputum, we tested adjuvant regimens consisting of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) or NAC together with rhDNase. While rhDNase alone did not enhance gene carrier diffusion, NAC and NAC + rhDNase increased average effective diffusivities by 6-fold and 13-fold, respectively, leading to markedly greater fractions of gene carriers that may penetrate sputum layers. We further tested the adjuvant effects of NAC in the airways of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mucus hypersecretion. Intranasal dosing of NAC prior to CK(30)PEG(10k)/DNA nanoparticles enhanced gene expression by up to ~12-fold compared to saline control, reaching levels observed in the lungs of mice without LPS challenge. Our findings suggest that a promising synthetic nanoparticle gene carrier may transfer genes substantially more effectively to lungs of CF patients if administered following adjuvant mucolytic therapy with NAC or NAC + rhDNase.

  19. N-acetylcysteine Enhances Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Penetration and Airway Gene Transfer by Highly Compacted DNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suk, Jung Soo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Trehan, Kanika; Tang, Benjamin C; Schneider, Craig S; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Boyle, Michael P; Zeitlin, Pamela L; Lai, Samuel K; Cooper, Mark J; Hanes, Justin

    2011-11-01

    For effective airway gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF), inhaled gene carriers must first penetrate the hyperviscoelastic sputum covering the epithelium. Whether clinically studied gene carriers can penetrate CF sputum remains unknown. Here, we measured the diffusion of a clinically tested nonviral gene carrier, composed of poly-l-lysine conjugated with a 10 kDa polyethylene glycol segment (CK30PEG10k). We found that CK30PEG10k/DNA nanoparticles were trapped in CF sputum. To improve gene carrier diffusion across sputum, we tested adjuvant regimens consisting of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) or NAC together with rhDNase. While rhDNase alone did not enhance gene carrier diffusion, NAC and NAC + rhDNase increased average effective diffusivities by 6-fold and 13-fold, respectively, leading to markedly greater fractions of gene carriers that may penetrate sputum layers. We further tested the adjuvant effects of NAC in the airways of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mucus hypersecretion. Intranasal dosing of NAC prior to CK30PEG10k/DNA nanoparticles enhanced gene expression by up to ~12-fold compared to saline control, reaching levels observed in the lungs of mice without LPS challenge. Our findings suggest that a promising synthetic nanoparticle gene carrier may transfer genes substantially more effectively to lungs of CF patients if administered following adjuvant mucolytic therapy with NAC or NAC + rhDNase.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Pycnogenol® (French maritime pine bark extract) on airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Jeon, Chan-Mi; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jong-Choon; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Hahn, Kyu-Woung; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2013-12-01

    Pycnogenol® (PYC) is a standardized extracts from the bark of the French maritime pine (Pinus maritime) and used as a herbal remedy for various diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PYC on airway inflammation using a model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and RAW264.7 cells. PYC decreased nitric oxide production and reduced the interleukine (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PYC also reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and enhanced the expression of hemeoxygenase (HO)-1. In the in vivo experiment, PYC decreased the inflammatory cell count and the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and immunoglobulin (Ig) E in BALF or serum. These results are consistent with the histological analysis findings, which showed that PYC attenuated the airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion induced by OVA challenge. In addition, PYC enhanced the expression of HO-1. In contrast, PYC inhibited the elevated expression of iNOS and MMP-9 proteins induced by OVA challenge. In conclusion, PYC exhibits protective effects against OVA-induced asthma and LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that PYC has potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma.

  1. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  2. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hanes, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or adhesion. Trapped particles are typically removed from the mucosal tissue within seconds to a few hours depending on anatomical location, thereby strongly limiting the duration of sustained drug delivery locally. A number of debilitating diseases could be treated more effectively and with fewer side effects if drugs and genes could be more efficiently delivered to the underlying mucosal tissues in a controlled manner. This review first describes the tenacious mucus barrier properties that have precluded the efficient penetration of therapeutic particles. It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues. PMID:19133304

  3. A new role for bicarbonate in mucus formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric Y T; Yang, Ning; Quinton, Paul M; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2010-10-01

    The impact of small anions on the physical properties of gel-forming mucin has been almost overlooked relative to that of cations. Recently, based on the coincident abnormalities in HCO(3)(-) secretion and abnormal mucus formed in the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis (CF), HCO(3)(-) was hypothesized to be critical in the formation of normal mucus by virtue of its ability to sequester Ca(2+) from condensed mucins being discharged from cells. However, direct evidence of the impact of HCO(3)(-) on mucus properties is lacking. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that mucin diffusivity (∼1/viscosity) increases as a function of [HCO(3)(-)]. Direct measurements of exocytosed mucin-swelling kinetics from airway cells showed that mucin diffusivity increases by ∼300% with 20 mM extracellular HCO(3)(-) concentration. Supporting data indicate that HCO(3)(-) reduces free Ca(2+) concentration and decreases the amount of Ca(2+) that remains associated with mucins. The results demonstrate that HCO(3)(-) enhances mucin swelling and hydration by reducing Ca(2+) cross-linking in mucins, thereby decreasing its viscosity and likely increasing its transportability. In addition, HCO(3)(-) can function as a Ca(2+) chelator like EGTA to disperse mucin aggregates. This study indicates that poor HCO(3)(-) availability in CF may explain why secreted mucus remains aggregated and more viscous in affected organs. These insights bear on not only the fundamental pathogenesis in CF, but also on the process of gel mucus formation and release in general.

  4. Picroside II Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Downregulating the Transcription Factor GATA3 and Th2-Related Cytokines in a Mouse Model of HDM-Induced Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin seok; Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hyun Ah; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Su Ui; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Yun, Won-Kee; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    Picroside II isolated from Pseudolysimachion rotundum var. subintegrum has been used as traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. In this study, we assessed whether picroside II has inhibitory effects on airway inflammation in a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced asthma. In the HDM-induced asthmatic model, picroside II significantly reduced inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the levels of total immunoglobulin (Ig) E and HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 in serum, airway inflammation, and mucus hypersecretion in the lung tissues. ELISA analysis showed that picroside II down-regulated the levels of Th2-related cytokines (including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and asthma-related mediators, but it up-regulated Th1-related cytokine, IFNγ in BALF. Picroside II also inhibited the expression of Th2 type cytokine genes and the transcription factor GATA3 in the lung tissues of HDM-induced mice. Finally, we demonstrated that picroside II significantly decreased the expression of GATA3 and Th2 cytokines in developing Th2 cells, consistent with in vivo results. Taken together, these results indicate that picroside II has protective effects on allergic asthma by reducing GATA3 expression and Th2 cytokine bias. PMID:27870920

  5. Impact of growth hormone hypersecretion on the adult human kidney.

    PubMed

    Grunenwald, Solange; Tack, Ivan; Chauveau, Dominique; Bennet, Antoine; Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Acromegaly is most often secondary to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with increased Insulin-like Growth Factor type 1 (IGF-1) level. The consequences of GH/IGF-1 hypersecretion reflect the diversity of action of these hormones. The genes of the GH receptor (GHR), IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP) are physiologically expressed in the adult kidney, suggesting a potential role of the somatotropic axis on renal structure and functions. The expression of these proteins is highly organized and differs according to the anatomical and functional segments of the nephron suggesting different roles of GH and IGF-1 in these segments. In animals, chronic exposure to high doses of GH induces glomerulosclerosis and increases albuminuria. Studies in patients with GH hypersecretion have identified numerous targets of GH/IGF-1 axis on the kidney: 1) an impact on renal filtration with increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 2) a structural impact with an increase in kidney weight and glomerular hypertrophy, and 3) a tubular impact leading to hyperphosphatemia, hypercalciuria and antinatriuretic effects. Despite the increased glomerular filtration rate observed in patients with GH hypersecretion, GH is an inefficient treatment for chronic renal failure. GH and IGF-1 seem to be involved in the physiopathology of diabetic nephropathy; this finding offers the possibility of targeting the GH/IGF-1 axis for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. On the effect of mucus rheology on the muco-ciliary transport.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, M H; Shahmardan, M M; Norouzi, M; Nazari, M; Jayathilake, P G

    2016-02-01

    A two dimensional numerical model is used to study the muco-ciliary transport process in human respiratory tract. Here, hybrid finite difference-lattice Boltzmann method is used to model the flow physics of the transport of mucus and periciliary liquid (PCL) layer in the airway surface liquid. The immersed boundary method is also used to implement the propulsive effect of the cilia and also the effects of the interface between the mucus and PCL layers. The main contribution of this study is on elucidating the role of the viscoelastic behavior of mucus on the muco-ciliary transport and for this purpose an Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equation of mucus for the first time. Results show that the viscosity and viscosity ratio of mucus have an enormous effect on the muco-ciliary transport process. It is also seen that the mucus velocity is affected by mucus relaxation time when its value is less than 0.002 s. Results also indicate that the variation of these properties on the mucus velocity at lower values of viscosity ratio is more significant.

  7. Verproside inhibits TNF-α-induced MUC5AC expression through suppression of the TNF-α/NF-κB pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Ui; Sung, Min Hee; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Hui-Seong; In, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Lee, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Shin, Dae-Hee; Lee, Yongnam; Hong, Sung-Tae; Oh, Sei-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    Airway mucus secretion is an essential innate immune response for host protection. However, overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus, mainly composed of MUC5AC, are significant risk factors in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Previously, we reported that verproside, a catalpol derivative iridoid glycoside isolated from Pseudolysimachion rotundum var. subintegrum, is a potent anti-asthmatic candidate drug in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacological actions of verproside remain unknown. Here, we found that verproside significantly reduces the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced MUC5AC mRNA and protein by inhibiting both nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activity and the phosphorylation of its upstream effectors such as IκB kinase (IKK)β, IκBα, and TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) in NCI-H292 cells. Moreover, verproside attenuated TNF-α-induced MUC5AC transcription more effectively when combined with an IKK (BAY11-7082) or a TAK1 (5z-7-oxozeaenol) inhibitor than when administered alone. Importantly, we demonstrated that verproside negatively modulates the formation of the TNF-α-receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling complex [TNF-RSC; TNFR1-recruited TNFR1-associated death domain protein (TRADD), TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2), receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1), and TAK1], the most upstream signaling factor of NF-κB signaling. In silico molecular docking studies show that verproside binds between TRADD and TRAF2 subunits. Altogether, these results suggest that verproside could be a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and COPD by blocking the TNF-α/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Tanreqing Injection Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Airway Inflammation through MAPK/NF-κB Signaling Pathways in Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Hong-li; Cai, Lin-li; Yan, Min; Dong, Shou-jin; Mao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tanreqing injection (TRQ) is a commonly used herbal patent medicine for treating inflammatory airway diseases in view of its outstanding anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we explored the signaling pathways involved in contributions of TRQ to LPS-induced airway inflammation in rats. Methods/Design. Adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats randomly divided into different groups received intratracheal instillation of LPS and/or intraperitoneal injection of TRQ. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF) and lung samples were collected at 24 h, 48 h, and 96 h after TRQ administration. Protein and mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, Interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and IL-8 in BALF and lung homogenate were observed by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Lung sections were stained for p38 MAPK and NF-κB detection by immunohistochemistry. Phospho-p38 MAPK, phosphor-extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, phospho-SAPK/JNK, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-IKKα/β, and phospho-IκB-α were measured by western blot analysis. Results. The results showed that TRQ significantly counteracted LPS-stimulated release of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, attenuated cells influx in BALF, mitigated mucus hypersecretion, suppressed phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, IκB-α, ΙKKα/β, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK, and inhibited p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 expression in rat lungs. Conclusions. Results of the current research indicate that TRQ possesses potent exhibitory effects in LPS-induced airway inflammation by, at least partially, suppressing the MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathways, in a general dose-dependent manner. PMID:27366191

  9. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  10. A new method to improve the clinical evaluation of cystic fibrosis patients by mucus viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rusciano, Giulia; Caserta, Sergio; Carciati, Antonio; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Abete, Pasquale; Sasso, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients airways mucus shows an increased viscoelasticity due to the concentration of high molecular weight components. Such mucus thickening eventually leads to bacterial overgrowth and prevents mucus clearance. The altered rheological behavior of mucus results in chronic lung infection and inflammation, which causes most of the cases of morbidity and mortality, although the cystic fibrosis complications affect other organs as well. Here, we present a quantitative study on the correlation between cystic fibrosis mucus viscoelasticity and patients clinical status. In particular, a new diagnostic parameter based on the correlation between CF sputum viscoelastic properties and the severity of the disease, expressed in terms of FEV1 and bacterial colonization, was developed. By using principal component analysis, we show that the types of colonization and FEV1 classes are significantly correlated to the elastic modulus, and that the latter can be used for CF severity classification with a high predictive efficiency (88%). The data presented here show that the elastic modulus of airways mucus, given the high predictive efficiency, could be used as a new clinical parameter in the prognostic evaluation of cystic fibrosis.

  11. Scalable method to produce biodegradable nanoparticles that rapidly penetrate human mucus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingguo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Cai, Shutian; Miao, Bolong; Patel, Himatkumar; Hanes, Justin

    2013-09-10

    Mucus typically traps and rapidly removes foreign particles from the airways, gastrointestinal tract, nasopharynx, female reproductive tract and the surface of the eye. Nanoparticles capable of rapid penetration through mucus can potentially avoid rapid clearance, and open significant opportunities for controlled drug delivery at mucosal surfaces. Here, we report an industrially scalable emulsification method to produce biodegradable mucus-penetrating particles (MPP). The emulsification of diblock copolymers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) using low molecular weight (MW) emulsifiers forms dense brush PEG coatings on nanoparticles that allow rapid nanoparticle penetration through fresh undiluted human mucus. In comparison, conventional high MW emulsifiers, such as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), interrupts the PEG coating on nanoparticles, resulting in their immobilization in mucus owing to adhesive interactions with mucus mesh elements. PLGA-PEG nanoparticles with a wide range of PEG MW (1, 2, 5, and 10 kDa), prepared by the emulsification method using low MW emulsifiers, all rapidly penetrated mucus. A range of drugs, from hydrophobic small molecules to hydrophilic large biologics, can be efficiently loaded into biodegradable MPP using the method described. This readily scalable method should facilitate the production of MPP products for mucosal drug delivery, as well as potentially longer-circulating particles following intravenous administration.

  12. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  13. Mathematical modeling of molecular diffusion through mucus

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The rate of molecular transport through the mucus gel can be an important determinant of efficacy for therapeutic agents delivered by oral, intranasal, intravaginal/rectal, and intraocular routes. Transport through mucus can be described by mathematical models based on principles of physical chemistry and known characteristics of the mucus gel, its constituents, and of the drug itself. In this paper, we review mathematical models of molecular diffusion in mucus, as well as the techniques commonly used to measure diffusion of solutes in the mucus gel, mucus gel mimics, and mucosal epithelia. PMID:19135488

  14. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on normal and hypersecretory airways in rats.

    PubMed

    Harkema, Jack R; Keeler, Gerald; Wagner, James; Morishita, Masako; Timm, Edward; Hotchkiss, Jon; Marsik, Frank; Dvonch, Timothy; Kaminski, Norbert; Barr, Edward

    2004-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that elevated levels of particulate air pollution in urban communities are associated with increases in attacks of asthma based on evidence from hospital admissions and emergency department visits. Principal pathologic features of chronic airway diseases, like asthma, are airway inflammation and mucous hypersecretion with excessive amounts of luminal mucus and increased numbers of mucus-secreting cells in regions of the respiratory tract that normally have few or no mucous cells (ie, mucous cell metaplasia). The overall goal of the present project was to understand the adverse effects of urban air fine particulate matter (PM2.5; < or = 2.5 pm in aerodynamic diameter)* on normal airways and airways compromised with airway inflammation and excess mucus. Our project was specifically designed to (1) examine the chemical and physical characteristics of PM2.5 and other airborne pollutants in the outdoor air of a local Detroit community with a high incidence of childhood asthma; (2) determine the effects of this community-based PM2.5 on the airway epithelium in normal rats and rats compromised with preexisting hypersecretory airway diseases (ie, animal models of human allergic airway disease--asthma and chronic bronchitis); and (3) identify the chemical or physical components of PM2.5 that are responsible for PM2.5 -induced airway inflammation and epithelial alterations in these animal models. Two animal models of airway disease were used to examine the effects of PM2.5 exposure on preexisting hypersecretory airways: neutrophilic airway inflammation induced by endotoxin challenge in F344 rats and eosinophilic airway inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in BN rats. A mobile air monitoring and exposure laboratory equipped with inhalation exposure chambers for animal toxicology studies, air pollution monitors, and particulate collection devices was used in this investigation. The mobile laboratory was parked in a community

  15. Bronchial hypersecretion, chronic airflow limitation, and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Brille, D

    1981-11-01

    Men with and men without a history of peptic ulcers were compared using respiratory symptoms and spirographic measurements taken from data recorded in an epidemiologic study. Among the 1,049 men examined, 7% reported a history of peptic ulcer. A clear relationship appeared between bronchial hypersecretion and peptic ulcers. It persisted after adjustment for age, smoking habits, social class, and country of origin. Men with ulcers inhaled tobacco smoke more often. Ulcers, smoking, and chronic phlegm were independently related to a lower body build index. It seems that the relationship between smoking and ulcers was greater among men with chronic phlegm, and it is postulated that peptic ulcers and "chronic bronchitis" might be related to a "common secretory disorder." After adjustment for age, men with a history of peptic ulcers had, not a lower FEV1, but a higher vital capacity. A slightly lower FEV1/VC ratio cannot in such cases be considered as an index of chronic airflow limitation.

  16. Diffusion-sensitive optical coherence tomography for real-time monitoring of mucus thinning treatments

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sears, Patrick R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Hill, David B.; Chapman, Brian S.; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Mucus hydration (wt%) has become an increasingly useful metric in real-time assessment of respiratory health in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD, with higher wt% indicative of diseased states. However, available in vivo rheological techniques are lacking. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are attractive biological probes whose diffusion through tissue is sensitive to the correlation length of comprising biopolymers. Through employment of dynamic light scattering theory on OCT signals from GNRs, we find that weakly-constrained GNR diffusion predictably decreases with increasing wt% (more disease-like) mucus. Previously, we determined this method is robust against mucus transport on human bronchial epithelial (hBE) air-liquid interface cultures (R2=0.976). Here we introduce diffusion-sensitive OCT (DS-OCT), where we collect M-mode image ensembles, from which we derive depth- and temporally-resolved GNR diffusion rates. DS-OCT allows for real-time monitoring of changing GNR diffusion as a result of topically applied mucus-thinning agents, enabling monitoring of the dynamics of mucus hydration never before seen. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3) with a layer of endogenous mucus were doped with topically deposited GNRs (80×22nm), and subsequently treated with hypertonic saline (HS) or isotonic saline (IS). DS-OCT provided imaging of the mucus thinning response up to a depth of 600μm with 4.65μm resolution, over a total of 8 minutes in increments of ≥3 seconds. For both IS and HS conditions, DS-OCT captured changes in the pattern of mucus hydration over time. DS-OCT opens a new window into understanding mechanisms of mucus thinning during treatment, enabling real-time efficacy feedback needed to optimize and tailor treatments for individual patients. PMID:27746581

  17. Diffusion-sensitive optical coherence tomography for real-time monitoring of mucus thinning treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sears, Patrick R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Hill, David B.; Chapman, Brian S.; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mucus hydration (wt%) has become an increasingly useful metric in real-time assessment of respiratory health in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD, with higher wt% indicative of diseased states. However, available in vivo rheological techniques are lacking. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are attractive biological probes whose diffusion through tissue is sensitive to the correlation length of comprising biopolymers. Through employment of dynamic light scattering theory on OCT signals from GNRs, we find that weakly-constrained GNR diffusion predictably decreases with increasing wt% (more disease-like) mucus. Previously, we determined this method is robust against mucus transport on human bronchial epithelial (hBE) air-liquid interface cultures (R2=0.976). Here we introduce diffusion-sensitive OCT (DS-OCT), where we collect M-mode image ensembles, from which we derive depth- and temporally-resolved GNR diffusion rates. DS-OCT allows for real-time monitoring of changing GNR diffusion as a result of topically applied mucus-thinning agents, enabling monitoring of the dynamics of mucus hydration never before seen. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cell) with a layer of endogenous mucus were doped with topically deposited GNRs (80x22nm), and subsequently treated with hypertonic saline (HS) or isotonic saline (IS). DS-OCT provided imaging of the mucus thinning response up to a depth of 600μm with 4.65μm resolution, over a total of 8 minutes in increments of >=3 seconds. For both IS and HS conditions, DS-OCT captured changes in the pattern of mucus hydration over time. DS-OCT opens a new window into understanding mechanisms of mucus thinning during treatment, enabling real-time efficacy feedback needed to optimize and tailor treatments for individual patients.

  18. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Recognition and management of acid hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Maton, P N

    1996-07-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) should be suspected if a patient has severe peptic ulceration, ulcers and kidney stones, a family history of ulcers or endocrine diseases, watery diarrhoea or malabsorption with or without ulcers, or if hypergastrinaemia is found. Any patient in whom ZES is suspected, and certainly if diagnosed, should be given large doses of antisecretory medication immediately. This should never be stopped except under controlled conditions or unless acid outputs have been reduced surgically. Patients cannot be managed safely without measuring acid outputs. These should be lowered to < 10 mmol/h, or < 5 mmol/h in patients with a previous gastric resection or severe oesophageal disease. Acid secretion can be controlled acutely in 70% of patients with an infusion of ranitidine 1 mg/kg/h, while 4 mg/kg/h will control acid in all. The initial oral dosage of omeprazole or lansoprazole should be 60 mg/day. Doses should then be adjusted daily on the basis of acid outputs. Proton pump inhibitors in a dosage of 60 mg/day will control acid output in most patients and 60 mg every 12 hours will control acid output in all. Doses can then often be slowly and progressively reduced. A parietal cell vagotomy reduces acid secretion and reduces, but does not abolish, the need for antisecretory medication. In patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and hyperparathyroidism, a parathyroidectomy that results in normocalcaemia will reduce acid secretion and drug requirements. A total gastrectomy is rarely if ever needed nowadays. Given the high degree of safety of gastric antisecretory medications versus the risks of acid hypersecretion in patients with ZES, the mistakes in management of acid hypersecretion that must be avoided are those of giving insufficient medication and not measuring acid secretory rates.

  19. Neonatal Pulmonary Macrophage Depletion Coupled to Defective Mucus Clearance Increases Susceptibility to Pneumonia and Alters Pulmonary Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Wilkinson, Kristen J; Terrell, Kristy A; Burns, Kimberlie A; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Doerschuk, Claire M; O'Neal, Wanda K; Boucher, Richard C

    2016-02-01

    Resident immune cells (e.g., macrophages [MΦs]) and airway mucus clearance both contribute to a healthy lung environment. To investigate interactions between pulmonary MΦ function and defective mucus clearance, a genetic model of lysozyme M (LysM) promoter-mediated MΦ depletion was generated, characterized, and crossed with the sodium channel β subunit transgenic (Scnn1b-Tg) mouse model of defective mucus clearance. Diphtheria toxin A-mediated depletion of LysM(+) pulmonary MΦs in wild-type mice with normal mucus clearance resulted in lethal pneumonia in 24% of neonates. The pneumonias were dominated by Pasteurella pneumotropica and accompanied by emaciation, neutrophilic inflammation, and elevated Th1 cytokines. The incidence of emaciation and pneumonia reached 51% when LysM(+) MΦ depletion was superimposed on the airway mucus clearance defect of Scnn1b-Tg mice. In LysM(+) MΦ-depleted Scnn1b-Tg mice, pneumonias were associated with a broader spectrum of bacterial species and a significant reduction in airway mucus plugging. Bacterial burden (CFUs) was comparable between Scnn1b-Tg and nonpneumonic LysM(+) MΦ-depleted Scnn1b-Tg mice. However, the nonpneumonic LysM(+) MΦ-depleted Scnn1b-Tg mice exhibited increased airway inflammation, the presence of neutrophilic infiltration, and increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with Scnn1b-Tg mice. Collectively, these data identify key MΦ-mucus clearance interactions with respect to both infectious and inflammatory components of muco-obstructive lung disease.

  20. Hyper-osmolarity and calcium chelation: Effects on cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-10-05

    A non-functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) leads to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the CFTR is expressed in multiple organs, pulmonary disease is the major cause of illness and death in patients with CF. Stagnant mucus, causing airway obstruction, bacterial overgrowth, persistent inflammation and tissue destruction characterizes the disease, but how the defect in CFTR function is coupled to the mucus phenotype is still controversial. We have recently shown that bicarbonate ions passing through CFTR are necessary for proper unfolding of the MUC2 mucin, thus highlighting the importance of bicarbonate ion transport via the CFTR and the ability of these ions to raise the pH and chelate calcium bound to the mucin as the important steps in forming normal mucus. In order to find potential CF treatments and expand our knowledge about the usefulness of bicarbonate as an active ingredient in formulations to alleviate mucus plugging, we used an Ussing-type chamber and explants from the F508del-CFTR mutant mouse ileum to test the effect of calcium chelators on mucus attachment, either in isolation or in combination with osmolytes such as mannitol or hypertonic saline. We found that increasing the concentration of bicarbonate, both alone or in combination with increased osmolarity of the solution, detached the otherwise attached CF mucus.

  1. Hyper-osmolarity and calcium chelation: Effects on cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N.; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2015-01-01

    A non-functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) leads to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the CFTR is expressed in multiple organs, pulmonary disease is the major cause of illness and death in patients with CF. Stagnant mucus, causing airway obstruction, bacterial overgrowth, persistent inflammation and tissue destruction characterizes the disease, but how the defect in CFTR function is coupled to the mucus phenotype is still controversial. We have recently shown that bicarbonate ions passing through CFTR are necessary for proper unfolding of the MUC2 mucin, thus highlighting the importance of bicarbonate ion transport via the CFTR and the ability of these ions to raise the pH and chelate calcium bound to the mucin as the important steps in forming normal mucus. In order to find potential CF treatments and expand our knowledge about the usefulness of bicarbonate as an active ingredient in formulations to alleviate mucus plugging, we used an Ussing-type chamber and explants from the F508del-CFTR mutant mouse ileum to test the effect of calcium chelators on mucus attachment, either in isolation or in combination with osmolytes such as mannitol or hypertonic saline. We found that increasing the concentration of bicarbonate, both alone or in combination with increased osmolarity of the solution, detached the otherwise attached CF mucus. PMID:26134505

  2. Chronic glucocorticoid hypersecretion in Cushing's syndrome exacerbates cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Kathy; Forget, Hélène; Cohen, Henri

    2009-10-01

    Cumulative exposure to glucocorticoid hormones (GC) over the lifespan has been associated with cognitive impairment and may contribute to physical and cognitive degeneration in aging. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the pattern of cognitive deficits in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), a disorder characterized by chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids (GC), is similar to that observed in older individuals. Ten subjects with CS were compared to sex-, age-, and education-matched healthy controls and older subjects (age of CS subjects+15 yr). All participants were administered tests to assess attention, visuospatial processing, learning and memory, reasoning, concept formation and verbal fluency. MANCOVAs with depression scores as covariate and polynomial contrasts revealed that the age-matched control group performed better than the CS and older subject groups in visual target detection, trail making test, stroop task, digit symbol substitution, block design, object assembly, visual reproduction, spatial memory and similarities. The CS and older subjects performed similarly on these tasks. Further, a principal component analysis revealed two significant factors, representing general cognitive function and verbal memory explaining 39.9% and 10.0% of the variance, respectively. Additional MANCOVAs with depression as a covariate revealed that CS and older control subjects showed impaired performance on general cognitive function compared to age-matched controls. These results suggest that hypersecretion of GCs has "aging-like" effects on cognitive performance in individuals with CS.

  3. Effects of drugs on mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Houtmeyers, E; Gosselink, R; Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    1999-08-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), the process in which airway mucus together with substances trapped within are moved out of the lungs, is an important defence mechanism of the human body. Drugs may alter this process, such that it is necessary to know the effect of the drugs on MCC. Indeed, agents stimulating MCC may be used therapeutically in respiratory medicine, especially in patients suspected of having an impairment of their mucociliary transport system. In contrast, caution should be taken with drugs depressing MCC as an undesired side-effect, independently of their therapeutic indication. Since cough clearance (CC) serves as a back-up system when MCC fails, the influence of drugs must be examined not only on MCC but also on CC. Ultimately, the clinical repercussions of alterations in mucus transport induced by drug administration must be studied. Tertiary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), aspirin, anaesthetic agents and benzodiazepines have been shown to be capable of depressing the mucociliary transport system. Cholinergics, methylxanthines, sodium cromoglycate, hypertonic saline, saline as well as water aerosol have been shown to increase MCC. Adrenergic antagonists, guaifenesin, S-carboxymethylcysteine, sodium 2-mercapto-ethane sulphonate and frusemide have been reported not to alter the mucociliary transport significantly. Amiloride, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), quaternary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), adrenergic agonists, corticosteroids, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), N-acetylcysteine, bromhexine and ambroxol have been reported either not to change or to augment MCC. Indirect data suggest that surfactant as well as antibiotics may improve the mucociliary transport system. As for the influence of drugs on CC, amiloride and rhDNase have been demonstrated to increase the effectiveness of cough. A trend towards an improved CC was noted after treatment with adrenergic agonists. The anticholinergic agent ipratropium bromide, which

  4. Cystic fibrosis airway secretions exhibit mucin hyperconcentration and increased osmotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ashley G; Ehre, Camille; Button, Brian; Abdullah, Lubna H; Cai, Li-Heng; Leigh, Margaret W; DeMaria, Genevieve C; Matsui, Hiro; Donaldson, Scott H; Davis, C William; Sheehan, John K; Boucher, Richard C; Kesimer, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of mucoinfective lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients likely involves poor mucus clearance. A recent model of mucus clearance predicts that mucus flow depends on the relative mucin concentration of the mucus layer compared with that of the periciliary layer; however, mucin concentrations have been difficult to measure in CF secretions. Here, we have shown that the concentration of mucin in CF sputum is low when measured by immunologically based techniques, and mass spectrometric analyses of CF mucins revealed mucin cleavage at antibody recognition sites. Using physical size exclusion chromatography/differential refractometry (SEC/dRI) techniques, we determined that mucin concentrations in CF secretions were higher than those in normal secretions. Measurements of partial osmotic pressures revealed that the partial osmotic pressure of CF sputum and the retained mucus in excised CF lungs were substantially greater than the partial osmotic pressure of normal secretions. Our data reveal that mucin concentration cannot be accurately measured immunologically in proteolytically active CF secretions; mucins are hyperconcentrated in CF secretions; and CF secretion osmotic pressures predict mucus layer-dependent osmotic compression of the periciliary liquid layer in CF lungs. Consequently, mucin hypersecretion likely produces mucus stasis, which contributes to key infectious and inflammatory components of CF lung disease.

  5. Action of N-acylated ambroxol derivatives on secretion of chloride ions in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Takemura, Yoshizumi; Niisato, Naomi; Mitsuyama, Etsuko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2009-03-13

    We report the effects of new N-acylated ambroxol derivatives (TEI-588a, TEI-588b, TEI-589a, TEI-589b, TEI-602a and TEI-602b: a, aromatic amine-acylated derivative; b, aliphatic amine-acylated derivative) induced from ambroxol (a mucolytic agent to treat human lung diseases) on Cl(-) secretion in human submucosal serous Calu-3 cells under a Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter-1 (NKCC1)-mediated hyper-secreting condition. TEI-589a, TEI-589b and TEI-602a diminished hyper-secretion of Cl(-) by diminishing the activity of NKCC1 without blockade of apical Cl(-) channel (TEI-589a>TEI-602a>TEI-589b), while any other tested compounds including ambroxol had no effects on Cl(-) secretion. These indicate that the inhibitory action of an aromatic amine-acylated derivative on Cl(-) secretion is stronger that that of an aliphatic amine-acylated derivative, and that 3-(2,5-dimethyl)furoyl group has a strong action in inhibition of Cl(-) secretion than cyclopropanoyl group. We here indicate that TEI-589a, TEI-589b and TEI-602a reduce hyper-secretion to an appropriate level in the airway, providing a possibility that the compound can be an effective drug in airway obstructive diseases including COPD by reducing the airway resistance under a hyper-secreting condition.

  6. Discovery of Low Mucus Adhesion Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge of medical and consumer import. Here, using a high throughput platform (HTP) with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1 hr static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited the significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 hr. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen-bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of PEG monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g/mol to 1100 g/mol, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R2 = 0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized HSP plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces. PMID:23072828

  7. Discovery of low mucus adhesion surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2013-02-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous, and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge. Here, using a high throughput platform with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1h static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 h. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g mol⁻¹ to 1100 g mol⁻¹, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R²=0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized Hansen solubility parameter plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces.

  8. Response of a viscoelastic layer (mucus) to turbulent airflow in a rigid tube.

    PubMed

    Evrensel, Cahit A; Khan, Raquib U; Krumpe, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    Basic interaction mechanism between the air flow and viscoelastic mucus layer lining a rigid tube is computationally studied. Linear wave instability theory is applied to the coupled air-mucus system to explore the stability of the interface. Primary velocity profile is taken to be the mean profile of turbulent flow and turbulent fluctuations are neglected. The model predicts that the instability initiates in the form of slow propagating waves on the mucus surface. Onset flow speed at which these waves initiate is very sensitive to mucus viscosity to elasticity ratio at lower range and it approaches to an asymptotic value for higher values. The results indicate that while the wave length increases, wave speed decreases with increasing mucus viscosity to elasticity ratio. Model also predicts that the waves initiate at lower flow velocities for the turbulent case compared to the published laminar case. Turbulent onset flow speed is only 34% Flow is considered to be turbulent during forced expiration and coughing in central and upper airways. Model predicts that this flow behavior tends to favor wave initiation at lower flow rates and may facilitate cough clearance.

  9. Resveratrol inhibits mucus overproduction and MUC5AC expression in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Ji-Hong; Chen, Guo; Lai, Yi-Min; Chen, Qing-Ge; Li, Zao; Yang, Wei; Luo, Xu-Min; Wang, Xiong-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that resveratrol is able to significantly inhibit the upregulation of mucin 5AC (MUC5AC), a major component of mucus; thus indicating that resveratrol may have potential in regulating mucus overproduction. However, there have been few studies regarding the resveratrol‑mediated prevention of MUC5AC overproduction in vivo, and the mechanisms by which resveratrol regulates MUC5AC expression have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, an ovalbumin (OVA)‑challenged murine model of asthma was used to assess the effects of resveratrol treatment on mucus production in vivo. The results demonstrated that resveratrol significantly inhibited OVA‑induced airway inflammation and mucus production. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of MUC5AC were increased in the OVA‑challenged mice, whereas treatment with resveratrol significantly inhibited this effect. The expression levels of murine calcium‑activated chloride channel (mCLCA)3, an important key mediator of MUC5AC production, were also reduced following resveratrol treatment. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrated that resveratrol significantly inhibited human (h)CLCA1 and MUC5AC expression in a dose‑dependent manner. These results indicated that resveratrol was effective in preventing mucus overproduction and MUC5AC expression in vivo, and its underlying mechanism may be associated with regulation of the mCLCA3/hCLCA1 signaling pathway.

  10. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  11. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  12. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  13. Colonic mucus, smoking and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Pullan, R D

    1996-03-01

    Human colonic mucosal protection is not fully understood but may in part rely on a layer of mucus gel adherent to the mucosa. Ulcerative colitis may occur if mucosal protection breaks down. Two studies are presented, both of which relate to the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. First, a layer of adherent mucus gel was demonstrated by a simple, reliable method. Measurements of mucus layer thickness were made in freshly resected colonic specimens and shown to increase from a mean of 107 microns on the right colon to 155 microns in the rectum. In ulcerative colitis the layer is significantly thinner or absent, whereas in Crohn's disease the colonic mucus layer is significantly thicker. Second, the relationship between smoking and colitis is explored by a double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trial of transdermal nicotine in active disease. Significant clinical benefit was seen, indicating nicotine may be both useful therapeutically and the component of tobacco smoke that acts to protect against colitis. Since smoking and nicotine have actions on mucosae and mucus in other organs, it is argued that there is a mucus deficiency in ulcerative colitis that smoking acts to reverse.

  14. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  15. Contribution of mucus concentration and secreted mucins Muc5ac and Muc5b to the pathogenesis of muco-obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Grubb, Barbara R.; Wilkinson, Kristen J.; Volmer, Allison S.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases, including cigarette smoke-induced chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, and primary ciliary dyskinesia are associated with decreased mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, it is not known whether a simple reduction in MCC or concentration-dependent mucus adhesion to airway surfaces dominates disease pathogenesis or whether decreasing the concentration of secreted mucins may be therapeutic. To address these questions, Scnn1b-Tg mice, which exhibit airway mucus dehydration/adhesion, were compared to and crossed with Muc5b- and Muc5ac-deficient mice. Absence of Muc5b caused a 90% reduction in MCC, whereas Scnn1b-Tg mice exhibited an ~50% reduction. However, the degree of MCC reduction did not correlate with bronchitic airways pathology, which was observed only in Scnn1b-Tg mice. Ablation of Muc5b significantly reduced the extent of mucus plugging in Scnn1b-Tg mice. However, complete absence of Muc5b in Scnn1b-Tg mice was associated with increased airway inflammation, suggesting that Muc5b is required to maintain immune homeostasis. Loss of Muc5ac had few phenotypic consequences in Scnn1b-Tg mice. These data suggest that: (1) mucus hyperconcentration dominates over MCC reduction alone to produce bronchitic airways pathology; (2) Muc5b is the dominant contributor to the Scnn1b-Tg phenotype; and (3) therapies that limit mucin secretion may reduce plugging, but complete Muc5b removal from airway surfaces may be detrimental. PMID:27435107

  16. Anti-inflammatory properties of the monoterpene 1.8-cineole: current evidence for co-medication in inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Juergens, U R

    2014-12-01

    1,8-cineole is a natural monoterpene, also known as eucalyptol. It is a major compound of many plant essential oils, mainly extracted from Eucalyptus globulus oil. As an isolated compound, 1,8-cineole is known for its mucolytic and spasmolytic action on the respiratory tract, with proven clinical efficacy. 1,8-cineole has also shown therapeutic benefits in inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This clinical evidence refers to its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant mode of action, which has been proven in numerous pre-clinical studies. In vitro studies found strong evidence that 1,8-cineole controls inflammatory processes and mediator production of infection- or inflammation-induced mucus hypersecretion by its action as anti-inflammatory modifier rather than a simple mucolytic agent. The aim of this review is to present these preclinical studies performed with the pure monoterpene, and to summarize the current knowledge on the mode of action of 1,8-cineole. The actual understanding of the pure 1,8-cineole compared to mixtures of natural volatile oils containing 1,8-cineole as a major compound and to mixtures of natural terpenes, known as essential oils, will be discussed. Based on the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, recent clinical trials with 1,8-cineole have shown first evidence for the beneficial use of 1,8-cineole as long-term therapy in the prevention of COPD-exacerbations and to improve asthma control.

  17. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidity in CF. We used a novel, mini-Ussing chamber system to investigate the properties of HCO3− transport in native porcine small airways (∼ 1 mm φ). We assayed HCO3− transport across small airway epithelia as reflected by the transepithelial voltage, conductance, and equivalent short-circuit current with bilateral 25-mM HCO3− plus 125-mM NaGlu Ringer’s solution in the presence of luminal amiloride (10 μM). Under these conditions, because no major transportable anions other than HCO3− were present, we took the equivalent short-circuit current to be a direct measure of active HCO3− secretion. Applying selective agonists and inhibitors, we show constitutive HCO3− secretion in small airways, which can be stimulated significantly by β-adrenergic– (cAMP) and purinergic (Ca2+) -mediated agonists, independently. These results indicate that two separate components for HCO3− secretion, likely via CFTR- and calcium-activated chloride channel–dependent processes, are physiologically regulated for likely roles in mucus clearance and antimicrobial innate defenses of small airways. PMID:24224935

  18. Impact of Helicobacter Pylori on Mucus Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Keates, Sarah; Kelly, Ciaran; Turner, Bradley; Bansil, Rama; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that the viscoelastic properties of gastric mucin are crucial to the protection of the lining of the stomach against its own acidic secretions and other agents. Helicobacter Pylori, a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that dwells in the mucus layer of approximately 50% of the world's population is a class I carcinogen and is associated with gastric ulcers and severe gastritis. The structural damage to the mucus layer caused by H. Pylori is an important aspect of infection with this bacteria. We are examining the impact of H. Pylori on mucin and mucus rheology quantitatively using a combination of dynamic light scattering and multiple particle tracking experiments. Video microscopy data will also be presented on the motility of this bacteria in mucin at different pH and in other viscoelastic gels.

  19. Sperm counts in enzymatically liquefied cervical mucus: quantitative validation using donor cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    de Agostini, A; Campana, A

    1996-02-01

    The post-coital test evaluates the penetration of spermatozoa into cervical mucus; it relies on subjective measurements and therefore lacks precision. Enzymatic liquefaction of cervical mucus allows sperm concentration to be measured in post-coital test samples, but the reliability of such measurements is not known. Donor cervical mucus was used as a model to test the accuracy and sensitivity of sperm quantification in liquefied cervical mucus. Donor cervical mucus was dissolved by enzymatic treatments in the presence of known numbers of spermatozoa and the recovery of sperm cells was assessed after liquefaction of the samples. Enzymatic treatment of cervical mucus with a combination of bromelin and glycosidases resulted in reliable and fast liquefaction of the samples. The accuracy of sperm concentration measurements was 89 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD, n = 50), and the sensitivity limits were 1 x 10(6) and 0.2 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml for quantitative concentration measurement and qualitative sperm detection respectively. This study demonstrates that liquefaction of cervical mucus by combined protease and glycosidases allows accurate and sensitive determination of sperm concentration in the sample. Therefore we believe that valuable data can be obtained for sperm concentration and total sperm counts in post-coital tests, that should help to improve the reliability of the post-coital test.

  20. Defects in mitochondrial clearance predispose human monocytes to interleukin-1β hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    van der Burgh, Robert; Nijhuis, Lotte; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Compeer, Ewoud B; Jongeneel, Lieneke H; van Gijn, Marielle; Coffer, Paul J; Murphy, Michael P; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Frenkel, Joost; Boes, Marianne

    2014-02-21

    Most hereditary periodic fever syndromes are mediated by deregulated IL-1β secretion. The generation of mature IL-1β requires two signals: one that induces synthesis of inflammasome components and substrates and a second that activates inflammasomes. The mechanisms that mediate autoinflammation in mevalonate kinase deficiency, a periodic fever disease characterized by a block in isoprenoid biosynthesis, are poorly understood. In studying the effects of isoprenoid shortage on IL-1 β generation, we identified a new inflammasome activation signal that originates from defects in autophagy. We find that hypersecretion of IL-1β and IL-18 requires reactive oxygen species and is associated with an oxidized redox status of monocytes but not lymphocytes. IL-1β hypersecretion by monocytes involves decreased mitochondrial stability, release of mitochondrial content into the cytosol and attenuated autophagosomal degradation. Defective autophagy, as established by ATG7 knockdown, results in prolonged cytosolic retention of damaged mitochondria and increased IL-1β secretion. Finally, activation of autophagy in healthy but not mevalonate kinase deficiency patient cells reduces IL-1β secretion. Together, these results indicate that defective autophagy can prime monocytes for mitochondria-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation, thereby contributing to hypersecretion of IL-1β in mevalonate kinase deficiency.

  1. STAT3 upregulation in pituitary somatotroph adenomas induces growth hormone hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cuiqi; Jiao, Yonghui; Wang, Renzhi; Ren, Song-Guang; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Melmed, Shlomo

    2015-04-01

    Pituitary somatotroph adenomas result in dysregulated growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion and acromegaly; however, regulatory mechanisms that promote GH hypersecretion remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that STAT3 directly induces somatotroph tumor cell GH. Evaluation of pituitary tumors revealed that STAT3 expression was enhanced in human GH-secreting adenomas compared with that in nonsecreting pituitary tumors. Moreover, STAT3 and GH expression were concordant in a somatotroph adenoma tissue array. Promoter and expression analysis in a GH-secreting rat cell line (GH3) revealed that STAT3 specifically binds the Gh promoter and induces transcription. Stable expression of STAT3 in GH3 cells induced expression of endogenous GH, and expression of a constitutively active STAT3 further enhanced GH production. Conversely, expression of dominant-negative STAT3 abrogated GH expression. In primary human somatotroph adenoma-derived cell cultures, STAT3 suppression with the specific inhibitor S3I-201 attenuated GH transcription and reduced GH secretion in the majority of derivative cultures. In addition, S3I-201 attenuated somatotroph tumor growth and GH secretion in a rat xenograft model. GH induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, indicating a positive feedback loop between STAT3 and GH in somatotroph tumor cells. Together, these results indicate that adenoma GH hypersecretion is the result of STAT3-dependent GH induction, which in turn promotes STAT3 expression, and suggest STAT3 as a potential therapeutic target for pituitary somatotroph adenomas.

  2. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  3. Defective postsecretory maturation of MUC5B mucin in cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Lubna H.; Evans, Jessica R.; Wang, T. Tiffany; Ford, Amina A.; Makhov, Alexander M.; Nguyen, Kristine; Coakley, Raymond D.; Griffith, Jack D.; Davis, C. William; Ballard, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), airway mucus becomes thick and viscous, and its clearance from the airways is impaired. The gel-forming mucins undergo an ordered “unpacking/maturation” process after granular release that requires an optimum postsecretory environment, including hydration and pH. We hypothesized that this unpacking process is compromised in the CF lung due to abnormal transepithelial fluid transport that reduces airway surface hydration and alters ionic composition. Using human tracheobronchial epithelial cells derived from non-CF and CF donors and mucus samples from human subjects and domestic pigs, we investigated the process of postsecretory mucin unfolding/maturation, how these processes are defective in CF airways, and the probable mechanism underlying defective unfolding. First, we found that mucins released into a normal lung environment transform from a compact granular form to a linear form. Second, we demonstrated that this maturation process is defective in the CF airway environment. Finally, we demonstrated that independent of HCO3− and pH levels, airway surface dehydration was the major determinant of this abnormal unfolding process. This defective unfolding/maturation process after granular release suggests that the CF extracellular environment is ion/water depleted and likely contributes to abnormal mucus properties in CF airways prior to infection and inflammation. PMID:28352653

  4. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  5. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  6. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  7. Vocal Fold Mucus Aggregation in Persons with Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; White, Lisa; Kuckhahn, Kelsey; Gerlach, Terri Treman; Deliyski, Dimitar D.

    2012-01-01

    Mucus aggregation on the vocal folds is a common finding from laryngeal endoscopy. Patients with voice disorders report the presence of mucus aggregation. Patients also report that mucus aggregation causes them to clear their throat, a behavior believed to be harmful to vocal fold mucosa. Even though clinicians and patients report and discuss…

  8. Unusual protozoal infestation of the cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Jabamoni, R; Dodson, M G; Blecka, L J; Jaskoski, B J; O'Leary, J A

    1977-08-01

    The transient colonization of the female genital tract with an unusual multiflagellated protozoan is reported. The presence of active organisms in large numbers in the mucus of the endocervical canal and their absence from the gastrointestinal tract and other areas indicates true colonization rather than contamination. The colonization resolved spontaneously. The organism has been classified as a Polymastigidan.

  9. New research method looks at fish mucus

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a new way to analyze fish tissues to understand fish ecology. Instead of killing the fish to collect the sample for analysis, we collect body mucus from the fish and analyze that. The fish can then be returned alive to the stream or lake.

  10. Use of mucolytics to enhance magnetic particle retention at a model airway surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Javed; Roa, Wilson; Amirfazli, A.

    A previous study has shown that retention of magnetic particles at a model airway surface requires prohibitively strong magnetic fields. As mucus viscoelasticity is the most significant factor contributing to clearance of magnetic particles from the airway surface, mucolytics are considered in this study to reduce mucus viscoelasticity and enable particle retention with moderate strength magnetic fields. The excised frog palate model was used to simulate the airway surface. Two mucolytics, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dextran sulfate (DS) were tested. NAC was found to enable retention at moderate field values (148 mT with a gradient of 10.2 T/m), whereas DS was found to be effective only for sufficiently large particle concentrations at the airway surface. The possible mechanisms for the observed behavior with different mucolytics are also discussed based on aggregate formation and the loading of cilia.

  11. Deletion of TLR3 alters the pulmonary immune environment and mucus production during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Brian D; Smit, Jetse J; Flavell, Richard A; Alexopoulou, Lena; Schaller, Matthew A; Gruber, Achim; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2006-02-01

    The detection of a viral infection by pattern recognition receptors (PAMPs) is an integral part of antiviral immunity. In these studies we have investigated the role of TLR3, which recognizes dsRNA, in Respiratory Syncytial virus (RSV) infection using B6 background mice with a TLR3 deletion. Although we observed no changes in viral growth, we did find that TLR3-/- mice demonstrated significant increases in mucus production in the airways of RSV-infected mice. The qualitative assessment was observed by examining differentially stained lungs, followed by immunohistochemical staining for gob5, a mucus-associated protein. The histopathologic observations were verified using quantitative gene expression analyses examining gob5 gene expression. Changes in pulmonary mucus production were accompanied by an increase in pulmonary IL-13 as well as IL-5 expression and eosinophils in the airways of TLR3-/- mice. Examining leukocytes in the airway indicated an accumulation of eosinophils in TLR3-/- mice, but not wild-type mice, after RSV infection. Isolated lung draining lymph node cells from TLR3-/- mice produced significant increases in Th2-type cytokines, IL-5, and IL-13, compared with wild-type TLR3+/+ mice only after RSV infection. To demonstrate a causative link, we depleted TLR3-/- mice of IL-13 during RSV infection and found that mucus and gob5 expression in the lungs was attenuated. Together, these studies highlight that although TLR3 may not be required for viral clearance, it is necessary to maintain the proper immune environment in the lung to avoid developing pathologic symptoms of disease.

  12. Oral N-acetylcysteine or S-carboxymethylcysteine inhibit cigarette smoke-induced hypersecretion of mucus in rat larynx and trachea in situ.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D F; Turner, N C; Marriott, C; Jeffery, P K

    1989-11-01

    Two weeks exposure of rats to cigarette smoke (CS) significantly (p less than 0.05) increased the secretion of fucose-containing glycoconjugates above normal in an in situ preparation of larynx and trachea. After equilibration mean basal secretion in CS-exposed rats was 24 micrograms (per 30 min collection) which was 8 times higher than that of unexposed animals (p less than 0.01). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or S-carboxymethylcysteine (SCMC) given as 1% of the drinking water, before and after daily exposure to CS, significantly inhibited the development of the CS-induced increase in fucose secretion reducing the mean for basal secretion in each group to 7 and 5 micrograms, respectively (p less than 0.05). Neither NAC nor SCMC had significant effects on baseline glycoconjugate secretion in control animals. Albumin was inconsistently present in the secretions of both control and CS-exposed animals, whereas in those exposed to CS and also given one of the two cysteine derivatives there was a consistent increase in albumin transudation.

  13. Decreased colonic mucus in rats with loperamide-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Meguro, S; Hase, T; Tokimitsu, I; Sakata, T

    2000-06-01

    Constipation is a risk factor of colorectal cancer. Mucin is a major component of lumenal mucus, which protects the colorectal mucosa against mechanical and chemical damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate mucus production and to quantitate lumen mucus in a rat model of spastic constipation. We induced constipation with loperamide (1.5 mg/kg), and histochemically evaluated mucus production and the thickness of the mucus layer at the fecal surface. We quantitated the mucus attached to the mucosal surface using colonic perfusion with N-acetylcysteine. While more feces remained in the colon, there was less fecal excretion and lower fecal water content in loperamide-administered rats than in control rats. Crypt epithelial cells contained less mucus in constipated rats than in control rats. The mucus layer at the fecal surface was thinner and less mucus was recovered from the mucosal surface in constipated rats than in control rats. Mucus production of crypt epithelial cells and mucus at the fecal and mucosal surface were reduced by loperamide-induced constipation.

  14. IL13 activates autophagy to regulate secretion in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, John D; Alevy, Yael; Malvin, Nicole P; Patel, Khushbu K; Gunsten, Sean P; Holtzman, Michael J; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine modulation of autophagy is increasingly recognized in disease pathogenesis, and current concepts suggest that type 1 cytokines activate autophagy, whereas type 2 cytokines are inhibitory. However, this paradigm derives primarily from studies of immune cells and is poorly characterized in tissue cells, including sentinel epithelial cells that regulate the immune response. In particular, the type 2 cytokine IL13 (interleukin 13) drives the formation of airway goblet cells that secrete excess mucus as a characteristic feature of airway disease, but whether this process is influenced by autophagy was undefined. Here we use a mouse model of airway disease in which IL33 (interleukin 33) stimulation leads to IL13-dependent formation of airway goblet cells as tracked by levels of mucin MUC5AC (mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel forming), and we show that these cells manifest a block in mucus secretion in autophagy gene Atg16l1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control mice. Similarly, primary-culture human tracheal epithelial cells treated with IL13 to stimulate mucus formation also exhibit a block in MUC5AC secretion in cells depleted of autophagy gene ATG5 (autophagy-related 5) or ATG14 (autophagy-related 14) compared to nondepleted control cells. Our findings indicate that autophagy is essential for airway mucus secretion in a type 2, IL13-dependent immune disease process and thereby provide a novel therapeutic strategy for attenuating airway obstruction in hypersecretory inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis lung disease. Taken together, these observations suggest that the regulation of autophagy by Th2 cytokines is cell-context dependent.

  15. [Mucus models for investigation of intestinal absorption mechanisms. 3. A mathematical simulation model of drug diffusion through enteral mucus].

    PubMed

    Fahr, A; Guitard, P; Matthes, I; Nimmerfall, F; Nüesch, E; Sucker, H

    1992-09-01

    The diffusion of drug substance in a closed three-compartment model through a mucus layer to equilibrium is simulated by available pharmacokinetic programs. The obtained curves conform very well to the values experimentally found. If mucus is replaced by buffer solution an explicit equation from the literature, the method used and the experimental findings give the same results. Examination of the rate constants k1 for the diffusion in, kD through and k2 from the mucus shows the significance of the relation k1/k2 > 1, = 1, < 1 as a measure for the affinity of the active agent to the mucus. The discussion of the kinetic parameters shows, as in previous results, no criterion for assuming specific mucus binding. Because of its unspecifity the usual term "mucus binding" should be replaced by "mucus retention".

  16. Flow cytometry of sputum: assessing inflammation and immune response elements in the bronchial airways**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The evaluation of sputum leukocytes by flow cytometry is an opportunity to assess characteristics of cells residing in the central airways, yet it is hampered by certain inherent properties of sputum including mucus and large amounts of contaminating cells and debris. ...

  17. The Phillips airway.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P; Wilkinson, D J

    2012-07-01

    The Phillips airway was developed by George Ramsay Phillips. There is no known original description of the airway and the earliest known reference to it is from 1919. The airway and its modifications are described.

  18. Failed CTL/NK cell killing and cytokine hypersecretion are directly linked through prolonged synapse time.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Misty R; Rudd-Schmidt, Jesse A; Lopez, Jamie A; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Mannering, Stuart I; Andrews, Daniel M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A

    2015-03-09

    Failure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) or natural killer (NK) cells to kill target cells by perforin (Prf)/granzyme (Gzm)-induced apoptosis causes severe immune dysregulation. In familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Prf-deficient infants suffer a fatal "cytokine storm" resulting from macrophage overactivation, but the link to failed target cell death is not understood. We show that prolonged target cell survival greatly amplifies the quanta of inflammatory cytokines secreted by CTLs/NK cells and that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) directly invokes the activation and secondary overproduction of proinflammatory IL-6 from naive macrophages. Furthermore, using live cell microscopy to visualize hundreds of synapses formed between wild-type, Prf-null, or GzmA/B-null CTLs/NK cells and their targets in real time, we show that hypersecretion of IL-2, TNF, IFN-γ, and various chemokines is linked to failed disengagement of Prf- or Gzm-deficient lymphocytes from their targets, with mean synapse time increased fivefold, from ∼8 to >40 min. Surprisingly, the signal for detachment arose from the dying target cell and was caspase dependent, as delaying target cell death with various forms of caspase blockade also prevented their disengagement from fully competent CTLs/NK cells and caused cytokine hypersecretion. Our findings provide the cellular mechanism through which failed killing by lymphocytes causes systemic inflammation involving recruitment and activation of myeloid cells.

  19. Growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas with concomitant hypersecretion of prolactin are particularly sensitive to photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Werner, S; af Trampe, E; Palacios, P; Lax, I; Hall, K

    1985-09-01

    The effect of photon irradiation (50 Gy with a 3-field technique in fractionated doses) on growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and somatomedin A (SMA) was studied in 25 patients with acromegaly after previous unsuccessful surgery. In patients with concomitant hypersecretion of PRL, the GH reduction was 70 +/- 22% 1 year and 88 +/- 10% 3 years after radiotherapy. The corresponding reductions in patients with isolated GH hypersecretion were 42 +/- 25% and 60 +/- 22%. The reduction of GH levels was most notable the first year after radiotherapy in 16 patients and during the second year in 7 patients. Serum PRL decreased after radiotherapy in all patients with hyperprolactinemia, whereas PRL in normoprolactinemic patients showed inconsistent changes, including PRL increments in 8/12 patients. The effect of radiotherapy on GH and PRL was not correlated to the irradiation target volume or the cumulative radiation effect. SMA levels decreased after radiotherapy, but became normal only in 3 patients, all with pretreatment GH less than 5 micrograms/l. Radiotherapy, 3 years after treatment, appeared to be equivalent to the primary surgical intervention in reducing GH and SMA in patients with acromegaly due to advanced macroadenomas. Patients with concomitant hyperprolactinemia showed increased sensitivity to radiation compared to normoprolactinemic patients with acromegaly.

  20. Evidence for a significant role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced hypersecretion of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, K; Shimizu, K; Ikeda, M; Watanabe, S; Hayashi, N

    1997-01-01

    Cysteamine has been known to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to induce duodenal ulcers in rats. We investigated the role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion in the perfused rat stomach. Intravenous infusion of cysteamine (75 mg/kg/h) resulted in a significant increase in acid secretion, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the plasma gastrin concentration. The cysteamine-induced increase in gastric acid secretion was completely blocked by i.v. injection of anti-gastrin rabbit serum (500 microliters). In addition, i.v. infusion of a CCK-B/gastrin receptor antagonist (L-365,260) (1 mg/kg/h) also suppressed the cysteamine-induced increase in acid secretion. Atropine significantly, but only partially, inhibited the increase. The elevated plasma gastrin levels induced by cysteamine were unaffected by atropine and L-365,260. In conclusion, cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion is mediated mainly by cysteamine-induced gastrin release and partially by cholinergic factors. Furthermore, gastrin release caused by cysteamine appears to be independent of cholinergic tone.

  1. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  2. Oral Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanoparticles: The Gastrointestinal Mucus Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery is the most common method for drug administration. However, poor solubility, stability, and bioavailability of many drugs make achieving therapeutic levels via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract challenging. Drug delivery must overcome numerous hurdles, including the acidic gastric environment and the continuous secretion of mucus that protects the GI tract. Nanoparticle drug carriers that can shield drugs from degradation and deliver them to intended sites within the GI tract may enable more efficient and sustained drug delivery. However, the rapid secretion and shedding of GI tract mucus can significantly limit the effectiveness of nanoparticle drug delivery systems. Many types of nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in and rapidly removed by mucus, making controlled release in the GI tract difficult. This review addresses the protective barrier properties of mucus secretions, how mucus affects the fate of orally administered nanoparticles, and recent developments in nanoparticles engineered to penetrate the mucus barrier. PMID:22212900

  3. Sialic acid-to-urea ratio as a measure of airway surface hydration.

    PubMed

    Esther, Charles R; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Shi, Shuai; Jania, Corey; Duncan, Elizabeth A; Doerschuk, Claire M; Chen, Gang; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Boucher, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Although airway mucus dehydration is key to pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other airways diseases, measuring mucus hydration is challenging. We explored a robust method to estimate mucus hydration using sialic acid as a marker for mucin content. Terminal sialic acid residues from mucins were cleaved by acid hydrolysis from airway samples, and concentrations of sialic acid, urea, and other biomarkers were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In mucins purified from human airway epithelial (HAE), sialic acid concentrations after acid hydrolysis correlated with mucin concentrations (r(2) = 0.92). Sialic acid-to-urea ratios measured from filters applied to the apical surface of cultured HAE correlated to percent solids and were elevated in samples from CF HAEs relative to controls (2.2 ± 1.1 vs. 0.93 ± 1.8, P < 0.01). Sialic acid-to-urea ratios were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from β-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) transgenic mice, known to have reduced mucus hydration, and mice sensitized to house dust mite allergen. In a translational application, elevated sialic acid-to-urea ratios were measured in BALF from young children with CF who had airway infection relative to those who did not (5.5 ± 3.7 vs. 1.9 ± 1.4, P < 0.02) and could be assessed simultaneously with established biomarkers of inflammation. The sialic acid-to-urea ratio performed similarly to percent solids, the gold standard measure of mucus hydration. The method proved robust and has potential to serve as flexible techniques to assess mucin hydration, particularly in samples like BALF in which established methods such as percent solids cannot be utilized.

  4. Synthetic Tracheal Mucus with Native Rheological and Surface Tension Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, R.; Fiegel, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the development of a model tracheal mucus with chemical composition and physical properties (bulk viscoelasticity and surface tension) matched to that of native tracheal mucus is described. The mucus mimetics were formulated using components that are abundant in tracheal mucus (glycoproteins, proteins, lipids, ions and water) at concentrations similar to those found natively. Pure solutions were unable to achieve the gel behavior observed with native mucus. The addition of a bi-functional crosslinking agent enabled control over the viscoelastic properties of the mucus mimetics by tailoring the concentration of the crosslinking agent and the duration of crosslinking. Three mucus mimetic formulations with different bulk viscoelastic properties, all within the normal range for non-diseased tracheal mucus, were chosen for investigation of surfactant spreading at the air-mimetic interface. Surfactant spread quickly and completely on the least viscoelastic mimetic surface, enabling the surface tension of the mimetic to be lowered to match native tracheal mucus. However, surfactant spreading on the more viscoelastic mimetics was hindered, suggesting that the bulk properties of the mimetics dictate the range of surface properties that can be achieved. PMID:23813841

  5. Colonization by lactobacilli of piglet small intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; Conway, P L

    1996-11-01

    The colonization potential of lactobacilli was investigated using small intestinal mucus extracts from 35-d-old pigs. Mucus-secreting tissue from the small intestine of piglets was gently rinsed to remove contents and then shaken in buffer to release mucus from the surface. Numbers of lactobacilli in different portions of the small intestine of 35-d-old pigs were enumerated. Also, mucus isolated from the small intestine of pigs was investigated for its capacity to support the growth of lactobacilli. Results indicated that Lactobacillus spp. inhabit the mucus layer of the small intestine and can grow and adhere to ileal mucus. From adhesion studies of Lactobacillus fermentum 104R to mucus analysed by Scatchard plot, it is suggested that an associating system showing positive cooperativity is involved. Proteinaceous compounds(s) involved in the adhesion to mucus were detected in the spent culture fluid from the growth of strain 104R. Studies are continuing in order to identify and characterize the adhesion-promoting protein(s). From the data, it is proposed that lactobacilli colonize the mucus layer of the small intestine of pigs.

  6. Mucolytic treatment with N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate metered dose inhaler in dogs: airway epithelial function changes.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, R P; App, E M; Coffiner, M; Fossion, J; Maes, P; King, M

    1994-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate Nacystelyn (L-NAC) is a newly synthesized mucolytic agent, of which the action in vivo has not been well defined. In six healthy mongrel dogs, the rheological properties of mucus, its mucociliary and cough clearability, and the transepithelial potential difference (PD) of the tracheobronchial epithelium were evaluated after placebo and L-NAC metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols. The principal index of mucus rigidity, log G*, decreased at all airway sites with L-NAC administration, i.e. the mucus became less rigid and more deformable (the overall change in G* was 0.29 log units, i.e. ca. twofold decrease). The viscoelasticity-derived mucus transportability parameters, mucociliary (MCI) and cough (CCI) clearability indices, increased with L-NAC MDI, particularly CCI, which predicts the effect of mucus rheology on cough clearability. PD increased significantly with L-NAC administration at all measurement sites, which appears to be a novel effect for a direct acting mucolytic agent. Tracheal mucus linear velocity (TMV) increased after L-NAC compared with placebo, as did the normalized frog palate transport rate (NFPTR). The increase in NFPTR was greater than that predicted from the mucus rheological properties alone, suggesting that L-NAC still resident in the collected mucus stimulated the frog palate cilia. The index of mucus flux, the collection rate in mg.min-1, was higher with L-NAC compared with placebo. From our results, we conclude that L-NAC shows potential benefit in terms of improving mucus rheological properties and clearability. It may act, in part, by stimulating the fresh secretion of mucus of lower viscoelasticity. The stimulation of mucociliary clearance could be related to ion flux changes, as indicated by the increase in PD.

  7. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  8. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  9. Electrolyte transport properties in distal small airways from cystic fibrosis pigs with implications for host defense

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Vargas Buonfiglio, Luis G.; Comellas, Alejandro P.; Thornell, Ian M.; Ramachandran, Shyam; Karp, Philip H.; Taft, Peter J.; Sheets, Kelsey; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    While pathological and clinical data suggest that small airways are involved in early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease development, little is known about how the lack of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function contributes to disease pathogenesis in these small airways. Large and small airway epithelia are exposed to different airflow velocities, temperatures, humidity, and CO2 concentrations. The cellular composition of these two regions is different, and small airways lack submucosal glands. To better understand the ion transport properties and impacts of lack of CFTR function on host defense function in small airways, we adapted a novel protocol to isolate small airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF pigs and established an organotypic culture model. Compared with non-CF large airways, non-CF small airway epithelia cultures had higher Cl− and bicarbonate (HCO3−) short-circuit currents and higher airway surface liquid (ASL) pH under 5% CO2 conditions. CF small airway epithelia were characterized by minimal Cl− and HCO3− transport and decreased ASL pH, and had impaired bacterial killing compared with non-CF small airways. In addition, CF small airway epithelia had a higher ASL viscosity than non-CF small airways. Thus, the activity of CFTR is higher in the small airways, where it plays a role in alkalinization of ASL, enhancement of antimicrobial activity, and lowering of mucus viscosity. These data provide insight to explain why the small airways are a susceptible site for the bacterial colonization. PMID:26801568

  10. Airway epithelial control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Campόdonico, Victoria L; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Uluer, Ahmet; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-01-01

    Defective expression or function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlies the hypersusceptibility of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to chronic airway infections, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CFTR is involved in the specific recognition of P. aeruginosa, thereby contributing to effective innate immunity and proper hydration of the airway surface layer (ASL). In CF, the airway epithelium fails to initiate an appropriate innate immune response, allowing the microbe to bind to mucus plugs that are then not properly cleared because of the dehydrated ASL. Recent studies have identified numerous CFTR-dependent factors that are recruited to the epithelial plasma membrane in response to infection and that are needed for bacterial clearance, a process that is defective in CF patients hypersusceptible to infection with this organism. PMID:18262467

  11. The gastrointestinal mucus system in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Malin E.V.; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2013-01-01

    Mucins—large, highly glycosylated proteins—are important for the luminal protection of the gastrointestinal tract. Enterocytes have their apical surface covered by transmembrane mucins and goblet cells produce the secreted gel-forming mucins that form mucus. The small intestine has a single unattached mucus layer. In cystic fibrosis, this layer becomes attached, accounting for the intestinal manifestations of this disease. The stomach and colon have two layers of mucus; the inner layer is attached and the outer layer is less dense and unattached. In the colon, the outer mucus layer is the habitat for commensal bacteria. The inner mucus layer is impervious to bacteria and is renewed every hour by surface goblet cells. The crypt goblet cells have the ability to restitute the mucus layer by secretion, for example after an ischaemic challenge. Proteases of certain parasites and some bacteria can cleave mucins and dissolve the mucus as part of their pathogenicity. The inner mucus layer can, however, also become penetrable to bacteria by several other mechanisms, including aberrations in the immune system. When bacteria reach the epithelial surface, the immune system is activated and inflammation is triggered. This mechanism might occur in some types of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23478383

  12. The gastrointestinal mucus system in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2013-06-01

    Mucins--large, highly glycosylated proteins--are important for the luminal protection of the gastrointestinal tract. Enterocytes have their apical surface covered by transmembrane mucins and goblet cells produce the secreted gel-forming mucins that form mucus. The small intestine has a single unattached mucus layer, which in cystic fibrosis becomes attached, accounting for the intestinal manifestations of this disease. The stomach and colon have two layers of mucus; the inner layer is attached and the outer layer is less dense and unattached. In the colon, the outer mucus layer is the habitat for commensal bacteria. The inner mucus layer is impervious to bacteria and is renewed every hour by surface goblet cells. The crypt goblet cells have the ability to restitute the mucus layer by secretion, for example after an ischaemic challenge. Proteases of certain parasites and some bacteria can cleave mucins and dissolve the mucus as part of their pathogenicity. The inner mucus layer can, however, also become penetrable to bacteria by several other mechanisms, including aberrations in the immune system. When bacteria reach the epithelial surface, the immune system is activated and inflammation is triggered. This mechanism might occur in some types of ulcerative colitis.

  13. Muc5b is required for airway defence.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michelle G; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A; McElwee, Melissa M; Evans, Scott E; Boerner, Ryan M; Alexander, Samantha N; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K; Song, Alfred S; Petrova, Youlia M; Tuvim, Michael J; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S; Bowden, M Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H; Woodruff, Prescott G; Thornton, David J; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M; Moghaddam, Seyed J; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R; Drouin, Scott M; Davis, C William; Terrell, Kristy A; Grubb, Barbara R; O'Neal, Wanda K; Flores, Sonia C; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A; Donnelly, Jody M; Watson, Alan M; Hennessy, Corinne E; Keith, Rebecca C; Yang, Ivana V; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M; Janssen, William J; Schwartz, David A; Boucher, Richard C; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Christopher M

    2014-01-16

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b(-/-) mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  14. Muc5b Is Required for Airway Defense

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Gabriela Bowden, M.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; William Davis, C.; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them via mucociliary clearance (MCC)1,2. However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases1. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus1,3. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases4-6, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in the lungs. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally7. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and IL-23 production was reduced inMuc5b−/− mice. By contrast, in Muc5b transgenic (Tg) mice, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum1,8. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%9-11. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC. PMID:24317696

  15. Muc5b is required for airway defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Bowden, M. Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; de La Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; Davis, C. William; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b-/- mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  16. Cystic fibrosis lung disease starts in the small airways: can we treat it more effectively?

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Donaldson, Scott H; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Paré, Peter D

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this article are to summarize existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of small airways disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), to speculate about additional mechanisms that might play a role, and to consider the available or potential options to treat it. In the first section, we review the evidence provided by pathologic, physiologic, and imaging studies suggesting that obstruction of small airways begins early in life and is progressive. In the second section we discuss how the relationships between CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ion transport, the volume of the periciliary liquid layer and airway mucus might lead to defective mucociliary clearance in small airways. In addition, we discuss how chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and a chronic neutrophilic inflammatory response increase the viscosity of CF secretions and exacerbate the clearance problem. Next, we discuss how the mechanical properties of small airways could be altered early in the disease process and how remodeling can contribute to small airways disease. In the final section, we discuss how established therapies impact small airways disease and new directions that may lead to improvement in the treatment of small airways disease. We conclude that there are many reasons to believe that small airways play an important role in the pathophysiology of (early) CF lung disease. Therapy should be aimed to target the small airways more efficiently, especially with drugs that can correct the basic defect at an early stage of disease.

  17. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.

  18. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  19. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sujit S.; Preska Steinberg, Asher

    2016-01-01

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host–microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer–mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory–Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice—whose microbiota degrade gut polymers—did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes. PMID:27303035

  20. A new method of separation and quantitation of mucus glycoprotein in rat gastric mucus gel layer and its application to mucus secretion induced by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Y; Ishihara, K; Ohara, S; Saigenji, K; Hotta, K

    1991-10-01

    A method was established for recovering the mucus gel layer of rat gastric mucosa without damage to underlying surface epithelium. The mucus gel was solubilized by stirring the gastric mucosa in a solution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent. Optimal mucus gel solubilization was possible by treatment with 2% NAC for 5 minutes at room temperature. Mucus glycoprotein was quantitatively extracted and measured from the mucus gel sample obtained by the NAC treatment. This treatment caused no damage to surface epithelial cells, as observed by a light microscope. Besides NAC, pronase solution was also adequate for solubilizing the mucus gel layer without any damage to the surface epithelium. However, extraction and measurement of mucus glycoprotein from the pronase-treated mucus gel sample was not possible due to contamination by high molecular hexose-containing substances which were eluted along with the mucus glycoprotein from the column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. This NAC method was used to examine changes in mucus glycoprotein content in the mucus gel at one hour following the oral administration of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2. A significant increase in mucus glycoprotein of the gel was brought about by the prostaglandin treatment. Thus, the present method was suitable for estimating the amount of mucus secreted in to the mucus gel layer.

  1. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms.

  2. Mucus secretion by single tracheal submucosal glands from normal and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Ianowski, Juan P; Choi, Jae Young; Wine, Jeffrey J; Hanrahan, John W

    2007-01-01

    Submucosal glands line the cartilaginous airways and produce most of the antimicrobial mucus that keeps the airways sterile. The glands are defective in cystic fibrosis (CF), but how this impacts airway health remains uncertain. Although most CF mouse strains exhibit mild airway defects, those with the C57Bl/6 genetic background have increased airway pathology and susceptibility to Pseudomonas. Thus, they offer the possibility of studying whether, and if so how, abnormal submucosal gland function contributes to CF airway disease. We used optical methods to study fluid secretion by individual glands in tracheas from normal, wild-type (WT) mice and from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice (Cftrm1UNC/Cftrm1UNC; CF mice). Glands from WT mice qualitatively resembled those in humans by responding to carbachol and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), although the relative rates of VIP- and forskolin-stimulated secretion were much lower in mice than in large mammals. The pharmacology of mouse gland secretion was also similar to that in humans; adding bumetanide or replacement of HCO3− by Hepes reduced the carbachol response by ∼50%, and this inhibition increased to 80% when both manoeuvres were performed simultaneously. It is important to note that glands from CFTR knockout mice responded to carbachol but did not secrete when exposed to VIP or forskolin, as has been shown previously for glands from CF patients. Tracheal glands from WT and CF mice both had robust secretory responses to electrical field stimulation that were blocked by tetrodotoxin. It is interesting that local irritation of the mucosa using chili pepper oil elicited secretion from WT glands but did not stimulate glands from CF mice. These results clarify the mechanisms of murine submucosal gland secretion and reveal a novel defect in local regulation of glands lacking CFTR which may also compromise airway defence in CF patients. PMID:17204498

  3. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, C.M.; Waldes, R.; Sampson, D.; Newhouse, M.T.

    1982-07-01

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a /sup 99/mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet.

  4. Nanocomplexes for gene therapy of respiratory diseases: Targeting and overcoming the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Sante; Trapani, Adriana; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Belgiovine, Giuliana; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Puglisi, Giovanni; Cavallaro, Gennara; Trapani, Giuseppe; Conese, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy, i.e. the delivery and expression of therapeutic genes, holds great promise for congenital and acquired respiratory diseases. Non-viral vectors are less toxic and immunogenic than viral vectors, although they are characterized by lower efficiency. However, they have to overcome many barriers, including inflammatory and immune mediators and cells. The respiratory and airway epithelial cells, the main target of these vectors, are coated with a layer of mucus, which hampers the effective reaching of gene therapy vectors carrying either plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA. This barrier is thicker in many lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. This review summarizes the most important advancements in the field of non-viral vectors that have been achieved with the use of nanoparticulate (NP) systems, composed either of polymers or lipids, in the lung gene delivery. In particular, different strategies of targeting of respiratory and airway lung cells will be described. Then, we will focus on the two approaches that attempt to overcome the mucus barrier: coating of the nanoparticulate system with poly(ethylene glycol) and treatment with mucolytics. Our conclusions are: 1) Ligand and physical targeting can direct therapeutic gene expression in specific cell types in the respiratory tract; 2) Mucopenetrating NPs are endowed with promising features to be useful in treating respiratory diseases and should be now advanced in pre-clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the development of such polymer- and lipid-based NPs in the context of in vitro and in vivo disease models, such as lung cancer, as well as in clinical trials.

  5. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant.

  6. Magnetic Nanodrug Delivery Through the Mucus Layer of Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Primary Normal Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Economou, E C; Marinelli, S; Smith, M C; Routt, A A; Kravets, V V; Chu, H W; Spendier, K; Celinski, Z J

    2016-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and highly anisotropic barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoparticles were coated with an anti-inflammatory drug and magnetically transported through mucus produced by primary human airway epithelial cells. Using wet planetary ball milling, dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid-coated BaFe12O19 nano-particles (BaNPs) of 1-100 nm in diameter were prepared in water. BaNPs and conventional 20-30-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (FeNPs) were then encased in a polymer (PLGA) loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) and tagged for imaging. PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Both PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were transferred to the surface of a ~100-μm thick mucus layer of air-liquid interface cultured primary normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTE) cells. Within 30 min, the nanoparticles were pulled successfully through the mucus layer by a permanent neodymium magnet. The penetration time of the nanomedicine was monitored using confocal microscopy and tailored by varying the thickness of the PLGA-Dex coating around the particles.

  7. Magnetic Nanodrug Delivery Through the Mucus Layer of Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Primary Normal Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Economou, E. C.; Marinelli, S.; Smith, M. C.; Routt, A. A.; Kravets, V. V.; Chu, H. W.; Spendier, K.; Celinski, Z. J.

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and highly anisotropic barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoparticles were coated with an anti-inflammatory drug and magnetically transported through mucus produced by primary human airway epithelial cells. Using wet planetary ball milling, dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid-coated BaFe12O19 nano-particles (BaNPs) of 1–100 nm in diameter were prepared in water. BaNPs and conventional 20–30-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (FeNPs) were then encased in a polymer (PLGA) loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) and tagged for imaging. PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Both PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were transferred to the surface of a ~100-μm thick mucus layer of air-liquid interface cultured primary normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTE) cells. Within 30 min, the nanoparticles were pulled successfully through the mucus layer by a permanent neodymium magnet. The penetration time of the nanomedicine was monitored using confocal microscopy and tailored by varying the thickness of the PLGA-Dex coating around the particles. PMID:27774374

  8. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  9. Roles and regulation of the mucus barrier in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Cornick, Steve; Tawiah, Adelaide; Chadee, Kris

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is coated by a thick layer of mucus that forms the front line of innate host defense. Mucus consists of high molecular weight glycoproteins called mucins that are synthesized and secreted by goblet cells and functions primarily to lubricate the epithelium and protect it from damage by noxious substances. Recent studies have also suggested the involvement of goblet cells and mucins in complex immune functions such as antigen presentation and tolerance. Under normal physiological conditions, goblet cells continually produce mucins to replenish and maintain the mucus barrier; however, goblet cell function can be disrupted by various factors that can affect the integrity of the mucus barrier. Some of these factors such as microbes, microbial toxins and cytokines can stimulate or inhibit mucin production and secretion, alter the chemical composition of mucins or degrade the mucus layer. This can lead to a compromised mucus barrier and subsequently to various pathological conditions like chronic inflammatory diseases. Insight into how these factors modulate the mucus barrier in the gut is necessary in order to develop strategies to combat these disorders. PMID:25838985

  10. Pathogen bacteria adhesion to skin mucus of fishes.

    PubMed

    Benhamed, Said; Guardiola, Francisco A; Mars, Mohammed; Esteban, María Ángeles

    2014-06-25

    Fish are always in intimate contact with their environment; therefore they are permanently exposed to very vary external hazards (e.g. aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, viruses, parasites, pollutants). To fight off pathogenic microorganisms, the epidermis and its secretion, the mucus acts as a barrier between the fish and the environment. Fish are surrounded by a continuous layer of mucus which is the first physical, chemical and biological barrier from infection and the first site of interaction between fish's skin cells and pathogens. The mucus composition is very complex and includes numerous antibacterial factors secreted by fish's skin cells, such as immunoglobulins, agglutinins, lectins, lysins and lysozymes. These factors have a very important role to discriminate between pathogenic and commensal microorganisms and to protect fish from invading pathogens. Furthermore, the skin mucus represents an important portal of entry of pathogens since it induces the development of biofilms, and represents a favorable microenvironment for bacteria, the main disease agents for fish. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the interaction between bacteria and fish skin mucus, the adhesion mechanisms of pathogens and the major factors influencing pathogen adhesion to mucus. The better knowledge of the interaction between fish and their environment could inspire other new perspectives to study as well as to exploit the mucus properties for different purposes.

  11. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... support for only a very short period of time. Alternative Names Needle cricothyrotomy Images Emergency airway puncture Cricoid cartilage Emergency airway puncture - series References Hebert RB, Bose S, Mace SE. Cricothyrotomy and ...

  12. Upper airway biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper airway Images Upper airway test Bronchoscopy Throat anatomy References Yung RC, Boss EF. Tracheobronchial endoscopy. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  13. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Asma; Dolovich, Myrna B.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations. PMID:27845721

  14. Functional small airways defence in symptomless cigarette smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Agnew, J E; Lopez-Vidriero, M T; Pavia, D; Clarke, S W

    1986-01-01

    Smoking induced changes in the secretory cells of bronchiolar epithelium by facilitating secretion of cross linked glycoprotein mucus may influence the efficiency of mucus-cilia coupling. The functional impact on mucociliary transport in small (peripheral) airways has been studied by comparing data on aerosol deposition and clearance from symptomless cigarette smokers (30 tests, 18 subjects) with data from age matched non-smokers (30 tests, 19 subjects). Gamma camera images, assessed in terms of a penetration index comparing peripheral with inner zone deposition, indicated closely similar initial deposition in the two groups. Alveolar deposition, however, assessed in terms of particle retention at 24 hours, was significantly (p less than 0.01) less in the smokers. Given the similarity of initial deposition, this implies that an increased proportion of small conducting airways are protected by mucociliary defence in the smokers' lungs. Clearance from conducting airways of the peripheral zone in tests with relatively high peripheral deposition (14 tests on smokers, and 12 on non-smokers) nevertheless proceeded at the same rate in smokers as in non-smokers. PMID:3787532

  15. Investigation of the effects of intranasal botulinum toxin type A and ipratropium bromide nasal spray on nasal hypersecretion in idiopathic rhinitis without eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Sapci, Tarik; Yazici, Sara; Evcimik, M Fatih; Bozkurt, Ziya; Karavus, Ahmet; Ugurlu, Bayram; Ozkurt, Emre

    2008-03-01

    Idiopathic rhinitis without eosinophilia is a group of frequently observed diseases, the aetiopathogenesis of which is not yet well known. One of the most disturbing symptoms for patients within this disease group is nasal hypersecretion. Although many different treatments have been tried for hypersecretion, nasal topical drugs form the basis of any such therapy today. Ipratropium bromide (IB) is a drug offirst choice in nasal hypersecretion therapy. It displays a parasympatholytic effect in topical use and antagonizes acetylcholine transport in efferent parasympathetic nerves, thus decreasing submucosal gland secretion, which is the cause of hypersecretion. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is among the alternative treatment choices that is increasingly used in symptomatic treatment of nasal hypersecretion. Our study was planned with the aim of comparing the effect of these two groups of drugs on nasal hypersecretion. Thirty-eight patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic rhinitis without eosinophilia were included in the study and were divided in 3 different groups: In the first group, a total of 10 units of BTX-A were injected into both nasal cavities. In the second group, 3x2 IB was injected into both nasal cavities for 4 weeks. The third group received intranasal physiologic saline as placebo. The patients were evaluated in terms of nasal hypersecretion with visual analogue scale prior to the treatment and at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 during the follow-up period. Throughout the 8 weeks follow-up period, the patient complaints displayed a 41.2% decrease in the group that received BTX-A and a 61.4% decrease in the group which received IB, while no change was observed in the control group. Both drug groups were well tolerated by the patients, with no serious adverse or systemic effects. As a result, while IB and BTX-A differ in terms of method of application, they display a similar degree and duration of efficiency in hypersecretion therapy.

  16. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  17. Near-Universal Prevalence of Pneumocystis and Associated Increase in Mucus in the Lungs of Infants With Sudden Unexpected Death

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Sergio L.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Gallo, Miriam; Pérez, Francisco; Astorga, J.-Felipe; Bustamante, Rebeca; Chabé, Magali; Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Iturra, Pablo; Miller, Robert F.; Aliouat, El Moukthar; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pneumocystis without obvious accompanying pathology is occasionally reported in autopsied infant lungs. Its prevalence and significance are unknown. Interestingly, this mild infection induces a strong activation of mucus secretion–related genes in young immunocompetent rodents that has not been explored in infants. Excess mucus is induced by multiple airway offenders through nonspecific pathways and would explain a cofactor role of Pneumocystis in respiratory disease. We undertook characterization of the prevalence of Pneumocystis and associated mucus in infant lungs. Methods. Samples from 128 infants (mean age, 101 days) who died suddenly and unexpectedly in Santiago during 1999–2004 were examined for Pneumocystis using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) amplification of the P. jirovecii mtLSU ribosomal RNA gene and immunofluorescence microscopy (IF). Pneumocystis-negative infants 28 days and older and their age-closest positives were studied for MUC5AC expression and Pneumocystis burden by Western blot and quantitative PCR, respectively. Results. Pneumocystis DNA was detected by nPCR in 105 of the 128 infants (82.0%) and Pneumocystis organisms were visualized by IF in 99 (94.3%) of the DNA-positive infants. The infection was commonest at 3–4 months with 40 of 41 (97.6%) infants of that age testing positive. MUC5AC was significantly increased in Pneumocystis-positive tissue specimens (P = .013). Death was unexplained in 113 (88.3%) infants; Pneumocystis was detected in 95 (84.0%) of them vs 10 of 15 (66.7%) with explained death (P = .28). Conclusions. A highly focal Pneumocystis infection associated to increased mucus expression is almost universally present in the lungs of infants dying unexpectedly in the community regardless of autopsy diagnosis. PMID:23074306

  18. Glycobiome: bacteria and mucus at the epithelial interface.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; de Vos, Willem M; Belzer, Clara

    2013-02-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is colonised with a dense and diverse microbial community, that is an important player in human health and physiology. Close to the epithelial cells the mucosal microbiota is separated from the host with a thin lining of host derived glycans, including the cell surface glycocalyx and the extracellular secreted mucus. The mucosa-associated microbial composition differs from the luminal content and could be particularly important for nutrient exchange, communication with the host, development of the immune system, and resistance against invading pathogens. The mucosa-associated microbiota has adapted to the glycan rich environment by the production of mucus-degrading enzymes and mucus-binding extracellular proteins, and include mucus-degrading specialists such as Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. This review is focussed on the host-microbe interactions within the glycan landscape at the epithelial interface and considers the spatial organisation and composition of the mucosa-associated microbiota in health and disease.

  19. The outer mucus layer hosts a distinct intestinal microbial niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Limenitakis, Julien P.; Fuhrer, Tobias; Geuking, Markus B.; Lawson, Melissa A.; Wyss, Madeleine; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Keller, Irene; Macpherson, Jamie A.; Rupp, Sandra; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V.; Stecher, Bärbel; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The overall composition of the mammalian intestinal microbiota varies between individuals: within each individual there are differences along the length of the intestinal tract related to host nutrition, intestinal motility and secretions. Mucus is a highly regenerative protective lubricant glycoprotein sheet secreted by host intestinal goblet cells; the inner mucus layer is nearly sterile. Here we show that the outer mucus of the large intestine forms a unique microbial niche with distinct communities, including bacteria without specialized mucolytic capability. Bacterial species present in the mucus show differential proliferation and resource utilization compared with the same species in the intestinal lumen, with high recovery of bioavailable iron and consumption of epithelial-derived carbon sources according to their genome-encoded metabolic repertoire. Functional competition for existence in this intimate layer is likely to be a major determinant of microbiota composition and microbial molecular exchange with the host. PMID:26392213

  20. Human Clostridium difficile infection: altered mucus production and composition

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Melinda A.; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Engevik, Kristen A.; Wang, Jiang; Darien, Benjamin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of antibiotic-induced diarrhea is caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Hospitalizations for C. difficile infection (CDI) have tripled in the last decade, emphasizing the need to better understand how the organism colonizes the intestine and maintain infection. The mucus provides an interface for bacterial-host interactions and changes in intestinal mucus have been linked host health. To assess mucus production and composition in healthy and CDI patients, the main mucins MUC1 and MUC2 and mucus oligosaccharides were examined. Compared with healthy subjects, CDI patients demonstrated decreased MUC2 with no changes in surface MUC1. Although MUC1 did not change at the level of the epithelia, MUC1 was the primary constituent of secreted mucus in CDI patients. CDI mucus also exhibited decreased N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), increased N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and increased terminal galactose residues. Increased galactose in CDI specimens is of particular interest since terminal galactose sugars are known as C. difficile toxin A receptor in animals. In vitro, C. difficile is capable of metabolizing fucose, mannose, galactose, GlcNAc, and GalNAc for growth under healthy stool conditions (low Na+ concentration, pH 6.0). Injection of C. difficile into human intestinal organoids (HIOs) demonstrated that C. difficile alone is sufficient to reduce MUC2 production but is not capable of altering host mucus oligosaccharide composition. We also demonstrate that C. difficile binds preferentially to mucus extracted from CDI patients compared with healthy subjects. Our results provide insight into a mechanism of C. difficile colonization and may provide novel target(s) for the development of alternative therapeutic agents. PMID:25552581

  1. A 3-D airway epithelial cell and macrophage co-culture system to study Rhodococcus equi infection.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ute; Caldwell, Shannon; Matychak, Mary-Beth; Felippe, Julia

    2013-07-15

    We developed a 3-D equine bronchial epithelial cell (BEC) culture that fully differentiates into ciliary beating and mucus producing cells. Using this system, we evaluated how mucus affects the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Adult horse monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with Rhodococcus equi for 4h either in the mucus layer of in vitro generated airway epithelium or on collagen coated membranes. Using light and electron microscopy, we noted that the number of macrophages with intracellular bacteria, and the number of intracellular bacteria per macrophage were lower in the presence of mucus. TNFα measurements revealed that the presence of BECs promoted TNFα production by R. equi-infected macrophages; a decrease in TLR-2 (involved in R. equi recognition) and an increase in EGF-R (involved in mucin production) mRNA expression were also noted. Interestingly, when foal macrophages were added to foal BECs, we made the opposite observation, i.e. many macrophages were loaded with R. equi. Our in vitro bronchial system shows great potential for the identification of mechanisms how BECs and mucus play a role in phagocyte activation and bacterial clearance. Further studies using this system will show whether the airway environment in the foal responds differently to R. equi infection.

  2. [The cleaning system of the airways: physiology, pathophysiology and effects of ambroxol].

    PubMed

    Wunderer, Horst; Morgenroth, Konrad; Weis, Günter

    2009-02-01

    The human airways are faced by a mucous membrane that keeps the airways humid and protects them. One of the main factors of this protection system is the secretion that covers the surface of the membrane. Like an escalator, secretion is moved steadily, day and night in order to eliminate germs and pollutants from the airways. Healthy people normally do not notice this transport. Infection of the airways accompanied by cough disturbs the transport. The aim of the therapy should be the reconstitution of the transport, not the unsighted suppression of mucus production. Therefore adequate rheological properties of the secretion are needed as well as the balance of its components. Ambroxol affects this system at several sites.

  3. Contribution of α7 nicotinic receptor to airway epithelium dysfunction under nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Maouche, Kamel; Medjber, Kahina; Zahm, Jean-Marie; Delavoie, Franck; Terryn, Christine; Coraux, Christelle; Pons, Stéphanie; Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Maskos, Uwe; Birembaut, Philippe; Tournier, Jean-Marie

    2013-03-05

    Loss or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to impairment of airway mucus transport and to chronic lung diseases resulting in progressive respiratory failure. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) bind nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamines and thus mediate many of the tobacco-related deleterious effects in the lung. Here we identify α7 nAChR as a key regulator of CFTR in the airways. The airway epithelium in α7 knockout mice is characterized by a higher transepithelial potential difference, an increase of amiloride-sensitive apical Na(+) absorption, a defective cAMP-dependent Cl(-) conductance, higher concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), and Ca(2+) in secretions, and a decreased mucus transport, all relevant to a deficient CFTR activity. Moreover, prolonged nicotine exposure mimics the absence of α7 nAChR in mice or its inactivation in vitro in human airway epithelial cell cultures. The functional coupling of α7 nAChR to CFTR occurs through Ca(2+) entry and activation of adenylyl cyclases, protein kinase A, and PKC. α7 nAChR, CFTR, and adenylyl cyclase-1 are physically and functionally associated in a macromolecular complex within lipid rafts at the apical membrane of surface and glandular airway epithelium. This study establishes the potential role of α7 nAChR in the regulation of CFTR function and in the pathogenesis of smoking-related chronic lung diseases.

  4. EGF-Amphiregulin Interplay in Airway Stem/Progenitor Cells Links the Pathogenesis of Smoking-Induced Lesions in the Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Yang, Jing; Gomi, Kazunori; Chao, IonWa; Crystal, Ronald G.; Shaykhiev, Renat

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium of cigarette smokers undergoes dramatic remodeling with hyperplasia of basal cells (BC) and mucus-producing cells, squamous metaplasia, altered ciliated cell differentiation and decreased junctional barrier integrity, relevant to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. In this study, we show that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand amphiregulin (AREG) is induced by smoking in human airway epithelium as a result of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-driven squamous differentiation of airway BC stem/progenitor cells. In turn, AREG induced a unique EGFR activation pattern in human airway BC, distinct from that evoked by EGF, leading to BC- and mucous hyperplasia, altered ciliated cell differentiation and impaired barrier integrity. Further, AREG promoted its own expression and suppressed expression of EGF, establishing an autonomous self-amplifying signaling loop in airway BC relevant for promotion of EGF-independent hyperplastic phenotypes. Thus, EGF-AREG interplay in airway BC stem/progenitor cells is one of the mechanisms that mediates the interconnected pathogenesis of all major smoking-induced lesions in the human airway epithelium. PMID:27709733

  5. TNFα Affects Ciliary Beat Response to Increased Viscosity in Human Pediatric Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    González, Claudia; Droguett, Karla; Rios, Mariana; Cohen, Noam A; Villalón, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In airway epithelium, mucociliary clearance (MCC) velocity depends on the ciliary beat frequency (CBF), and it is affected by mucus viscoelastic properties. Local inflammation induces secretion of cytokines (TNFα) that can alter mucus viscosity; however airway ciliated cells have an autoregulatory mechanism to prevent the collapse of CBF in response to increase in mucus viscosity, mechanism that is associated with an increment in intracellular Ca(+2) level ([Ca(2+)]i). We studied the effect of TNFα on the autoregulatory mechanism that regulates CBF in response to increased viscosity using dextran solutions, in ciliated cells cultured from human pediatric epithelial adenoid tissue. Cultures were treated with TNFα, before and after the viscous load was changed. TNFα treatment produced a significantly larger decrease in CBF in cultures exposed to dextran. Furthermore, an increment in [Ca(2+)]i was observed, which was significantly larger after TNFα treatment. In conclusion, although TNFα has deleterious effects on ciliated cells in response to maintaining CBF after increasing viscous loading, it has a positive effect, since increasing [Ca(2+)]i may prevent the MCC collapse. These findings suggest that augmented levels of TNFα associated with an inflammatory response of the nasopharyngeal epithelium may have dual effects that contribute to maintaining the effectiveness of MCC in the upper airways.

  6. TNFα Affects Ciliary Beat Response to Increased Viscosity in Human Pediatric Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Droguett, Karla; Rios, Mariana; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    In airway epithelium, mucociliary clearance (MCC) velocity depends on the ciliary beat frequency (CBF), and it is affected by mucus viscoelastic properties. Local inflammation induces secretion of cytokines (TNFα) that can alter mucus viscosity; however airway ciliated cells have an autoregulatory mechanism to prevent the collapse of CBF in response to increase in mucus viscosity, mechanism that is associated with an increment in intracellular Ca+2 level ([Ca2+]i). We studied the effect of TNFα on the autoregulatory mechanism that regulates CBF in response to increased viscosity using dextran solutions, in ciliated cells cultured from human pediatric epithelial adenoid tissue. Cultures were treated with TNFα, before and after the viscous load was changed. TNFα treatment produced a significantly larger decrease in CBF in cultures exposed to dextran. Furthermore, an increment in [Ca2+]i was observed, which was significantly larger after TNFα treatment. In conclusion, although TNFα has deleterious effects on ciliated cells in response to maintaining CBF after increasing viscous loading, it has a positive effect, since increasing [Ca2+]i may prevent the MCC collapse. These findings suggest that augmented levels of TNFα associated with an inflammatory response of the nasopharyngeal epithelium may have dual effects that contribute to maintaining the effectiveness of MCC in the upper airways. PMID:28025644

  7. Developmental Programming: Insulin Sensitizer Prevents the GnRH-Stimulated LH Hypersecretion in a Sheep Model of PCOS.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rodolfo C; Burns, Ashleigh; Moeller, Jacob; Skinner, Donal C; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2016-12-01

    Prenatal testosterone (T) treatment recapitulates the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome in female sheep. At the neuroendocrine level, prenatal T treatment results in disrupted steroid feedback on gonadotropin release, increased pituitary sensitivity to GnRH, and subsequent LH hypersecretion. Because prenatal T-treated sheep manifest functional hyperandrogenism and hyperinsulinemia, gonadal steroids and/or insulin may play a role in programming and/or maintaining these neuroendocrine defects. Here, we investigated the effects of prenatal and postnatal treatments with an androgen antagonist (flutamide [F]) or an insulin sensitizer (rosiglitazone [R]) on GnRH-stimulated LH secretion in prenatal T-treated sheep. As expected, prenatal T treatment increased the pituitary responsiveness to GnRH leading to LH hypersecretion. Neither prenatal interventions nor postnatal F treatment normalized the GnRH-stimulated LH secretion. Conversely, postnatal R treatment completely normalized the GnRH-stimulated LH secretion. At the tissue level, gestational T increased pituitary LHβ, androgen receptor, and insulin receptor-β, whereas it reduced estrogen receptor (ER)α protein levels. Although postnatal F normalized pituitary androgen receptor and insulin receptor-β, it failed to prevent an increase in LHβ expression. Contrarily, postnatal R treatment restored ERα and partially normalized LHβ pituitary levels. Immunohistochemical findings confirmed changes in pituitary ERα expression to be specific to gonadotropes. In conclusion, these findings indicate that increased pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in prenatal T-treated sheep is likely a function of reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity. Moreover, results suggest that restoration of ERα levels in the pituitary may be one mechanism by which R prevents GnRH-stimulated LH hypersecretion in this sheep model of polycystic ovary syndrome-like phenotype.

  8. Complex rheological behaviors of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) skin mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang Su, Heng Lv, Weiyang Du, Miao Song, Yihu Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    The functions and structures of biological mucus are closely linked to rheology. In this article, the skin mucus of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) was proved to be a weak hydrogel susceptible to shear rate, time, and history, exhibiting: (i) Two-region breakdown of its gel structure during oscillatory strain sweep; (ii) rate-dependent thickening followed by three-region thinning with increased shear rate, and straight thinning with decreased shear rate; and (iii) time-dependent rheopexy at low shear rates, and thixotropy at high shear rates. An interesting correlation between the shear rate- and time-dependent rheological behaviors was also revealed, i.e., the rheopexy-thixotropy transition coincided with the first-second shear thinning region transition. Apart from rheology, a structure of colloidal network was observed in loach skin mucus using transmission electron microscopy. The complex rheology was speculated to result from inter- and intracolloid structural alterations. The unique rheology associated with the colloidal network structure, which has never been previously reported in vertebrate mucus, may play a key role in the functions (e.g., flow, reannealing, lubrication, and barrier) of the mucus.

  9. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  10. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  11. Skin mucus proteome map of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Cordero, Héctor; Brinchmann, Monica F; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María A

    2015-12-01

    Skin mucus is the first barrier of fish defence. Proteins from skin mucus of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were identified by 2DE followed by LC-MS/MS. From all the identified proteins in the proteome map, we focus on the proteins associated with several immune pathways in fish. Furthermore, the real-time PCR transcript levels in skin are shown. Proteins found include apolipoprotein A1, calmodulin, complement C3, fucose-binding lectin, lysozyme and several caspases. To our knowledge, this is the first skin mucus proteome study and further transcriptional profiling of the identified proteins done on this bony fish species. This not only contributes knowledge on the routes involved in mucosal innate immunity, but also establishes a non-invasive technique based on locating immune markers with a potential use for prevention and/or diagnosis of fish diseases.

  12. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration.

  13. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities.

  14. Repurposing tromethamine as inhaled therapy to treat CF airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Launspach, Janice L.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Rivera, Jade A.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Thorne, Peter S.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel activity causes airway surface liquid (ASL) pH to become acidic, which impairs airway host defenses. One potential therapeutic approach is to correct the acidic pH in CF airways by aerosolizing HCO3– and/or nonbicarbonate pH buffers. Here, we show that raising ASL pH with inhaled HCO3– increased pH. However, the effect was transient, and pH returned to baseline values within 30 minutes. Tromethamine (Tham) is a buffer with a long serum half-life used as an i.v. formulation to treat metabolic acidosis. We found that Tham aerosols increased ASL pH in vivo for at least 2 hours and enhanced bacterial killing. Inhaled hypertonic saline (7% NaCl) is delivered to people with CF in an attempt to promote mucus clearance. Because an increased ionic strength inhibits ASL antimicrobial factors, we added Tham to hypertonic saline and applied it to CF sputum. We found that Tham alone and in combination with hypertonic saline increased pH and enhanced bacterial killing. These findings suggest that aerosolizing the HCO3–-independent buffer Tham, either alone or in combination with hypertonic saline, might be of therapeutic benefit in CF airway disease. PMID:27390778

  15. Two layer fluid stress analysis during airway closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-Feng; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    2009-11-01

    The airways are lined with a film consisting of two immiscible liquids, a serous layer and a more viscous mucus layer. Due to a surface tension driven instability, a liquid plug can form that obstructs the passage of air along the airways provided the ratio of the film thickness to the tube radius is greater than a critical value ˜0.12. In this study, we assume that the liquid layers are Newtonian, the surface tension is constant at the interfaces and the air-core phase is passive. We solve the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations subject to interfacial stress conditions and kinematic boundary conditions numerically using a finite volume approach in conjunction with a sharp interface method for the interfaces. Surface tension, viscosity and film thickness ratios can be altered by disease, and their influence on the closure instability is investigated. Results show that the shear and normal stresses along the airway walls can be strong enough to injure airway epithelial cells. We acknowledge support from the National Institutes of Health grant number NIH HL85156.

  16. Inadequate cervical mucus--a cause of "idiopathic" infertility.

    PubMed

    Sher, G; Katz, M

    1976-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and treat a group of patients referred for "idiopathic" infertility in whom no apparent cause for infertility, apart from inadequate cervical mucus, was found. Hormone investigations revealed that these patients could be divided into two groups: those with low sex steroid profiles despite apparent ovulation, and a second group with normal sex steroid profiles. All patients were treated with ovulation-inducing agents in an attempt to produce "controlled" ovarian hyperstimulation and an improved cervical mucus. Four of six patients conceived. The rationale behind the use of ovulation-inducing agents in this situation is discussed.

  17. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  18. Neurophenotypes in Airway Diseases. Insights from Translational Cough Studies

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A.; Khalid, Saifudin; Wortley, Michael A.; Dockry, Rachel; Coote, Julie; Holt, Kimberley; Dubuis, Eric; Kelsall, Angela; Maher, Sarah A.; Bonvini, Sara; Woodcock, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Most airway diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are associated with excessive coughing. The extent to which this may be a consequence of increased activation of vagal afferents by pathology in the airways (e.g., inflammatory mediators, excessive mucus) or an altered neuronal phenotype is unknown. Understanding whether respiratory diseases are associated with dysfunction of airway sensory nerves has the potential to identify novel therapeutic targets. Objectives: To assess the changes in cough responses to a range of inhaled irritants in COPD and model these in animals to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Cough responses to inhaled stimuli in patients with COPD, healthy smokers, refractory chronic cough, asthma, and healthy volunteers were assessed and compared with vagus/airway nerve and cough responses in a cigarette smoke (CS) exposure guinea pig model. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with COPD had heightened cough responses to capsaicin but reduced responses to prostaglandin E2 compared with healthy volunteers. Furthermore, the different patient groups all exhibited different patterns of modulation of cough responses. Consistent with these findings, capsaicin caused a greater number of coughs in CS-exposed guinea pigs than in control animals; similar increased responses were observed in ex vivo vagus nerve and neuron cell bodies in the vagal ganglia. However, responses to prostaglandin E2 were decreased by CS exposure. Conclusions: CS exposure is capable of inducing responses consistent with phenotypic switching in airway sensory nerves comparable with the cough responses observed in patients with COPD. Moreover, the differing profiles of cough responses support the concept of disease-specific neurophenotypes in airway disease. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01297790). PMID:26741046

  19. Evaluation of nebulised hay dust suspensions (HDS) for the diagnosis and investigation of heaves. 2: Effects of inhaled HDS on control and heaves horses.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S; Collie, D D S; Dixon, P M; McGorum, B C

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate inhaled hay dust suspensions (HDS) as a tool for the diagnosis and investigation of heaves, the pulmonary inflammatory and functional consequences of inhalation challenge with 3 different HDS were determined in 6 control and 7 asymptomatic heaves horses. Heaves horses given HDS challenge developed the characteristic features of heaves, including airway neutrophilia, obstructive airway dysfunction and mucus hypersecretion. While HDS challenge induced a mild airway neutrophilia in controls, the no-response threshold for controls was greater than that of heaves horses, and there was no overlap in BALF neutrophil ratio of controls and heaves horses. Furthermore, HDS challenge did not induce airway dysfunction or mucus hypersecretion in controls. Therefore, HDS challenges enabled differentiation of control and heaves horses. Interestingly, in both groups, the airway neutrophilia was a dose-dependent response rather than an 'all or nothing' response. This study suggests that HDS challenges are of value in the diagnosis and investigation of heaves.

  20. Repeated allergen exposure of sensitized Brown-Norway rats induces airway cell DNA synthesis and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, M; Walsh, D A; Koto, H; Barnes, P J; Chung, K F

    1999-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in asthmatic airways can lead to characteristic airway smooth muscle (ASM) thickening and pathological changes within the airway wall. This study assessed the effect of repeated allergen exposure on ASM and epithelial cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, cell recruitment and airway wall pathology. Brown-Norway rats were sensitized and then exposed to ovalbumin or saline aerosol every 3 days on six occasions. After the final exposure, rats were administered twice daily for 7 days with the DNA S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Using a triple immunohistochemical staining technique, BrdU incorporation into ASM and epithelium was quantified employing computer-assisted image analysis. There were >3-fold mean increases in BrdU incorporation into ASM from 1.3% of cells (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.6) in saline controls to 4.7% (95% CI 2.6-6.7) after allergen exposure (p<0.001), and in airway epithelium, from 1.3 (95% CI 0.6-2.0) BrdU-positive cells x mm basement membrane(-1) in saline controls to 4.9 (95% CI 3.0-6.7) after allergen exposure (p<0.001). There was increased subepithelial collagen deposition and mucus secretion along with a significant eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment to the airways. Increased rates of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in both airway smooth muscle and epithelial cells along with changes to the airway wall pathology may precede the establishment of smooth muscle thickening and airway remodelling after repeated allergen exposure in rats. This model seems to be appropriate for studying structural changes within the airways as observed in asthma.

  1. Infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi affects mucus biosynthesis in the abomasum of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered to be the first line of defense to the external environment. Alteration in mucus components has been reported to occur during intestinal nematode infection in ruminants, but the role of mucus in the response to abomasal parasites remai...

  2. Intestinal Mucus Gel and Secretory Antibody are Barriers to Campylobacter jejuni Adherence to INT 407 Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    An in vitro mucus assay was developed to study the role of mucus gel and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in preventing attachment of Campylobacter ... jejuni to INT 407 cells. An overlay of rabbit small intestinal mucus was found to impede the attachment of C. jejuni to a monolayer of INT 407 cells

  3. 76 FR 36557 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License; Devices for Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS...-074-2005/0 ``Mucus Slurping Endotracheal Tube''; U.S. Patent 7,503,328 to Oculus Innovative Sciences... mucus from endotracheal tubes. DATES: Only written comments and/or applications for a license...

  4. Imaging and tracking HIV viruses in human cervical mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukari, Fatima; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Nossal, Ralph; Boukari, Hacène

    2016-09-01

    We describe a systematic approach to image, track, and quantify the movements of HIV viruses embedded in human cervical mucus. The underlying motivation for this study is that, in HIV-infected adults, women account for more than half of all new cases and most of these women acquire the infection through heterosexual contact. The endocervix is believed to be a susceptible site for HIV entry. Cervical mucus, which coats the endocervix, should play a protective role against the viruses. Thus, we developed a methodology to apply time-resolved confocal microscopy to examine the motion of HIV viruses that were added to samples of untreated cervical mucus. From the images, we identified the viruses, tracked them over time, and calculated changes of the statistical mean-squared displacement (MSD) of each virus. Approximately half of tracked viruses appear constrained while the others show mobility with MSDs that are proportional to τα+ν2τ2, over time range τ, depicting a combination of anomalous diffusion (0<α<0.4) and flow-like behavior. The MSD data also reveal plateaus attributable to possible stalling of the viruses. Although a more extensive study is warranted, these results support the assumption of mucus being a barrier against the motion of these viruses.

  5. Chemotaxis of Flavobacterium columnare: To Channel Catfish Mucus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is the etiological agent of columnaris disease in fresh water fish. The disease is characterized by chronic skin lesions and severe mortality. The skin mucus constitutes a large portion of body and many infectious organisms including F. columnare, is believed to invade throu...

  6. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Alan R; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A; Harding, Stephen E; Bajka, Balazs H

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia.

  7. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Alan R.; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M.; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A.; Harding, Stephen E.; Bajka, Balazs H.

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia. PMID:26726279

  8. Adhesion properties of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus kefiri to gastrointestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Carasi, Paula; Ambrosis, Nicolás M; De Antoni, Graciela L; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, María C; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the mucus-binding properties of aggregating and non-aggregating potentially probiotic strains of kefir-isolated Lactobacillus kefiri, using different substrates. All the strains were able to adhere to commercial gastric mucin (MUCIN) and extracted mucus from small intestine (SIM) and colon (CM). The extraction of surface proteins from bacteria using LiCl or NaOH significantly reduced the adhesion of three selected strains (CIDCA 8348, CIDCA 83115 and JCM 5818); although a significant proportion (up to 50%) of S-layer proteins were not completely eliminated after treatments. The surface (S-layer) protein extracts from all the strains of Lb. kefiri were capable of binding to MUCIN, SIM or CM, and no differences were observed among them. The addition of their own surface protein extract increased adhesion of CIDCA 8348 and 83115 to MUCIN and SIM, meanwhile no changes in adhesion were observed for JCM 5818. None of the seven sugars tested had the ability to inhibit the adhesion of whole bacteria to the three mucus extracts. Noteworthy, the degree of bacterial adhesion reached in the presence of their own surface protein (S-layer) extract decreased to basal levels in the presence of some sugars, suggesting an interaction between the added sugar and the surface proteins. In conclusion, the ability of these food-isolated bacteria to adhere to gastrointestinal mucus becomes an essential issue regarding the biotechnological potentiality of Lb. kefiri for the food industry.

  9. Deposition-dependent normal ranges for radioaerosol assessment of lung mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Agnew, John E; Hasani, Amir

    2008-12-01

    Deposition distribution variability strongly influences data from radioaerosol mucus clearance measurements. We investigated how one clearance measurement-the area under the 0-6 h tracheobronchial retention curve (AUC)-relates to three different indices characterizing initial particle distribution. These indices were a conventional penetration index (PI), retention at 24 h (R(24)) and an Airways Penetration Index (API). API is an estimate of an outer to inner zone ratio for "tracheobronchial" (short-term cleared) deposition. Data were analyzed from "control" tests on 35 normal nonsmoking volunteers (16 females, 19 males, age 18-72 years). The strongest clearance-deposition correlation (r = 0.84, p < 0.0001) was obtained with API, yielding a narrower normal range than those with PI or R(24). No influence of age was detected. Data from repeat tests on 17 subjects demonstrated AUC changes correlating closely with API changes (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001), confirming the potential value of API as a "predictor" of clearance changes resulting simply from a changed distribution of initial deposition along the tracheobronchial airway generations. Additional data from 19 "placebo" tests on normal subjects gave AUC values within or close to suggested normal confidence limits derived from the control subject plots of AUC against, respectively, PI, R(24), and API. Quantitative attention to the influence of depositionclearance relationships should help in analyzing data from studies where posttreatment aerosol distribution cannot be exactly matched to the pretreatment situation. Deposition-corrected clearance provides an approach to improved estimation of clearance "normality."

  10. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  11. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  12. Effect of inhaled 15-(s)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid on tracheobronchial clearance in normal human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C K; Polosa, R; Pavia, D; Hasani, A; Agnew, J E; Clarke, S W; Holgate, S T

    1991-01-01

    15-(s)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) is the predominant metabolite of arachidonic acid in normal and asthmatic human airways and a potent mucus secretagogue in canine and human airways. A study was carried out on the effect of inhaled 15-HETE on tracheobronchial clearance, measured for six hours by a radioaerosol technique, in 10 normal subjects. Subjects inhaled 80 nmol 15-HETE or the diluent (sodium phosphate buffer) on two occasions at least two weeks apart in a double blind and randomised fashion (20 minutes after radioaerosol inhalation. Tracheobronchial clearance after inhaled 15-HETE was almost identical to that after placebo for all measurements up to six hours. It is concluded that 15-HETE has no effect on tracheobronchial clearance in normal human airways and is unlikely to account for the impaired mucociliary clearance seen in asthma. PMID:1858085

  13. Cutting edge: STAT6 signaling in eosinophils is necessary for development of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Kindra; LaMarche, Nelson M; Islam, Nasif; Wood, Amie; Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2015-03-15

    Eosinophils are critical cellular mediators in allergic asthma and inflammation; however, the signals that regulate their functions are unclear. The transcription factor STAT6 regulates Th2 cytokine responses, acting downstream of IL-4 and IL-13. We showed previously that eosinophil-derived IL-13 plays an important role in the recruitment of T cells to the lung and the subsequent development of allergic asthma. However, whether eosinophils respond to Th2 signals to control allergic airway inflammation is unclear. In this report, we show that STAT6(-/-) eosinophils are unable to induce the development of allergic lung inflammation, including recruitment of CD4(+) T cells, mucus production, and development of airways hyperresponsiveness. This is likely due to the reduced migration of STAT6(-/-) eosinophils to the lung and in response to eotaxin. These data indicate that, like Th cells, eosinophils need to respond to Th2 cytokines via STAT6 during the development of allergic airway inflammation.

  14. Front-runners for pharmacotherapeutic correction of the airway ion transport defect in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Clunes, Mark T; Boucher, Richard C

    2008-06-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) patients display multiorgan dysfunction (e.g. pancreas, gut, and lung) it is lung disease that is the leading cause of premature death in these patients. CF lung disease is characterized by persistent pulmonary infection and mucus plugging of the airways initiated by the failure of solute transport across the airway epithelium. Many drug therapies aim to alleviate the secondary characteristics of CF lung disease; however, new therapies in development are targeted at correcting the ion transport deficiency of CF. The goal is to hydrate airway surfaces by stimulating secretion (through activation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated chloride channels), and/or inhibiting absorption (through the epithelial sodium channel) thereby stimulating healthy mucociliary clearance. If mucociliary clearance can be stimulated sufficiently from an early age, then there is the possibility that secondary lung infection may be eradicated from the syndrome of CF disease.

  15. Front-Runners for pharmacotherapeutic correction of the airway ion transport defect in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Mark T.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although cystic fibrosis patients display multi organ dysfunction (e.g. pancreas, gut, lung) it is lung disease that is the leading cause of premature death in these patients. Cystic fibrosis lung disease is characterized by persistent pulmonary infection and mucus plugging of the airways initiated by failure of solute transport across the airway epithelium. Many drug therapies aim to alleviate the secondary characteristics of CF lung disease, however, new therapies in development are targeted at correcting the ion transport deficiency of CF. The goal is to hydrate airway surfaces by stimulating secretion (through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium activated chloride channels), and/or inhibiting absorption (through the epithelial sodium channel) thereby stimulating healthy mucociliary clearance. If mucociliary clearance can be stimulated sufficiently from an early age then there is the possibility that secondary lung infection may be eradicated from the syndrome of CF disease. PMID:18468487

  16. Composition and functional role of the mucus layers in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V; Ambort, Daniel; Pelaseyed, Thaher; Schütte, André; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Ermund, Anna; Subramani, Durai B; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica M; Thomsson, Kristina A; Bergström, Joakim H; van der Post, Sjoerd; Rodriguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; Sjövall, Henrik; Bäckström, Malin; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-11-01

    In discussions on intestinal protection, the protective capacity of mucus has not been very much considered. The progress in the last years in understanding the molecular nature of mucins, the main building blocks of mucus, has, however, changed this. The intestinal enterocytes have their apical surfaces covered by transmembrane mucins and the whole intestinal surface is further covered by mucus, built around the gel-forming mucin MUC2. The mucus of the small intestine has only one layer, whereas the large intestine has a two-layered mucus where the inner, attached layer has a protective function for the intestine, as it is impermeable to the luminal bacteria.

  17. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Philip H.; McMenimen, James D.; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3– concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator–dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  18. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Hoegger, Mark J; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; McMenimen, James D; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3- concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF.

  19. Inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei prevents asthma‑mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia in mice by reducing IL‑5 and IL‑13 levels.

    PubMed

    Ming, Moyu; Luo, Zhixi; Lv, Shengqiu; Li, Chaoqian

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei could prevent airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia. A total of 24 male Balb/c mice were randomly divided into three groups: Normal control group (group A), asthma model group (group B) and the intervention group (group C), (8 mice/group). Group A mice were sensitized and with challenged saline and group B with ovalbumin (OVA). Group C mice were administered with aerosol Mycobacterium phlei once daily prior to the allergen challenge. Airway responsiveness in each group was assessed. All the animals were sacrificed and lung tissues, blood samples and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were harvested. Cell fractionation and differential cells were counted in serum and BALF. HE staining and alcian blue/periodic acid Schiff staining were used to measure airway eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production. The levels of the cytokines IL‑5, IL‑13 and IgE were measured in lung and BALF as determined by ELISA and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results indicated that inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei suppressed the airway hyperresponsiveness and mitigated airway eosinophilia induced by a methacholine challenge, and significantly reduced the levels of cytokines IL‑5 and IL‑13 in lung tissue and IgE level in BALF when compared with the OVA‑sensitized mice. In conclusion, inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei could reduce OVA‑induced airway hyperresponsiveness and may be a potential alternative therapy for allergic airway diseases.

  20. A model for the volume regulatory mechanism of the Airway Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Rubinstein, Michael; Davis, C. William; Tarran, Robert; Boucher, Richard

    2006-03-01

    The airway surface layer (ASL) of a lung consists of two parts: a mucus layer with thickness of about 30 μm in contact with air and a periciliary layer (PCL) of about 7 μm below. Mucus collects dust and bacteria and is swept to throat by beating cilia, while riding on top of PCL. It is important that the thickness of PCL is matched with the length of cilia in order to optimize clearance of mucus. Decrease of PCL thickness would finally lead to an occlusion of the respiratory system. Experiments show that the height of PCL stays constant after removing mucus. When modifying height or composition of this open PCL by removing fluid or adding isotonic solution leads to the same final height of PCL. Thus, there must be a regulatory mechanism, that controls height, i.e. ASL volume. Additional experiments show that mechanical stimulus of the cells like shear leads to an increase of ASL volume, thus, the cell is able to actively adjust this volume. Based on these observations a class of models is introduced that describes the experiments and a specific minimum model for the given problem is proposed.

  1. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Shawna L; Rubin, Bruce K; Haas, Carl F; Volsko, Teresa A; Drescher, Gail S; O'Malley, Catherine A

    2015-07-01

    Aerosolized medications are used as airway clearance therapy to treat a variety of airway diseases. These guidelines were developed from a systematic review with the purpose of determining whether the use of these medications to promote airway clearance improves oxygenation and respiratory mechanics, reduces ventilator time and ICU stay, and/or resolves atelectasis/consolidation compared with usual care. Recombinant human dornase alfa should not be used in hospitalized adult and pediatric patients without cystic fibrosis. The routine use of bronchodilators to aid in secretion clearance is not recommended. The routine use of aerosolized N-acetylcysteine to improve airway clearance is not recommended. Aerosolized agents to change mucus biophysical properties or promote airway clearance are not recommended for adult or pediatric patients with neuromuscular disease, respiratory muscle weakness, or impaired cough. Mucolytics are not recommended to treat atelectasis in postoperative adult or pediatric patients, and the routine administration of bronchodilators to postoperative patients is not recommended. There is no high-level evidence related to the use of bronchodilators, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and novel therapy to promote airway clearance in these populations.

  2. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  3. Physiological impact of abnormal lipoxin A₄ production on cystic fibrosis airway epithelium and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerard; Ringholz, Fiona; Buchanan, Paul; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation.

  4. Integrated Innate Mechanisms Involved in Airway Allergic Inflammation to the Serine Protease Subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Florsheim, Esther; Yu, Shuang; Bragatto, Ivan; Faustino, Lucas; Gomes, Eliane; Ramos, Rodrigo N.; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are recognized environmental allergens, but little is known about the mechanisms responsible for sensing enzyme activity and initiating the development of allergic inflammation. Because usage of the serine protease subtilisin in the detergent industry resulted in an outbreak of occupational asthma in workers, we sought to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation to subtilisin and to determine the immunological mechanisms involved in type 2 responses. By using a mouse model of allergic airway disease, we have defined here that subcutaneous or intranasal sensitization followed by airway challenge to subtilisin induces prototypic allergic lung inflammation, characterized by airway eosinophilia, type 2 cytokines release, mucus production, high levels of serum IgE, and airway reactivity. These allergic responses were dependent on subtilisin protease activity, protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, IL-33 receptor ST2, and MyD88 signaling. Also, subtilisin stimulated the expression of the pro-allergic cytokines IL-1α, IL-33, TSLP, and the growth factor amphiregulin in a human bronchial epithelial cell line. Notably, acute administration of subtilisin into the airways increased lung IL-5-producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells, which required PAR-2 expression. Finally, subtilisin activity acted as a Th2 adjuvant to an unrelated airborne antigen promoting allergic inflammation to inhaled OVA. Therefore, we established a murine model of occupational asthma to a serine protease and characterized the main molecular pathways involved in allergic sensitization to subtilisin that potentially contribute to initiate allergic airway disease. PMID:25876764

  5. Allergen-induced airway remodeling is impaired in galectin-3 deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Kang, Bit Na; Hosseinkhani, Reza M.; Ha, Sung Gil; Frenzel, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2010-01-01

    The role played by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal-3) in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of asthma that leads to airway dysfunction and poor clinical outcome in humans, was investigated in a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and Gal-3 knock-out (KO) mice were subjected to repetitive allergen challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) up to 12 weeks and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue collected after the last challenge were evaluated for cellular features associated with airway remodeling. Compared to WT mice, chronic OVA challenge in Gal-3 KO mice resulted in diminished remodeling of the airways with significantly reduced mucus secretion, sub-epithelial fibrosis, smooth muscle thickness, and peribronchial angiogenesis. The higher degree of airway remodeling in WT mice was associated with higher Gal-3 expression in the BALF as well as lung tissue. Cell counts in BALF and lung immunohistology demonstrated that eosinophil infiltration in OVA-challenged Gal-3 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to WT mice. Evaluation of cellular mediators associated with eosinophil recruitment and airway remodeling revealed that levels of eotaxin-1, IL-5, IL-13, FIZZ1 and TGF-β were substantially lower in Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, leukocytes from Gal-3 KO mice demonstrated decreased trafficking (rolling) on vascular endothelial adhesion molecules compared to WT cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Gal-3 is an important lectin that promotes airway remodeling via airway recruitment of inflammatory cells, specifically eosinophils, and the development of a Th2 phenotype as well as increased expression of eosinophil-specific chemokines, pro-fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators. PMID:20543100

  6. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  7. Mucus barrier-triggered disassembly of siRNA nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Troels B.; Li, Leon; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-10-01

    The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the mucus, potentiated by the large surface area of the nanocarrier. We have developed a fluorescence activation-based reporter system showing that the interaction between polyanionic mucins and the cationic chitosan/small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocarriers (polyplexes) results in the disassembly and consequent triggered release of fluorescent siRNA. The quantity of release was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between chitosan amino groups and siRNA phosphate groups (NP ratio) of the polyplexes with a maximal estimated 48.6% release of siRNA over 30 min at NP 60. Furthermore, a microfluidic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal mucus barrier was used to visualize the dynamic interaction between chitosan/siRNA nanocarriers and native purified porcine stomach mucins. We observed strong interactions and aggregations at the mucin-liquid interface, followed by an NP ratio dependent release and consequent diffusion of siRNA across the mucin barrier. This work describes a new model of interaction at the nanocarrier-mucin interface and has important implications for the design and development of nucleic acid-based nanocarrier therapeutics for mucosal disease treatments and also provides insights into nanoscale pathogenic processes.The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the

  8. [Airway clearance techniques in chronic obstructive pulmonary syndrome : 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Opdekamp, C

    2011-09-01

    For many years the airway clearance techniques used in chest physical therapy were assimilated with the singular technique of postural drainage, percussions and vibrations. However the side effects and counter indications and the lack of scientific proof regarding this technique have forced reflection and development of other techniques more comfortable and without deleterious effects. If all these techniques show a high efficiency in terms of improved mucociliary clearance, the literature is unanimous on how little effect these techniques have in the short and the long-term with regards to lung function and arterial blood gases. In view of the scientific literature, it is clear that the airway clearance techniques don't have the same recognition concerning their efficiency in all obstructive pulmonary diseases. As the cornerstone in the management of cystic fibrosis, the efficiency of the bronchial hygiene techniques are in general poorly documented in the management of the non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, bronchitis or emphysema. The use of the chest physical therapy seems more to do with the interpretation of the imagery and symptomatology. The airway clearance techniques should be individualised according to symptoms, the amount of expectorated mucus and the objectives signs of secretions retention or subjective signs of difficulty expectorating secretions with progression of the disease.

  9. Coral Mucus Is a Hot Spot for Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh; Bouvier, Thierry; Bouvier, Corinne; Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Nguyen-Thanh, Thuy; Tran-Quang, Huy; Brune, Justine

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing suspicion that viral communities play a pivotal role in maintaining coral health, yet their main ecological traits still remain poorly characterized. In this study, we examined the seasonal distribution and reproduction pathways of viruses inhabiting the mucus of the scleractinians Fungia repanda and Acropora formosa collected in Nha Trang Bay (Vietnam) during an 11-month survey. The strong coupling between epibiotic viral and bacterial abundance suggested that phages are dominant among coral-associated viral communities. Mucosal viruses also exhibited significant differences in their main features between the two coral species and were also remarkably contrasted with their planktonic counterparts. For example, their abundance (inferred from epifluorescence counts), lytic production rates (KCN incubations), and the proportion of lysogenic cells (mitomycin C inductions) were, respectively, 2.6-, 9.5-, and 2.2-fold higher in mucus than in the surrounding water. Both lytic and lysogenic indicators were tightly coupled with temperature and salinity, suggesting that the life strategy of viral epibionts is strongly dependent upon environmental circumstances. Finally, our results suggest that coral mucus may represent a highly favorable habitat for viral proliferation, promoting the development of both temperate and virulent phages. Here, we discuss how such an optimized viral arsenal could be crucial for coral viability by presumably forging complex links with both symbiotic and adjacent nonsymbiotic microorganisms. PMID:26092456

  10. Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus

    PubMed Central

    Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Andreas; Abou, Bérengère; Hopf, Alexander; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Schneider, Marc; Schall, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the mobility of nanoparticles in mucus and similar hydrogels as model systems was assessed to elucidate the link between microscopic diffusion behavior and macroscopic penetration of such gels. Differences in particle adhesion to mucus components were strongly dependent on particle coating. Particles coated with 2 kDa PEG exhibited a decreased adhesion to mucus components, whereas chitosan strongly increased the adhesion. Despite such mucoinert properties of PEG, magnetic nanoparticles of both coatings did not penetrate through native respiratory mucus, resisting high magnetic forces (even for several hours). However, model hydrogels were, indeed, penetrated by both particles in dependency of particle coating, obeying the theory of particle mobility in an external force field. Comparison of penetration data with cryogenic scanning EM images of mucus and the applied model systems suggested particularly high rigidity of the mucin scaffold and a broad pore size distribution in mucus as reasons for the observed particle immobilization. Active probing of the rigidity of mucus and model gels with optical tweezers was used in this context to confirm such properties of mucus on the microscale, thus presenting the missing link between micro- and macroscopical observations. Because of high heterogeneity in the size of the voids and pores in mucus, on small scales, particle mobility will depend on adhesive or inert properties. However, particle translocation over distances larger than a few micrometers is restricted by highly rigid structures within the mucus mesh. PMID:23091027

  11. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected.

  12. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  13. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  14. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions. PMID:27886077

  15. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) induced mucin production by airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Walters, Dianne M.; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lee, Pak-Kei

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants has been linked to various airway diseases and disease exacerbations. Almost all chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are caused by complicated interactions between gene and environment. One of the major hallmarks of those diseases is airway mucus overproduction (MO). Excessive mucus causes airway obstruction and significantly increases morbidity and mortality. Metals are major components of environmental particulate matters (PM). Among them, vanadium has been suggested to play an important role in PM-induced mucin production. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is the most common commercial source of vanadium, and it has been associated with occupational chronic bronchitis and asthma, both of which are MO diseases. However, the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear. In this study, we used both in vitro and in vivo models to demonstrate the robust inductions of mucin production by V2O5. Furthermore, the follow-up mechanistic study revealed a novel v-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1-IKK-NF-κB pathway that mediated V2O5-induced mucin production. Most interestingly, the reactive oxygen species and the classical mucin-inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-MAPK pathway appeared not to be involved in this process. Thus the V2O5-induced mucin production may represent a novel EGFR-MAPK-independent and environmental toxicant-associated MO model. Complete elucidation of the signaling pathway in this model will not only facilitate the development of the treatment for V2O5-associated occupational diseases but also advance our understanding on the EGFR-independent mucin production in other chronic airway diseases. PMID:21531775

  16. Comparative permeability of some acyclovir derivatives through native mucus and crude mucin dispersions.

    PubMed

    Legen; Kristl, A

    2001-08-01

    The permeability of some guanine derivatives (acyclovir [ACV], deoxyacyclovir [DCV], and their N-acetyl congeners) through native porcine mucus and crude porcine mucin dispersions (30% and 50% w/v) was investigated in two-compartment dialysis cells. High correlation between apparent permeability coefficients Papp of tested substances determined in these two models was observed, although the examined compounds permeated faster through the native mucus. It was also established that Papp values decrease with increasing hydrophilicity and molecular mass of the tested substances. Furthermore, the influence of some substances that affect mucus structure (cysteine, N-acetylcysteine [NCY], sodium taurocholate [ST], and sodium chloride) on the permeation rate of the examined compounds through mucus and mucin dispersions was examined. It was shown that the Papp values of guanine derivatives were generally lower after the addition of these substances to the native mucus and mucin dispersions, although the lowering effect was more pronounced in the case of native mucus.

  17. Upper airway radiographs in infants with upper airway insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, S L; Davis, S L; Gunn, T R

    1994-01-01

    Upper airway measurements in nine infants considered to be at risk of upper airway insufficiency, six of whom presented after an apnoeic episode, were compared with measurements taken in two age groups of healthy infants. Paired, inspiratory and expiratory, lateral upper airway radiographs were obtained while the infants were awake and breathing quietly. The radiographs of all nine infants demonstrated narrowing in the oropharyngeal portion of the airway during inspiration and in six infants there was ballooning of the upper airway during expiration. Seven of the nine infants subsequently experienced recurrent apnoeic episodes which required vigorous stimulation to restore breathing. Experience suggests that respiratory phase timed radiographs are a useful adjunct to the evaluation of infants who are suspected of having upper airway dysfunction. They provide information regarding both the dimensions and compliance of the upper airway as well as the site of any restriction. Images PMID:8048825

  18. A Beneficiary Role for Neuraminidase in Influenza Virus Penetration through the Respiratory Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Steukers, Lennert; Forier, Katrien; Xiong, Ranhua; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) has a strong tropism for pig respiratory mucosa, which consists of a mucus layer, epithelium, basement membrane and lamina propria. Sialic acids present on the epithelial surface have long been considered to be determinants of influenza virus tropism. However, mucus which is also rich in sialic acids may serve as the first barrier of selection. It was investigated how influenza virus interacts with the mucus to infect epithelial cells. Two techniques were applied to track SIV H1N1 in porcine mucus. The microscopic diffusion of SIV particles in the mucus was analyzed by single particle tracking (SPT), and the macroscopic penetration of SIV through mucus was studied by a virus in-capsule-mucus penetration system, followed by visualizing the translocation of the virions with time by immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, the effects of neuraminidase on SIV getting through or binding to the mucus were studied by using zanamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), and Arthrobacter ureafaciens neuraminidase. The distribution of the diffusion coefficient shows that 70% of SIV particles were entrapped, while the rest diffused freely in the mucus. Additionally, SIV penetrated the porcine mucus with time, reaching a depth of 65 µm at 30 min post virus addition, 2 fold of that at 2 min. Both the microscopic diffusion and macroscopic penetration were largely diminished by NAI, while were clearly increased by the effect of exogenous neuraminidase. Moreover, the exogenous neuraminidase sufficiently prevented the binding of SIV to mucus which was reversely enhanced by effect of NAI. These findings clearly show that the neuraminidase helps SIV move through the mucus, which is important for the virus to reach and infect epithelial cells and eventually become shed into the lumen of the respiratory tract. PMID:25333824

  19. Different macro- and micro-rheological properties of native porcine respiratory and intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Bokkasam, Harish; Ernst, Matthias; Guenther, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-08-20

    Aim of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences at macro- and microscale in the viscoelastic properties of mucus that covers the epithelia of the intestinal and respiratory tract. Natural mucus was collected from pulmonary and intestinal regions of healthy pigs. Macro-rheological investigations were carried out through conventional plate-plate rheometry. Microrheology was investigated using optical tweezers. Our data revealed significant differences both in macro- and micro-rheological properties between respiratory and intestinal mucus.

  20. Fish mucus versus parasitic gnathiid isopods as sources of energy and sunscreens for a cleaner fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckes, Maxi; Dove, Sophie; Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Grutter, Alexandra S.

    2015-09-01

    The cleaning behaviour of the bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus is extensively used as a model system for understanding cooperation. It feeds mainly on blood-sucking gnathiid isopods and also on the epidermal mucus of client fish; the nutritional quality of these foods, however, is unknown. The epidermal mucus of reef fish contains ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (mycosporine-like amino acids, MAAs), which are only obtained via the diet; nevertheless, while La. dimidiatus has high amounts of MAAs in its mucus, their source is unknown. Therefore, the energetic value (calories and protein estimated using carbon and nitrogen) and MAA level in gnathiids and mucus from several clients [parrotfishes, wrasses (Labridae), and a snapper (Lutjanidae)] were determined. The energetic value of mucus and gnathiids varied among fishes. Overall, carbon, nitrogen, calories, and protein per dry weight were higher in the mucus of most client species compared to gnathiids. Thus, depending on the client species, mucus may be energetically more advantageous for cleaner wrasse to feed on than gnathiids. UV absorbance, a confirmed proxy for MAA levels, indicated high MAA levels in mucus, whereas gnathiids had no detectable MAAs. This suggests that La. dimidiatus obtain MAAs from mucus but not from gnathiids. Hence, in addition to energy, the mucus of some clients also provides La. dimidiatus with the added bonus of UV-absorbing compounds. This may explain why cleaner fish prefer to feed on mucus over gnathiid isopods. The likely costs and benefits to clients of the removal of UV protecting mucus and parasitic gnathiids, respectively, and the variation in benefits gained by cleaner fish from feeding on these foods may explain some variation in cooperation levels in cleaning interactions.

  1. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  2. Imaging endocervical mucus anatomy and dynamics in macaque female reproductive track using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Dong, Biqin; Sun, Cheng; Kiser, Patrick F.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocervical mucus acts as an important barrier to block human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Disruption of the mucus layer increases the risk of infection for females. An effective method to image the mucus properties can serve as a pre-screening step to risk-stratify the susceptible population. Methods We proposed to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) to quantitatively measure the thickness of endocervical mucus. We used a home-built bench-top OCT system to monitor the dynamic change in mucus thickness of a cultivated sample. We also fabricated a prototype endoscopic OCT probe to demonstrate potential in situ applications. Results We observed a 200% increase in the endocervical mucus thickness after cultivating in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline solution for 30 minutes. During mucus hydrolysis, we found that mucus layer thickness decreased to about 60% of its original value after applying neuraminidase. Three dimensional volumetric image of intact macaque inner vaginal wall was also acquired. Conclusions We demonstrated that OCT can quantitatively measure the endocervical mucus thickness and its dynamics in ex vivo experiments. Endoscopic OCT has the potential to resolve fine structures inside macaque female reproductive track (FRT) for in vivo applications. PMID:25694952

  3. Active microrheology reveals molecular-level variations in the viscoelastic properties of Chaetopterus mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, William; Messmore, Ashley; Anderson, Rae

    The sea annelid, Chaetopterus Variopedatus, secretes a bioluminescent mucus that also exhibits complex viscoelastic properties. The constituents of the mucus are relatively unknown but it does play an important role in the development of the worms' parchment-like housing tubes. In order to determine how and why this mucus can exhibit material properties ranging from fluidity to rigidity we perform microrheology experiments. We determine the microscale viscoelastic properties by using optical tweezers to produce small oscillations in the mucus which allow us to determine both the linear storage and loss moduli (G',G'') along with the viscosity of the fluid. By varying the size of the microspheres (2-10 µm) and oscillation amplitude (.5-10 µm) we are able to determine the dominant intrinsic length scales of the molecular mesh comprising the mucus. By varying the oscillation frequency (1-15Hz) we determine the crossover frequency at which G' surpasses G'', to quantify the longest relaxation time of the mesh network. Initial results show a strong dependence on bead size which indicate that the dominant entanglement lengthscale of the mucus mesh is ~5 um. Microspheres of this size exhibit a wide variety of stress responses in different regions of the mucus demonstrating the substantial microscale heterogeneity of the mucus. We carry out measurements on a population of worms of varying size and age to determine mucus variability between worms.

  4. Measurement of the Airway Surface Liquid Volume with Simple Light Refraction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Peter R.; Tarran, Robert; Garoff, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, the airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is depleted, impairing mucus clearance from the lung and leading to chronic airway infection and obstruction. Several therapeutics have been developed that aim to restore normal airway surface hydration to the CF airway, yet preclinical evaluation of these agents is hindered by the paucity of methods available to directly measure the ASL. Therefore, we sought to develop a straightforward approach to measure the ASL volume that would serve as the basis for a standardized method to assess mucosal hydration using readily available resources. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells cultured at an air–liquid interface develop a liquid meniscus at the edge of the culture. We hypothesized that the size of the fluid meniscus is determined by the ASL volume, and could be measured as an index of the epithelial surface hydration status. A simple method was developed to measure the volume of fluid present in meniscus by imaging the refraction of light at the ASL interface with the culture wall using low-magnification microscopy. Using this method, we found that primary CF HBE cells had a reduced ASL volume compared with non-CF HBE cells, and that known modulators of ASL volume caused the predicted responses. Thus, we have demonstrated that this method can detect physiologically relevant changes in the ASL volume, and propose that this novel approach may be used to rapidly assess the effects of airway hydration therapies in high-throughput screening assays. PMID:21239602

  5. GS143, an I{kappa}B ubiquitination inhibitor, inhibits allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Koichi; Wakashin, Hidefumi; Oki, Mie; Kagami, Shin-ichiro; Suto, Akira; Ikeda, Kei; Watanabe, Norihiko; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-26

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation with intense eosinophil infiltration and mucus hyper-production, in which antigen-specific Th2 cells play critical roles. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway has been demonstrated to be essential for the production of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the airways in murine asthma models. In the present study, we examined the effect of GS143, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of I{kappa}B ubiquitination, on antigen-induced airway inflammation and Th2 cytokine production in mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 prior to antigen challenge suppressed antigen-induced NF-{kappa}B activation in the lung of sensitized mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 also inhibited antigen-induced eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment into the airways as well as the expression of Th2 cytokines and eotaxin in the airways. Moreover, GS143 inhibited antigen-induced differentiation of Th2 cells but not of Th1 cells in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that I{kappa}B ubiquitination inhibitor may have therapeutic potential against asthma.

  6. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  7. Tiotropium bromide inhibits relapsing allergic asthma in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Berislav; Tilp, Cornelia; Tomsic, Christopher; Dekan, Gerhard; Pieper, Michael P; Erb, Klaus J; Epstein, Michelle M

    2014-02-01

    Recurrent relapses of allergic lung inflammation in asthmatics may lead to airway remodeling and lung damage. We tested the efficacy of tiotropium bromide, a selective long-acting, muscarinic receptor antagonist as an adjunct therapy in relapses of allergic asthma in mice. We compared the effectiveness of local intranasal administration of tiotropium and dexamethasone in acute and relapsing allergic asthma in BALB/c mice. Although tiotropium at low doses is a potent bronchodilator, we tested higher doses to determine effectiveness on inflammation and mucus hypersecretion. A 5-day course of twice daily intranasal tiotropium or dexamethasone (1 mg/kg (b.w.)) suppressed airway eosinophils by over 87% during disease initiation and 88% at relapse compared to vehicle alone. Both drugs were comparable in their capacity to suppress airway and parenchymal inflammation and mucus hypersecretion, though tiotropium was better than dexamethasone at reducing mucus secretion during disease relapse. Despite treatment with either drug, serum antigen-specific IgE or IgG1 antibody titres remained unchanged. Our study indicates that tiotropium at higher doses than required for bronchodilation, effectively suppresses inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in the lungs and airways of mice during the initiation and relapse of asthma. Tiotropium is currently not approved for use in asthma. Clinical studies have to demonstrate the efficacy of tiotropium in this respiratory disease.

  8. Localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria in cystic fibrosis lungs and interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hypoxic mucus.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ute; Abdullah, Lubna H; Perlmutt, Olivia S; Albert, Daniel; Davis, C William; Arnold, Roland R; Yankaskas, James R; Gilligan, Peter; Neubauer, Heiner; Randell, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    The localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs, alone or during coinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is poorly understood. We performed immunohistochemistry for Bcc and P. aeruginosa bacteria on 21 coinfected or singly infected CF lungs obtained at transplantation or autopsy. Parallel in vitro experiments examined the growth of two Bcc species, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans, in environments similar to those occupied by P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. Bcc bacteria were predominantly identified in the CF lung as single cells or small clusters within phagocytes and mucus but not as "biofilm-like structures." In contrast, P. aeruginosa was identified in biofilm-like masses, but densities appeared to be reduced during coinfection with Bcc bacteria. Based on chemical analyses of CF and non-CF respiratory secretions, a test medium was defined to study Bcc growth and interactions with P. aeruginosa in an environment mimicking the CF lung. When test medium was supplemented with alternative electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans used fermentation rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of fermentation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both Bcc species also expressed mucinases that produced carbon sources from mucins for growth. In the presence of P. aeruginosa in vitro, both Bcc species grew anaerobically but not aerobically. We propose that Bcc bacteria (i) invade a P. aeruginosa-infected CF lung when the airway lumen is anaerobic, (ii) inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm-like growth, and (iii) expand the host bacterial niche from mucus to also include macrophages.

  9. Localization of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs and Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hypoxic Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Lubna H.; Perlmutt, Olivia S.; Albert, Daniel; Davis, C. William; Arnold, Roland R.; Yankaskas, James R.; Gilligan, Peter; Neubauer, Heiner; Randell, Scott H.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs, alone or during coinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is poorly understood. We performed immunohistochemistry for Bcc and P. aeruginosa bacteria on 21 coinfected or singly infected CF lungs obtained at transplantation or autopsy. Parallel in vitro experiments examined the growth of two Bcc species, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans, in environments similar to those occupied by P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. Bcc bacteria were predominantly identified in the CF lung as single cells or small clusters within phagocytes and mucus but not as “biofilm-like structures.” In contrast, P. aeruginosa was identified in biofilm-like masses, but densities appeared to be reduced during coinfection with Bcc bacteria. Based on chemical analyses of CF and non-CF respiratory secretions, a test medium was defined to study Bcc growth and interactions with P. aeruginosa in an environment mimicking the CF lung. When test medium was supplemented with alternative electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans used fermentation rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of fermentation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both Bcc species also expressed mucinases that produced carbon sources from mucins for growth. In the presence of P. aeruginosa in vitro, both Bcc species grew anaerobically but not aerobically. We propose that Bcc bacteria (i) invade a P. aeruginosa-infected CF lung when the airway lumen is anaerobic, (ii) inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm-like growth, and (iii) expand the host bacterial niche from mucus to also include macrophages. PMID:25156735

  10. Morphologic aspects of airways of patients with pulmonary emphysema followed by bronchial asthma-like attack.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, M; Shimura, S; Shirato, K

    1996-02-01

    Morphometric analysis of airways was performed in autopsied lungs from four patients with pulmonary emphysema (PE) followed by bronchial-asthma (BA)-like attacks (Group PE+BA) (four males, 72 +/- 9 yr). The results were compared with those from five pulmonary emphysema patients (Group PE) (five males, age 71 +/- 4 hr), three patients with bronchial asthma (Group BA) (one female and two males, age 65 +/- 7 yr), and four control subjects with no pulmonary diseases (Group Cont) (one female, three males, age 64 +/- 4 yr). The proportion of gland area to bronchial wall (gland%), ratio of goblet-cell occupancy to the total epithelial layer (goblet%), thickness of the basement membrane, amount of intraluminal mucus (mucus occupying ratio; MOR%), and number of various cell types per square millimeter in airway walls in a section 4 microns thick were measured in central (3 to 8 mm diameter) and peripheral airways (2 mm or less diameter). Gland% for the PE+BA group was significantly greater than that for the Cont group, whereas it did not differ significantly from that of the PE or BA groups. Goblet% and thickness of the basement membrane in central and/or peripheral airways in Group PE+BA were significantly greater than those in Group Cont, whereas those in Group PE were similar to those in Group Cont. Although not statistically significant, MOR% in central and peripheral airways from Group PE+BA showed a similar value to that in Group BA, whereas MOR% in Group PE was the same as that in Group Cont. The eosinophil number in peripheral airways walls in Group PE+BA showed a similar value to that in Group BA, which was significantly greater than in Group Cont. Other cells (macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils) showed similar values among Groups PE+BA, PE, and BA. The number of eosinophils in central and/or peripheral airways correlated significantly with both goblet% and BMT, whereas other cells did not. These findings indicate that the airways of Group PE+BA are

  11. The Effects of Uygur Herb Hyssopus officinalis L. on the Process of Airway Remodeling in Asthmatic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Wang, Jing; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could affect the levels of some cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ) in asthmatic mice. By detection of the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the morphological changes, the aim of this research is to reveal the mechanism of Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. in the process of airway remodeling. It was observed that the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 increased, but the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1 decreased in airway remodeling group. However, the expression of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1 decreased after being treated with dexamethasone and Hyssopus offcinalis L., accompanied by the relieved pathological changes, including collagen deposition, mucus secretion, and smooth muscle proliferation. It is suggested that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could inhibit airway remodeling by correcting imbalance of MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio.

  12. The Effects of Uygur Herb Hyssopus officinalis L. on the Process of Airway Remodeling in Asthmatic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Wang, Jing; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could affect the levels of some cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ) in asthmatic mice. By detection of the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the morphological changes, the aim of this research is to reveal the mechanism of Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. in the process of airway remodeling. It was observed that the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 increased, but the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1 decreased in airway remodeling group. However, the expression of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1 decreased after being treated with dexamethasone and Hyssopus offcinalis L., accompanied by the relieved pathological changes, including collagen deposition, mucus secretion, and smooth muscle proliferation. It is suggested that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could inhibit airway remodeling by correcting imbalance of MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. PMID:25383084

  13. Carbachol-induced colonic mucus formation requires transport via NKCC1, K+ channels and CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Sara K.; Alwan, Ala H.; Scholte, Bob J.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Sjövall, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The colonic mucosa protects itself from the luminal content by secreting mucus that keeps the bacteria at a distance from the epithelium. For this barrier to be effective, the mucus has to be constantly replenished which involves exocytosis and expansion of the secreted mucins. Mechanisms involved in regulation of mucus exocytosis and expansion are poorly understood, and the aim of this study was to investigate whether epithelial anion secretion regulates mucus formation in the colon. The muscarinic agonist carbachol was used to induce parallel secretion of anions and mucus, and by using established inhibitors of ion transport, we studied how inhibition of epithelial transport affected mucus formation in mouse colon. Anion secretion and mucin exocytosis were measured by changes in membrane current and epithelial capacitance, respectively. Mucus thickness measurements were used to determine the carbachol effect on mucus growth. The results showed that the carbachol-induced increase in membrane current was dependent on NKCC1 co-transport, basolateral K+ channels and Cftr activity. In contrast, the carbachol-induced increase in capacitance was partially dependent on NKCC1 and K+ channel activity, but did not require Cftr activity. Carbachol also induced an increase in mucus thickness that was inhibited by the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. However, mice that lacked a functional Cftr channel did not respond to carbachol with an increase in mucus thickness, suggesting that carbachol-induced mucin expansion requires Cftr channel activity. In conclusion, these findings suggest that colonic epithelial transport regulates mucus formation by affecting both exocytosis and expansion of the mucin molecules. PMID:25139191

  14. Role of mucus in ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mojzis, J; Hegedüsová, R; Mirossay, L

    2000-01-01

    Gastric mucus plays an important role in gastric mucosal protection. Apart from its "barrier" function, it has been demonstrated that mucus protects gastric epithelial cells against toxic oxygen metabolites derived from the xanthine/ xanthine oxidase system. In this study, we investigated the effect of malotilate and sucralfate (mucus production stimulators) and N-acetylcysteine (mucolytic agent) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury. Gastric ischemia was induced by 30 min clamping of the coeliac artery followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The mucus content was determined by the Alcian blue method. Sucralfate (100 mg/kg), malotilate (100 mg/kg), and N-acetylcysteine (100 mg/kg) were given orally 30 min before surgery. Both sucralfate and malotilate increased the mucus production in control rats. On the other hand, N-acetyloysteine significantly decreased mucus content in control (sham) group. A significant decrease of mucus content was found in the control and the N-acetylcysteine pretreated group during the period of ischemia. On the other hand, sucralfate and malotilate prevented the decrease the content of mucus during ischemia. A similar result can be seen after ischemia/reperfusion. In the control group and N-acetylcysteine pretreated group a significant decrease of adherent mucus content was found. However, sucralfate and malotilate increased mucus production (sucralfate significantly). Sucralfate and malotilate also significantly protected the gastric mucosa against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury. However, N-acetylcysteine significantly increased gastric mucosal injury after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that gastric mucus may be involved in the protection of gastric mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion.

  15. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose, and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont. PMID:27047481

  16. HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine inhibits airway remodeling by regulating the transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Xiao-Ling, Shi; Zheng-Yan, Cheng; Guo-Ping, Li; Sen, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Airway remodeling is an important pathologic feature of chronic asthma. T-bet and GATA-3, the key transcription factors for differentiation toward Th1 and Th2 cells, play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. Previous studies showed that HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in acute asthmatic mice. The present study was designed to determine the effect of HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine on airway remodeling through regulating the development of Th1/Th2. Material and methods Before being sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin, the BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine. Lung tissues were assessed by histological examinations. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)/interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined by ELISA and expressions of IFN-γ, IL-4, T-bet and GATA-3 in spleen were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Chronic asthmatic mice had higher airway hyperresponsiveness, a thicker airway wall, more PAS-positive goblet cells, more subepithelial extracellular matrix deposition and more proliferating airway smooth muscle (ASM)-like cells than control mice (p < 0.05). Compared with the chronic asthmatic mice, the treatment with HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine could reduce airway hyperreactivity, mucus secretion, subepithelial collagen deposition, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (p < 0.05). DNA vaccination also increased levels of IFN-γ/IL-4 in BAL fluid (p < 0.05), and expression of T-bet/GATA-3 in the spleen (p < 0.05). Conclusions HSP70/CD80 DNA vaccine can inhibit airway remodeling through regulating the development of Th1/Th2 subsets in asthmatic mice. PMID:24273578

  17. Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01-3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

  18. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  19. Microarray gene expression analysis of the human airway in patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ali; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohamad Reza

    2014-08-01

    There is much data about the acute effects of sulfur mustard gas on humans, animals and cells. But less is known regarding the molecular basics of chronic complications in humans. Basically, mustard gas, as an alkylating agent, causes several chronic problems in the eyes, skin and more importantly in the pulmonary system which is the main cause of death. Although recent proteomic research has been carried out on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum, but high-throughput transcriptomics have not yet been applied to chronic airway remodeling. This is the first cDNA-microarray report on the chronic human mustard lung disease, 25 years after exposure during the Iran-Iraq war. Microarray transcriptional profiling indicated that a total of 122 genes were significantly dysregulated in tissues located in the airway of patients. These genes are associated with the extracellular matrix components, apoptosis, stress response, inflammation and mucus secretion.

  20. Efficient mucus permeation and tight junction opening by dissociable "mucus-inert" agent coated trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Xi; Shan, Wei; Li, Lian; Zhong, Jiaju; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2016-01-28

    Oral administration of protein drugs is greatly impeded by the lack of drug carriers that can efficiently overcome the absorption barriers of mucosa tissue, which consists of not only epithelium but also a blanket of mucus gel. We herein report a novel self-assembled nanoparticle (NP) platform for oral delivery of insulin by facilitating the efficient permeation through both of these two barriers. The NP possesses a core composed of insulin and trimethyl chitosan (TMC), and a dissociable "mucus-inert" hydrophilic coating of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer (pHPMA) derivative. The NPs exhibited free Brownian motion and excellent permeability in mucus, which enabled the access of the NP core to the epithelial cell surface underneath the mucus. Moreover, investigation of NP behavior showed that the pHPMA molecules started to dissociate as the NP permeates through mucus, and the TMC NP core was then exposed to facilitate transepithelial transport via paracellular pathway. The pHPMA coating significantly improved transepithelial transport of TMC-based NP and their ability to open tight junctions between the mucus-secreting epithelial cells. Moreover, in diabetic rats, pHPMA coated NPs generated a prominent hypoglycemic response following oral administration, and exhibited a relative bioavailability 2.8-fold higher than that of uncoated TMC-based NPs. Our study provided the evidence of using pHPMA as "mucus-inert" agent to enhance mucus permeation of TMC-based NPs, and validated a novel strategy to overcome the multiple absorption barriers using NP platform with dissociable hydrophilic coating and TMC-based core possessing tight junction-opening ability.

  1. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri cell and mucus-binding protein A (CmbA) in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hanne; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A; Axelsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, a symbiotic inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals, is marketed as a probiotic. The ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus is an interesting property with regard to probiotic features such as colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with the host. Here, we present a study performed to elucidate the role of sortase (SrtA), four putative sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs), and one C-terminal membrane-anchored cell surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 in adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus in vitro. This included mutagenesis of the genes encoding these proteins and complementation of mutants. A null mutation in hmpref0536_10255 encoding srtA resulted in significantly reduced adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus, indicating involvement of SDPs in adhesion. Evaluation of the bacterial adhesion revealed that of the five putative surface protein mutants tested, only a null mutation in the hmpref0536_10633 gene, encoding a putative SDP with an LPxTG motif, resulted in a significant loss of adhesion to both Caco-2 cells and mucus. Complementation with the functional gene on a plasmid restored adhesion to Caco-2 cells. However, complete restoration of adhesion to mucus was not achieved. Overexpression of hmpref0536_10633 in strain ATCC PTA 6475 resulted in an increased adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus compared with the WT strain. We conclude from these results that, among the putative surface proteins tested, the protein encoded by hmpref0536_10633 plays a critical role in binding of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 to Caco-2 cells and mucus. Based on this, we propose that this LPxTG motif containing protein should be referred to as cell and mucus binding protein A (CmbA).

  2. Coral mucus functions as an energy carrier and particle trap in the reef ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wild, Christian; Huettel, Markus; Klueter, Anke; Kremb, Stephan G; Rasheed, Mohammed Y M; Jørgensen, Bo B

    2004-03-04

    Zooxanthellae, endosymbiotic algae of reef-building corals, substantially contribute to the high gross primary production of coral reefs, but corals exude up to half of the carbon assimilated by their zooxanthellae as mucus. Here we show that released coral mucus efficiently traps organic matter from the water column and rapidly carries energy and nutrients to the reef lagoon sediment, which acts as a biocatalytic mineralizing filter. In the Great Barrier Reef, the dominant genus of hard corals, Acropora, exudes up to 4.8 litres of mucus per square metre of reef area per day. Between 56% and 80% of this mucus dissolves in the reef water, which is filtered through the lagoon sands. Here, coral mucus is degraded at a turnover rate of at least 7% per hour. Detached undissolved mucus traps suspended particles, increasing its initial organic carbon and nitrogen content by three orders of magnitude within 2 h. Tidal currents concentrate these mucus aggregates into the lagoon, where they rapidly settle. Coral mucus provides light energy harvested by the zooxanthellae and trapped particles to the heterotrophic reef community, thereby establishing a recycling loop that supports benthic life, while reducing loss of energy and nutrients from the reef ecosystem.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection does not reduce the viscosity of human gastric mucus gel.

    PubMed Central

    Markesich, D C; Anand, B S; Lew, G M; Graham, D Y

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori undermines host defence mechanisms is unclear. Several in vitro studies using soluble mucins have suggested that H pylori may compromise mucus function. Gastric mucus gel was obtained from 13 H pylori infected patients; six untreated subjects and seven after eradication of the infection. Gastric mucus is a non-Newtonian substance in that its viscosity changes with changing rates of shear, requiring mucus viscosity to be measured in a rotational cone-plate microviscometer. Viscosity was measured at shear rates varying from 1.15 s-1 to 46 s-1. The gastric mucus viscosity was significantly higher in patients infected with H pylori compared with mucus gel obtained after eradication of the infection. The results of our study suggest that the previous studies using in vitro methods involving soluble mucins or its components may have lead to erroneous conclusions about the in vivo interactions of H pylori and gastric mucus gel. The present findings argue against the hypothesis that degradation of gastric mucus by H pylori is important in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer. PMID:7698685

  4. Quantitative post-coital test: sperm counts in cervical mucus after enzymatic liquefaction.

    PubMed

    de Agostini, A; Tawfik, E; Campana, A

    1996-02-01

    The post-coital test involves direct microscopic examination of sperm number and motility in cervical mucus. The results depend on the quality of the mucus and the distribution of spermatozoa within the sample. To progress from such qualitative data to quantitative measurements of the spermatozoa present in post-coital mucus, we have developed methods to measure sperm concentrations in enzymatically liquefied post-coital cervical mucus. The mucus score and sperm motility were measured prior to mucus liquefaction, and, together with sperm concentration, they allowed the calculation of the total number of motile spermatozoa present. A combination of bromelin and glycosidases proved to be more efficient in achieving reliable mucus liquefaction than treatment with bromelin alone, and was used to liquefy a series of 36 post-coital test samples. Total sperm numbers ranged between 19 x 10(3) and 16.8 x 10(6). Of the samples, 75% contained < 3 x 10(6) spermatozoa, and 39% contained < 1 x 10(6) spermatozoa. Sperm motility was very high in these samples, except for a distinct subset of samples (19%) in which the total sperm motility was markedly decreased ( < 20%). The measurement of sperm concentration in liquefied cervical mucus will help to determine normal values for the post-coital test, and to estimate the number of motile spermatozoa reaching the upper female genital tract.

  5. Preliminary Results on the Influence of Engineered Artificial Mucus Layer on Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Döllinger, Michael; Gröhn, Franziska; Berry, David A.; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Luegmair, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have confirmed the influence of dehydration and an altered mucus (e.g., due to pathologies) on phonation. However, the underlying reasons for these influences are not fully understood. This study was a preliminary inquiry into the influences of mucus architecture and concentration on vocal fold oscillation. Method: Two…

  6. A microfluidic in vitro system for the quantitative study of the stomach mucus barrier function.

    PubMed

    Li, Leon; Lieleg, Oliver; Jang, Sae; Ribbeck, Katharina; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-10-21

    In the stomach, a layer of gastric mucus protects the epithelial cells of the stomach wall against damage by the acidic digestive juices in the gastric lumen. Despite considerable research, the biophysical mechanisms for this acid barrier are not understood. We present an in vitro microfluidic tool to characterize the stomach acid barrier, in which purified mucin polymers are "secreted" against an acidic zone on chip, mimicking the in vivo secretion of gastric mucus into an acidic stomach lumen. This device reconstitutes both the H(+) concentration gradient and outward flow environment of the mucus layer in vivo. Our experiments demonstrate that a continuously secreted mucin layer hinders acid diffusion, suggesting novel insights into the barrier role of mucins. More broadly, our system may serve as a platform tool for studying the barrier functions provided by mucus layers in the body and for studying mucus drug interactions.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers CFTR-mediated airway surface liquid secretion in swine trachea.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiaojie; Campanucci, Verónica A; Nair, Manoj; Yilmaz, Orhan; Belev, George; Machen, Terry E; Chapman, Dean; Ianowski, Juan P

    2014-09-02

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several organs are affected in CF, but most of the morbidity and mortality comes from lung disease. Recent data show that the initial consequence of CFTR mutation is the failure to eradicate bacteria before the development of inflammation and airway remodeling. Bacterial clearance depends on a layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) consisting of both a mucus layer that traps, kills, and inactivates bacteria and a periciliary liquid layer that keeps the mucus at an optimum distance from the underlying epithelia, to maximize ciliary motility and clearance of bacteria. The airways in CF patients and animal models of CF demonstrate abnormal ASL secretion and reduced antimicrobial properties. Thus, it has been proposed that abnormal ASL secretion in response to bacteria may facilitate the development of the infection and inflammation that characterize CF airway disease. Whether the inhalation of bacteria triggers ASL secretion, and the role of CFTR, have never been tested, however. We developed a synchrotron-based imaging technique to visualize the ASL layer and measure the effect of bacteria on ASL secretion. We show that the introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria into the lumen of intact isolated swine tracheas triggers CFTR-dependent ASL secretion by the submucosal glands. This response requires expression of the bacterial protein flagellin. In patients with CF, the inhalation of bacteria would fail to trigger ASL secretion, leading to infection and inflammation.

  8. Antimicrobial properties of mucus from the brown garden snail Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Pitt, S J; Graham, M A; Dedi, C G; Taylor-Harris, P M; Gunn, A

    2015-01-01

    Research into naturally occurring antimicrobial substances has yielded effective treatments. One area of interest is peptides and proteins produced by invertebrates as part of their defence system, including the contents of mollusc mucus. Mucus produced by the African giant land snail, Achatina fulica has been reported to contain two proteins with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Mucus from the brown garden snail, Helix aspersa, appears to have skin regeneration properties. This study sought to investigate the antimicrobial properties of H. aspersa mucus. Mucus was collected from H. aspersa snails, diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), with the supernatant tested against a wide range of organisms in a disc-diffusion antimicrobial assay. This was followed with comparative experiments involving A. fulica, including bacteriophage assays. Mucus from both species of snail was passed through a series of protein size separation columns in order to determine the approximate size of the antimicrobial substance. Electrophoresis was also carried out on the H. aspersa mucus. Results indicated that H. aspersa mucus had a strong antibacterial effect against several strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a weak effect against Staphylococcus aureus. Mucus from A. fulica also inhibited the growth of S. aureus, but the broad spectrum of activity reported by other workers was not observed. Antimicrobial activity was not caused by bacteriophage. Size separation experiments indicated that the antimicrobial substance(s) in H. aspersa were between 30 and 100 kDa. Electrophoresis revealed two proteins in this region (30-40 kDa and 50-60 kDa). These do not correspond with antimicrobial proteins previously reported in A. fulica. This study found one or more novel antimicrobial agents in H. aspersa mucus, with a strong effect against P. aeruginosa.

  9. High-frequency and low-frequency chest compression: effects on lung water secretion, mucus transport, heart rate, and blood pressure using a trapezoidal source pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    O'Clock, George D; Lee, Yong Wan; Lee, Jongwong; Warwick, Warren J

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC), using an appropriate source (pump) waveform for frequencies at or above 3 Hz, can enhance pulmonary clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using a trapezoidal HFCC source pressure waveform, secretion of water from epithelial tissue and transport of mucus through lung airways can be enhanced for patients with CF and COPD. At frequencies below 3 Hz, low-frequency chest compression (LFCC) appears to have a significant impact on the cardiovascular system. For a trapezoidal source pressure waveform at frequencies close to 1 Hz, LFCC produces amplitude or intensity variations in various components of the electrocardiogram time-domain waveform, produces changes at very low frequencies associated with the electrocardiogram frequency spectra (indicating enhanced parasympathetic nervous system activity), and promotes a form of heart rate synchronization. It appears that LFCC can also provide additional cardiovascular benefits by reducing peak and average systolic and diastolic blood pressure for patients with hypertension.

  10. CRTH2 antagonism significantly ameliorates airway hyperreactivity and downregulates inflammation-induced genes in a mouse model of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Nicholas W; Berlin, Aaron A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Sásik, Roman; Sprague, L James; Ly, Tai Wei; Hardiman, Gary; Boehme, Stefen A; Bacon, Kevin B

    2008-11-01

    Prostaglandin D(2), the ligand for the G protein-coupled receptors DP1 and CRTH2, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the allergic response in diseases such as asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. This prostanoid also fulfills a number of physiological, anti-inflammatory roles through its receptor DP1. We investigated the role of PGD(2) and CRTH2 in allergic pulmonary inflammation by using a highly potent and specific antagonist of CRTH2. Administration of this antagonist ameliorated inflammation caused by either acute or subchronic sensitization using the cockroach egg antigen. Gene expression and ELISA analysis revealed that there was reduced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA or protein produced, as well as a wide array of genes associated with the Th2-type proinflammatory response. Importantly, the CRTH2 antagonist reduced antigen-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a antibody levels as well as decreased mucus deposition and leukocyte infiltration in the large airways. Collectively, these findings suggest that the PGD(2)-CRTH2 activation axis has a pivotal role in mediating the inflammation and the underlying immune response in a T cell-driven model of allergic airway inflammation.

  11. Occurrence of organo-arsenicals in jellyfishes and their mucus.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, K; Ohno, H; Wada, N; Ueno, S; Goessler, W; Kuehnelt, D; Schlagenhaufen, C; Kaise, T; Irgolic, K J

    2001-08-01

    Water-soluble arsenic compound fractions were extracted from seven species of jellyfishes and subjected to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for arsenicals. A low content of arsenic was found to be the characteristic of jellyfish. Arsenobetaine (AB) was the major arsenic compound without exception in the tissues of the jellyfish species and mucus-blobs collected from some of them. Although the arsenic content in Beroe cucumis, which preys on Bolinopsis mikado, was more than 13 times that in B. mikado, the chromatograms of these two species were similar in the distribution pattern of arsenicals. The nine species of jellyfishes including two species treated in the previous paper can be classified into arsenocholine (AC)-rich and AC-poor species. Jellyfishes belonging to Semaostamae were classified as AC-rich species.

  12. Mucoactive and antioxidant medicines for COPD: consensus of a group of Chinese pulmonary physicians

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xixin; Song, Yuanlin; Shen, Ce; Xu, Wenbing; Chen, Liangan; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Huiguo; Huang, Mao; Lai, Guoxiang; Qian, Guishen; Wang, Jing; Ye, Xianwei; Zheng, Jinping; Bai, Chunxue

    2017-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a frequent symptom associated with acute and chronic airway disease. Inhibition of mucus production or promotion of mucolysis not only relieved symptoms but also improved disease outcomes. There are numerous available mucoactive medicines for prescription, and how to select them properly for different diseases is important for clinical practice. So far, there is no one consensus or guideline reported. A group of Chinese pulmonary physicians worked together to complete this consensus based on literature review, summarized mechanism and usage of each classical mucoactive medicine. In general, antioxidant mucoactive medicines play an important role in chronic airway disease, including but not limited to airway mucus clearance, reduced acute exacerbation and improved pulmonary function.

  13. Effect of viscosity on metachrony in mucus propelling cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we report that increasing the viscosity of the medium caused not only a decrease in the ciliary beat frequency but also changes in the metachrony and correlation between cilia. The study was performed using double and triple simultaneous photoelectric measurements on cultured ciliary cells from the frog esophagus in the viscosity range of 1-2,000 cp. We observed that increasing the viscosity intensified the fluctuations in all the measured parameters. Ciliary beat frequency decreased moderately. Even at quite high viscosities (circa 2000 cp.), cilia were still active with beating frequencies of 3-5 Hz. In addition, the degree of correlation between cilia parallel to the effective stroke direction (ESD) decreased, while that perpendicular to the ESD at a low range of viscosities remained unchanged and even increased at high viscosities. Medium viscosities in the range of 30-1,500 cp. altered the metachronal wave properties of cultured frog esophagus. The metachronal wavelength increased by up to 50%, and the wave direction changed towards more orthoplectic type of coordination. According to our recently suggested model [Gheber and Priel, 1990: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 16:167-181], these effects can be explained by a decrease in the temporal asymmetry of the ciliary beat. Since similar results were observed in water propelling cilia of Paramecium subjected to medium viscosity ranges of up to 40 cp. [Machemer, 1972: J. Exp. Biol. 57:239-259], we conclude that hydrodynamic interactions govern the metachronal wave properties of both mucus and water propelling cilia, though mucus propelling cilia, with their better adaptation to increased load, are affected at much higher viscosities than water propelling cilia.

  14. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-01-27

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients.

  15. Altered Sputum Microstructure as a Marker of Airway Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg; Jung, James; West, Natalie; Boyle, Michael; Suk, Jung Soo; Hanes, Justin

    In the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, highly viscoelastic mucus remains stagnant in the lung leading to obstructed airways prone to recurrent infections. Bulk-fluid rheological measurement is primarily used to assess the pathological features of mucus. However, this approach is limited in detecting microscopic properties on the length scale of pathogens and immune cells. We have shown in prior work based on the transport of muco-inert nanoparticles (MIP) in CF sputum that patients can carry significantly different microstructural properties. In this study, we aimed to determine the factors leading to variations between patients in sputum microstructure and their clinical implications. The microrheological properties of CF sputum were measured using multi-particle tracking experiments of MIP. MIP were made by grafting polyethylene glycol onto the surface of polystyrene nanoparticles which prior work has shown prevents adhesion to CF sputum. Biochemical analyses show that sputum microstructure was significantly altered by elevated mucin and DNA content. Reduction in sputum pore size is characteristic of patients with obstructed airways as indicated by measured pulmonary function tests. Our microstructural read-out may serve as a novel biomarker for CF.

  16. Secretion of acid and base equivalents by intact distal airways.

    PubMed

    Inglis, S K; Wilson, S M; Olver, R E

    2003-05-01

    Secretion of HCO(3)(-) by airway submucosal glands is essential for normal liquid and mucus secretion. Because the liquid bathing the airway surface (ASL) is acidic, it has been proposed that the surface epithelium may acidify HCO(3)(-)-rich glandular fluid. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which intact distal bronchi, which contain both surface and glandular epithelium, modify pH of luminal fluid. Distal bronchi were isolated from pig lungs, cannulated in a bath containing HCO(3)(-)-buffered solution, and perfused continually with an aliquot of similar, lightly buffered solution (LBS) in which NaCl replaced NaHCO(3)(-) (pH 7 with NaOH). The pH of this circulating LBS initially acidified (by 0.053 +/- 0.0053 pH units) and transepithelial potential difference (PD) depolarized. The magnitude of acidification was increased when pH(LBS) was higher. This acidification was unaffected by luminal dimethylamiloride (DMA, 100 microM) but was inhibited by 100 nM bafilomycin A(1) (by 76 +/- 13%), suggesting involvement of vacuolar-H(+) ATPase. Addition of ACh (10 microM) evoked alkalinization of luminal LBS and hyperpolarization of transepithelial PD. The alkalinization was inhibited in HCO(3)(-)-free solutions containing acetazolamide (1 mM) and by DMA and was enhanced by bumetanide (100 microM), an inhibitor of Cl(-) secretion. The hyperpolarization was unaffected by these maneuvers. The anion channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoate (300 microM) and combined treatment with DMA and bumetanide blocked both the alkalinization and hyperpolarization responses to ACh. These results are consistent with earlier studies showing that ACh evokes glandular secretion of HCO(3)(-) and Cl(-). Isolated distal airways thus secrete both acid and base equivalents.

  17. Interleukin-1beta causes pulmonary inflammation, emphysema, and airway remodeling in the adult murine lung.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Urpo; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Tichelaar, Jay W; Bry, Kristina

    2005-04-01

    The production of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 is increased in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. To characterize the in vivo actions of IL-1 in the lung, transgenic mice were generated in which human IL-1beta was expressed in the lung epithelium with a doxycycline-inducible system controlled by the rat Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter. Induction of IL-1beta expression in the lungs of adult mice caused pulmonary inflammation characterized by neutrophil and macrophage infiltrates. IL-1beta caused distal airspace enlargement, consistent with emphysema. IL-1beta caused disruption of elastin fibers in alveolar septa and fibrosis in airway walls and in the pleura. IL-1beta increased the thickness of conducting airways, enhanced mucin production, and caused lymphocytic aggregates in the airways. Decreased immunostaining for the winged helix transcription factor FOXA2 was associated with goblet cell hyperplasia in IL-1beta-expressing mice. The production of the neutrophil attractant CXC chemokines KC (CXCL1) and MIP-2 (CXCL2), and of matrix metalloproteases MMP-9 and MMP-12, was increased by IL-1beta. Chronic production of IL-1beta in respiratory epithelial cells of adult mice causes lung inflammation, enlargement of distal airspaces, mucus metaplasia, and airway fibrosis in the adult mouse.

  18. A Novel Nonhuman Primate Model of Cigarette Smoke–Induced Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Francesca; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; McDonald, Jacob; Wilder, Julie A.; Royer, Christopher; Laucho-Contreras, Maria; Kelly, Emer M.; Divo, Miguel; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Mauderly, Joe; Celli, Bartolome R.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Owen, Caroline A.

    2016-01-01

    Small animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have several limitations for identifying new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for human COPD. These include a pulmonary anatomy that differs from humans, the limited airway pathologies and lymphoid aggregates that develop in smoke-exposed mice, and the challenges associated with serial biological sampling. Thus, we assessed the utility of cigarette smoke (CS)–exposed cynomolgus macaque as a nonhuman primate (NHP) large animal model of COPD. Twenty-eight NHPs were exposed to air or CS 5 days per week for up to 12 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage and pulmonary function tests were performed at intervals. After 12 weeks, we measured airway pathologies, pulmonary inflammation, and airspace enlargement. CS-exposed NHPs developed robust mucus metaplasia, submucosal gland hypertrophy and hyperplasia, airway inflammation, peribronchial fibrosis, and increases in bronchial lymphoid aggregates. Although CS-exposed NHPs did not develop emphysema over the study time, they exhibited pathologies that precede emphysema development, including increases in the following: i) matrix metalloproteinase-9 and proinflammatory mediator levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, ii) lung parenchymal leukocyte counts and lymphoid aggregates, iii) lung oxidative stress levels, and iv) alveolar septal cell apoptosis. CS-exposed NHPs can be used as a model of airway disease occurring in COPD patients. Unlike rodents, NHPs can safely undergo longitudinal sampling, which could be useful for assessing novel biomarkers or therapeutics for COPD. PMID:25542772

  19. Airway surface liquid homeostasis in cystic fibrosis: pathophysiology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Haq, Iram J; Gray, Michael A; Garnett, James P; Ward, Christopher; Brodlie, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease characterised by recurrent respiratory infections, inflammation and lung damage. The volume and composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) are important in maintaining ciliary function, mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial properties of the airway. In CF, these homeostatic mechanisms are impaired, leading to a dehydrated and acidic ASL. ASL volume depletion in CF is secondary to defective anion transport by the abnormal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Abnormal CFTR mediated bicarbonate transport creates an unfavourable, acidic environment, which impairs antimicrobial function and alters mucus properties and clearance. These disease mechanisms create a disordered airway milieu, consisting of thick mucopurulent secretions and chronic bacterial infection. In addition to CFTR, there are additional ion channels and transporters in the apical airway epithelium that play a role in maintaining ASL homeostasis. These include the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the solute carrier 26A (SLC26A) family of anion exchangers, and calcium-activated chloride channels. In this review we discuss how the ASL is abnormal in CF and how targeting these alternative channels and transporters could provide an attractive therapeutic strategy to correct the underlying ASL abnormalities evident in CF.

  20. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  1. Sputum Leucine-Rich Alpha-2 Glycoprotein as a Marker of Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Serada, Satoshi; Hattori, Noboru; Nomura, Shintaro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Yokoyama, Akihito; Naka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways, but an ideal biomarker that accurately reflects ongoing airway inflammation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of sputum leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein (LRG) as a new biomarker for airway inflammation in asthma. Methods We obtained induced sputum samples from patients with asthma (N = 64) and healthy volunteers (N = 22) and measured LRG concentration by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model mice were used to investigate the mechanism of LRG production during airway inflammation. The LRG concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from mice were determined by ELISA and mouse lung sections were stained with anti-LRG antibody and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent. Results Sputum LRG concentrations were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.00686). Consistent with patients’ data, BALF LRG levels in asthma model mice were significantly higher than in control mice (p = 0.00013). Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from asthma model mice revealed that LRG was intensely expressed in a subpopulation of bronchial epithelial cells, which corresponded with PAS-positive mucus producing cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that sputum LRG is a promising biomarker of local inflammation in asthma. PMID:27611322

  2. Calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A modulates mucin secretion and airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Zhang, Hongkang; Wu, Meng; Yang, Huanghe; Kudo, Makoto; Peters, Christian J.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Solberg, Owen D.; Donne, Matthew L.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Fahy, John V.; Wolters, Paul J.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Li, Min; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Rock, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Mucous cell hyperplasia and airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness are hallmark features of inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma. Here, we show that the recently identified calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) TMEM16A is expressed in the adult airway surface epithelium and ASM. The epithelial expression is increased in asthmatics, particularly in secretory cells. Based on this and the proposed functions of CaCC, we hypothesized that TMEM16A inhibitors would negatively regulate both epithelial mucin secretion and ASM contraction. We used a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule blockers of TMEM16A-CaCC channels. We show that inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly impairs mucus secretion in primary human airway surface epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly reduces mouse and human ASM contraction in response to cholinergic agonists. TMEM16A-CaCC blockers, including those identified here, may positively impact multiple causes of asthma symptoms. PMID:22988107

  3. Ambroxol suppresses influenza-virus proliferation in the mouse airway by increasing antiviral factor levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Yao, D F; Ohuchi, M; Ide, M; Yano, M; Okumura, Y; Kido, H

    2002-05-01

    The protective effect of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent which has antioxidant properties and stimulates the release of pulmonary surfactant, against influenza-virus proliferation in the airway was investigated in mice. Ambroxol or the vehicle was administered intraperitoneally twice a day for 5-7 days to mice shortly after intranasal infection with a lethal dose of influenza A/Aichi/68 (H3N2) virus, and the survival rate, virus titre and levels of factors regulating virus proliferation in the airway fluid were analysed. Ambroxol significantly suppressed virus multiplication and improved the survival rate of mice. The effect of ambroxol reached a peak at 10 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), higher doses being less effective. Ambroxol stimulated the release of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication, such as pulmonary surfactant, mucus protease inhibitor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-A and IgG, although it stimulated the release of a trypsin-type protease that potentiates virus proliferation. In addition, ambroxol transiently suppressed release of the cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-12, into airway fluid. Although ambroxol had several negative effects on the host defence system, overall it strikingly increased the concentrations of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication in the airway.

  4. An investigation into the role of mucus thickness on mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract of pig.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; Veiga, Francisco; Sousa, João S; Basit, Abdul W

    2010-07-11

    Mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract is a complex phenomenon and both formulation and physiological features need to be well understood and considered. Mucus thickness has been inferred to play a role in this process; however no definitive influence has been established. This study aimed to investigate the influence of mucus thickness on the mucoadhesion process, using a large animal (pig) as a model to closely resemble the human physiological features. The mucus thickness of different regions of the gastrointestinal tract of pig was fully measured by means of a histochemical method (hematoxilin/eosin) employing cryostat sections. Mucoadhesion was evaluated ex vivo on porcine mucosa by tensiometry using a polyacrylic acid polymer (Carbopol 974P NF) as a mucoadhesive model material, both in a dry and swollen state. Mucus was thickest in the stomach (body 67.9+/-54.7 microm) and mucus thickness increased from proximal to distal segments in both the small intestine (duodenum 25.9+/-11.8 microm, ileum 31.0+/-15.7 microm) and large intestine (caecum 19.4+/-8.7 microm, ascending colon 31.9+/-17.2 microm, descending colon 35.1+/-16.0 microm and rectum 40.8+/-12.5 microm). Swollen polymer exhibited lower mucoadhesion than the dry form in all sections analysed. Mucus thickness plays a role on the mucoadhesion, as thicker mucus provides deeper polymer chain diffusion and entanglements; however, other factors are also involved in this complex process.

  5. Towards a versatile technique for tracking nanoparticle-mucus interaction: a step on the road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafee, N.; Schneider, M.

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory mucus is one of the main barriers for nanoparticle-based pulmonary delivery systems. This holds true especially for lung diseases like cystic fibrosis, where a very tenacious thick mucus layer hinders particle diffusion to the lung epithelium or the target area. Typically, mean square displacement of particles is used for mobility evaluation. In contrast, our objective is to develop a feasible technique to track directed particle penetration as a prerequisite for efficient pulmonary nanotherapy. Therefore, particle diffusion in artificial mucus was monitored based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and particle-mucus interaction was observed. As pharmaceutical relevant and benign materials, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by hot-melt emulsification using glyceryl behenate and different stabilizing agents such as poloxamer-407, tween-80, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The diffusion of labeled SLNs in stained artificial sputum representing CF-patient sputum was verified by 3D time laps imaging. Thus, the effect of coating, particle size and mucus viscosity on nanoparticle diffusion was studied. Using image analysis software "Image J", the total fluorescent signal after 30 min in case of poloxamer-coated SLNs was 5 and 100 folds higher than tween- and PVA-coated SLNs, respectively. Nevertheless, increasing mucus viscosity reduced the diffusion of tweencoated SLNs by a factor of 10. Studying particle-mucus interaction by CLSM can be considered a promising and versatile technique.

  6. Alteration in Pimephales promelas mucus production after exposure to nanosilver or silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Adam D; Thornton, Cammi; Steevens, Jeffery A; Willett, Kristine L

    2014-12-01

    The fish gill's ability to produce mucus effectively is a critical part of the stress response and protection against xenobiotic toxicity. Adult fathead minnows were exposed to silver nitrate (0.82 µg/L or 13.2 µg/L), polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (11.1 µg/L or 208 µg/L), and citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (10.1 µg/L or 175 µg/L) for 96 h. Mucus concentrations based on glucose as a surrogate were determined at 0 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h and 24 h after re-dosing each day. Higher mucus production rates following silver treatment were observed at the beginning as compared to controls and compared to after 3 d of exposure. Control fish produced consistent mucus concentrations throughout the exposure (0.62 mg/L and 0.40 mg/L at 24 h and 96 h, respectively). Following 24 h of exposure, all silver treatment groups produced significantly more mucus than controls. Following 96 h of exposure, mucus concentrations in treatment groups were significantly reduced compared with each respective treatment at 24 h. Reduced mucus production following long-term silver exposure could prevent the gills from removing silver, and thus increase toxicity.

  7. Methods to determine the interactions of micro- and nanoparticles with mucus.

    PubMed

    Grießinger, Julia; Dünnhaupt, Sarah; Cattoz, Beatrice; Griffiths, Peter; Oh, Sejin; Borrós i Gómez, Salvador; Wilcox, Matthew; Pearson, Jeffrey; Gumbleton, Mark; Abdulkarim, Muthanna; Pereira de Sousa, Irene; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The present review provides an overview of methods and techniques for studying interactions of micro- and nanoparticulate drug delivery system with mucus. Nanocarriers trapped by mucus are featuring a change in particle size and zeta potential that can be utilized to predict their mucus permeation behavior. Furthermore, interactions between nanoparticulate drug delivery systems and mucus layer modify the viscoelasticity of mucus which can be detected via rheological studies and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) analysis. Having a closer look at molecular interactions between drug carrier and mucus small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is an appropriate analysis technique. Moreover, different methods to determine particle diffusion in mucus such as the newly established Transwell diffusion system, rotating silicone tube technique, multiple-particle tracking (MPT) and diffusion NMR are summarized within this review. The explanations and discussed pros and cons of collated methods and techniques should provide a good starting point for all those looking forward to move in this interesting field.

  8. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  9. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  10. Recurrent airway obstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction is a widely recognised airway disorder, characterised by hypersensitivity-mediated neutrophilic airway inflammation and lower airway obstruction in a subpopulation of horses when exposed to suboptimal environments high in airborne organic dust. Over the past decade, numerous studies have further advanced our understanding of different aspects of the disease. These include clarification of the important inhaled airborne agents responsible for disease induction, improving our understanding of the underlying genetic basis of disease susceptibility and unveiling the fundamental immunological mechanisms leading to establishment of the classic disease phenotype. This review, as well as giving a clinical overview of recurrent airway obstruction, summarises much of the work in these areas that have culminated in a more thorough understanding of this debilitating disease.

  11. The airway microbiome and disease.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Yadava, Koshika; Nicod, Laurent P

    2013-08-01

    Although traditionally thought to be sterile, accumulating evidence now supports the concept that our airways harbor a microbiome. Thus far, studies have focused upon characterizing the bacterial constituents of the airway microbiome in both healthy and diseased lungs, but what perhaps provides the greatest impetus for the exploration of the airway microbiome is that different bacterial phyla appear to dominate diseased as compared with healthy lungs. As yet, there is very limited evidence supporting a functional role for the airway microbiome, but continued research in this direction is likely to provide such evidence, particularly considering the progress that has been made in understanding host-microbe mutualism in the intestinal tract. In this review, we highlight the major advances that have been made discovering and describing the airway microbiome, discuss the experimental evidence that supports a functional role for the microbiome in health and disease, and propose how this emerging field is going to impact clinical practice.

  12. Influence of intrauterine growth restriction on airway development in fetal and postnatal sheep.

    PubMed

    Wignarajah, Dharshini; Cock, Megan L; Pinkerton, Kent E; Harding, Richard

    2002-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) can lead to impaired lung function, yet little information exists on the effects of IUGR on airway development. Our objectives were to characterize morphometrically effects of IUGR on airway structure in the fetus and to determine whether alterations persist into postnatal life. We used two groups of sheep, each with appropriate controls; a fetal group was subjected to IUGR by restriction of placental function from 120 to 140 d (term approximately 147 d), and a postnatal group, killed 8 wk after birth, was subjected to IUGR from 120 d to birth at term. In both fetuses and postnatal lambs, IUGR did not alter lung weight relative to body weight. In IUGR fetuses, the luminal areas and basement membrane perimeters of the trachea and larger bronchi (generations 0-8, trachea = 0) were smaller than in controls. Airway wall areas, relative to basement membrane perimeters, were reduced in IUGR fetuses compared with controls, largely due to reduced areas of cartilage and epithelium. At 8 wk after birth, there were no significant differences in airway dimensions between IUGR and control lambs. However, the number of profiles of bronchial submucosal glands, relative to basement membrane perimeters, was lower in IUGR lambs than in controls and the area of epithelial mucin was increased. We conclude that restriction of fetal growth during late gestation impairs the growth of bronchial walls that could affect airway compliance in the immediate postnatal period. Although airway growth deficits are reversed by 8 wk, alterations in mucus elements persist.

  13. Static friction of porous bioceramic β-TCP on intestinal mucus films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Ying-Chao; Jiang, Xin; Dai, Hong-Lian; Li, Shi-Pu

    2006-09-01

    The static friction behavior between a porous bioceramic material and an intestinal mucus film was investigated in order to develop a new intestine robotic endoscope. Here, the friction couple is porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and an artificial intestine mucus film. The effect of pore size of the β-TCP material on the friction behavior is investigated. The results illustrated that in this friction system there is a relatively small normal force upon the intestinal mucus film of the intestine wall during locomotion. The maximum static friction force in this friction couple varies with the pore size of the porous β-TCP material.

  14. Vaginal mucus from ewes treated with progestogen sponges affects quality of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Manes, Jorgelina; Ríos, Glenda; Fiorentino, María Andrea; Ungerfeld, Rodolfo

    2016-03-15

    The use of intravaginal sponges (IS) to synchronize estrous onset in ewes provokes vaginitis, an increase in the vaginal bacterial load, and growth of bacterial species that are not present during spontaneous estrous behavior. The objective of the study was to compare the functional sperm parameters after incubating it with mucus collected from the vagina of ewes during spontaneous estrus or estrous synchronized with IS. Pooled spermatozoa were co-incubated with: (1) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in spontaneous estrus; (2) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in estrus pretreated with progestogen-impregnated IS; (3) synthetic mucus; and (4) medium without mucus as a control group. Sperm samples were evaluated after incubating it for 30 and 90 minutes. The number of colony-forming units (CFUs/mL), pH, and osmolality were greater in the mucus collected from ewes treated with IS than from those untreated (P = 0.046; P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). The percentage of sperm with progressive motility was lower after incubation with vaginal mucus collected from estrous ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments both, 30 and 90 minutes after incubation (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The sample incubated for 30 minutes with mucus from ewes treated with IS had a lower percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane than all the other treatments (P < 0.0001). The percentage of sperm with functional membrane was significantly lower in the sample incubated for 30 minutes with vaginal mucus from ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments (P < 0.0001). After 90 minutes, the percentage was still lower than that in the sample collected from ewes during their spontaneous estrus (P = 0.0005). The lowest percentages of sperm with acrosome damage were observed in sperm incubated with mucus collected from sheep in spontaneous estrus for 30 and 90 minutes (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.008, respectively). The percentage of apoptotic spermatozoa was

  15. Basal insulin hypersecretion in insulin-resistant Zucker diabetic and Zucker fatty rats: role of enhanced fuel metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y P; Cockburn, B N; Pugh, W; Polonsky, K S

    1999-07-01

    The biochemical mechanisms responsible for basal hyperinsulinemia in insulin-resistant states have not been fully defined. We therefore studied pancreatic beta-cell function in vitro to characterize the relative importance of fuel metabolism or secretion via a constitutive pathway in the maintenance of high basal insulin secretion in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker fatty (ZF) rats. Insulin secretion from ZF (10+/-1.8 v 5+/-0.6 pmol/ng DNA/h) and ZDF (30+/-4 v 7+/-0.8 pmol/ng DNA/h) islets at 2.8 mmol/L glucose was two to four times greater than secretion from islets of lean littermate control rats. In response to a decreasing glucose concentration (from 12 to 0 mmol/L), a paradoxical increase in insulin secretion was observed in perfused ZDF rat pancreas. Insulin secretion at 2.8 mmol/L glucose was suppressed approximately 70% to 80% in islets from ZDF and ZF rats following exposure to diazoxide, a K+-adenosine triphosphate (K(ATP)) channel opener that inhibits membrane depolarization, or rotenone and oligomycin, agents that inhibit ATP production, or by incubation at 23 degrees C. Inhibition of glycolysis with mannoheptulose, 2-deoxyglucose, and iodoacetate or fatty acid oxidation with a carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor also significantly inhibited basal insulin secretion in islets of ZDF and ZF rats but not their lean littermates. Furthermore, the glycolytic flux at 2.8 mmol/L glucose was significantly higher in ZDF islets versus ZDF lean littermate (ZLC) islets (2.2+/-0.1 v 3.7+/-0.3 pmol/ng DNA/2 h, P < .01) and was suppressed by mannoheptulose. In ZDF and ZF islets, high basal insulin secretion was maintained despite a 50% reduction in the rate of proinsulin/insulin biosynthesis at 2.8 mmol/L glucose. The rate of proinsulin to insulin conversion and the ratio of proinsulin to insulin secretion by islets of ZDF rats were similar to the values in the lean littermates. Thus, basal hypersecretion in these two insulin-resistant models appears to be

  16. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  17. Mucus and pepsin role in gastric damage prevention by H2-receptor antagonists and antiulcer drugs.

    PubMed

    Impicciatore, M; Morini, G; Chiavarini, M; Plazzi, P V; Agosti, A; Soldani, G

    1984-01-01

    The effects of cimetidine and ranitidine, alone or combined with sulglycotide or carbenoxolone, and those of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 were investigated on mucosal lesions induced in pylorus-ligated rats. The drugs were administered orally after pylorus ligation; 3 hr later the animals were killed, the stomachs removed and examined for the presence of mucosal lesions. Volume, pH, total acidity, pepsin, free and barrier mucus were determined. H2-antagonists both at nonantisecretory and antisecretory doses failed to prevent gastric mucosal lesions or to affect significantly mucus and pepsin. Sulglycotide and carbenoxolone inhibited pepsin secretion, the latter enhanced barrier mucus and both reduced lesion severity. A nearly complete prevention of mucosal damage was observed after anti-secretory doses of cimetidine plus sulglycotide or carbenoxolone. Data obtained compared with those of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 suggest that mucus and pepsin might have a partial role in ulcer prevention.

  18. A Dietary Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota Degrades the Colonic Mucus Barrier and Enhances Pathogen Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mahesh S; Seekatz, Anna M; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Hickey, Christina A; Wolter, Mathis; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Kitamoto, Sho; Terrapon, Nicolas; Muller, Arnaud; Young, Vincent B; Henrissat, Bernard; Wilmes, Paul; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Núñez, Gabriel; Martens, Eric C

    2016-11-17

    Despite the accepted health benefits of consuming dietary fiber, little is known about the mechanisms by which fiber deprivation impacts the gut microbiota and alters disease risk. Using a gnotobiotic mouse model, in which animals were colonized with a synthetic human gut microbiota composed of fully sequenced commensal bacteria, we elucidated the functional interactions between dietary fiber, the gut microbiota, and the colonic mucus barrier, which serves as a primary defense against enteric pathogens. We show that during chronic or intermittent dietary fiber deficiency, the gut microbiota resorts to host-secreted mucus glycoproteins as a nutrient source, leading to erosion of the colonic mucus barrier. Dietary fiber deprivation, together with a fiber-deprived, mucus-eroding microbiota, promotes greater epithelial access and lethal colitis by the mucosal pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium. Our work reveals intricate pathways linking diet, the gut microbiome, and intestinal barrier dysfunction, which could be exploited to improve health using dietary therapeutics.

  19. Lectin histochemical aspects of mucus function in the oesophagus of the reticulated python (Python reticulatus).

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Luz, S; Schnapper, A

    2009-08-01

    Using lectin histochemistry, the study characterizes basic functional aspects of the mucus produced by the oesophageal epithelium of the Reticulated python (Python reticulatus). Reaction staining varied as related to the two epithelium types present, containing goblet cells and ciliary cells. Remarkable intensities were achieved especially in the luminal mucus layer and the fine mucus covering the epithelial ciliary border for Con A (alpha-D-Man; alpha-D-Glc) as part of neutral glycoproteins, Limax flavus agglutinin (NeuNac = NeuNgc), emphasizing that water binding hyaluronan provides a hydrated interface conductive to the passage of material and UEA-I (alpha-L-Fuc), corroborating the view that fucose-rich highly viscous mucus is helpful against mechanical stress during prey transport.

  20. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  1. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  2. Degradation, foraging, and depletion of mucus sialoglycans by the vagina-adapted Actinobacterium Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Warren G; Robinson, Lloyd S; Gilbert, Nicole M; Perry, Justin C; Lewis, Amanda L

    2013-04-26

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial imbalance of the vaginal microbiota associated with reproductive infections, preterm birth, and other adverse health outcomes. Sialidase activity in vaginal fluids is diagnostic of BV and sialic acid-rich components of mucus have protective and immunological roles. However, whereas mucus degradation is believed to be important in the etiology and complications associated with BV, the role(s) of sialidases and the participation of individual bacterial species in the degradation of mucus barriers in BV have not been investigated. Here we demonstrate that the BV-associated bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis uses sialidase to break down and deplete sialic acid-containing mucus components in the vagina. Biochemical evidence using purified sialoglycan substrates supports a model in which 1) G. vaginalis extracellular sialidase hydrolyzes mucosal sialoglycans, 2) liberated sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) is transported into the bacterium, a process inhibited by excess N-glycolylneuraminic acid, and 3) sialic acid catabolism is initiated by an intracellular aldolase/lyase mechanism. G. vaginalis engaged in sialoglycan foraging in vitro, in the presence of human vaginal mucus, and in vivo, in a murine vaginal model, in each case leading to depletion of sialic acids. Comparison of sialic acid levels in human vaginal specimens also demonstrated significant depletion of mucus sialic acids in women with BV compared with women with a "normal" lactobacilli-dominated microbiota. Taken together, these studies show that G. vaginalis utilizes sialidase to support the degradation, foraging, and depletion of protective host mucus barriers, and that this process of mucus barrier degradation and depletion also occurs in the clinical setting of BV.

  3. [Inhibitory effect of nasal mucus on the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H

    1990-01-01

    The absorption of Dibekacin (DKB) through rabbit's tracheal mucosa with and without nasal mucus were examined in vitro. The modified double chamber method was used for the purpose of this study. DKB solution (20 mg/ml) and Hanks' balanced salt solution were put into the donor compartment (DC) and the receiver compartment (RC), respectively. A plate with a hole and the tracheal mucosa were inserted between the compartments in the order of DC, dialytic membrane, the plate, the rabbit tracheal mucosa and RC. The hole of the plate was filled with nasal mucus or Hanks' solution. The latter was used as the control. The chamber was incubated in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air for 3 hours at 37 degrees C. The absorption rate (AR) was obtained by dividing the concentration of DKB in RC by that in DC. The nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis significantly decreased the AR of DKB compared with that in the control (P less than 0.05). The AR significantly decreased with increments in the thickness of nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis. This decreased AR was improved by the addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DKB solution in DC. NAC can cleave disulfied bonds of mucus glycoprotein and this results in the decrease of viscoelasticity of nasal mucus. The results indicate that nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis intercept the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium in vitro. One of the mechanisms of the intercepter may be due to the high molecular-reticular structure of nasal mucus.

  4. Degradation, Foraging, and Depletion of Mucus Sialoglycans by the Vagina-adapted Actinobacterium Gardnerella vaginalis*

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Warren G.; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Gilbert, Nicole M; Perry, Justin C.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial imbalance of the vaginal microbiota associated with reproductive infections, preterm birth, and other adverse health outcomes. Sialidase activity in vaginal fluids is diagnostic of BV and sialic acid-rich components of mucus have protective and immunological roles. However, whereas mucus degradation is believed to be important in the etiology and complications associated with BV, the role(s) of sialidases and the participation of individual bacterial species in the degradation of mucus barriers in BV have not been investigated. Here we demonstrate that the BV-associated bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis uses sialidase to break down and deplete sialic acid-containing mucus components in the vagina. Biochemical evidence using purified sialoglycan substrates supports a model in which 1) G. vaginalis extracellular sialidase hydrolyzes mucosal sialoglycans, 2) liberated sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) is transported into the bacterium, a process inhibited by excess N-glycolylneuraminic acid, and 3) sialic acid catabolism is initiated by an intracellular aldolase/lyase mechanism. G. vaginalis engaged in sialoglycan foraging in vitro, in the presence of human vaginal mucus, and in vivo, in a murine vaginal model, in each case leading to depletion of sialic acids. Comparison of sialic acid levels in human vaginal specimens also demonstrated significant depletion of mucus sialic acids in women with BV compared with women with a “normal” lactobacilli-dominated microbiota. Taken together, these studies show that G. vaginalis utilizes sialidase to support the degradation, foraging, and depletion of protective host mucus barriers, and that this process of mucus barrier degradation and depletion also occurs in the clinical setting of BV. PMID:23479734

  5. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Cauz, Ana Carolina G.; Magalhães, Beatriz L.; Carlos, Camila; da Costa, Fernanda L.P.; Scagion, Guilherme P.; Higa, Juliana S.; Almeida, Ludimila D.; das Neves, Meiriele da S.; Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; do Prado, Paula F.V.; da Silva, Thiago M.; Balsalobre, Thiago Willian A.; Paulino, Luciana C.; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F.C.; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000). The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress) and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the coral mucus. PMID:26981384

  6. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles made with "mucoadhesive" poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Popov, Alexey; Enlow, Elizabeth; Bourassa, James; Chen, Hongming

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles that readily penetrate mucosal layers are desirable for a variety of biomedical applications. Nevertheless, most nanoparticles tend to be immobilized in mucus via steric and/or adhesive interactions. Contrary to the established opinion that poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is mucoadhesive, we discovered that coating otherwise mucoadhesive nanoparticles with certain partially hydrolyzed PVAs can aid particle mobility in mucus. We describe two approaches to producing such mucus-penetrating particles (non-covalent modification of pre-formed nanoparticles and emulsification in the presence of PVA) and provide mobility data in human cervicovaginal mucus ex vivo as measured by multiple particle tracking and bulk permeation. When coated with PVAs that are ≥95% hydrolyzed, nanoparticles as small as ~210nm were immobilized in mucus similarly to well-established mucoadhesive controls (P>0.05). However, nanoparticles coated with PVAs that are <95% hydrolyzed penetrated mucus with velocities significantly exceeding those for the mucoadhesive controls (P<0.001) and were mobile in the bulk permeation assay.

  7. Treatment with Norplant subdermal implants inhibits sperm penetration through cervical mucus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, H B; Díaz, S; Salvatierra, A M; Morales, P; Ebensperger, C; Brandeis, A

    1987-08-01

    Attempts were made to collect several samples of cervical mucus in each of thirty-three cycles of women using NORPLANT subdermal implants, in seven cycles from NORPLANT-2 rod users, and in 33 control cycles. The attempts to collect a mucus sample were successful on 20 of 77 and 7 of 14 occasions in NORPLANT capsule and rod users, respectively, due to the scanty amount and stickiness found in the majority. All 59 attempts in control subjects were successful. The distance travelled by the fastest sperm and by the bulk of spermatozoa through the cervical mucus in vitro was assessed after 10 min of incubation with a normal semen sample. The best score for each cycle was considered for the comparison between treated and control cases. Sperm penetration was greatly impaired in mucus samples of implant users with penetration by the fastest sperm exceeding 10 mm in only two instances and exceeding 20 mm in none. In 30 of 33 control samples, the fastest sperm travelled 21 mm or more and in 28, the bulk of spermatozoa travelled further than 10 mm. Unsuccessful attempts to collect mucus and poor sperm migration were observed in NORPLANT implant users even when circulating estradiol levels were comparable to those seen in the late follicular phase of the normal menstrual cycle. These results suggest that the principal mechanism by which NORPLANT implants prevent pregnancy is by interference of sperm migration through cervical mucus.

  8. Bacteriophage adhering to mucus provide a non–host-derived immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Auro, Rita; Furlan, Mike; Whiteson, Katrine L.; Erb, Marcella L.; Pogliano, Joe; Stotland, Aleksandr; Wolkowicz, Roland; Cutting, Andrew S.; Doran, Kelly S.; Salamon, Peter; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are a main entry point for pathogens and the principal sites of defense against infection. Both bacteria and phage are associated with this mucus. Here we show that phage-to-bacteria ratios were increased, relative to the adjacent environment, on all mucosal surfaces sampled, ranging from cnidarians to humans. In vitro studies of tissue culture cells with and without surface mucus demonstrated that this increase in phage abundance is mucus dependent and protects the underlying epithelium from bacterial infection. Enrichment of phage in mucus occurs via binding interactions between mucin glycoproteins and Ig-like protein domains exposed on phage capsids. In particular, phage Ig-like domains bind variable glycan residues that coat the mucin glycoprotein component of mucus. Metagenomic analysis found these Ig-like proteins present in the phages sampled from many environments, particularly from locations adjacent to mucosal surfaces. Based on these observations, we present the bacteriophage adherence to mucus model that provides a ubiquitous, but non–host-derived, immunity applicable to mucosal surfaces. The model suggests that metazoan mucosal surfaces and phage coevolve to maintain phage adherence. This benefits the metazoan host by limiting mucosal bacteria, and benefits the phage through more frequent interactions with bacterial hosts. The relationships shown here suggest a symbiotic relationship between phage and metazoan hosts that provides a previously unrecognized antimicrobial defense that actively protects mucosal surfaces. PMID:23690590

  9. Influence of estrogens on vascular transudation and mucus production in the rabbit endocervix.

    PubMed

    Haas, G G; Nicosia, S V; Wolf, D P

    1987-12-01

    The manner in which estrogens mediate cyclical changes in the viscoelastic properties and volume of cervical mucus is unclear. To identify the response to estrogens of each of the major mucus components (mucin[s], soluble proteins, and small electrolytes and water), the authors quantitated their accumulation rates before and during estrogen stimulation in the rabbit. Circulating radiolabeled markers (35S-sulfate and 131I-albumin) were used to monitor the incorporation of small and large molecular weight intravascular substances into the cervical mucus. The accumulation rate of mucins was unaffected by exogenous estrogen administration, despite significant increases in mucus volume. This increase in mucus volume was attributed to a significantly increased transudation of water and small electrolytes increasing mucus hydration as early as the first 2 hours of estrogen administration. Water, small electrolytes, and soluble proteins significantly increased during the third and fourth hours of estrogen administration, not only when compared with the unstimulated basal levels, but also when compared with the levels found during the first 2 hours of estrogen administration. No significant change occurred in mucin production, while significant changes occurred in the accumulation of proteins and small electrolytes, whether estrogen was given initially or terminally in the experiment protocol.

  10. The Mucus of Actinia equina (Anthozoa, Cnidaria): An Unexplored Resource for Potential Applicative Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Stabili, Loredana; Schirosi, Roberto; Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Piraino, Stefano; Cammarata, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    The mucus produced by many marine organisms is a complex mixture of proteins and polysaccharides forming a weak watery gel. It is essential for vital processes including locomotion, navigation, structural support, heterotrophic feeding and defence against a multitude of environmental stresses, predators, parasites, and pathogens. In the present study we focused on mucus produced by a benthic cnidarian, the sea anemone Actinia equina (Linnaeus, 1758) for preventing burial by excess sedimentation and for protection. We investigated some of the physico-chemical properties of this matrix such as viscosity, osmolarity, electrical conductivity, protein, carbohydrate, and total lipid contents. Some biological activities such as hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antibacterial lysozyme-like activities were also studied. The A. equina mucus is mainly composed by water (96.2% ± 0.3%), whereas its dry weight is made of 24.2% ± 1.3% proteins and 7.8% ± 0.2% carbohydrates, with the smallest and largest components referable to lipids (0.9%) and inorganic matter (67.1%). The A. equina mucus matrix exhibited hemolytic activity on rabbit erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell line K562 (human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia) and antibacterial lysozyme-like activity. The findings from this study improve the available information on the mucus composition in invertebrates and have implications for future investigations related to exploitation of A. equina and other sea anemones’ mucus as a source of bioactive compounds of high pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest. PMID:26295400

  11. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo.

  12. Analysis of gunshot residues as trace in nasal mucus by GFAAS.

    PubMed

    Aliste, Marina; Chávez, Luis Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    When a gun is fired, the majority of gunshot residues are deposited on the shooter's hands. But these residues disappear through contact with surfaces or washing. Therefore, the maximum time frame to find GSR on a suspect's hands is 8h. The mucus, inside of a nostril, forms a surface layer where they are trapped foreign particles. In this way, mucus inside of a gunshot suspect's nostrils could act like an adhesive medium to stick on it gaseous particles from a gunshot. In this study, the presence of GSR in nasal mucus and its residence time is examined. A new procedure for the sampling of possible gunshot residue accumulated in the nasal mucus is designed. Samples are taken with cotton swabs moistened with a solution of EDTA and, after an acid digestion, are analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, samples of hands are taken for comparison purposes. GSR recovery has been successful. The concentration of GSR in nasal mucus is found to be lower than on the hands, but with a longer residence time. Thus, it is possible to expand the sampling time of a suspect also, as nasal mucus cannot be contaminated by handling weapons.

  13. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua; Forier, Katrien; Remaut, Katrien; Stremersch, Stephan; Guimarães, Nuno; Fontenete, Sílvia; Wengel, Jesper; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Braeckmans, Kevin; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe) have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical barriers—the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus, while remaining capable of diffusing through the mucus and delivering these nucleic acid mimics directly into the bacteria. PMID:26645765

  14. The effects of smoking and smoking cessation on nasal mucociliary clearance, mucus properties and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Utiyama, Daniela Mitiyo Odagiri; Yoshida, Carolina Tieko; Goto, Danielle Miyuki; de Santana Carvalho, Tômas; de Paula Santos, Ubiratan; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess nasal mucociliary clearance, mucus properties and inflammation in smokers and subjects enrolled in a Smoking Cessation Program (referred to as quitters). METHOD: A total of 33 subjects with a median (IQR) smoking history of 34 (20-58) pack years were examined for nasal mucociliary clearance using a saccharine transit test, mucus properties using contact angle and sneeze clearability tests, and quantification of inflammatory and epithelial cells, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations in nasal lavage fluid. Twenty quitters (mean age: 51 years, 9 male) were assessed at baseline, 1 month, 3 months and 12 months after smoking cessation, and 13 smokers (mean age: 52 years, 6 male) were assessed at baseline and after 12 months. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02136550. RESULTS: Smokers and quitters showed similar demographic characteristics and morbidities. At baseline, all subjects showed impaired nasal mucociliary clearance (mean 17.6 min), although 63% and 85% of the quitters demonstrated significant nasal mucociliary clearance improvement at 1 month and 12 months, respectively. At 12 months, quitters also showed mucus sneeze clearability improvement (∼26%), an increased number of macrophages (2-fold) and no changes in mucus contact angle or cytokine concentrations. CONCLUSION: This study showed that smoking cessation induced early improvements in nasal mucociliary clearance independent of mucus properties and inflammation. Changes in mucus properties were observed after only 12 months of smoking cessation. PMID:27438569

  15. Predicting First Traversal Times for Virions and Nanoparticles in Mucus with Slowed Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Austen M.; Henry, Bruce I.; Murray, John M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Angstmann, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Particle-tracking experiments focusing on virions or nanoparticles in mucus have measured mean-square displacements and reported diffusion coefficients that are orders of magnitude smaller than the diffusion coefficients of such particles in water. Accurate description of this subdiffusion is important to properly estimate the likelihood of virions traversing the mucus boundary layer and infecting cells in the epithelium. However, there are several candidate models for diffusion that can fit experimental measurements of mean-square displacements. We show that these models yield very different estimates for the time taken for subdiffusive virions to traverse through a mucus layer. We explain why fits of subdiffusive mean-square displacements to standard diffusion models may be misleading. Relevant to human immunodeficiency virus infection, using computational methods for fractional subdiffusion, we show that subdiffusion in normal acidic mucus provides a more effective barrier against infection than previously thought. By contrast, the neutralization of the mucus by alkaline semen, after sexual intercourse, allows virions to cross the mucus layer and reach the epithelium in a short timeframe. The computed barrier protection from fractional subdiffusion is some orders of magnitude greater than that derived by fitting standard models of diffusion to subdiffusive data. PMID:26153713

  16. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  17. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  18. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  19. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  20. The relative roles of passive surface forces and active ion transport in the modulation of airway surface liquid volume and composition.

    PubMed

    Tarran, R; Grubb, B R; Gatzy, J T; Davis, C W; Boucher, R C

    2001-08-01

    Two hypotheses have been proposed recently that offer different views on the role of airway surface liquid (ASL) in lung defense. The "compositional" hypothesis predicts that ASL [NaCl] is kept low (<50 mM) by passive forces to permit antimicrobial factors to act as a chemical defense. The "volume" hypothesis predicts that ASL volume (height) is regulated isotonically by active ion transport to maintain efficient mechanical mucus clearance as the primary form of lung defense. To compare these hypotheses, we searched for roles for: (1) passive forces (surface tension, ciliary tip capillarity, Donnan, and nonionic osmolytes) in the regulation of ASL composition; and (2) active ion transport in ASL volume regulation. In primary human tracheobronchial cultures, we found no evidence that a low [NaCl] ASL could be produced by passive forces, or that nonionic osmolytes contributed substantially to ASL osmolality. Instead, we found that active ion transport regulated ASL volume (height), and that feedback existed between the ASL and airway epithelia to govern the rate of ion transport and volume absorption. The mucus layer acted as a "reservoir" to buffer periciliary liquid layer height (7 microm) at a level optimal for mucus transport by donating or accepting liquid to or from the periciliary liquid layer, respectively. These data favor the active ion transport/volume model hypothesis to describe ASL physiology.

  1. Identification of genes differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency that alter lung pathophysiology and inflammation in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Troy, Niamh M; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Kicic, Anthony; Zosky, Graeme R

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with asthma risk. Vitamin D deficiency may enhance the inflammatory response, and we have previously shown that airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness is increased in vitamin D-deficient mice. In this study, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency would exacerbate house dust mite (HDM)-induced inflammation and alterations in lung structure and function. A BALB/c mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was established by dietary manipulation. Responsiveness to methacholine, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, mucus cell metaplasia, lung and airway inflammation, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed. Gene expression patterns in mouse lung samples were profiled by RNA-Seq. HDM exposure increased inflammation and inflammatory cytokines in BAL, baseline airway resistance, tissue elastance, and ASM mass. Vitamin D deficiency enhanced the HDM-induced influx of lymphocytes into BAL, ameliorated the HDM-induced increase in ASM mass, and protected against the HDM-induced increase in baseline airway resistance. RNA-Seq identified nine genes that were differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency in the lungs of HDM-treated mice. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that protein expression of midline 1 (MID1) and adrenomedullin was differentially regulated such that they promoted inflammation, while hypoxia-inducible lipid droplet-associated, which is associated with ASM remodeling, was downregulated. Protein expression studies in human bronchial epithelial cells also showed that addition of vitamin D decreased MID1 expression. Differential regulation of these genes by vitamin D deficiency could determine lung inflammation and pathophysiology and suggest that the effect of vitamin D deficiency on HDM-induced allergic airways disease is complex.

  2. Secondary Structure and Glycosylation of Mucus Glycoproteins by Raman Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The major structural components of protective mucus hydrogels on mucosal surfaces are the secreted polymeric gel-forming mucins. The very high molecular weight and extensive O-glycosylation of gel-forming mucins, which are key to their viscoelastic properties, create problems when studying mucins using conventional biochemical/structural techniques. Thus, key structural information, such as the secondary structure of the various mucin subdomains, and glycosylation patterns along individual molecules, remains to be elucidated. Here, we utilized Raman spectroscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA), circular dichroism (CD), and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) to study the structure of the secreted polymeric gel-forming mucin MUC5B. ROA indicated that the protein backbone of MUC5B is dominated by unordered conformation, which was found to originate from the heavily glycosylated central mucin domain by isolation of MUC5B O-glycan-rich regions. In sharp contrast, recombinant proteins of the N-terminal region of MUC5B (D1-D2-D′-D3 domains, NT5B), C-terminal region of MUC5B (D4-B-C-CK domains, CT5B) and the Cys-domain (within the central mucin domain of MUC5B) were found to be dominated by the β-sheet. Using these findings, we employed TERS, which combines the chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy to study the secondary structure along 90 nm of an individual MUC5B molecule. Interestingly, the molecule was found to contain a large amount of α-helix/unordered structures and many signatures of glycosylation, pointing to a highly O-glycosylated region on the mucin. PMID:27791356

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Mucus Flow in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Cultures - Part I: Idealized Axisymmetric Swirling Flow.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Paula A; Jin, Yuan; Palmer, Erik; Hill, David; Forest, M Gregory

    2016-08-01

    A multi-mode nonlinear constitutive model for mucus is constructed directly from micro- and macro-rheology experimental data on cell culture mucus, and a numerical algorithm is developed for the culture geometry and idealized cilia driving conditions. This study investigates the roles that mucus rheology, wall effects, and HBE culture geometry play in the development of flow profiles and the shape of the air-mucus interface. Simulations show that viscoelasticity captures normal stress generation in shear leading to a peak in the air-mucus interface at the middle of the culture and a depression at the walls. Linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regimes can be observed in cultures by varying the hurricane radius and mean rotational velocity. The advection-diffusion of a drug concentration dropped at the surface of the mucus flow is simulated as a function of Peclet number.

  4. Addition of mucin to the growth medium triggers mucus-binding activity in different strains of Lactobacillus reuteri in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, H; Ström, E; Roos, S

    2001-10-16

    We have examined the ability of a number of Lactobacillus reuteri strains to bind immobilised mucus material. After growth in MRS broth, some strains showed high binding activity towards mucus whilst many strains exhibited a very low binding activity. In order to simulate the intestinal milieu, we grew the bacteria in MRS supplemented with the glycoprotein mucin, the main component of mucus. Growth under these conditions dramatically improved the mucus-binding activity of most strains that initially showed very poor binding when grown in MRS broth. In addition, there was a strong induction of mucus binding in some strains after growth on solid substrate as compared to growth in liquid culture. Protease treatment of bacteria grown in the presence of mucin eliminated the adhesion, suggesting that mucin induces the production of cell surface proteins that possess mucus-binding properties.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Mucus Flow in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Cultures – Part I: Idealized Axisymmetric Swirling Flow

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Paula A.; Jin, Yuan; Palmer, Erik; Hill, David; Forest, M. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    A multi-mode nonlinear constitutive model for mucus is constructed directly from micro- and macro-rheology experimental data on cell culture mucus, and a numerical algorithm is developed for the culture geometry and idealized cilia driving conditions. This study investigates the roles that mucus rheology, wall effects, and HBE culture geometry play in the development of flow profiles and the shape of the air-mucus interface. Simulations show that viscoelasticity captures normal stress generation in shear leading to a peak in the air-mucus interface at the middle of the culture and a depression at the walls. Linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regimes can be observed in cultures by varying the hurricane radius and mean rotational velocity. The advection-diffusion of a drug concentration dropped at the surface of the mucus flow is simulated as a function of Peclet number. PMID:27494700

  6. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIAOJUAN; MA, XIUMIN; MA, ZHIXING; WANG, JING; SUN, ZHAN; YU, WENYAN; LI, FENGSEN; DING, JIANBING

    2014-01-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  7. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Wang, Jing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-11-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation.

  8. Characterization of vibrios diversity in the mucus of the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum (Annellida, Polichaeta).

    PubMed

    Stabili, Loredana; Giangrande, Adriana; Pizzolante, Graziano; Caruso, Giorgia; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Vibrios are among the most abundant culturable microbes in aquatic environments. They can be either free-living in the water column or associated with several marine organisms as mutualists, saprophytes, or parasites. In the present study we analysed vibrios abundance and diversity in the mucus of the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum, complementing culture-based with molecular methods. Vibrios reached 4.6 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1) thus representing a conspicuous component of the heterotrophic culturable bacteria. In addition, luminous vibrios accounted for about 60% of the total culturable vibrios in the mucus. The isolates were assigned to: Vibrio gigantis, Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio jasicida, Vibrio crassostreae, Vibrio kanaloae, and Vibrio xuii. Two Vibrio isolates (MI-13 and MI-15) may belong to a new species. We also tested the ability of the Vibrio isolates to grow on M. infundibulum mucus as the sole carbon source. All strains showed appreciable growth in the presence of mucus, leading us to conclude that this matrix, which is abundant and covers the animal entirely, may represent a microcosm and a food source for some bacteria, playing a crucial role in the structuring of a mucus-associated beneficial microbial community. Moreover, the trophic relationship between vibrios and M. infundibulum mucus could be enhanced by the protection that mucus offers to vibrios. The results of this study represent a contribution to the growing evidence for complex and dynamic invertebrate-microbe associations present in nature and highlight the importance of exploring relationships that Vibrio species establish with marine invertebrates.

  9. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  10. Airway management in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Dörges, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Securing and monitoring the airway are among the key requirements of appropriate therapy in emergency patients. Failures to secure the airways can drastically increase morbidity and mortality of patients within a very short time. Therefore, the entire range of measures needed to secure the airway in an emergency, without intermediate ventilation and oxygenation, is limited to 30-40 seconds. Endotracheal intubation is often called the 'gold standard' for airway management in an emergency, but multiple failed intubation attempts do not result in maintaining oxygenation; instead, they endanger the patient by prolonging hypoxia and causing additional trauma to the upper airways. Thus, knowledge and availability of alternative procedures are also essential in every emergency setting. Given the great variety of techniques available, it is important to establish a well-planned, methodical protocol within the framework of an algorithm. This not only facilitates the preparation of equipment and the training of personnel, it also ensures efficient decision-making under time pressure. Most anaesthesia-related deaths are due to hypoxaemia when difficulty in securing the airway is encountered, especially in obstetrics during induction of anaesthesia for caesarean delivery. The most commonly occurring adverse respiratory events are failure to intubate, failure to recognize oesophageal intubation, and failure to ventilate. Thus, it is essential that every anaesthesiologist working on the labour and delivery ward is comfortable with the algorithm for the management of failed intubation. The algorithm for emergency airway management describing the sequence of various procedures has to be adapted to internal standards and to techniques that are available.

  11. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in cilia-driven transport and airway epithelial development

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Maike K.; Haberberger, Rainer V.; Hartmann, Petra; Faulhammer, Petra; Lips, Katrin S.; Krain, Benjamin; Wess, Jürgen; Kummer, Wolfgang; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells drives the removal of mucus and particles from the airways. Mucociliary transport and possibly airway epithelial development are governed by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but the precise roles of the subtypes involved are unknown. This issue was addressed by determining cilia-driven particle transport, ciliary beat frequency, and the composition and ultrastructural morphology of the tracheal epithelium in M1–M5 muscarinic receptor gene-deficient mice. Knockout of M3 muscarinic receptors prevented an increase in particle transport speed and ciliary beat frequency in response to muscarine. Furthermore, the ATP response after application of muscarine was blunted. Pretreatment with atropine before application of muscarine restored the response to ATP. Additional knockout of the M2 receptor in these mice partially restored the muscarine effect most likely through the M1 receptor and normalized the ATP response. M1, M4, and M5 receptor deficient mice exhibited normal responses to muscarine. None of the investigated mutant mouse strains had any impairment of epithelial cellular structure or composition. In conclusion, M3 receptors stimulate whereas M2 receptors inhibit cilia-driven particle transport. The M1 receptor increases cilia-driven particle transport if the M3 and M2 receptor are missing. None of the receptors is necessary for epithelial development. PMID:19213795

  12. Spiperone, identified through compound screening, activates calcium-dependent chloride secretion in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lihua; MacDonald, Kelvin; Schwiebert, Erik M.; Zeitlin, Pamela L.; Guggino, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene producing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR functions as a Cl− channel. Its dysfunction limits Cl− secretion and enhances Na+ absorption, leading to viscous mucus in the airway. Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are coexpressed with CFTR in the airway surface epithelia. Increases in cytosolic Ca2+ activate the epithelial CaCCs, which provides an alternative Cl− secretory pathway in CF. We developed a screening assay and screened a library for compounds that could enhance cytoplasmic Ca2+, activate the CaCC, and increase Cl− secretion. We found that spiperone, a known antipsychotic drug, is a potent intracellular Ca2+ enhancer and demonstrated that it stimulates intracellular Ca2+, not by acting in its well-known role as an antagonist of serotonin 5-HT2 or dopamine D2 receptors, but through a protein tyrosine kinase-coupled phospholipase C-dependent pathway. Spiperone activates CaCCs, which stimulates Cl− secretion in polarized human non-CF and CF airway epithelial cell monolayers in vitro and in CFTR-knockout mice in vivo. In conclusion, we have identified spiperone as a new therapeutic platform for correction of defective Cl− secretion in CF via a pathway independent of CFTR. PMID:18987251

  13. The role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in airway epithelial gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L D; Krunkosky, T M; Voynow, J A; Adler, K B

    1998-01-01

    The body first encounters deleterious inhaled substances, such as allergens, industrial particles, pollutants, and infectious agents, at the airway epithelium. When this occurs, the epithelium and its resident inflammatory cells respond defensively by increasing production of cytokines, mucus, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). As inflammation in the airway increases, additional infiltrating cells increase the level of these products. Recent interest has focused on ROS/RNS as potential modulators of the expression of inflammation-associated genes important to the pathogenesis of various respiratory diseases. ROS/RNS appear to play a variety of roles that lead to changes in expression of genes such as interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. By controlling this regulation, the reactive species can serve as exogenous stimuli, as intercellular signaling molecules, and as modulators of the redox state in epithelial cells. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms affected by ROS/RNS acting in these capacities should aid in the understanding of how stimulated defense mechanisms within the airway can lead to disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:9788898

  14. Effects of guaifenesin, N-acetylcysteine, and ambroxol on MUC5AC and mucociliary transport in primary differentiated human tracheal-bronchial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic intervention in the pathophysiology of airway mucus hypersecretion is clinically important. Several types of drugs are available with different possible modes of action. We examined the effects of guaifenesin (GGE), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ambroxol (Amb) on differentiated human airway epithelial cells stimulated with IL-13 to produce additional MUC5AC. Methods After IL-13 pre-treatment (3 days), the cultures were treated with GGE, NAC or Amb (10–300 μM) in the continued presence of IL-13. Cellular and secreted MUC5AC, mucociliary transport rates (MTR), mucus rheology at several time points, and the antioxidant capacity of the drugs were assessed. Results IL-13 increased MUC5AC content (~25%) and secretion (~2-fold) and decreased MTR, but only slightly affected the G’ (elastic) or G” (viscous) moduli of the secretions. GGE significantly inhibited MUC5AC secretion and content in the IL-13-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50s at 24 hr ~100 and 150 μM, respectively). NAC or Amb were less effective. All drugs increased MTR and decreased G’ and G” relative to IL-13 alone. Cell viability was not affected and only NAC exhibited antioxidant capacity. Conclusions Thus, GGE effectively reduces cellular content and secretion of MUC5AC, increases MTR, and alters mucus rheology, and may therefore be useful in treating airway mucus hypersecretion and mucostasis in airway diseases. PMID:23113953

  15. The microbiome of coral surface mucus has a key role in mediating holobiont health and survival upon disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Glasl, Bettina; Herndl, Gerhard J; Frade, Pedro R

    2016-01-01

    Microbes are well-recognized members of the coral holobiont. However, little is known about the short-term dynamics of mucus-associated microbial communities under natural conditions and after disturbances, and how these dynamics relate to the host's health. Here we examined the natural variability of prokaryotic communities (based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing) associating with the surface mucus layer (SML) of Porites astreoides, a species exhibiting cyclical mucus aging and shedding. Shifts in the prokaryotic community composition during mucus aging led to the prevalence of opportunistic and potentially pathogenic bacteria (Verrucomicrobiaceae and Vibrionaceae) in aged mucus and to a twofold increase in prokaryotic abundance. After the release of aged mucus sheets, the community reverted to its original state, dominated by Endozoicimonaceae and Oxalobacteraceae. Furthermore, we followed the fate of the coral holobiont upon depletion of its natural mucus microbiome through antibiotics treatment. After re-introduction to the reef, healthy-looking microbe-depleted corals started exhibiting clear signs of bleaching and necrosis. Recovery versus mortality of the P. astreoides holobiont was related to the degree of change in abundance distribution of the mucus microbiome. We conclude that the natural prokaryotic community inhabiting the coral SML contributes to coral health and that cyclical mucus shedding has a key role in coral microbiome dynamics. PMID:26953605

  16. [Multicenter, controlled, double-blind study of the efficacy and tolerance of Vectrine (erdostein) versus placebo in the treatment of stabilized chronic bronchitis with hypersecretion].

    PubMed

    Aubier, M; Berdah, L

    1999-09-01

    The clinical efficacy of vectrine (erdosteine) was evaluated in the treatment of chronic bronchitis patients with hypersecretion during a controlled clinical trial having included 170 patients. For inclusion, the bronchitis patients had to be in a stable status (no exacerbation since at least three months). The patients received, in double-blind protocol, vectrine, one capsule b.i.d. or placebo, one similar capsule b.i.d. during a period treatment of 21 days. The results of the main evaluation criteria, the global index of efficacy (frequency of the cough + severity of the cough + difficulty in breathing + dyspnea) but also on the intensity and frequency of the cough were statistically significant in favor of vectrine. The safety of the treatment was excellent.

  17. Pancreatic alpha-cell dysfunction contributes to the disruption of glucose homeostasis and compensatory insulin hypersecretion in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Rafacho, Alex; Gonçalves-Neto, Luiz M; Santos-Silva, Junia C; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Merino, Beatriz; Taboga, Sebastião R; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Nadal, Angel; Quesada, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC)-based therapies can cause insulin resistance (IR), glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia and, occasionally, overt diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms behind these metabolic disorders could improve the management of glucose homeostasis in patients undergoing GC treatment. For this purpose, adult rats were treated with a daily injection of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) (DEX) or saline as a control for 5 consecutive days. The DEX rats developed IR, augmented glycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperglucagonemia. Treatment of the DEX rats with a glucagon receptor antagonist normalized their blood glucose level. The characteristic inhibitory effect of glucose on glucagon secretion was impaired in the islets of the DEX rats, while no direct effects were found on α-cells in islets that were incubated with DEX in vitro. A higher proportion of docked secretory granules was found in the DEX α-cells as well as a trend towards increased α-cell mass. Additionally, insulin secretion in the presence of glucagon was augmented in the islets of the DEX rats, which was most likely due to their higher glucagon receptor content. We also found that the enzyme 11βHSD-1, which participates in GC metabolism, contributed to the insulin hypersecretion in the DEX rats under basal glucose conditions. Altogether, we showed that GC treatment induces hyperglucagonemia, which contributes to an imbalance in glucose homeostasis and compensatory β-cell hypersecretion. This hyperglucagonemia may result from altered α-cell function and, likely, α-cell mass. Additionally, blockage of the glucagon receptor seems to be effective in preventing the elevation in blood glucose levels induced by GC administration.

  18. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  19. Gastroprotective effect of ranitidine bismuth citrate is associated with increased mucus bismuth concentration in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Guth, P H; Paulsen, G; Kaunitz, J D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antisecretory and bismuth compounds protect the gastric mucosa from injury resulting from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. AIM: To study the mechanism underlying the gastroprotective effects of ranitidine bismuth citrate (GG311) in rats. METHODS: Indomethacin rat injury model and in vivo microscopy in which acid output, surface cell intracellular pH (pHi), gastric mucus gel thickness, and mucosal blood flow were measured simultaneously. RESULTS: In injury studies, GG311 dose dependently protected against severe injury induced by indomethacin (60 mg/kg subcutaneously). In in vivo microscopic studies, indomethacin significantly decreased mucus gel thickness and increased the initial rate of acidification of gastric surface cells when the superfusate pH was lowered from 7.4 to 1.0, and impaired pHi during acid exposure. Indomethacin had no effect on mucosal blood flow or acid output. GG311 alone had no effect on gel thickness, blood flow, or pHi homeostasis during acid exposure, but improved the initial acidification rate and pHi during superfusion with pH 1.0 solutions in the presence of indomethacin. In separate experiments, indomethacin pretreatment considerably increased gastric mucus bismuth concentrations in rats given GG311. CONCLUSIONS: The gastroprotective effect of GG311 against indomethacin induced gastric injury is associated with high and prolonged gastric mucus bismuth concentrations, which may impair proton permeation across the mucus gel. PMID:8977335

  20. Some effects of tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate on gastric secretion and the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Sidebotham, R L; Batten, J J; Li, K; Spencer, J; Baron, J H

    1990-10-01

    The effect of tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate (De-Nol) on the breakdown of the gastric mucus barrier was investigated by measuring the output of mucus glycoprotein in pentagastrin-stimulated secretion from 13 patients before and after treatment for peptic ulcer, and by examining the accumulation of dialysable peptides and amino acids (DPAA) in stimulated secretion from ten of these patients. The accumulation of DPAA was significantly reduced after De-Nol (by 54%) and to a greater extent than was the output of mucus glycoprotein (by 27%). These observations are consistent with a decrease in the rate of breakdown of the mucus barrier as a result of De-Nol treatment. De-Nol significantly reduced pepsin output (by 32%) in the same group of patients. Comparison of the change in pepsin output with the change in accumulation of DPAA in stimulated juice indicated that De-Nol increases the resistance of the mucus barrier to acid-pepsin proteolysis and/or inhibits the secretion of amino acids and peptides from gastric mucosa.

  1. Glycosylation and sulphation of colonic mucus glycoproteins in patients with ulcerative colitis and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, H; Kettlewell, M G; Jewell, D P; Kent, P W

    1993-01-01

    Studies have been made of mucus glycoprotein biosynthesis in different regions of the lower gastrointestinal tract in normal patients and those with ulcerative colitis (UC), active or inactive, by means of 3H-glucosamine (3H-GlcNH2)--35S-sulphate double labelling of epithelial biopsy specimens under culture conditions. The time based rate of 3H-GlcNH2 labelling of mucus in rectal tissue was similar to that in active or inactive UC whereas the rate of 35SO4(2) labelling was significantly increased in active disease. The 3H specific activities measuring the amount of isotopic incorporation into surface and tissue mucus glycoproteins were increased in patients with active UC compared with normal or inactive subjects. The 35S specific activities did not differ significantly between patients with active UC and those in remission. In the rectum, glycosylation of mucus glycoproteins decreases with the increasing age of the patient. Regional differences in 3H-labelling of mucus components are reported for ascending colon, transverse colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Sulphation (35S-labelling) was higher in all parts of the colon in left sided UC. Results point to accelerated glycosylation of core proteins in the active phase of UC. PMID:8344580

  2. Clearance of viscoelastic mucus simulant with airflow in a rectangular channel, an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amgad A; Evrensel, Cahit A; Krumpe, Peter E

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of mucus simulant with airflow in a rectangular channel is investigated experimentally. Two different viscoelastic gel mucus simulants are prepared by cross linking Borax with Locust Bean Gum (LBG) solution; liquid-like (LM) with lower storage modulus and semi-solid (SM). The rheological difference between LM and SM represent the qualitative change from liquid-like healthy mucus to the one with higher storage modulus found in a person with lung disease. The study concentrates on the effect of viscoelastic layer thickness and rheology on the wave formation and clearance due to its interaction with airflow. The results indicate that the onset air velocity for wave initiation reduces by increasing layer thickness. This effect is more pronounced for SM. Slowly propagating waves initiate at a lower air velocity for LM compared to SM for thinner layer thickness and this behavior reverses for a thicker layer. Although SM clears at a critical air velocity, LM does not show clearance behavior, defined as separation of layer section from rest and movement in the downstream flow direction. This seems to suggest that thicker mucus with higher elastic modulus, similar to the mucus for a person with lung disease, may clear easier with a two-phase air-liquid flow, as in cough.

  3. Proteomics profiling of epidermal mucus secretion of a cichlid (Symphysodon aequifasciata) demonstrating parental care behavior.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kenny; Joshi, Shashikant; Jin, Lam Toong; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2006-04-01

    The discus fish (Symphysodon aequifasciata) is a cichlid demonstrating advanced mode of parental care towards fry. Both male and female fish utilized epidermal mucus secreted from specialized epidermal cells to feed developing fry. We utilized proteomics to compare protein profile from parental and nonparental fish. Gel analysis revealed a total of 35 spots that were up-regulated in parental mucus. In tandem, another 18 spots were uniquely expressed in parental mucus. MS analysis of these spots identified proteins such as fructose biphosphate aldolase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase, and heat shock proteins, which are essential to support energy provision, cell repair and proliferation, stress mediation, and defense mechanism in parental fish during parental-care period. Concurrently, the detection of several antioxidant-related proteins such as thioredoxin peroxidase and hemopexin suggests a need to overcome oxidative stress during hypermucosal production in parental-care behavior. A C-type lectin was also found to be uniquely expressed in parental mucus and could have important role in providing antimicrobial defense to both parental fish and fry. In summary, our study shows that discus mucus proteome undergoes changes in protein expression during parental-care period.

  4. [Glycoproteins of mucus of gastric and duodenal wall surface during ulcerogenesis and the impact of fenugreek].

    PubMed

    Khil'ko, T D; Iakubtsova, I V; Preobrazhens'ka, T D; Ostapchenko, L I

    2013-01-01

    The comparative evaluation of qualitative and quantitative composition of glycoproteins of gastric and duodenal wall surface layer of protective mucus in the normal, at the modeling of ulcers in rats and at the introduction to animals with ulcerative lesions of fenugreek extract carried out. It was shown in control (normally) the general level of glycosylation of glycoproteins gastric mucus is 1.7 times more than the duodenum. Under acute stress model ulceration in the stomach mucus decrease in hexosamine (1.4 times), galactose (2.2 times), fucose (1.3-fold) and an increase in NANA (3.6 times) observed. Under cysteamine model ulceration in duodenal mucus increase galactose (2.7 times), NANA (2.4 times), fucose (1.8-fold) but significant decrease in the amount of hexosamines 3 times compared to the control occurred. It was proved the protective effect of fenugreek extract to the wall surface mucus of the stomach and duodenum mucosa under conditions modeling ulceration in rats.

  5. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    PubMed

    Schrier, B P; Lichtendonk, W J; Witjes, J A

    2002-05-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a refrigerator. After precipitation, the urine was decanted. The residue was stirred to a homogeneous suspension. To samples of 4.5 ml mucus, 0.5 ml NAC 10% was added. To the control sample, 0.5 ml water was added. The samples were incubated in a water bath at 37 degrees C for 5, 30 and 60 min. Viscosity was measured in the Bohlin VOR Rheometer. The viscosity of the ileal neobladder mucus decreased quickly after incubating with NAC 10%. Viscosity increased slightly after I h of incubation. The viscosity in the control sample was higher than in the other incubated samples. NAC was found to decrease the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus, supporting the in vivo experience that NAC can be useful in patients with an ileal neobladder to facilitate the evacuation of mucus by decreasing viscosity.

  6. Antibody activity to type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus in human cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, B M; Skinner, G R

    1977-08-01

    Neutralizing antibody activity in cervical mucus to type 1 herpes virus was detected in 24 of 28 patients, and to type 2 herpes simplex virus in 18 of 24 patients. The neutralizing antibody activity resisted heat inactivation for 30 minutes at 56 degrees C, was independent of complement and followed first order kinetics. There was evidence of antibody against both virus types in immunoglobulin fractions IgG and IgA, the latter containing approximately threefold greater neutralizing antibody activity per unit of immunoglobulin concentration. Type 1 and type 2 neutralizing antibody activity showed a positive but weak correlation and type 2 neutralizing antibody activity showed a positive but weak correlation and a type-common immunoprecipitin was identified in all concentrated pooled mucus samples. However, type-specific neutralizing antibody against both virus types was identified in pooled mucus samples by heterologous absorption techniques. There was a relatively higher average type 2 neutralizing antibody activity in the mucus than in the serum and there was no correlation between serum and mucus antibody levels for either virus type. These observations support the concept of an independent local antibody system for herpes simplex virus in the uterine cervix.

  7. Ulcerative colitis as a polymicrobial infection characterized by sustained broken mucus barrier

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shui-Jiao; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Jian-Ping; Yang, Xi-Yan; Lu, Fang-Gen

    2014-01-01

    To reduce medication for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), we need to establish the etiology of UC. The intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been shown to differ from that of healthy controls and abundant data indicate that it changes in both composition and localization. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is significantly higher in IBD patients compared with controls. Probiotics have been investigated for their capacity to reduce the severity of UC. The luminal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract are covered by a mucus layer. This normally acts as a barrier that does not allow bacteria to reach the epithelial cells and thus limits the direct contact between the host and the bacteria. The mucus layer in the colon comprises an inner layer that is firmly adherent to the intestinal mucosa, and an outer layer that can be washed off with minimal rinsing. Some bacteria can dissolve the protective inner mucus layer. Defects in renewal and formation of the inner mucus layer allow bacteria to reach the epithelium and have implications for the causes of colitis. In this review, important elements of UC pathology are thought to be the intestinal bacteria, gut mucus, and the mucosa-associated immune system. PMID:25071341

  8. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rix, Laura; de Goeij, Jasper M; Mueller, Christina E; Struck, Ulrich; Middelburg, Jack J; van Duyl, Fleur C; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Wild, Christian; Naumann, Malik S; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-07

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments.

  9. Factors affecting magnetic retention of particles in the upper airways: an in vitro and ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Ally, J; Amirfazli, A; Roa, W

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments using an in vitro model and an ex vivo animal model (Rana catesbeiana) to study magnetic particle retention in the conducting airways, specifically the trachea and bronchi. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the significant factors for retention of magnetic particles deposited from an aerosol at the airway surface using a magnetic field. The results indicate that the apparent viscosity of the mucus layer at low shear rates is the most significant obstacle to particle retention. The results also show that particle size and aggregation play major roles in particle retention. The mucus transport rate, unlike the effect of fluid velocity in intravenous applications, did not appear to be a determining factor for particle retention. It was also found that a suitably designed magnetic system, aside from having a high intensity, needs to exert a strong radial field to promote particle aggregation. The findings suggest that one possible approach to magnetic particle retention could be delivery of a mucolytic agent along with the drug particles. This study provides the fundamentals needed for development of a targeted magnetic drug delivery system for inhaled therapeutic aerosol particles.

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  11. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways.

  12. Selection and fabrication of a non-woven polycarbonate urethane cover for a tissue engineered airway stent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiluan; Clauser, Johanna; Thiebes, Anja Lena; McGrath, Donnacha J; McHugh, Peter E; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Hennink, Wim E; Kok, Robbert Jan

    2016-11-30

    One of the major problems in end-stage bronchotracheal cancer is stenosis of the upper airways, either due to luminal ingrowth of the tumor or mucus plugging. Airway stents that suppress tumor ingrowth and sustain mucociliary transport can alleviate these problems in end-stage bronchial cancer. We evaluated different types of polymeric covers for a tissue engineered airway stent. The distinguishing feature of this stent concept is that respiratory epithelial cells can grow on the luminal surface of the stent which facilitates mucociliary clearance. To facilitate growth of epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface of the stent, we developed a polyurethane cover that allows transport of nutrients to the cells. Nonwoven polycarbonate urethane (PCU) covers were prepared by a spraying process and evaluated for their porosity and glucose permeability. Respiratory epithelial cells harvested from sheep trachea were cultured onto the selected PCU cover and remained viable at the air-liquid interface when cultured for 21days. Lastly, we evaluated the radial force of a PCU-covered nitinol stent, and showed the PCU covers did not adversely affect the mechanical properties of the stents for their intended application in the smaller bronchi. These in vitro data corroborate the design of a novel airway stent for palliative treatment of bronchotracheal stenosis by combination of stent-technology with tissue-engineered epithelial cells.

  13. C5 Modulates Airway Hyperreactivity and Pulmonary Eosinophilia during Enhanced Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease by Decreasing C3a Receptor Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Melendi, Guillermina A.; Hoffman, Scott J.; Karron, Ruth A.; Irusta, Pablo M.; Laham, Federico R.; Humbles, Alison; Schofield, Brian; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Rabold, Richard; Thumar, Bhagvanji; Thumar, Adeep; Gerard, Norma P.; Mitzner, Wayne; Barnum, Scott R.; Gerard, Craig; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2007-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory syncytial virus disease, a serious pulmonary disorder that affected recipients of an inactivated vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus in the 1960s, has delayed the development of vaccines against the virus. The enhanced disease was characterized by immune complex-mediated airway hyperreactivity and a severe pneumonia associated with pulmonary eosinophilia. In this paper, we show that complement factors contribute to enhanced-disease phenotypes. Mice with a targeted disruption of complement component C5 affected by the enhanced disease displayed enhanced airway reactivity, lung eosinophilia, and mucus production compared to wild-type mice and C5-deficient mice reconstituted with C5. C3aR expression in bronchial epithelial and smooth muscle cells in the lungs of C5-deficient mice was enhanced compared to that in wild-type and reconstituted rodents. Treatment of C5-deficient mice with a C3aR antagonist significantly attenuated airway reactivity, eosinophilia, and mucus production. These results indicate that C5 plays a crucial role in modulating the enhanced-disease phenotype, by affecting expression of C3aR in the lungs. These findings reveal a novel autoregulatory mechanism for the complement cascade that affects the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:17079327

  14. Antibiotic-free nanotherapeutics: ultra-small, mucus-penetrating solid lipid nanoparticles enhance the pulmonary delivery and anti-virulence efficacy of novel quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Noha; Husari, Ayman; Maurer, Christine K; Lu, Cenbin; de Rossi, Chiara; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schneider, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease mainly manifested in the respiratory tract. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is the most common pathogen identified in cultures of the CF airways, however, its eradication with antibiotics remains challenging as it grows in biofilms that counterwork human immune response and dramatically decrease susceptibility to antibiotics. P. aeruginosa regulates pathogenicity via a cell-to-cell communication system known as quorum sensing (QS) involving the virulence factor (pyocyanin), thus representing an attractive target for coping with bacterial pathogenicity. The first in vivo potent QS inhibitor (QSI) was recently developed. Nevertheless, its lipophilic nature might hamper its penetration of non-cellular barriers such as mucus and bacterial biofilms, which limits its biomedical application. Successful anti-infective inhalation therapy necessitates proper design of a biodegradable nanocarrier allowing: 1) high loading and prolonged release, 2) mucus penetration, 3) effective pulmonary delivery, and 4) maintenance of the anti-virulence activity of the QSI. In this context, various pharmaceutical lipids were used to prepare ultra-small solid lipid nanoparticles (us-SLNs) by hot melt homogenization. Plain and QSI-loaded SLNs were characterized in terms of colloidal properties, drug loading, in vitro release and acute toxicity on Calu-3 cells. Mucus penetration was studied using a newly-developed confocal microscopy technique based on 3D-time-lapse imaging. For pulmonary application, nebulization efficiency of SLNs and lung deposition using next generation impactor (NGI) were performed. The anti-virulence efficacy was investigated by pyocyanin formation in P. aeruginosa cultures. Ultra-small SLNs (<100nm diameter) provided high encapsulation efficiency (68-95%) according to SLN composition, high burst in phosphate buffer saline compared to prolonged release of the payload over >8h in simulated lung fluid with minor burst. All

  15. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Uller, Lena; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Alenmyr, Lisa; Korsgren, Magnus; Ulven, Trond; Högberg, Thomas; Andersson, Gunnar; Persson, Carl GA; Kostenis, Evi

    2007-01-01

    Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2), a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban. PMID:17328802

  16. Effect of D-002 on gastric mucus composition in ethanol-induced ulcer.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, D; Molina, V; Noa, M; Valdés, S; Arruzazabala, M L; Aguilar, C; Más, R

    2000-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of D-002, a natural product isolated and purified from beeswax (Apis mellifera), on gastric mucus composition on ethanol-induced ulcer in rats. The morphology of the lesions was analysed histologically, and morphometric analysis of gastric-gland content in total glycoprotein and sulphated macromolecules were done. Oral pretreatment with D-002 at 5 and 25 mgkg(-1)1 before oral administration of ethanol at 60%, produced a significant increase in the amount of gastric mucus and total protein. The histomorphometric evaluation of the gastric damage at the same doses showed a significant increase in neutral glycoproteins and sulfated macromolecules. It is concluded that enhancement of the quantity and quality of the mucus could partly explain the gastroprotective effect of D-002.

  17. Immunoglobulin concentrations in cervical mucus in patients with normal and abnormal cervical cytology.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, B M; Skinner, G R

    1977-02-01

    The cervical mucus of 31 patients with normal and 16 patients with abnormal cervical cytology was investigated at each stage of the menstrual cycle for immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM. IgG and IgA were present in every mucus sample, while IgM was only occasionally found in trace amounts. IgG and IgA increased towards the last week of the menstrual cycle, the increase being in general more marked for IgA. Patients with abnormal cervical cytology showed increased IgG and, more strikingly, IgA concentrations in their cervical mucus, but there was no correlation between the IgG and IgA concentrations at any stage of the menstrual cycle. Whereas in patients with normal cervical cytology the IgG and IgA concentrations correlated throughout the menstrual cycle.

  18. Bacterial communities and species-specific associations with the mucus of Brazilian coral species

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Camila; Torres, Tatiana T.; Ottoboni, Laura M. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the existence of species-specific associations between Brazilian coral species and bacteria. Pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rDNA was used to analyze the taxonomic composition of bacterial communities associated with the mucus of four coral species (Madracis decactis, Mussismilia hispida, Palythoa caribaeorum, and Tubastraea coccinea) in two seasons (winter and summer), which were compared with the surrounding water and sediment. The microbial communities found in samples of mucus, water, and sediment differed according to the composition and relative frequency of OTUs. The coral mucus community seemed to be more stable and resistant to seasonal variations, compared to the water and sediment communities. There was no influence of geographic location on the composition of the communities. The sediment community was extremely diverse and might act as a "seed bank" for the entire environment. Species-specific OTUs were found in P. caribaeorum, T. coccinea, and M. hispida. PMID:23567936

  19. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  20. Comments to Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Lien, Wan-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal ultrasound can be an alternative diagnostic tool in airway management, besides traditional confirmatory methods such as capnography and auscultation. The standard image is a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with a reverberation artifact posteriorly (comet-tail artifact). If the second A-M interface appears, which we call a "double-tract sign," esophageal intubation is considered.

  1. Nanoparticle penetration of human cervicovaginal mucus: The effect of polyvinyl alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Lai, Samuel K.; Yu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Happe, Christina; Zhong, Weixi; Zhang, Michael; Anonuevo, Abraham; Fridley, Colleen; Hung, Amy; Fu, Jie; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic nanoparticles must rapidly penetrate the mucus secretions lining the surfaces of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and cervicovaginal tracts to efficiently reach the underlying tissues. Whereas most polymeric nanoparticles are highly mucoadhesive, we previously discovered that a dense layer of low MW polyethylene glycol (PEG) conferred a sufficiently hydrophilic and uncharged surface to effectively minimize mucin-nanoparticle adhesive interactions, allowing well-coated particles to rapidly diffuse through human mucus. Here, we sought to investigate the influence of surface coating by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a relatively hydrophilic and uncharged polymer routinely used as a surfactant to formulate drug carriers, on the transport of nanoparticles in fresh human cervicovaginal mucus. We found that PVA-coated polystyrene (PS) particles were immobilized, with speeds at least 4,000-fold lower in mucus than in water, regardless of the PVA molecular weight or incubation concentration tested. Nanoparticles composed of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or diblock copolymers of PEG-PLGA were similarly immobilized when coated with PVA (slowed 29,000- and 2,500-fold, respectively). PVA coatings could not be adequately removed upon washing, and the residual PVA prevented sufficient coating with Pluronic F127 capable of reducing particle mucoadhesion. In contrast to PVA-coated particles, the similar sized PEG-coated formulations were slowed only ~6- to 10-fold in mucus compared to in water. Our results suggest incorporating PVA in the particle formulation process may lead to the formation of mucoadhesive particles for many nanoparticulate systems. Thus, alternative methods for particle formulation, based on novel surfactants or changes in the formulation process, should be identified and developed in order to produce mucus-penetrating particles for mucosal applications. PMID:25090196

  2. Quantitative study of changes in intestinal morphology and mucus gel on total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K; Hirose, H; Onizuka, A; Hayashi, M; Futamura, N; Kawamura, Y; Ezaki, T

    2000-12-01

    Quantification of changes in gastrointestinal morphology and mucus gel has been difficult to study. In the present study, we investigated changes in rat intestine under total parenteral nutrition (TPN) using fluoresceinated lectin staining and image analysis. Wistar rats (n = 34) were divided into two groups: one group received TPN for 2 weeks, and a control group received standard rat chow and water ad libitum for the same period. A 1-cm segment of distal ileum was removed and cut into cross sections. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and to stain the mucus, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), alcian blue (AB), and fluoresceinated lectin, that is, FITC-labeled Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (FITC-UEA-I), were used. Light microscope images were stored in a personal computer and analyzed using image analysis. We measured perimeter length, mucosal thickness, villus area, villus surface area index, mucus stain-positive area, mucosal area ratio, and mucosal surface area ratio. Perimeter length, mucosal thickness, villus area, and villus surface area index in the TPN group were significantly less than those in the control group (P < 0.001 for each parameter). In all mucus stainings, the stain-positive area in the TPN group was significantly less than that in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in mucosal area or mucosal surface area ratios between the two groups. The FITC-UEA-I-positive area was significantly greater than the PAS- or and AB-positive area. There were significant positive correlations between the FITC-UEA-I-positive area and both the PAS-positive and AB-positive areas. TPN for 2 weeks promoted intestinal atrophy and decreased absolute quantity of mucus gel. We successfully introduced the FITC-UEA-I staining method to evaluate changes in mucus gel.

  3. Nanoparticles decorated with proteolytic enzymes, a promising strategy to overcome the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Sousa, Irene; Cattoz, Beatrice; Wilcox, Matthew D; Griffiths, Peter C; Dalgliesh, Robert; Rogers, Sarah; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The intestinal mucus gel layer represents a stumbling block for drug adsorption. This study is aimed to formulate a nanoparticulate system able to overcome this barrier by cleaving locally the glycoprotein substructures of the mucus. Mucolytic enzymes such as papain (PAP) and bromelain (BRO) were covalently conjugated to poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). Nanoparticles (NPs) were then formulated via ionic gelation method and characterized by particle size, zeta potential, enzyme content and enzymatic activity. The NPs permeation quantified by rotating tube studies was correlated with changes in the mucus gel layer structure determined by pulsed-gradient-spin-echo NMR (PGSE-NMR), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and spin-echo SANS (SESANS). PAP and BRO functionalized NPs had an average size in the range of 250 and 285 nm and a zeta potential that ranged between -6 and -5 mV. The enzyme content was 242 μg enzyme/mg for PAP modified NPs and 253 μg enzyme/mg for BRO modified NPs. The maintained enzymatic activity was 43% for PAP decorated NPs and 76% for BRO decorated NPs. The rotating tube technique revealed a better performance of BRO decorated NPs compared to PAA decorated NPs, with a 4.8-fold higher concentration of NPs in the inner slice of mucus. Addition of 0.5 wt% of enzyme functionalized NPs to 5 wt% intestinal mucin led to c.a. 2-fold increase in the mobility of the mucin as measured by PGSE-NMR indicative of a significant break-up of the structure of the mucin. SANS and SESANS measurements further revealed a change in structure of the intestinal mucus induced by the incorporation of the functionalized NPs mostly occurring at a length scale longer than 0.5 μm. Accordingly, BRO decorated NPs show higher potential than PAP functionalized NPs as mucus permeating drug delivery systems.

  4. Functional C1q is present in the skin mucus of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xuguang; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    The skin mucus of fish acts as the first line of self-protection against pathogens in the aquatic environment and comprises a number of innate immune components. However, the presence of the critical classical complement component C1q, which links the innate and adaptive immune systems of mammalians, has not been explored in a primitive actinopterygian fish. In this study, we report that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii). The skin mucus was able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli. The bacteriostatic activity of the skin mucus was reduced by heating and by pre-incubation with EDTA or mouse anti-human C1q antibody. We also detected C1q protein in skin mucus using the western blot procedure and isolated a cDNA that encodes the Siberian sturgeon C1qC, which had 44.7-51.4% identity with C1qCs in teleosts and tetrapods. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Siberian sturgeon C1qC lies at the root of the actinopterygian branch and is separate from the tetrapod branch. The C1qC transcript was expressed in many tissues as well as in skin. Our data indicate that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon to protect against water-borne bacteria, and the C1qC found in the sturgeon may represent the primitive form of teleost and tetrapod C1qCs.

  5. Ultraviolet-B wavelengths regulate changes in UV absorption of cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus mucus.

    PubMed

    Zamzow, Jill P; Siebeck, Ulrike E; Eckes, Maxi J; Grutter, Alexandra S

    2013-01-01

    High-energy wavelengths in the ultraviolet-B (UVB, 280-315 nm) and the UVA (315-400-nm) portion of the spectrum are harmful to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Interestingly, UVA is also involved in the repair of UV induced damage. Organisms living in shallow coral reef environments possess UV absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids, to protect them from UV radiation. While it has been demonstrated that exposure to UV (280-400 nm) affects the UV absorbance of fish mucus, whether the effects of UV exposure vary between UVB and UVA wavelengths is not known. Therefore, we investigated whether the UVB, UVA, or photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) portions of the spectrum affected the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus and Fulton's body condition index of the cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. We also compared field-measured UV absorbance with laboratory based high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of mycosporine-like amino acid concentrations. After 1 week, we found that the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus was higher in the UVB+UVA+PAR treatment compared with the UVA+PAR and PAR only treatments; after 2 and 3 weeks, however, differences between treatments were not detected. After 3 weeks, Fulton's body condition index was lower for fish in the UVB+UVA+PAR compared with PAR and UVA+PAR treatments; furthermore, all experimentally treated fish had a lower Fulton's body condition index than did freshly caught fish. Finally, we found a decrease with depth in the UV absorbance of mucus of wild-caught fish. This study suggests that the increase in UV absorbance of fish mucus in response to increased overall UV levels is a function of the UVB portion of the spectrum. This has important implications for the ability of cleaner fish and other fishes to adjust their mucus UV protection in response to variations in environmental UV exposure.

  6. Chibby functions to preserve normal ciliary morphology through the regulation of intraflagellar transport in airway ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Saul S; Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Airway cilia provide the coordinated motive force for mucociliary transport, which prevents the accumulation of mucus, debris, pollutants, and bacteria in our respiratory tracts. As airway cilia are constantly exposed to the environment and, hence, are an integral component of the pathogenesis of several congenital and chronic pulmonary disorders, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that control ciliated cell differentiation and ciliogenesis. We have previously reported that loss of the basal body protein Chibby (Cby) results in chronic upper airway infection in mice due to a significant reduction in the number of airway cilia. In the present work, we demonstrate that Cby is required for normal ciliary structure and proper distribution of proteins involved in the bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which consists of 2 distinct sub-complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, and is essential for ciliary biogenesis and maintenance. In fully differentiated ciliated cells, abnormal paddle-like cilia with dilated ciliary tips are observed in Cby-/- airways and primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). In addition, IFT88, an IFT-B sub-complex protein, robustly accumulates within the dilated tips of both multicilia in Cby-/- MTECs and primary cilia in Cby-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, we show that only IFT-B components, including IFT20 and IFT57, but not IFT-A and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins, amass with IFT88 in these distended tips in Cby-/- ciliated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Cby plays a role in the proper distribution of IFT particles to preserve normal ciliary morphology in airway ciliated cells.

  7. Models of muco-ciliary transport and tracer dispersion in airway surface liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Blake, John; Gaffney, Eamonn

    2003-11-01

    The airways of the lungs are protected by a thin layer of mucus ( 5-15 microns) which traps dust and other pathogens. The mucus plaque is secreted by specialised epithelial cells, then transported axially towards the pharynx by the action of a dense mat of beating cilia. The cilia beat in a watery `periciliary liquid' (PCL). According to previous theoretical analysis, axial transport of PCL is relatively small, consistent with an impermeable epithelium. However, tracer dispersion experiments by Matsui et al. (1998) appear to show large axial transport, consistent with a highly permeable epithelium. The resolution of the question of the amount of absorption of PCL is related to the issue of the pathogensis of cystic fibrosis lung disease. We present the results of a new model of mucociliary transport which combines the best features of several very different previous models. We also present a model of tracer dispersion and show how this can be used to interpret the findings of Matsui et al. and relate them to our theoretical results.

  8. Growth and survival of the fish pathogenic bacterium, Flavobacterium columnare, in tilapia mucus and porcine gastric mucin.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Craig A; LaFrentz, Benjamin R

    2015-02-01

    Flavobacterium columnare, an economically important Gram-negative bacterium of freshwater farmed fish, colonizes the skin and gills in the initial steps of pathogenesis. The surface of fish is coated with mucus made up of high molecular weight glycoproteins. Limited studies have described the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in fish mucus. Our objective was to determine if F. columnare isolates could grow and survive in formulated water (FW) containing autoclaved tilapia mucus or porcine gastric mucin. We demonstrated the ability of F. columnare genomovars I, II, II-B and III to replicate (2-3 logs) and survive (21 to >100 days) in FW containing tilapia mucus. In a second experiment, genomovar I and II isolates were found to replicate in FW containing tilapia mucus or porcine mucin but not in FW only. From a practical standpoint, fish handling and/or hauling results in stress that leads to mucus sloughing often with subsequent F. columnare infection. Flavobacterium columnare utilizes fish mucus as a nutrient source, and studies are underway to determine if growth in mucus or mucin results in differential protein expression and/or increased virulence of F. columnare towards fish.

  9. Effects of verapamil, carbenoxolone and N-acetylcysteine on gastric wall mucus and ulceration in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Koo, M W; Ogle, C W; Cho, C H

    1986-01-01

    The effects of verapamil on gastric wall mucus and ulceration were studied in rats which were restrained and exposed to 4 degrees C (stress). Stress for 2 h significantly depleted stomach wall mucus and produced marked gastric glandular ulcers. Verapamil pretreatment (2, 4, 8 or 16 mg/kg), injected intraperitoneally 30 min before experimentation, significantly prevented stress-induced mucus depletion and gastric ulceration; however, it did not itself influence stomach wall mucus levels in nonstressed animals. Intragastric administration of carbenoxolone (100 or 200 mg/kg), also given 30 min before stress, exhibited similar actions as verapamil. A 15% solution of N-acetylcysteine (10 ml/kg), given orally, strongly decreased the mucus content in both nonstress and stress conditions; it induced ulcers in nonstressed rats, and worsened stress ulceration. These effects were not reversed by verapamil pretreatment. The influence of multiple-dose pretreatment with verapamil or carbenoxolone on mucus content and ulceration in the gastric glandular mucosa during stress is also discussed. It is concluded that gastric wall mucus depletion is likely to play an important role in stress ulcer formation; the antiulcer action of verapamil could partly be due to the preservation of mucus.

  10. The microstructure and bulk rheology of human cervicovaginal mucus are remarkably resistant to changes in pH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K; Ensign, Laura M; Zhong, Weixi; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2013-12-09

    The protective barrier, lubricant, and clearance functions of mucus are intimately coupled to its microstructure and bulk rheology. Mucus gels consist of a network of mucin biopolymers along with lipids, salts, and other proteins and exhibit similar biochemical and physical properties across diverse mucosal surfaces. Nevertheless, mucus is exposed to a broad range of pH values throughout the human body. Protein functions are typically sensitive to small changes in pH, and prior investigations using reconstituted, purified mucin gels suggested mucus undergoes a transition from a low-viscosity liquid at neutral pH to a highly viscoelastic solid at low pH. We sought to determine whether those observations hold for fresh, minimally perturbed human mucus ex vivo by using different-sized muco-inert nanoparticles to probe microstructure and cone-and-plate rheometry to measure bulk rheology. We demonstrate that both the microstructure and bulk rheology of fresh, undiluted, and minimally perturbed cervicovaginal mucus exhibit relatively minor changes from pH 1-2 to 8-9, in marked contrast with the pH sensitivity of purified mucin gels. Our work also suggests additional components in mucus secretions, typically eliminated during mucin purification and reconstitution, may play an important role in maintaining the protective properties of mucus.

  11. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  12. The Lung Microbiome and Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated relationships between the composition of the airway microbiota (mixed-species communities of microbes that exist in the respiratory tract) and critical features of immune response and pulmonary function. These studies provide evidence that airway inflammatory status and capacity for repair are coassociated with specific taxonomic features of the airway microbiome. Although directionality has yet to be established, the fact that microbes are known drivers of inflammation and tissue damage suggests that in the context of chronic inflammatory airway disease, the composition and, more importantly, the function, of the pulmonary microbiome represent critical factors in defining airway disease outcomes.

  13. Airway nerves: in vitro electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alyson

    2002-06-01

    Recording the activity of single airway sensory fibres or neuronal cell bodies in vitro has allowed detailed characterisation of fibre types and membrane properties. Fibre types can be identified by their conduction velocities and further studied by the application of drugs to their receptive field. C-fibres are sensitive to mechanical stimuli and a range of irritant chemicals (bradykinin, capsaicin, low pH, platelet-activating factor), whereas Adelta-fibres are relatively insensitive to chemical stimuli and appear to correlate to the rapidly adapting receptors identified in airways in vivo. Their site of origin also differs: upper airway C-fibres arise predominantly from the jugular ganglion and Adelta-fibres from the jugular and nodose ganglia. Intracellular recording from cell bodies in the ganglia has revealed a calcium-dependent potassium current common to many putative C-fibre cell bodies. This slow after hyperpolarisation current may be inhibited by stimuli that excite and sensitise C-fibres - this could be an important mechanism underlying the sensitisation of C-fibres in airway irritability.

  14. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments.

  15. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed.

  16. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  17. Mucus: A new tissue fraction for rapid determination of fish diet switching using stable isotope analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analysis of diet switching by fishes often is hampered by slow turnover rates of the tissues analyzed (usually muscle or fins). We examined epidermal mucus as a potentially faster turnover “tissue” that might provide a more rapid assessment of diet switching. In a ...

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Luteimonas sp. Strain from Coral Mucus, Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James M.; Rowley, Sonia J.

    2016-01-01

    Luteimonas sp. strain JM171 was cultivated from mucus collected around the coral Porites lobata. The JM171 draft genome of 2,992,353 bp contains 2,672 protein-coding open reading frames, 45 tRNA coding regions, and encodes a putative globin-coupled diguanylate cyclase, JmGReg. PMID:27811107

  19. STABLE ISOTOPE SIGNATURES OF MUCUS OF STEELHEAD TROUT IN A CONTROLLED DIET SWITCH EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our work has shown that fish mucus can serve as a very rapid indicator of diet switching in fish. We performed diet switching studies of steelhead trout in a controlled hatchery setting using specially formulated low delta 15N signature and high delta 15N signature diets. To ou...

  20. Analysis of stable isotopes in fish mucus during a controlled diet switch

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used a controlled diet switch in steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center to study the time rates of changes in stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (13C and 15N) in epidermal mucus, a rapidly responding “tissue.” Because of the ra...

  1. 76 FR 52961 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Devices for Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ...-061-2004/0 ``Mucus Shaving Apparatus for Endotracheal Tubes''; U.S. Patent 7,051,737 to EndOclear, LLC.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The patent intended for licensure covers an endotracheal tube cleaning apparatus...). The preferred embodiment as recited in the claims is a cleaning apparatus with a flexible central...

  2. Flow cytometric enumeration of bacterial in the coral surface mucus layer.

    PubMed

    Bettarel, Yvan; Thanh, Mai Chi; Patrice, Got; Antoinette, Adingra; Nadège, Kouadio-Ngbesso; Bui, Van Ngoc; Thierry, Bouvier

    2016-09-01

    The direct counts of bacteria inhabiting coral mucus were performed by flow cytometry testing four fluorescent dyes (SYBR®Green I, HCS, TOPRO®3, SYTO®62) with three different scleractinian species. Results obtained with SYTO62 were the most reliable based on the comparison with standardized epifluorescence counts and the resolution of cytograms.

  3. Growth and survival of Flavobacterium columnare in fish mucus and porcine gastric mucin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare, an economically important gram negative bacterium of freshwater farmed fish, colonizes the skin and gills in the initial steps of pathogenesis. The surface of fish is coated with mucus made up of high molecular weight glycoproteins. Limited studies have described the abili...

  4. Stable isotope analysis of fish mucus during a controlled diet switch

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used a controlled diet switch in steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center to study the time rates of changes in stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (13C and 15N) in epidermal mucus, a rapidly responding “tissue.” Because of the ra...

  5. Mucus: a new tissue fraction for rapid determination of fish diet switching using stable isotope analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable isotope analysis of diet switching by fishes is often hampered by slow turnover rates of the tissues analyzed (usually muscle or fins). We examined epidermal mucus as a potentially faster turnover “tissue” that might provide a more rapid assessment of diet switching. In a controlled hatchery...

  6. Evidence that ferritin is associated with light production in the mucus of the marine worm Chaetopterus

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Renu; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    The blue glow of the mucus from Chaetopterus involves a photoprotein, iron and flavins. Identity and respective role of these components remain, however, largely unresolved today, likely because of viscosity issues and inhibition of this system by oxidizers conventionally used to track bioluminescence activity. Here, we used gentle centrifugation to obtain a mucus supernatant showing no inhibition to oxidizers, allowing for further analysis. We applied conventional chromatographic techniques to isolate major proteins associated with light emission. Luminescence ability of elutriate fractions was tested with hydrogen peroxide to track photoprotein and/or protein-bound chromophore. Fractions producing light contained few major proteins, one with similarity to ferritin. Addition to the mucus of elements with inhibitory/potentiary effect on ferritin ferroxidase activity induced corresponding changes in light production, emphasizing the possible role of ferritin in the worm bioluminescence. DNA of the protein was cloned, sequenced, and expressed, confirming its identity to a Chaetopterus Ferritin (ChF). Both ferric and ferrous iron were found in the mucus, indicating the occurrence of both oxidase and reductase activity. Biochemical analysis showed ChF has strong ferroxidase activity, which could be a source of biological iron and catalytic energy for the worm bioluminescence when coupled to a reduction process with flavins. PMID:27830745

  7. Direct Visualization of Mucus Production by the Cold-Water Coral Lophelia pertusa with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Baussant, Thierry; Meysman, Filip J. R.; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the existing tools to study these processes are not appropriate. Using a novel microscopic technique—digital holographic microscopy (DHM)–we studied the mucus release of L. pertusa under various experimental conditions. DHM technology permits μm-scale observations and allows the visualization of transparent mucoid substances in real time without staining. Fragments of L. pertusa were first maintained in flow-through chambers without stressors and imaged with DHM, then exposed to various stressors (suspended particles, particulate food and air exposure) and re-imaged. Under non-stressed conditions no release of mucus was observed, whilst mucus strings and sheaths were produced in response to suspended particles (activated charcoal and drill cuttings sediment) i.e. in a stressed condition. Mucus strings and so-called ‘string balls’ were also observed in response to exposure to particulate food (brine shrimp Artemia salina). Upon air-exposure, mucus production was clearly visible once the fragments were returned to the flow chamber. Distinct optical properties such as optical path length difference (OPD) were measured with DHM in response to the various stimuli suggesting that different mucus types are produced by L. pertusa. Mucus produced to reject particles is similar in refractive index to the surrounding seawater, suggesting that the energy content of this mucus is low. In contrast, mucus produced in response to either food particle addition or air exposure had a higher refractive index, suggesting a higher metabolic investment in the production of these mucoid substances. This paper shows for the first time the

  8. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  9. Adhesion of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to human mucus secreting HT-29 cell subpopulations in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kerneis, S; Bernet, M F; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bearing the fimbrial colonisation factor antigens CFA/I, CFA/II, CFA/III, and the non-fimbrial antigen 2230 were tested for their ability to adhere to two cultured human intestinal HT-29 mucus secreting cell subpopulations. These populations are referred to as HT29-MTX and HT29-FU, which differ in the amount of secreted mucins and in their gastric or colonic mucin immunoreactivity respectively. Adherence of radiolabelled bacteria to cell monolayers infected apically was assessed. All ETEC strains adhered to the mucus secreting HT29-FU subpopulation, which secretes mucins of colonic immunoreactivity. Visualisation of bacteria by scanning electron microscopy showed that ETEC bound to the HT29-FU cells possessing a brush border, but not to the mucus and that ETEC binding developed as a function of cell differentiation. The adhesion of ETEC to cells possessing a brush border and to mucus secreting cells was also analysed by indirect immunofluorescence in HT29-MTX cells, which secrete mucins of gastric immunoreactivity. Fluorescein isothiocyanate labelling using specific anti-CFA/I antibody was used to show ETEC; rhodamine isothiocyanate labelling using a monoclonal antibody (designated M1) against purified human gastric mucus was used to detect secreted mucins, and rhodamine isothiocyanate labelling using a monoclonal antibody (designated 4H3) against human dipeptidylpeptidase IV was used to show cells possessing a brush border. Binding of bacteria colocalised with dipeptidylpeptidase IV of enterocytes and not with mucins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7959203

  10. Mucus trail tracking in a predatory snail: olfactory processing retooled to serve a novel sensory modality

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kinjal; Shaheen, Nagma; Witherspoon, Jessica; Robinson, Natallia; Harrington, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The rosy wolfsnail (Euglandina rosea), a predatory land snail, finds prey snails and potential mates by following their mucus trails. Euglandina have evolved unique, mobile lip extensions that detect mucus and aid in following trails. Currently, little is known of the neural substrates of the trail-following behavior. Methods To investigate the neural correlates of trail following we used tract-tracing experiments in which nerves were backfilled with either nickel-lysine or Lucifer yellow, extracellular recording of spiking neurons in snail procerebra using a multielectrode array, and behavioral assays of trail following and movement toward the source of a conditioned odor. Results The tract-tracing experiments demonstrate that in Euglandina, the nerves carrying mucus signals innervate the same region of the central ganglia as the olfactory nerves, while the electrophysiology studies show that mucus stimulation of the sensory epithelium on the lip extensions alters the frequency and pattern of neural activity in the procerebrum in a manner similar to odor stimulation of the olfactory epithelium on the optic tentacles of another land snail species, Cantareus aspersa (previously known as Helix aspersa). While Euglandina learn to follow trails of novel chemicals that they contact with their lip extensions in one to three trials, these snails proved remarkably resistant to associative learning in the olfactory modality. Even after seven to nine pairings of odorant molecules with food, they showed no orientation toward the conditioned odor. This is in marked contrast to Cantareus snails, which reliably oriented toward conditioned odors after two to three trials. Conclusions The apparent inability of Euglandina to learn to associate food with odors and use odor cues to drive behavior suggests that the capability for sophisticated neural processing of nonvolatile mucus cues detected by the lip extensions has evolved at the expense of processing of odorant

  11. Generation of Pig Airways using Rules Developed from the Measurements of Physical Airways

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md Khurshidul; Mansy, Hansen A.

    2017-01-01

    Background A method for generating bronchial tree would be helpful when constructing models of the tree for benchtop experiments as well as for numerical modeling of flow or sound propagation in the airways. Early studies documented the geometric details of the human airways that were used to develop methods for generating human airway tree. However, methods for generating animal airway tree are scarcer. Earlier studies suggested that the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. Hence, using algorithms for the human airways may not be accurate in generating models of animal airway geometry. Objective The objective of this study is to develop an algorithm for generating pig airway tree based on the geometric details extracted from the physical measurements. Methods In the current study, measured values of branch diameters, lengths and bifurcation angles and rotation of bifurcating planes were used to develop an algorithm that is capable of generating a realistic pig airway tree. Results The generation relations between parent and daughter branches were found to follow certain trends. The diameters and the length of different branches were dependent on airway generations while the bifurcation angles were primarily dependent on bifurcation plane rotations. These relations were sufficient to develop rules for generating a model of the pig large airways. Conclusion The results suggested that the airway tree generated from the algorithm can provide an approximate geometric model of pig airways for computational and benchtop studies. PMID:28255517

  12. Recent trends in airway management

    PubMed Central

    Karlik, Joelle; Aziz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal intubation remains a life-saving procedure that is typically not difficult for experienced providers in routine conditions. Unfortunately, difficult intubation remains challenging to predict and intubation conditions may make the event life threatening. Recent technological advances aim to further improve the ease, speed, safety, and success of intubation but have not been fully investigated. Video laryngoscopy, though proven effective in the difficult airway, may result in different intubation success rates in various settings and in different providers’ hands. The rescue surgical airway remains a rarely used but critical skill, and research continues to investigate optimal techniques. This review highlights some of the new thoughts and research on these important topics. PMID:28299194

  13. Surfactant Driven Post-Deposition Spreading of Aerosols on Complex Aqueous Subphases. 2: Low Deposition Flux Representative of Aerosol Delivery to Small Airways

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ramankur; Khanal, Amsul; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Przybycien, Todd M.; Tilton, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with the accumulation of dehydrated mucus in the pulmonary airways. This alters ventilation and aerosol deposition patterns in ways that limit drug delivery to peripheral lung regions. We investigated the use of surfactant-based, self-dispersing aerosol carriers that produce surface tension gradients to drive two-dimensional transport of aerosolized medications via Marangoni flows after deposition on the airway surface liquid (ASL). We considered the post-deposition spreading of individual aerosol droplets and two-dimensional expansion of a field of aerosol droplets, when deposited at low fluxes that are representative of aerosol deposition in the small airways. Methods: We used physically entangled aqueous solutions of poly(acrylamide) or porcine gastric mucin as simple ASL mimics that adequately capture the full miscibility but slow penetration of entangled macromolecular chains of the ASL into the deposited drop. Surfactant formulations were prepared with aqueous solutions of nonionic tyloxapol or FS-3100 fluorosurfactant. Fluorescein dye served as a model “drug” tracer and to visualize the extent of post-deposition spreading. Results: The surfactants not only enhanced post-deposition spreading of individual aerosol droplets due to localized Marangoni stresses, as previously observed with macroscopic drops, but they also produced large-scale Marangoni stresses that caused the deposited aerosol fields to expand into initially unexposed regions of the subphase. We show that the latter is the main mechanism for spreading drug over large distances when aerosol is deposited at low fluxes representative of the small airways. The large scale convective expansion of the aerosol field drives the tracer (drug mimic) over areas that would cover an entire airway generation or more, in peripheral airways, where sub-monolayer droplet deposition is expected during aerosol inhalation. Conclusions: The results suggest

  14. Unprenylated RhoA Contributes to IL-1β Hypersecretion in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency Model through Stimulation of Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgh, Robert; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Turkenburg, Marjolein; Waterham, Hans R.; Frenkel, Joost; Boes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification whereby non-sterol isoprenoid lipid chains are added, thereby modifying the molecular partners with which proteins interact. The autoinflammatory disease mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is characterized by a severe reduction in protein prenylation. A major class of proteins that are affected are small GTPases, including Rac1 and RhoA. It is not clear how protein prenylation of small GTPases relates to GTP hydrolysis activity and downstream signaling. Here, we investigated the contribution of RhoA prenylation to the biochemical pathways that underlie MKD-associated IL-1β hypersecretion using human cell cultures, Rac1 and RhoA protein variants, and pharmacological inhibitors. We found that when unprenylated, the GTP-bound levels of RhoA decrease, causing a reduction in GTPase activity and increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation. Cells expressing unprenylated RhoA produce increased levels of interleukin 1β mRNA. Of other phenotypic cellular changes seen in MKD, increased mitochondrial potential and mitochondrial elongation, only mitochondrial elongation was observed. Finally, we show that pharmacological inactivation of RhoA boosts Rac1 activity, a small GTPase whose activity was earlier implied in MKD pathogenesis. Together, our data show that RhoA plays a pivotal role in MKD pathogenesis through Rac1/PKB signaling toward interleukin 1β production and elucidate the effects of protein prenylation in monocytes. PMID:25107911

  15. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans.

  16. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion.

  17. A clinical pilot study: high frequency chest wall oscillation airway clearance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Kathleen Marya; Walsh, Susan; Simmons, Zachary; Vender, Robert L

    2006-06-01

    Respiratory complications are common in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with respiratory failure representing the most common cause of death. Ineffective airway clearance resultant from deficient cough frequently contributes to these abnormalities. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) administered through the Vest Airway Clearance System when added to standard care in preventing pulmonary complications and prolonging the time to death in patients with ALS. This is a single center study performed at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (HMC). Nine patients with a diagnosis of ALS and concurrently receiving non-invasive ventilatory support with bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) were recruited from the outpatient clinic at HMC. Four patients were randomized to receive standard care and five patients to receive standard care plus the addition of HFCWO administered twice-daily for 15 min duration. Longitudinal assessments of oxyhemoglobin saturation, forced vital capacity (FVC), and adverse events were obtained until time of death. Pulmonary complications of atelectasis, pneumonia, hospitalization for a respiratory-related abnormality, and tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation were monitored throughout the study duration. No differences were observed between treatment groups in relation to the rate of decline in FVC. The addition of HFCWO airway clearance failed to improve time to death compared to standard treatment alone (340 days +/- 247 vs. 470 days +/- 241; p = 0.26). The random allocation of HFCWO airway clearance to patients with ALS concomitantly receiving BiPAP failed to attain any significant clinical benefits in relation to either loss of lung function or mortality. This study does not exclude the potential benefit of HFCWO in select patients with ALS who have coexistent pulmonary diseases, pre-existent mucus-related pulmonary complications, or less severe levels of

  18. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  19. Functional invariant NKT cells in pig lungs regulate the airway hyperreactivity: a potential animal model.

    PubMed

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Manickam, Cordelia; Khatri, Mahesh; Rauf, Abdul; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Dwivedi, Varun

    2011-04-01

    Important roles played by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in asthma pathogenesis have been demonstrated. We identified functional iNKT cells and CD1d molecules in pig lungs. Pig iNKT cells cultured in the presence of α-GalCer proliferated and secreted Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Like in other animal models, direct activation of pig lung iNKT cells using α-GalCer resulted in acute airway hyperreactivity (AHR). Clinically, acute AHR-induced pigs had increased respiratory rate, enhanced mucus secretion in the airways, fever, etc. In addition, we observed petechial hemorrhages, infiltration of CD4(+) cells, and increased Th2 cytokines in AHR-induced pig lungs. Ex vivo proliferated iNKT cells of asthma induced pigs in the presence of C-glycoside analogs of α-GalCer had predominant Th2 phenotype and secreted more of Th2 cytokine, IL-4. Thus, baby pigs may serve as a useful animal model to study iNKT cell-mediated AHR caused by various environmental and microbial CD1d-specific glycolipid antigens.

  20. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  1. Automated Lobe-Based Airway Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M.; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L.; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  2. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  3. Study on the increment of the production of gastric mucus in rats treated with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. cladodes.

    PubMed

    Galati, E M; Pergolizzi, S; Miceli, N; Monforte, M T; Tripodo, M M

    2002-12-01

    Opuntia ficus indica cladodes are used in traditional medicine of many countries for their cicatrisant activity. The major components of cladodes are carbohydrate-containing polymers, which consist of a mixture of mucilage and pectin. In this paper we studied the cytoprotective effects of cladodes on experimental ethanol-induced ulcer in rat. The O. ficus indica cladodes administration gives rise to cytoprotection phenomena by breaking up the epithelial cells and stimulating an increase in mucus production. When O. ficus indica cladodes are administered as a preventive therapy, keep the gastric mucosa under normal condition by preventing mucus dissolution caused by ethanol and favouring mucus production. An increase of mucus production is also observed during the course of the curative treatment. The treatment with O. ficus indica cladodes provokes an increase in the number of secretory cells. Probably, the gastric fibroblasts are involved in the antiulcer activity.

  4. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  5. Novel Compounds from Shark and Stingray Epidermal Mucus With Antimicrobial Activity Against Wound Infection Pathogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    cultures have been screened against a different panel of human pathogenic tester strains, including Bacillus spp (B. anthracis and B. cereus ...classify the Gram positive bacteria as Bacillus spp or not, or members of the Bacillus cereus group. Optimal temperatures (25, 30 or 35ºC) were...Mucus Mg(TFA)2-extracted samples were screened for antibiotic activity using the tester pathogen, Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis was grown overnight

  6. Gut microbiota facilitates dietary heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation by opening the mucus barrier in colon

    PubMed Central

    Ijssennagger, Noortje; Belzer, Clara; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Dekker, Jan; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Müller, Michael; Kleerebezem, Michiel; van der Meer, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of colonic contents and elicits epithelial damage and compensatory hyperproliferation, leading to hyperplasia. Here we explore the possible causal role of the gut microbiota in heme-induced hyperproliferation. To this end, mice were fed a purified control or heme diet (0.5 μmol/g heme) with or without broad-spectrum antibiotics for 14 d. Heme-induced hyperproliferation was shown to depend on the presence of the gut microbiota, because hyperproliferation was completely eliminated by antibiotics, although heme-induced luminal cytotoxicity was sustained in these mice. Colon mucosa transcriptomics revealed that antibiotics block heme-induced differential expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and cell turnover genes, implying that antibiotic treatment prevented the heme-dependent cytotoxic micelles to reach the epithelium. Our results indicate that this occurs because antibiotics reinforce the mucus barrier by eliminating sulfide-producing bacteria and mucin-degrading bacteria (e.g., Akkermansia). Sulfide potently reduces disulfide bonds and can drive mucin denaturation and microbial access to the mucus layer. This reduction results in formation of trisulfides that can be detected in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, trisulfides can serve as a novel marker of colonic mucolysis and thus as a proxy for mucus barrier reduction. In feces, antibiotics drastically decreased trisulfides but increased mucin polymers that can be lysed by sulfide. We conclude that the gut microbiota is required for heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia because of the capacity to reduce mucus barrier function. PMID:26216954

  7. Gut microbiota facilitates dietary heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation by opening the mucus barrier in colon.

    PubMed

    Ijssennagger, Noortje; Belzer, Clara; Hooiveld, Guido J; Dekker, Jan; van Mil, Saskia W C; Müller, Michael; Kleerebezem, Michiel; van der Meer, Roelof

    2015-08-11

    Colorectal cancer risk is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of colonic contents and elicits epithelial damage and compensatory hyperproliferation, leading to hyperplasia. Here we explore the possible causal role of the gut microbiota in heme-induced hyperproliferation. To this end, mice were fed a purified control or heme diet (0.5 μmol/g heme) with or without broad-spectrum antibiotics for 14 d. Heme-induced hyperproliferation was shown to depend on the presence of the gut microbiota, because hyperproliferation was completely eliminated by antibiotics, although heme-induced luminal cytotoxicity was sustained in these mice. Colon mucosa transcriptomics revealed that antibiotics block heme-induced differential expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and cell turnover genes, implying that antibiotic treatment prevented the heme-dependent cytotoxic micelles to reach the epithelium. Our results indicate that this occurs because antibiotics reinforce the mucus barrier by eliminating sulfide-producing bacteria and mucin-degrading bacteria (e.g., Akkermansia). Sulfide potently reduces disulfide bonds and can drive mucin denaturation and microbial access to the mucus layer. This reduction results in formation of trisulfides that can be detected in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, trisulfides can serve as a novel marker of colonic mucolysis and thus as a proxy for mucus barrier reduction. In feces, antibiotics drastically decreased trisulfides but increased mucin polymers that can be lysed by sulfide. We conclude that the gut microbiota is required for heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia because of the capacity to reduce mucus barrier function.

  8. Expression profiling analysis of immune-related genes in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) skin mucus following Flavobacterium columnare challenge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yichao; Zhao, Honggang; Su, Baofeng; Peatman, Eric; Li, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Fish are covered by a watery gel-mucus, mainly secreted by the goblet cells, serving as the physical and biochemical barrier between the external environment and the interior milieu, playing more important roles in fish that without scale. Despite the important roles of mucus in fish immunity, the knowledge of detailed molecular events happened during infection process is still limited. While most studies were focused on characterizing the protein and enzyme activities in the mucus following challenge, no studies have examined the gene expression profiles in fish mucus. In this regard, herein we carried out the first gene profiling analysis in catfish mucus using real-time PCR. Ten important immune-related genes were selected according to our previous studies. Their expression levels were examined in the early timepoints (namely, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h) following Flavobacterium columnare challenge. Notably, expression levels of most of the selected genes were rapidly altered by the challenge. Seven genes were down-regulated, while only three genes were up-regulated. In addition, the gene expression patterns in mucus were very different from the mucosal surfaces (skin, gill and intestine) and the classical immune organs (liver, spleen and kidney). The unique expression patterns obtained here may be resulted from the great advantage of the large amount of attached bacteria in the mucus than the internal tissues, and resulted from the bacteria virulent actors to suppress the host immune response. Taken together, our results can expand our knowledge of fish mucosal immunity, and the un-lethal mucus sampling can provide early insight for developing the strategies for selection of disease resistant families and strains in catfish as well as other fish species.

  9. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R.; Avram, Michael J.; Coppeta, Jonathan R.; Wishnok, John S.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior. PMID:26586376

  10. Sinomenine attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in a mouse model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    BAO, HAI-RONG; LIU, XIAO-JU; LI, YUN-LIN; MEN, XIANG; ZENG, XIAO-LI

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease that involves airway inflammation and remodeling. Sinomenine (SIN) has been demonstrated to have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of SIN on airway inflammation and remodeling in an asthma mouse model and observe the effects of SIN on the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) pathway and oxidative stress. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized by repetitive ovalbumin (OVA) challenge for 6 weeks in order to develop a mouse model of asthma. OVA-sensitized animals received SIN (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (2 mg/kg). A blank control group received saline only. The area of smooth muscle and collagen, levels of mucus secretion and inflammatory cell infiltration were evaluated 24 h subsequent to the final OVA challenge. mRNA and protein levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistology, respectively. The indicators of oxidative stress were detected by spectrophotometry. SIN significantly reduced allergen-induced increases in smooth muscle thickness, mucous gland hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition and eosinophilic inflammation. The levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in the lungs of mice treated with SIN. Additionally, the total antioxidant capacity was increased in lungs following treatment with SIN. The malondialdehyde content and myeloperoxidase activities in the lungs from OVA-sensitized mice were significantly inhibited by SIN. In conclusion, SIN may inhibit airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma mouse models, and may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of asthma. PMID:26820806

  11. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  12. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  13. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  14. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  15. Beyond the mucus escalator: Complex ciliary hydrodynamics in disease and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; John, Dabiri; Kanso, Eva; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures lining external and internal body surfaces where they interact with fluids. The main function of motile cilia is often described as that of a ``mucus escalator'', i.e., a homogeneous ciliary carpet moving along layer of mucus along the surface to transport food, germ cells, debris, or pathogens. Accordingly, the performance of ciliary systems is usually measured in terms of a single metric, transport velocity, or its presumed proxy, ciliary beat frequency. We challenge this simple view through the observation that both healthy and diseased biological systems exhibit a variety of cilia morphologies, beat patterns, and arrangements, resulting in complex flow patterns and transport phenomena that cannot be reduced to a single parameter. Here we present two case studies. In one system, the ciliated surface creates two distinct flow regimes for first trapping and then sheltering potential symbiont bacteria for further biochemical screening. In the other system, chronic disease induces a misalignment of ciliary beat, leading to a pathological transition from uniform mucus transport to a pattern of stagnation and circulation. These studies suggest that (a), we need to develop a wider range of metrics for describing ciliary transport in biological and clinical contexts, and (b), engineered ciliated systems exploiting a variety of design parameters could provide novel ways of manipulating fluids at the microscale.

  16. Mitomycin-C suppresses mucus secretion in an ileal neobladder rat model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Yu, Yang; Shu, Junjie; Ming, Hao; Li, Weiping; Fan, Zhilu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mucus secretion status of mature goblet cells following the application of mitomycin-C (MMC) in ileal neobladder rat models. Bladder substitution models were established in Sprague Dawley rats, which had been divided into five groups, namely the control (sham), normal saline (NS), high-dose MMC (HMMC), low-dose MMC (LMMC) and dehydrated alcohol (DA) groups. To evaluate the total protein concentration and level of sialic acid following the therapy, urine from the rats in each group was collected on days 8, 11 and 14. In addition, to observe the variances between mucus secretion and the ileum goblet cells, immunohistochemistry and hematoxylin and eosin staining were conducted in the different groups on day 17. The results indicated that the ileal neobladder mucosas in the MMC groups were clearly undamaged, as compared with the DA group. Furthermore, the MMC and DA groups were shown to inhibit the proliferation of goblet cells. The concentration of protein and sialic acid in the LMMC group was found to be lower compared with the NS group, while the concentration in the HMMC group was considerably lower. In conclusion, HMMC was demonstrated to evidently reduce the mucin and sialic acid concentration in the urine, without visible damage to the ileal neobladder mucus membrane. Therefore, MMC may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of certain bladder conditions.

  17. Mitomycin-C suppresses mucus secretion in an ileal neobladder rat model

    PubMed Central

    FAN, WEIWEI; YU, YANG; SHU, JUNJIE; MING, HAO; LI, WEIPING; FAN, ZHILU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mucus secretion status of mature goblet cells following the application of mitomycin-C (MMC) in ileal neobladder rat models. Bladder substitution models were established in Sprague Dawley rats, which had been divided into five groups, namely the control (sham), normal saline (NS), high-dose MMC (HMMC), low-dose MMC (LMMC) and dehydrated alcohol (DA) groups. To evaluate the total protein concentration and level of sialic acid following the therapy, urine from the rats in each group was collected on days 8, 11 and 14. In addition, to observe the variances between mucus secretion and the ileum goblet cells, immunohistochemistry and hematoxylin and eosin staining were conducted in the different groups on day 17. The results indicated that the ileal neobladder mucosas in the MMC groups were clearly undamaged, as compared with the DA group. Furthermore, the MMC and DA groups were shown to inhibit the proliferation of goblet cells. The concentration of protein and sialic acid in the LMMC group was found to be lower compared with the NS group, while the concentration in the HMMC group was considerably lower. In conclusion, HMMC was demonstrated to evidently reduce the mucin and sialic acid concentration in the urine, without visible damage to the ileal neobladder mucus membrane. Therefore, MMC may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of certain bladder conditions. PMID:26622360

  18. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. We calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid. Funded by National Science Foundation award CBET-1252182.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry Chien

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. Here, we calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid.

  20. Characterization of gelatin/chitosan scaffold blended with aloe vera and snail mucus for biomedical purpose.

    PubMed

    López Angulo, Daniel Enrique; do Amaral Sobral, Paulo José

    2016-11-01

    Biologically active scaffolds used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been generating promising results in skin replacement. The present study aims to test the hypothesis that the incorporation of Aloe vera and snail mucus into scaffolds based on gelatin and chitosan could improve their structure, composition and biodegradability, with a potential effect on bioactivity. Homogeneous pore diameter as well as pore walls in the composite scaffold could be seen in the SEM image. The pores in the scaffolds were interconnected and their sizes ranged from 93 to 296μm. The addition of Aloe vera and snail mucus enlarged the mean pore size with increased porosity and caused changes in the pore architecture. The FTIR analysis has shown good affinity and interaction between the matrix and the Aloe, which may decrease water-binding sites, so this fact hindered the water absorption capacity of the material. The mechanical properties could explain the highest swelling capacity of the snail scaffold, because the high percentage of elongation could facilitate the entry of liquid in it, generating a matrix with plenty of fluid retention. The real innovation in the present work could be the use of these substances (Aloe and snail mucus) for tissue engineering.

  1. A Tale of Transmission: Aeromonas veronii Activity within Leech-Exuded Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brittany M.; Dacks, Andrew M.; Ryan, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission, critical to the establishment and persistence of host-associated microbiotas, also exposes symbionts to new environmental conditions. With horizontal transmission, these different conditions represent major lifestyle shifts. Yet genome-wide analyses of how microbes adjust their transcriptomes toward these dramatic shifts remain understudied. Here, we provide a comprehensive and comparative analysis of the global transcriptional profiles of a symbiont as it shifts between lifestyles during transmission. The gammaproteobacterium Aeromonas veronii is transmitted from the gut of the medicinal leech to other hosts via host mucosal castings, yet A. veronii can also transition from mucosal habitancy to a free-living lifestyle. These three lifestyles are characterized by distinct physiological constraints and consequently lifestyle-specific changes in the expression of stress-response genes. Mucus-bound A. veronii had the greatest expression in terms of both the number of loci and levels of transcription of stress-response mechanisms. However, these bacteria are still capable of proliferating within the mucus, suggesting the availability of nutrients within this environment. We found that A. veronii alters transcription of loci in a synthetic pathway that obtains and incorporates N-acetylglucosamine (NAG; a major component of mucus) into the bacterial cell wall, enabling proliferation. Our results demonstrate that symbionts undergo dramatic local adaptation, demonstrated by widespread transcriptional changes, throughout the process of transmission that allows them to thrive while they encounter new environments which further shape their ecology and evolution. PMID:26896136

  2. Potamotrygon cf. henlei stingray mucus: biochemical features of a novel antimicrobial protein.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Katia; Monteiro-dos-Santos, Juliane; Seibert, Carla Simone; Silva, Pedro Ismael; Marques, Elineide Eugênio; Richardson, Michael; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica

    2012-10-01

    Antimicrobial molecules are important components of the innate immune system in vertebrates. They have been studied widely in several fishes, but little is known about these defence factors in stingrays, which are thought to have less sophisticated adaptive immune systems when compared to other teleosts. Stingrays from the specie Potamotrygon cf. henlei are distributed throughout the rivers of central-west Brazil, being the cause of numerous envenomations occurring in the dry seasons. In a previous study, we reported that the mucus of the stingray P. cf. henlei shows antimicrobial effects. Here, to analyze the antimicrobial compounds from the mucus of P. cf. henlei, we employed solid-phase extraction, chromatographic separation followed by ESI-MS, and Edman degradation. A protein similar to the β-chain of hemoglobin was identified, isolated and partially sequenced by Edman degradation. This protein has a molecular weight of 16072.8 Da, and was shown to be active against bacteria (Micrococcus luteus and Escherichiacoli) and yeast (Candida tropicalis) without hemolytic activity. Effects of this new protein in the microcirculation environment were also evaluated. The results obtained provide fundamental information for future basic research, clinical diagnosis and development of new therapies to accident treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a bioactive polypeptide from the mucus of a stingray.

  3. Competition for attachment of aquaculture candidate probiotic and pathogenic bacteria on fish intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Vine, N G; Leukes, W D; Kaiser, H; Daya, S; Baxter, J; Hecht, T

    2004-06-01

    Probiotics for aquaculture are generally only selected by their ability to produce antimicrobial metabolites; however, attachment to intestinal mucus is important in order to remain within the gut of its host. Five candidate probiotics (AP1-AP5), isolated from the clownfish, Amphiprion percula (Lacepéde), were examined for their ability to attach to fish intestinal mucus and compete with two pathogens, Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio alginolyticus. Two different radioactive isotopes were used to quantify competition between pathogens and probionts. Attachment of the pathogens was enhanced by the presence of the candidate probiotics. However, the addition of the candidate probiotics after the pathogens resulted in reduced pathogen attachment. Only AP5 caused lower attachment success of V. alginolyticus when added before the pathogen. When AP5 was added first, the average attachment change was 41% compared with 72% when added after V. alginolyticus, suggesting that the probiotic is displaced but that enhanced attachment of the pathogen does not occur. Conversely, when V. alginolyticus was added first, followed by AP5, attachment change was 37% while AP5 had 92% attachment change when added second. This implies that the pathogen was displaced by the candidate probiotic and therefore it appeared that, based on the ability of probiont AP5 to attach to mucus, the growth of the pathogen in the digestive tract might be suppressed by the candidate probiont's presence.

  4. Mechanisms of inflammation-mediated airway smooth muscle plasticity and airways remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Amrani, Yassine

    2003-09-16

    Recent evidence points to progressive structural change in the airway wall, driven by chronic local inflammation, as a fundamental component for development of irreversible airway hyperresponsiveness. Acute and chronic inflammation is orchestrated by cytokines from recruited inflammatory cells, airway myofibroblasts and myocytes. Airway myocytes exhibit functional plasticity in their capacity for contraction, proliferation, and synthesis of matrix protein and cytokines. This confers a principal role in driving different components of the airway remodeling process, and mediating constrictor hyperresponsiveness. Functional plasticity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by an array of environmental cues, including cytokines, which mediate their effects through receptors and a number of intracellular signaling pathways. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured airway myocytes, few have identified how intracellular signaling pathways modulate or induce these cellular responses. This review summarizes current understanding of these concepts and presents a model for the effects of inflammatory mediators on functional plasticity of ASM in asthma.

  5. A poly(ethylene glycol)-based surfactant for formulation of drug-loaded mucus penetrating particles

    PubMed Central

    Mert, Olcay; Lai, Samuel K.; Ensign, Laura; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ying-Ying; Wood, Joseph; Hanes, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are protected by a highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus layer that traps most foreign particles, including conventional drug and gene carriers. Trapped particles are eliminated on the order of seconds to hours by mucus clearance mechanisms, precluding sustained and targeted drug and nucleic acid delivery to mucosal tissues. We have previously shown that polymeric coatings that minimize adhesive interactions with mucus constituents lead to particles that rapidly penetrate human mucus secretions. Nevertheless, a particular challenge in formulating drug-loaded mucus penetrating particles (MPP) is that many commonly used surfactants are either mucoadhesive, or do not facilitate efficient drug encapsulation. We tested a novel surfactant molecule for particle formulation composed of Vitamin E conjugated to 5 kDa polyethylene glycol (VP5k). We show that VP5k-coated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cervicovaginal mucus, whereas PLGA nanoparticles coated with polyvinyl alcohol or Vitamin E conjugated to 1 kDa PEG were trapped. Importantly, VP5k facilitated high loading of paclitaxel, a frontline chemo drug, into PLGA MPP, with controlled release for at least 4 days and negligible burst release. Our results offer a promising new method for engineering biodegradable, drug-loaded MPP for sustained and targeted delivery of therapeutics at mucosal surfaces. PMID:21911015

  6. A poly(ethylene glycol)-based surfactant for formulation of drug-loaded mucus penetrating particles.

    PubMed

    Mert, Olcay; Lai, Samuel K; Ensign, Laura; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ying-Ying; Wood, Joseph; Hanes, Justin

    2012-02-10

    Mucosal surfaces are protected by a highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus layer that traps most foreign particles, including conventional drug and gene carriers. Trapped particles are eliminated on the order of seconds to hours by mucus clearance mechanisms, precluding sustained and targeted drug and nucleic acid delivery to mucosal tissues. We have previously shown that polymeric coatings that minimize adhesive interactions with mucus constituents lead to particles that rapidly penetrate human mucus secretions. Nevertheless, a particular challenge in formulating drug-loaded mucus penetrating particles (MPP) is that many commonly used surfactants are either mucoadhesive, or do not facilitate efficient drug encapsulation. We tested a novel surfactant molecule for particle formulation composed of Vitamin E conjugated to 5 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (VP5k). We show that VP5k-coated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cervicovaginal mucus, whereas PLGA nanoparticles coated with polyvinyl alcohol or Vitamin E conjugated to 1 kDa PEG were trapped. Importantly, VP5k facilitated high loading of paclitaxel, a frontline chemo drug, into PLGA MPP, with controlled release for at least 4 days and negligible burst release. Our results offer a promising new method for engineering biodegradable, drug-loaded MPP for sustained and targeted delivery of therapeutics at mucosal surfaces.

  7. Spray-dried powders enhance vaginal siRNA delivery by potentially modulating the mucus molecular sieve structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Na; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Yong; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery provides a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of vaginal diseases. However, the densely cross-linked mucus layer on the vaginal wall severely restricts nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery to the vaginal epithelium. In order to overcome this barrier and enhance vaginal mucus penetration, we prepared spray-dried powders containing siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Powders with Pluronic F127 (F127), hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), and mannitol as carriers were obtained using an ultrasound-assisted spray-drying technique. Highly dispersed dry powders with diameters of 5–15 μm were produced. These powders showed effective siRNA protection and sustained release. The mucus-penetrating properties of the powders differed depending on their compositions. They exhibited different potential of opening mesh size of molecular sieve in simulated vaginal mucus system. A powder formulation with 0.6% F127 and 0.1% HPMC produced the maximum increase in the pore size of the model gel used to simulate vaginal mucus by rapidly extracting water from the gel and interacting with the gel; the resulting modulation of the molecular sieve effect achieved a 17.8-fold improvement of siRNA delivery in vaginal tract and effective siRNA delivery to the epithelium. This study suggests that powder formulations with optimized compositions have the potential to alter the steric barrier posed by mucus and hold promise for effective vaginal siRNA delivery. PMID:26347257

  8. Formation of a fibrin based gelatinous coat over repairing rat gastric epithelium after acute ethanol damage: interaction with adherent mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, L A; Allen, A; Bennett, M K

    1987-01-01

    A gelatinous coat, heterogeneous in appearance, was formed over damaged rat gastric mucosa recovering from acute ethanol injury. This coat, in places 1.6 mm thick (median thickness 680 microns), was 10 times thicker than the translucent layer of adherent mucus (median thickness 70 microns) covering the undamaged mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and periodic acid Schiff staining showed this gelatinous coat to be predominantly a fibrin gel with an exterior layer rich in mucus and necrotic cells. The plasma clotting time was significantly decreased in vitro by pig gastric mucus gel and soluble mucus glycoprotein (90% and 13% respectively) suggesting that in vivo the mucus layer remaining after epithelial damage could act as a template for fibrinogen-fibrin conversion. These results show that a fibrin based gelatinous coat, quite distinct from the adherent mucus layer and with considerable protective potential could be formed over the repairing rat gastric mucosa after acute ethanol damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3653751

  9. Spray-dried powders enhance vaginal siRNA delivery by potentially modulating the mucus molecular sieve structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Na; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Yong; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery provides a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of vaginal diseases. However, the densely cross-linked mucus layer on the vaginal wall severely restricts nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery to the vaginal epithelium. In order to overcome this barrier and enhance vaginal mucus penetration, we prepared spray-dried powders containing siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Powders with Pluronic F127 (F127), hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), and mannitol as carriers were obtained using an ultrasound-assisted spray-drying technique. Highly dispersed dry powders with diameters of 5-15 μm were produced. These powders showed effective siRNA protection and sustained release. The mucus-penetrating properties of the powders differed depending on their compositions. They exhibited different potential of opening mesh size of molecular sieve in simulated vaginal mucus system. A powder formulation with 0.6% F127 and 0.1% HPMC produced the maximum increase in the pore size of the model gel used to simulate vaginal mucus by rapidly extracting water from the gel and interacting with the gel; the resulting modulation of the molecular sieve effect achieved a 17.8-fold improvement of siRNA delivery in vaginal tract and effective siRNA delivery to the epithelium. This study suggests that powder formulations with optimized compositions have the potential to alter the steric barrier posed by mucus and hold promise for effective vaginal siRNA delivery.

  10. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  11. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  12. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  13. Upper airway resistance: species-related differences.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, N; Reinhold, P

    2010-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, upper airway resistance deserves a particular attention in equines athletes and brachycephalic dogs. Due to the anatomical peculiarities of the upper airway and/or pathological conditions, significant alterations of performance and/or well being might occur in horses and dogs. Physiological specificities and pathological changes of the lower respiratory tract deserve a major attention in other species.

  14. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  15. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  16. The critical airway in adults: The facts

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm on the indications and timing for a surgical airway in emergency as such cannot be drawn due to the multiplicity of variables and the inapplicability in the context of life-threatening critical emergency, where human brain elaborates decisions better in cluster rather than in binary fashion. In particular, in emergency or urgent scenarios, there is no clear or established consensus as to specifically who should receive a tracheostomy as a life-saving procedure; and more importantly, when. The two classical indications for emergency tracheostomy (laryngeal injury and failure to secure airway with endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy) are too generic and encompass a broad spectrum of possibilities. In literature, specific indications for emergency tracheostomy are scattered and are biased, partially comprehensive, not clearly described or not homogeneously gathered. The review highlights the indications and timing for an emergency surgical airway and gives recommendations on which surgical airway method to use in critical airway. PMID:22787346

  17. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  18. Far from superficial: microbial diversity associated with the skin and mucus of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cipriano, Rocco C.; Dove, Alistair; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    During horizontal or water-borne infection involving an obligate pathogen (e.g. – Aeromonas salmonicida, cause of furunculosis), the pathogen interacted with and influenced the microbial diversity of the dermal mucus of fish. Prior to infection, the prevalent bacterial flora cultured from juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) included Pseudomonas fluorescens, Comomonas terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., Pseudomonas dimunita, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Serratia liquefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, other motile Aeromonas spp., and Corynebacterium aquaticum. After A. salmonicida was initially detected in this population as an external mucus infection, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., C. terrigenia, P. fluorescens, and P. dimunita, Staphylococcus sp., and A. hydrophila, were also present in appreciable numbers. Within several weeks, however, the A. salmonicida infection amplified and composed 78% of the total flora in the mucus. Only P. dimunita (4%). P. fluorescens (2%), and C. terrigenia (1%) were cultured at that time and more than a third of these fish showed evidence of a systemic A. salmonicida infection within their kidneys. Eight weeks after oral oxytetracycline treatments, A. salmonicida was no longer isolated from the mucus or kidneys of any fish and glucose inert or other oxidative microbes (e.g., P. fluorescens, C. terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp.) were beginning to repopulate the external surface of the salmon in increasing frequency. Still present and composing fairly large percentages of the total flora were A. hydrophila, as well as Enterobacter sp., and P. putrefaciens. A normal microbial diversity was re-established as the fish recovered. In another investigation, reduced biological diversity was noted in the dermal mucus among smallmouth bass that were sampled from the Jackson River (Covington, VA). In these fish, A. hydrophila and P. putrefaciens were the two

  19. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  20. Exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes results in aggravation of airway inflammation and remodeling and in increased production of epithelium-derived innate cytokines in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ronzani, Carole; Casset, Anne; Pons, Françoise

    2014-02-01

    With the development of nanotechnologies, the potential adverse effects of nanomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on the respiratory tract of asthmatics are questioned. Furthermore, investigations are necessary to understand how these effects might arise. In the present study, we hypothesized that epithelium-derived innate cytokines that are considered as important promoting factors in allergy may contribute to an aggravating effect of MWCNT on asthma. We investigated in the mouse the effect of MWCNT on systemic immune response and airway inflammation and remodeling induced by the most frequent allergen so far associated with asthma, house dust mite (HDM), and we examined the production of the innate cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), IL-25, IL-33, and GM-CSF. Mice exposed to HDM exhibited specific IgG1 in serum and inflammatory cell infiltration, and increased Th2 cytokine production, mucus hyperproduction, and collagen deposition in the airways when compared to naïve animals. Levels of total IgG1 and HDM-specific IgG1, influx of macrophages, eosinophils and neutrophils, production of collagen, TGF-β1, and mucus, as well as levels of IL-13, eotaxin, and TARC, were dose-dependently increased in mice exposed to HDM and MWCNT compared to HDM alone. These effects were associated with an increased production of TSLP, IL-25, IL-33, and GM-CSF in the airways. Our data demonstrate that MWCNT increase in a dose-dependent manner systemic immune response, as well as airway allergic inflammation and remodeling induced by HDM in the mouse. Our data suggest also a role for airway epithelium and innate cytokines in these effects.

  1. A new paradigm in respiratory hygiene: increasing the cohesivity of airway secretions to improve cough interaction and reduce aerosol dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Gustavo; Dimitry, John; Zayas, Ana; O'Brien, Darryl; King, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Background Infectious respiratory diseases are transmitted to non-infected subjects when an infected person expels pathogenic microorganisms to the surrounding environment when coughing or sneezing. When the airway mucus layer interacts with high-speed airflow, droplets are expelled as aerosol; their concentration and size distribution may each play an important role in disease transmission. Our goal is to reduce the aerosolizability of respiratory secretions while interfering only minimally with normal mucus clearance using agents capable of increasing crosslinking in the mucin glycoprotein network. Methods We exposed mucus simulants (MS) to airflow in a simulated cough machine (SCM). The MS ranged from non-viscous, non-elastic substances (water) to MS of varying degrees of viscosity and elasticity. Mucociliary clearance of the MS was assessed on the frog palate, elasticity in the Filancemeter and the aerosol pattern in a "bulls-eye" target. The sample loaded was weighed before and after each cough maneuver. We tested two mucomodulators: sodium tetraborate (XL"B") and calcium chloride (XL "C"). Results Mucociliary transport was close to normal speed in viscoelastic samples compared to non-elastic, non-viscous or viscous-only samples. Spinnability ranged from 2.5 ± 0.6 to 50.9 ± 6.9 cm, and the amount of MS expelled from the SCM increased from 47 % to 96 % adding 1.5 μL to 150 μL of XL "B". Concurrently, particles were inversely reduced to almost disappear from the aerosolization pattern. Conclusion The aerosolizability of MS was modified by increasing its cohesivity, thereby reducing the number of particles expelled from the SCM while interfering minimally with its clearance on the frog palate. An unexpected finding is that MS crosslinking increased "expectoration". PMID:16138926

  2. Glutathione redox regulates airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoko; Hisada, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Yasuo; Ono, Akihiro; Murata, Yukie; Hamuro, Junji; Mori, Masatomo; Dobashi, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer. We have shown that glutathione redox status, which is the balance between intracellular reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, in antigen-presenting cells (APC) regulates the helper T cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance due to the production of IL-12. Bronchial asthma is a typical Th2 disease. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines are characteristic of asthma and trigger off an inflammation. Accordingly, we studied the effects of the intracellular glutathione redox status on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergen-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We used gamma-Glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, to elevate the intracellular GSH level and GSH/GSSG ratio of mice. In vitro, gamma-GCE pretreatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced IL-12(p70) production induced by LPS. In the mouse asthma model, intraperitoneal injection of gamma-GCE elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio of lung tissue and reduced AHR. gamma-GCE reduced levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and the chemokines eotaxin and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas it enhanced the production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma. Histologically, gamma-GCE suppressed eosinophils infiltration. Interestingly, we also found that gamma-GCE directly inhibited chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis without affecting eotaxin receptor chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) expressions. Taken together, these findings suggest that changing glutathione redox balance, increase in GSH level, and the GSH/GSSG ratio by gamma-GCE, ameliorate bronchial asthma by altering the Th1/Th2 imbalance through IL-12 production from APC and suppressing chemokine production and eosinophil migration itself.

  3. Mucoactive effects of naringin in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury mice and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Wu, Hao; Nie, Yi-chu; Li, Pei-bo; Shen, Jian-gang; Su, Wei-wei

    2014-07-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that naringin attenuates EGF-induced MUC5AC hypersecretion in A549 cells by suppressing the cooperative activities of MAPKs/AP-1 and IKKs/IκB/NF-κB signaling pathways. However, the volume of airway mucus is determined by two factors including the number of mucous cells and capacity of mucus secretion. The aim of the present study is to explore the mucoactive effects of naringin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mice and beagle dogs. The results demonstrated that naringin of 12.4 mg/kg treatment significantly decreased LPS-induced enhancement of sputum volume and pulmonary inflammation, remarkably increased the subglottic sputum volume and solids content in sputum of lower trachea, while partially, but not fully, significantly increased the elasticity and viscosity of sputum in lower trachea of beagle dogs. Moreover, the MUC5AC content in BALF and goblet-cells in large airways of LPS-induced ALI mice were significantly attenuated by dexamethasone (5 mg/kg), ambroxol (25 mg/kg), and naringin (15, 60 mg/kg). However, the goblet-cells hyperplasia in small airways induced by LPS was only significantly inhibited by dexamethasone and naringin (60 mg/kg). In conclusion, naringin exhibits mucoactive effects through multiple targets which including reduction of goblet cells hyperplasia and mucus hypersecretion, as well as promotion of sputum excretion.

  4. Attenuation of airway inflammation by simvastatin and the implications for asthma treatment: is the jury still out?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing-Nan; Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Yang, Eun-Mi; Lee, Seung-Ihm; Park, Hae-Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies have explained the immunomodulatory effects of statins, the exact mechanisms and the therapeutic significance of these molecules remain to be elucidated. This study not only evaluated the therapeutic potential and inhibitory mechanism of simvastatin in an ovalbumin (OVA)-specific asthma model in mice but also sought to clarify the future directions indicated by previous studies through a thorough review of the literature. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA and then administered three OVA challenges. On each challenge day, 40 mg kg−1 simvastatin was injected before the challenge. The airway responsiveness, inflammatory cell composition, and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed after the final challenge, and the T cell composition and adhesion molecule expression in lung homogenates were determined. The administration of simvastatin decreased the airway responsiveness, the number of airway inflammatory cells, and the interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations in BAL fluid compared with vehicle-treated mice (P<0.05). Histologically, the number of inflammatory cells and mucus-containing goblet cells in lung tissues also decreased in the simvastatin-treated mice. Flow cytometry showed that simvastatin treatment significantly reduced the percentage of pulmonary CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio (P<0.05). Simvastatin treatment also decreased the expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 proteins, as measured in homogenized lung tissues (P<0.05) and human epithelial cells. The reduction in the T cell influx as a result of the decreased expression of cell adhesion molecules is one of the mechanisms by which simvastatin attenuates airway responsiveness and allergic inflammation. Rigorous review of the literature together with our findings suggested that simvastatin should be further developed as a potential therapeutic strategy for allergic asthma. PMID

  5. s-Carboxymethylcysteine inhibits carbachol-induced constriction of epithelium-denuded rat and human airway preparations.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dragan; Frieling, Helge; Usichenko, Taras; Nedeljkov, Vladimir; Nafissi, Thais; Lehmann, Christian; Aubier, Michel; Wendt, Michael

    2008-05-01

    1. The effects of s-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (S-CMC), either administered orally to rats or incubated with tissue preparations from rats and humans, on isometric contractions of tracheal smooth muscle were investigated in the present study using an improved in vitro model of tracheal tube or ring preparations. The involvement of the tracheal epithelium in the observed effects was also investigated. 2. The experimental model permitted selective perfusion of the airway tube, luminal-IN or serosal-OUT, and measurement of airway smooth muscle contraction or relaxation in preparations with (+) or without (-) epithelium (Ep), excluding direct effects of airway mucus. 3. We found that oral pretreatment of rats with S-CMC (mixed with water; 200 mg/kg per day for 2 weeks), but not short pre-incubation of preparations in vitro (10(-3) mol/L S-CMC for 1 h), diminished the sensitivity of -Ep preparations to carbachol compared with controls (EC(50) (-log(10) mol/L) values: 5.5 +/- 0.1 vs 5.8 +/- 0.1, respectively, for IN perfusion (P < 0.005); 5.6 +/- 0.1 vs 5.9 +/- 0.1, respectively, for OUT perfusion (P < 0.005)), whereas the sensitivity of preparations to aminophylline was not affected. Normal sensitivity to carbachol stimulation was re-established if preparations were pre-incubated with capsaicin. 4. It was also found that longer pre-incubation (4 h) of ring-preparations of human bronchus with S-CMC (10(-5) mol/L) in vitro resulted in a diminished response to carbachol stimulation. 5. In conclusion, S-CMC had small inhibitory effects on the sensitivity of rat and human airway smooth muscle to carbachol, particularly in endothelium-denuded preparations. Whether the epithelium was responding to S-CMC by producing some contracting factor(s) requires further investigation.

  6. High-fat diet promotes lung fibrosis and attenuates airway eosinophilia after exposure to cockroach allergen in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Greenberg, Yana; Hosseinkhani, M Reza; Long, Eric K; Bahaie, Nooshin S; Rao, Amrita; Ha, Sung Gil; Rao, Savita P; Bernlohr, David A; Sriramarao, P

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma but the mechanistic basis for this association is not well understood. In the current study, the impact of obesity on lung inflammatory responses after allergen exposure was investigated. C57BL/6 mice maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal diet (ND) after weaning were sensitized and challenged with cockroach allergen (CRA). Airway inflammation was assessed based on inflammatory cell recruitment, measurement of lung Th1-Th2 cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and other proinflammatory mediators as well as airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CRA-challenged mice fed a HFD exhibited significantly decreased allergen-induced airway eosinophilia along with reduced lung IL-5, IL-13, LTC4, CCL11, and CCL2 levels as well as reduced mucus secretion and smooth muscle mass compared to ND fed mice. However, allergen-challenged HFD fed mice demonstrated significantly increased PAI-1 and reduced PGE2 levels in the lung relative to corresponding ND fed mice. Interestingly, saline-exposed HFD fed mice demonstrated elevated baseline levels of TGF-β1, arginase-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and lung collagen expression associated with decreased lung function compared to corresponding ND fed mice. These studies indicate that a HFD inhibits airway eosinophilia while altering levels of PAI-1 and PGE2 in response to CRA in mice. Further, a HFD can lead to the development of lung fibrosis even in the absence of allergen exposure which could be due to innate elevated levels of specific profibrotic factors, potentially affecting lung function during asthma.

  7. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  8. Airway adequacy, head posture, and craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Solow, B; Siersbaek-Nielsen, S; Greve, E

    1984-09-01

    Previous studies of different samples have demonstrated associations between craniocervical angulation and craniofacial morphology, between airway obstruction by adenoids and craniofacial morphology, and between airway obstruction and craniocervical angulation. A hypothesis to account for the different sets of associations was suggested by Solow and Kreiborg in 1977. In the present study, the three sets of associations were examined in a single group of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction. Cephalometric radiographs taken in the natural head position and rhinomanometric recordings were obtained from twenty-four children 7 to 9 years of age. Correlations were calculated between twenty-seven morphologic, eight postural, and two airway variables. A large craniocervical angle was, on the average, seen in connection with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, and a large mandibular inclination. Obstructed nasopharyngeal airways (defined as a small pm-ad 2 radiographic distance and a large nasal respiratory resistance, NRR, determined rhinomanometrically) were, on the average, seen in connection with a large craniocervical angle and with small mandibular dimensions, mandibular retrognathism, a large mandibular inclination, and retroclination of the upper incisors. The observed correlations were in agreement with the predicted pattern of associations between craniofacial morphology, craniocervical angulation, and airway resistance, thus suggesting the simultaneous presence of such associations in the sample of nonpathologic subjects with no history of airway obstruction.

  9. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  10. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.