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Sample records for airway mucus production

  1. A crucial role of Flagellin in the induction of airway mucus production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ben Mohamed, Fatima; Mohamed, Fatima Ben; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Medina, Mathieu; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Ramphal, Reuben; Touqui, Lhousseine

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections. Flagellin is a P. aeruginosa virulence factor involved in host response to this pathogen. We examined the role of flagellin in P. aeruginosa-induced mucus secretion. Using a mouse model of pulmonary infection we showed that PAK, a wild type strain of P. aeruginosa, induced airway mucus secretion and mucin muc5ac expression at higher levels than its flagellin-deficient mutant (ΔFliC). PAK induced expression of MUC5AC and MUC2 in both human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cell line and in primary epithelial cells. In contrast, ΔFliC infection had lower to no effect on MUC5AC and MUC2 expressions. A purified P. aeruginosa flagellin induced MUC5AC expression in parallel to IL-8 secretion in NCI-H292 cells. Accordingly, ΔFliC mutant stimulated IL-8 secretion at significantly lower levels compared to PAK. Incubation of NCI-H292 cells with exogenous IL-8 induced MUC5AC expression and pre-incubation of these cells with an anti-IL-8 antibody abrogated flagellin-mediated MUC5AC expression. Silencing of TLR5 and Naip, siRNA inhibited both flagellin-induced MUC5AC expression and IL-8 secretion. Finally, inhibition of ERK abolished the expression of both PAK- and flagellin-induced MUC5AC. We conclude that: (i) flagellin is crucial in P. aeruginosa-induced mucus hyper-secretion through TLR5 and Naip pathways; (ii) this process is mediated by ERK and amplified by IL-8. Our findings help understand the mechanisms involved in mucus secretion during pulmonary infectious disease induced by P. aeruginosa, such as in cystic fibrosis. PMID:22768318

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha triggers mucus production in airway epithelium through an IkappaB kinase beta-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lora, José M; Zhang, Dong Mei; Liao, Sha Mei; Burwell, Timothy; King, Anne Marie; Barker, Philip A; Singh, Latika; Keaveney, Marie; Morgenstern, Jay; Gutiérrez-Ramos, José Carlos; Coyle, Anthony J; Fraser, Christopher C

    2005-10-28

    Excessive mucus production by airway epithelium is a major characteristic of a number of respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, and cystic fibrosis. However, the signal transduction pathways leading to mucus production are poorly understood. Here we examined the potential role of IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta) in mucus synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or transforming growth factor-alpha stimulation of human epithelial cells resulted in mucus secretion as measured by MUC5AC mRNA and protein. TNF-alpha stimulation induced IKKbeta-dependent p65 nuclear translocation, mucus synthesis, and production of cytokines from epithelial cells. TNF-alpha, but not transforming growth factor-alpha, induced mucus production dependent on IKKbeta-mediated NF-kappaB activation. In vivo, TNF-alpha induced NF-kappaB as determined by whole mouse body bioluminescence. This activation was localized to the epithelium as revealed by LacZ staining in NF-kappaB-LacZ transgenic mice. TNF-alpha-induced mucus production in vivo could also be inhibited by administration into the epithelium of an IKKbeta dominant negative adenovirus. Taken together, our results demonstrated the important role of IKKbeta in TNF-alpha-mediated mucus production in airway epithelium in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16123045

  3. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  4. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  5. Effects of reduced mucus oxygen concentration in airway Pseudomonas infections of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Worlitzsch, Dieter; Tarran, Robert; Ulrich, Martina; Schwab, Ute; Cekici, Aynur; Meyer, Keith C.; Birrer, Peter; Bellon, Gabriel; Berger, Jürgen; Weiss, Tilo; Botzenhart, Konrad; Yankaskas, James R.; Randell, Scott; Boucher, Richard C.; Döring, Gerd

    2002-01-01

    Current theories of CF pathogenesis predict different predisposing “local environmental” conditions and sites of bacterial infection within CF airways. Here we show that, in CF patients with established lung disease, Psuedomonas aeruginosa was located within hypoxic mucopurulent masses in airway lumens. In vitro studies revealed that CF-specific increases in epithelial O2 consumption, linked to increased airway surface liquid (ASL) volume absorption and mucus stasis, generated steep hypoxic gradients within thickened mucus on CF epithelial surfaces prior to infection. Motile P. aeruginosa deposited on CF airway surfaces penetrated into hypoxic mucus zones and responded to this environment with increased alginate production. With P. aeruginosa growth in oxygen restricted environments, local hypoxia was exacerbated and frank anaerobiosis, as detected in vivo, resulted. These studies indicate that novel therapies for CF include removal of hypoxic mucus plaques and antibiotics effective against P. aeruginosa adapted to anaerobic environments. PMID:11827991

  6. The role of airway mucus in pulmonary toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Cheng, P W

    1994-01-01

    Airway mucus is a complex airway secretion whose primary function as part of the mucociliary transport mechanism is to to serve as renewable and transportable barrier against inhaled particulates and toxic agents. The rheologic properties necessary for this function are imparted by glycoproteins, or mucins. Some respiratory disease states, e.g., asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchitis, are characterized by quantitative and qualitative changes in mucus biosynthesis that contribute to pulmonary pathology. Similar alterations in various aspects of mucin biochemistry and biophysics, leading to mucus hypersecretion and altered mucus rheology, result from inhalation of certain air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and cigarette smoke. The consequences of these pollutant-induced alterations in mucus biology are discussed in the context of pulmonary pathophysiology and toxicology. PMID:7925190

  7. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Kerr, Sheena C; Dunican, Eleanor M; Daniel, Brian M; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V

    2015-02-25

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates. PMID:25717100

  8. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Kerr, Sheena C; Dunican, Eleanor M; Daniel, Brian M; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V

    2015-02-25

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates.

  9. Transient motion of mucus plugs in respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Parsa; Hu, Yingying; Helenbrook, Brian; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Airway closure occurs in lung diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, or emphysema which have an excess of mucus that forms plugs. The reopening process involves displacement of mucus plugs in the airways by the airflow of respiration. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid with a yield stress; therefore its behavior can be approximated by a Bingham fluid constitutive equation. In this work the reopening process is approximated by simulation of a transient Bingham fluid plug in a 2D channel. The governing equations are solved by an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method through an in-house code. The constitutive equation for the Bingham fluid is implemented through a regularization method. The effects of the yield stress on the flow features and wall stresses are discussed with applications to potential injuries to the airway epithelial cells which form the wall. The minimum driving pressure for the initiation of the motion is computed and its value is related to the mucus properties and the plug shape. Supported by HL84370 and HL85156.

  10. Autophagy is essential for ultrafine particle-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Ping-Li; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhou-Yang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhu, Chen; Cao, Chao; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Bei-Bei; Cormier, Stephania A; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Environmental ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is capable of inducing airway injury, while the detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate pivotal roles of autophagy in regulation of inflammation and mucus hyperproduction induced by PM containing environmentally persistent free radicals in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. PM was endocytosed by HBE cells and simultaneously triggered autophagosomes, which then engulfed the invading particles to form amphisomes and subsequent autolysosomes. Genetic blockage of autophagy markedly reduced PM-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, e.g. IL8 and IL6, and MUC5AC in HBE cells. Mice with impaired autophagy due to knockdown of autophagy-related gene Becn1 or Lc3b displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Interference of the autophagic flux by lysosomal inhibition resulted in accumulated autophagosomes/amphisomes, and intriguingly, this process significantly aggravated the IL8 production through NFKB1, and markedly attenuated MUC5AC expression via activator protein 1. These data indicate that autophagy is required for PM-induced airway epithelial injury, and that inhibition of autophagy exerts therapeutic benefits for PM-induced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, although they are differentially orchestrated by the autophagic flux.

  11. Kaempferol Inhibits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Mucus Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells And Ovalbumin-Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is an important pathological feature of chronic airway diseases, such as asthma and pulmonary diseases. MUC5AC is a major component of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways. The initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated stress responses contributes to the pathogenesis of airway diseases. The present study investigated that ER stress was responsible for airway mucus production and this effect was blocked by the flavonoid kaempferol. Oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol suppressed mucus secretion and goblet cell hyperplasia observed in the bronchial airway and lung of BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). TGF-β and tunicamycin promoted MUC5AC induction after 72 h in human bronchial airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells, which was dampened by 20 μM kaempferol. Kaempferol inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress of airway epithelial cells through disturbing the activation of the ER transmembrane sensor ATF6 and IRE1α. Additionally, this compound demoted the induction of ER chaperones such as GRP78 and HSP70 and the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA by tunicamycin. The in vivo study further revealed that kaempferol attenuated the induction of XBP-1 and IRE1α in epithelial tissues of OVA-challenged mice. TGF-β and tunicamycin induced TRAF2 with JNK activation and such induction was deterred by kaempferol. The inhibition of JNK activation encumbered the XBP-1 mRNA splicing and MUC5AC induction by tunicamycin and TGF-β. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated asthmatic mucus hypersecretion through blocking bronchial epithelial ER stress via the inhibition of IRE1α-TRAF2-JNK activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting mucus hypersecretion-associated pulmonary diseases. PMID:26599511

  12. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients. PMID:27595800

  13. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients. PMID:27595800

  14. Luteolin Attenuates Airway Mucus Overproduction via Inhibition of the GABAergic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Lin, Ching-Huei; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-09-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is one of the most common symptoms of asthma that causes severe clinical outcomes in patients. Despite the effectiveness of general asthma therapies, specific treatments that prevent mucus overproduction in asthma patients remain lacking. Recent studies have found that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAAR) is important for promoting mucus oversecretion in lung airway epithelia. Here, we report that luteolin, a natural flavonoid compound, suppresses mucus overproduction by functionally inhibiting the GABAergic system. This hypothesis was investigated by testing the effects of luteolin on goblet cell hyperplasia, excessive mucus secretion, and GABAergic transmission using histological and electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that 10 mg/kg luteolin significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the lung tissue and inhibited mucus overproduction in an in vivo asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Patch-clamp recordings showed that luteolin inhibited GABAAR-mediated currents in A549 cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of luteolin on OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction were occluded by the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin. In conclusion, our observations indicate that luteolin effectively attenuates mucus overproduction at least partially by inhibiting GABAARs, suggesting the potential for therapeutic administration of luteolin in the treatment of mucus overproduction in asthma patients.

  15. Rheology of mucus and transepithelial potential difference: small airways versus trachea.

    PubMed

    App, E M; Zayas, J G; King, M

    1993-01-01

    The transfer of water across the airway epithelium is closely related to the transepithelial potential difference (PD). Thus, PD should be directly involved in the regulation of airway intraluminal water content and, by extension, mucus rheology. Experiments by Boucher and co-workers (J Appl Physiol, 1980; 48: 169; and 1981; 51: 706) indicated that the values of PD in the small airways of dogs were considerably lower than in the trachea or mainstem bronchus. This fact suggests that water is increasingly removed from the airway lumen in the cephalad direction, and provides a possible mechanism whereby airway flooding is avoided as the total airway cross-section diminishes mouthward. We investigated this possibility by collecting and analysing mucus from the small airways and trachea of anaesthetized dogs and comparing our findings with measurements of PD. Mucus was collected on a cytology brush placed against the wall of the airway. Tracheal samples were taken from the lower lateral or anterior trachea, while small airway samples were taken from a 6th or 7th generation bronchus, chosen at random from either side. Measurements of PD were made at comparable sites. The mucus was analysed for its viscoelastic properties using the magnetic microrheometer technique. PD in the 6th-7th generation bronchus was significantly less than in the lower trachea (4.1 +/- 1.3 vs 17.2 +/- 7.1 mV). The rigidity of mucus collected from the small airways (log mechanical impedance (G*) at 100 rad.s-1) was significantly less than in the trachea (2.81 +/- 0.22 vs 3.01 +/- 0.29).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Mechanisms of cilia-driven transport in the airways in the absence of mucus.

    PubMed

    Bermbach, Saskia; Weinhold, Karina; Roeder, Thomas; Petersen, Frank; Kugler, Christian; Goldmann, Torsten; Rupp, Jan; König, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Airway mucus is thought to be required for the clearance of inhaled particles by mucociliary transport, but this view has recently been challenged. To test if mucus is necessary for cilia-driven particle transport, we removed mucus from murine and human ex vivo airway preparations by thorough rinsing with buffer with or without additional dithiothreitol washing. The transport of particles with diameters of 4.5 μm, 200 nm, and 40 nm and of bacteria was analyzed by video microscopy. Complete removal of mucus was verified by wheat germ agglutinin staining and by scanning electron microscopy. In the absence of mucus, we observed efficient transport of particles and bacteria by direct cilia-mediated propulsion or via fluid flow generated by ciliary beating. Virus-sized particles had the tendency to attach to cilia. Because direct contact of particles with ciliated cells occurs in the absence of mucus, we examined if this direct interaction changes epithelial function. Neither bacteria- nor LPS-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in ciliated cells occurred, indicating that mere contact between ciliated cells and bacteria during transport does not activate the epithelium. Attachment of virus-sized particles to cilia could induce mucus release and/or increase the ciliary beat frequency. Our results indicate that cilia-driven transport of particles with various sizes is possible in murine and human airways without the presence of mucus. If mucus-free transport fails, the epithelium can react by releasing mucus or increasing the ciliary beat frequency to maintain particle transport.

  17. A novel siderophore system is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in airway mucus

    PubMed Central

    Gi, Mia; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Yoon, Sang Sun; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes airway infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Here, we investigate the molecular interactions between P. aeruginosa and airway mucus secretions (AMS) derived from the primary cultures of normal human tracheal epithelial (NHTE) cells. PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, was capable of proliferating during incubation with AMS, while all other tested bacterial species perished. A PAO1 mutant lacking PA4834 gene became susceptible to AMS treatment. The ΔPA4834 mutant was grown in AMS supplemented with 100 μM ferric iron, suggesting that the PA4834 gene product is involved in iron metabolism. Consistently, intracellular iron content was decreased in the mutant, but not in PAO1 after the AMS treatment. Importantly, a PAO1 mutant unable to produce both pyoverdine and pyochelin remained viable, suggesting that these two major siderophore molecules are dispensable for maintaining viability during incubation with AMS. The ΔPA4834 mutant was regrown in AMS amended with 100 μM nicotianamine, a phytosiderophore whose production is predicted to be mediated by the PA4836 gene. Infectivity of the ΔPA4834 mutant was also significantly compromised in vivo. Together, our results identify a genetic element encoding a novel iron acquisition system that plays a previously undiscovered role in P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:26446565

  18. A novel siderophore system is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in airway mucus.

    PubMed

    Gi, Mia; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Yoon, Sang Sun; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes airway infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Here, we investigate the molecular interactions between P. aeruginosa and airway mucus secretions (AMS) derived from the primary cultures of normal human tracheal epithelial (NHTE) cells. PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, was capable of proliferating during incubation with AMS, while all other tested bacterial species perished. A PAO1 mutant lacking PA4834 gene became susceptible to AMS treatment. The ΔPA4834 mutant was grown in AMS supplemented with 100 μM ferric iron, suggesting that the PA4834 gene product is involved in iron metabolism. Consistently, intracellular iron content was decreased in the mutant, but not in PAO1 after the AMS treatment. Importantly, a PAO1 mutant unable to produce both pyoverdine and pyochelin remained viable, suggesting that these two major siderophore molecules are dispensable for maintaining viability during incubation with AMS. The ΔPA4834 mutant was regrown in AMS amended with 100 μM nicotianamine, a phytosiderophore whose production is predicted to be mediated by the PA4836 gene. Infectivity of the ΔPA4834 mutant was also significantly compromised in vivo. Together, our results identify a genetic element encoding a novel iron acquisition system that plays a previously undiscovered role in P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:26446565

  19. A microfluidic model to study fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture in small lung airways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John; Filoche, Marcel; White, Joshua; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture is important to understand mucus clearance in lung airways and potential effects of mucus plug rupture on epithelial cells at lung airway walls. We established a microfluidic model to study mucus plug rupture in a collapsed airway of the 12th generation. Mucus plugs were simulated using Carbopol 940 (C940) gels at concentrations of 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25%, and 0.3%, which have non-Newtonian properties close to healthy and diseased lung mucus. The airway was modeled with a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic channel. Plug motion was driven by pressurized air. Global strain rates and shear stress were defined to quantitatively describe plug deformation and rupture. Results show that a plug needs to overcome yield stress before deformation and rupture. The plug takes relatively long time to yield at the high Bingham number. Plug length shortening is the more significant deformation than shearing at gel concentration higher than 0.15%. Although strain rates increase dramatically at rupture, the transient shear stress drops due to the shear-thinning effect of the C940 gels. Dimensionless time-averaged shear stress, Txy, linearly increases from 3.7 to 5.6 times the Bingham number as the Bingham number varies from 0.018 to 0.1. The dimensionless time-averaged shear rate simply equals to Txy/2. In dimension, shear stress magnitude is about one order lower than the pressure drop, and one order higher than yield stress. Mucus with high yield stress leads to high shear stress, and therefore would be more likely to cause epithelial cell damage. Crackling sounds produced with plug rupture might be more detectable for gels with higher concentration. PMID:26392827

  20. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  1. Automated detection of presence of mucus foci in airway diseases: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Ko, Jane; Godoy, Myrna C. B.

    2009-02-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is often characterized by partial or complete obstruction of airflow in the lungs. This can be due to airway wall thickening and retained secretions, resulting in foci of mucoid impactions. Although radiologists have proposed scoring systems to assess extent and severity of airway diseases from CT images, these scores are seldom used clinically due to impracticality. The high level of subjectivity from visual inspection and the sheer number of airways in the lungs mean that automation is critical in order to realize accurate scoring. In this work we assess the feasibility of including an automated mucus detection method in a clinical scoring system. Twenty high-resolution datasets of patients with mild to severe bronchiectasis were randomly selected, and used to test the ability of the computer to detect the presence or absence of mucus in each lobe (100 lobes in all). Two experienced radiologists independently scored the presence or absence of mucus in each lobe based on the visual assessment method recommended by Sheehan et al [1]. These results were compared with an automated method developed for mucus plug detection [2]. Results showed agreement between the two readers on 44% of the lobes for presence of mucus, 39% of lobes for absence of mucus, and discordant opinions on 17 lobes. For 61 lobes where 1 or both readers detected mucus, the computer sensitivity was 75.4%, the specificity was 69.2%, and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 79.3%. Six computer false positives were a-posteriori reviewed by the experts and reassessed as true positives, yielding results of 77.6% sensitivity, 81.8% for specificity, and 89.6% PPV.

  2. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Pure Human Airway Gland Mucus Reveals a Large Component of Protective Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Evans, Idil Apak T.; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Park, Il-Ho; Engelhardt, John F.; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269–319 proteins per subject). We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38%) had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican). A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment. PMID:25706550

  4. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  5. Imaging of mucus clearance in the airways of living spontaneously breathing mice by optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Mario; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Hüttmann, Gereon; König, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mucus transport is essential to remove inhaled particles and pathogens from the lung. Impaired removal of mucus often results in worsening of lung diseases. To understand the mechanisms of mucus transport and to monitor the impact of therapeutic strategies, it is essential to visualize airways and mucus in living animals without disturbing transport processes by intubation or surgically opening the airways. We developed a custom-built optical coherence microscope (OCM) providing a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 1.5 µm with a field of view of 2 mm at up to 150 images/s. Images of the intact trachea and its mucus transport were recorded in anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice. NaCl solution (0.9% and 7%) or Lipopolysaccharide were applied intranasally. OCM resolved detailed structure of the trachea and enabled measuring the airway surface liquid (ASL) thickness through the tracheal wall. Without stimulation, the amount of ASL was only a few µm above the epithelium and remained constant. After intranasal application of 30 µl saline at different concentrations, an early fast cough-like fluid removal with velocities higher than 1 mm/s was observed that removed a high amount of liquid. The ASL thickness increased transiently and quickly returned to levels before stimulation. In contrast to saline, application of Lipopolysaccharide induced substantial mucus release and an additional slow mucus transport by ciliary beating (around 100 µm/s) towards the larynx was observed. In conclusion, OCM is appropriate unique tool to study mechanisms of mucus transport in the airways and effects of therapeutic interventions in living animals.

  6. Tbet Deficiency Causes T Helper Cell Dependent Airways Eosinophilia and Mucus Hypersecretion in Response to Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Nicholas; Schröder, Armin; Walton, Ross P.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of adaptive immune, particularly T cell, responses to human rhinoviruses (RV) is limited. Memory T cells are thought to be of a primarily T helper 1 type, but both T helper 1 and T helper 2 memory cells have been described, and heightened T helper 2/ lessened T helper 1 responses have been associated with increased RV-induced asthma exacerbation severity. We examined the contribution of T helper 1 cells to RV-induced airways inflammation using mice deficient in the transcription factor T-Box Expressed In T Cells (Tbet), a critical controller of T helper 1 cell differentiation. Using flow cytometry we showed that Tbet deficient mice lacked the T helper 1 response of wild type mice and instead developed mixed T helper 2/T helper 17 responses to RV infection, evidenced by increased numbers of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) and RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt), and interleukin-13 and interleukin-17A expressing CD4+ T cells in the lung. Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and interleukin-10 expressing T cell numbers were unaffected. Tbet deficient mice also displayed deficiencies in lung Natural Killer, Natural Killer T cell and γδT cell responses, and serum neutralising antibody responses. Tbet deficient mice exhibited pronounced airways eosinophilia and mucus production in response to RV infection that, by utilising a CD4+ cell depleting antibody, were found to be T helper cell dependent. RV induction of T helper 2 and T helper 17 responses may therefore have an important role in directly driving features of allergic airways disease such as eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion during asthma exacerbations. PMID:27683080

  7. Molecular organization of the mucins and glycocalyx underlying mucus transport over mucosal surfaces of the airways.

    PubMed

    Kesimer, M; Ehre, C; Burns, K A; Davis, C W; Sheehan, J K; Pickles, R J

    2013-03-01

    Mucus, with its burden of inspired particulates and pathogens, is cleared from mucosal surfaces of the airways by cilia beating within the periciliary layer (PCL). The PCL is held to be "watery" and free of mucus by thixotropic-like forces arising from beating cilia. With radii of gyration ~250 nm, however, polymeric mucins should reptate readily into the PCL, so we assessed the glycocalyx for barrier functions. The PCL stained negative for MUC5AC and MUC5B, but it was positive for keratan sulfate (KS), a glycosaminoglycan commonly associated with glycoconjugates. Shotgun proteomics showed KS-rich fractions from mucus containing abundant tethered mucins, MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16, but no proteoglycans. Immuno-histology by light and electron microscopy localized MUC1 to microvilli, MUC4 and MUC20 to cilia, and MUC16 to goblet cells. Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed molecular lengths of 190-1,500 nm for tethered mucins, and a finely textured glycocalyx matrix filling interciliary spaces. Adenoviral particles were excluded from glycocalyx of the microvilli, whereas the smaller adenoassociated virus penetrated, but were trapped within. Hence, tethered mucins organized as a space-filling glycocalyx function as a selective barrier for the PCL, broadening their role in innate lung defense and offering new molecular targets for conventional and gene therapies.

  8. Airway mucus obstruction triggers macrophage activation and matrix metalloproteinase 12-dependent emphysema.

    PubMed

    Trojanek, Joanna B; Cobos-Correa, Amanda; Diemer, Stefanie; Kormann, Michael; Schubert, Susanne C; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Agrawal, Raman; Duerr, Julia; Wagner, Claudius J; Schatterny, Jolanthe; Hirtz, Stephanie; Sommerburg, Olaf; Hartl, Dominik; Schultz, Carsten; Mall, Marcus A

    2014-11-01

    Whereas cigarette smoking remains the main risk factor for emphysema, recent studies in β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic (βENaC-Tg) mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration, a key pathophysiological mechanism in cystic fibrosis (CF), caused emphysema in the absence of cigarette smoke exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of emphysema formation triggered by airway surface dehydration. We therefore used expression profiling, genetic and pharmacological inhibition, Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based activity assays, and genetic association studies to identify and validate emphysema candidate genes in βENaC-Tg mice and patients with CF. We identified matrix metalloproteinase 12 (Mmp12) as a highly up-regulated gene in lungs from βENaC-Tg mice, and demonstrate that elevated Mmp12 expression was associated with progressive emphysema formation, which was reduced by genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of MMP12 in vivo. By using FRET reporters, we show that MMP12 activity was elevated on the surface of airway macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage from βENaC-Tg mice and patients with CF. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a functional polymorphism in MMP12 (rs2276109) was associated with severity of lung disease in CF. Our results suggest that MMP12 released by macrophages activated on dehydrated airway surfaces may play an important role in emphysema formation in the absence of cigarette smoke exposure, and may serve as a therapeutic target in CF and potentially other chronic lung diseases associated with airway mucus dehydration and obstruction. PMID:24828142

  9. In vivo imaging of airway cilia and mucus clearance with micro-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kengyeh K.; Unglert, Carolin; Ford, Tim N.; Cui, Dongyao; Carruth, Robert W.; Singh, Kanwarpal; Liu, Linbo; Birket, Susan E.; Solomon, George M.; Rowe, Steven M.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated a 4 mm diameter rigid endoscopic probe to obtain high resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) images from the tracheal epithelium of living swine. Our common-path fiber-optic probe used gradient-index focusing optics, a selectively coated prism reflector to implement a circular-obscuration apodization for depth-of-focus enhancement, and a common-path reference arm and an ultra-broadbrand supercontinuum laser to achieve high axial resolution. Benchtop characterization demonstrated lateral and axial resolutions of 3.4 μm and 1.7 μm, respectively (in tissue). Mechanical standoff rails flanking the imaging window allowed the epithelial surface to be maintained in focus without disrupting mucus flow. During in vivo imaging, relative motion was mitigated by inflating an airway balloon to hold the standoff rails on the epithelium. Software implemented image stabilization was also implemented during post-processing. The resulting image sequences yielded co-registered quantitative outputs of airway surface liquid and periciliary liquid layer thicknesses, ciliary beat frequency, and mucociliary transport rate, metrics that directly indicate airway epithelial function that have dominated in vitro research in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but have not been available in vivo. PMID:27446685

  10. In vivo imaging of airway cilia and mucus clearance with micro-optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kengyeh K; Unglert, Carolin; Ford, Tim N; Cui, Dongyao; Carruth, Robert W; Singh, Kanwarpal; Liu, Linbo; Birket, Susan E; Solomon, George M; Rowe, Steven M; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2016-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a 4 mm diameter rigid endoscopic probe to obtain high resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) images from the tracheal epithelium of living swine. Our common-path fiber-optic probe used gradient-index focusing optics, a selectively coated prism reflector to implement a circular-obscuration apodization for depth-of-focus enhancement, and a common-path reference arm and an ultra-broadbrand supercontinuum laser to achieve high axial resolution. Benchtop characterization demonstrated lateral and axial resolutions of 3.4 μm and 1.7 μm, respectively (in tissue). Mechanical standoff rails flanking the imaging window allowed the epithelial surface to be maintained in focus without disrupting mucus flow. During in vivo imaging, relative motion was mitigated by inflating an airway balloon to hold the standoff rails on the epithelium. Software implemented image stabilization was also implemented during post-processing. The resulting image sequences yielded co-registered quantitative outputs of airway surface liquid and periciliary liquid layer thicknesses, ciliary beat frequency, and mucociliary transport rate, metrics that directly indicate airway epithelial function that have dominated in vitro research in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but have not been available in vivo. PMID:27446685

  11. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal.

  12. Mucus protection and airway peroxidation following nitrogen dioxide exposure in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, D.G.; Morris, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the current study, biochemical measures of lipid peroxidation following 4-h inhalation exposure to 76 mg/m/sup 3/ (40 ppm) nitrogen dioxide were correlated with measures of deposition and tissue antioxidant levels in the nasal cavity and the trachea of the Fischer rat. In addition, respirator-tract mucus samples were collected via esophageal cannulation and nasopharyngeal lavage over known time periods, and were analyzed for phospholipid (PL) content to provide an index of the unsaturated lipids (UL) that they may contain. Nasal deposition efficiency averaged 25%, corresponding to an absolute deposition rate of 41 nmol/min. Vitamin E levels averaged 1.7, 5.9, and 0.7 nmol/..mu..mol PL in nasal, tracheal, and pulmonary tissues, respectively. The level in the trachea was significantly higher than in the other tissues. The overall mucous PL transport rate was less than 0.013 nmol/min, suggesting the PL of the mucous lining layer could not offer significant protection against the inhaled NO/sub 2/. Conjugated dienes were detected in two of four pooled nasal tissue samples. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive material levels in tracheal tissues were significantly elevated over control levels by NO/sub 2/. Thus, despite the relatively high vitamin E levels, 4-h NO/sub 2/ exposure appeared to result in lipid peroxidation in the trachea and, perhaps, in the nasal airways of the rat, a result that correlated with the apparent lack of oxidant-scavenging species in the mucus lining these airways.

  13. Human Clostridium difficile infection: altered mucus production and composition

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Melinda A.; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Engevik, Kristen A.; Wang, Jiang; Darien, Benjamin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of antibiotic-induced diarrhea is caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Hospitalizations for C. difficile infection (CDI) have tripled in the last decade, emphasizing the need to better understand how the organism colonizes the intestine and maintain infection. The mucus provides an interface for bacterial-host interactions and changes in intestinal mucus have been linked host health. To assess mucus production and composition in healthy and CDI patients, the main mucins MUC1 and MUC2 and mucus oligosaccharides were examined. Compared with healthy subjects, CDI patients demonstrated decreased MUC2 with no changes in surface MUC1. Although MUC1 did not change at the level of the epithelia, MUC1 was the primary constituent of secreted mucus in CDI patients. CDI mucus also exhibited decreased N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), increased N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and increased terminal galactose residues. Increased galactose in CDI specimens is of particular interest since terminal galactose sugars are known as C. difficile toxin A receptor in animals. In vitro, C. difficile is capable of metabolizing fucose, mannose, galactose, GlcNAc, and GalNAc for growth under healthy stool conditions (low Na+ concentration, pH 6.0). Injection of C. difficile into human intestinal organoids (HIOs) demonstrated that C. difficile alone is sufficient to reduce MUC2 production but is not capable of altering host mucus oligosaccharide composition. We also demonstrate that C. difficile binds preferentially to mucus extracted from CDI patients compared with healthy subjects. Our results provide insight into a mechanism of C. difficile colonization and may provide novel target(s) for the development of alternative therapeutic agents. PMID:25552581

  14. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion through a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Haiqiao, Wu; Xie, Wenyao; Huaping, Huang; Zhong, Han; Xiangdong, Zhou; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2016-09-01

    Acute or chronic cold exposure exacerbates chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a cold-shock protein and is induced by various environmental stressors, such as hypothermia and hypoxia. In this study, we showed that CIRP gene and protein levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD and in rats with chronic airway inflammation compared with healthy subjects. Similarly, inflammatory cytokine production and MUC5AC secretion were up-regulated in rats following cigarette smoke inhalation. Cold temperature-induced CIRP overexpression and translocation were shown to be dependent on arginine methylation in vitro. CIRP overexpression promoted stress granule (SG) assembly. In the cytoplasm, the stability of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs was increased through specific interactions between CIRP and mediator mRNA 3'-UTRs; these interactions increased the mRNA translation, resulting in MUC5AC overproduction in response to cold stress. Conversely, CIRP silencing and a methyltransferase inhibitor (adenosine dialdehyde) promoted cytokine mRNA degradation and inhibited the inflammatory response and mucus hypersecretion. These findings indicate that cold temperature can induce an airway inflammatory response and excess mucus production via a CIRP-mediated increase in mRNA stability and protein translation. PMID:27477308

  15. Pinellia ternata Attenuates Mucus Secretion and Airway Inflammation after Inhaled Corticosteroid Withdrawal in COPD Rats.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Su, Jinyu; Ye, Dan; Wang, Yuegang; Huang, Qiaobing; Gong, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are widely used to manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, withdrawal of ICS generally causes various adverse effects, warranting careful management of the ICS withdrawal. Pinellia ternata, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been used to treat respiratory diseases in China for centuries. Here, we investigated its role in antagonizing ICS withdrawal-induced side effects, and explored the underlying mechanisms. The rat COPD model was established using a combination of passive cigarette smoking and intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). COPD rats were treated with saline or budesonide inhalation, or with budesonide inhalation followed by saline inhalation or Pinellia ternata gavage. The number of goblet cells and the level of mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) were enhanced by budesonide withdrawal. Pinellia ternata treatment significantly blocked these effects. Further, Pinellia ternata treatment reversed budesonide withdrawal-induced increase of interleukin 1[Formula: see text] (IL-1[Formula: see text] and tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text]) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but neither p38 nor c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), was activated by budesonide withdrawal, and the activation was blocked by Pinellia ternata treatment. The MUC5AC expression was positively correlated with goblet cell number, IL-1[Formula: see text] and TNF-[Formula: see text] levels, and ERK activity. Pinellia ternata treatment protected the airway from ICS withdrawal-induced mucus hypersecretion and airway inflammation by inhibiting ERK activation. Pinellia ternata treatment may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent ICS withdrawal-induced side effects in COPD patients. PMID:27430907

  16. Hypertonic saline is effective in the prevention and treatment of mucus obstruction, but not airway inflammation, in mice with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Simon Y; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Schatterny, Jolanthe; Hirtz, Stephanie; Boucher, Richard C; Mall, Marcus A

    2013-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inadequate hydration of airway surfaces is a common mechanism in the pathogenesis of airway mucus obstruction. Inhaled hypertonic saline (HS) induces osmotic water flux, improving hydration of airway surfaces. However, trials in patients with obstructive lung diseases are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of HS on mucus obstruction and airway inflammation in the prevention and treatment of obstructive lung disease in vivo. We, therefore, used the β-epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse as a model of chronic obstructive lung disease and determined effects of preventive and late therapy with 3% HS and 7% HS on pulmonary mortality, airway mucus obstruction, and inflammation. We found that preventive treatment with 3% HS and 7% HS improved growth, reduced mortality, and reduced mucus obstruction in neonatal βENaC-overexpressing mice. In adult βENaC-overexpressing mice with chronic lung disease, mucus obstruction was significantly reduced by 7% HS, but not by 3% HS. Treatment with HS triggered airway inflammation with elevated keratinocyte chemoattractant levels and neutrophils in airways from wild-type mice, but reduced keratinocyte chemoattractant in chronic neutrophilic inflammation in adult βENaC-overexpressing mice. Our data demonstrate that airway surface rehydration with HS provides an effective preventive and late therapy of mucus obstruction with no consistent effects on inflammation in chronic lung disease. These results suggest that, through mucokinetic effects, HS may be beneficial for patients with a spectrum of obstructive lung diseases, and that additional strategies are required for effective treatment of associated airway inflammation.

  17. Effects of inhaled acids on airway mucus and its consequences for health.

    PubMed

    Holma, B

    1989-02-01

    The high molecular fractions, i.e., greater than 100,000 dalton, are found to be most responsible for the H+ ion absorption capacity of the mucus in the respiratory tract. This function serves as a protection against the penetration of the H+ ion to the surrounding tissue. Acidifying mucus with a high concentration of protein, mainly glycoproteins, results in increased viscosity, which affects various lung functions. After acid saturation of the mucus, the H+ ion will react with the epithelial tissue, which results in increased permeability and a variety of effects. Acidic mucus or mucus with a low protein concentration, as in some asthmatics, constitutes a base for risk groups regarding acidic exposures. A rough estimate indicates that persons with normal mucus buffer capacity and protein content can tolerate about 3000 micrograms SO2/m3 or 300 micrograms H2SO4/m3 per 30 min.

  18. Spatial organization of cilia tufts governs airways mucus transport: Application to severe asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelloufi, Mustapha Kamel; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Viallat, Annie

    2014-11-01

    We study the coupling between both density and spatial repartition of beating cilia tufts, and the coordinated transport of mucus in an in-vitro epithelial model. We use a fully differentiated model epithelium in air liquid interface (ALI) obtained from endo-bronchial biopsies from healthy subjects and patients with asthma. The asthma phenotype is known to persist in the model. Mucus transport is characterized by the trajectories and velocities of microscopic beads incorporated in the mucus layer. When the beating cilia tufts density is higher than dc = 11/100 × 100 μm2 a spherical spiral coordinated mucus transport is observed over the whole ALI chamber (radius = 6 mm). Below dc, local mucus coordinated transport is observed on small circular domains on the epithelium surface. We reveal that the radii of these domains scale with the beating cilia tufts density with a power 3.7. Surprisingly, this power law is independent on cilia beat frequency, concentration and rheological properties of mucus for healthy subject and patient with asthma. The rotating or linear mucus transport is related to dispersion of the cilia tufts on the epithelium surface. We show that impaired mucus transport observed in severe asthma model epithelia is due to a drastic lack and dysfunction of cilia tufts. The author acknowledges the support of the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under reference ANR-13-BSV5-0015-01.

  19. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Frederick L; Krahnke, Jason S; Kim, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus is part of the lung’s native immune function that traps particulates and microorganisms, enabling their clearance from the lung by ciliary transport and cough. Mucus hypersecretion and chronic productive cough are the features of the chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Overproduction and hypersecretion by goblet cells and the decreased elimination of mucus are the primary mechanisms responsible for excessive mucus in chronic bronchitis. Mucus accumulation in COPD patients affects several important outcomes such as lung function, health-related quality of life, COPD exacerbations, hospitalizations, and mortality. Nonpharmacologic options for the treatment of mucus accumulation in COPD are smoking cessation and physical measures used to promote mucus clearance. Pharmacologic therapies include expectorants, mucolytics, methylxanthines, beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, anticholinergics, glucocorticoids, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, antioxidants, and antibiotics. PMID:24493923

  20. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from human lung: role of airways deformation on air-mucus interaction.

    PubMed

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Flaud, Patrice; Pelca, Dominique; Fausser, Christian; Merckx, Jacques; Mitchell, Barrett R

    2015-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is an empirical technique used to help secretions to get out of the lung whenever stagnation occurs. Although commonly used, little is known about the inner mechanisms of chest physiotherapy and controversies about its use are coming out regularly. Thus, a scientific validation of chest physiotherapy is needed to evaluate its effects on secretions. We setup a quasi-static numerical model of chest physiotherapy based on thorax and lung physiology and on their respective biophysics. We modeled the lung with an idealized deformable symmetric bifurcating tree. Bronchi and their inner fluids mechanics are assumed axisymmetric. Static data from the literature is used to build a model for the lung's mechanics. Secretions motion is the consequence of the shear constraints apply by the air flow. The input of the model is the pressure on the chest wall at each time, and the output is the bronchi geometry and air and secretions properties. In the limit of our model, we mimicked manual and mechanical chest physiotherapy techniques. We show that for secretions to move, air flow has to be high enough to overcome secretion resistance to motion. Moreover, the higher the pressure or the quicker it is applied, the higher is the air flow and thus the mobilization of secretions. However, pressures too high are efficient up to a point where airways compressions prevents air flow to increase any further. Generally, the first effects of manipulations is a decrease of the airway tree hydrodynamic resistance, thus improving ventilation even if secretions do not get out of the lungs. Also, some secretions might be pushed deeper into the lungs; this effect is stronger for high pressures and for mechanical chest physiotherapy. Finally, we propose and tested two a dimensional numbers that depend on lung properties and that allow to measure the efficiency and comfort of a manipulation.

  1. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from human lung: role of airways deformation on air-mucus interaction.

    PubMed

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Flaud, Patrice; Pelca, Dominique; Fausser, Christian; Merckx, Jacques; Mitchell, Barrett R

    2015-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is an empirical technique used to help secretions to get out of the lung whenever stagnation occurs. Although commonly used, little is known about the inner mechanisms of chest physiotherapy and controversies about its use are coming out regularly. Thus, a scientific validation of chest physiotherapy is needed to evaluate its effects on secretions. We setup a quasi-static numerical model of chest physiotherapy based on thorax and lung physiology and on their respective biophysics. We modeled the lung with an idealized deformable symmetric bifurcating tree. Bronchi and their inner fluids mechanics are assumed axisymmetric. Static data from the literature is used to build a model for the lung's mechanics. Secretions motion is the consequence of the shear constraints apply by the air flow. The input of the model is the pressure on the chest wall at each time, and the output is the bronchi geometry and air and secretions properties. In the limit of our model, we mimicked manual and mechanical chest physiotherapy techniques. We show that for secretions to move, air flow has to be high enough to overcome secretion resistance to motion. Moreover, the higher the pressure or the quicker it is applied, the higher is the air flow and thus the mobilization of secretions. However, pressures too high are efficient up to a point where airways compressions prevents air flow to increase any further. Generally, the first effects of manipulations is a decrease of the airway tree hydrodynamic resistance, thus improving ventilation even if secretions do not get out of the lungs. Also, some secretions might be pushed deeper into the lungs; this effect is stronger for high pressures and for mechanical chest physiotherapy. Finally, we propose and tested two a dimensional numbers that depend on lung properties and that allow to measure the efficiency and comfort of a manipulation. PMID:26300780

  2. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from human lung: role of airways deformation on air-mucus interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Flaud, Patrice; Pelca, Dominique; Fausser, Christian; Merckx, Jacques; Mitchell, Barrett R.

    2015-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is an empirical technique used to help secretions to get out of the lung whenever stagnation occurs. Although commonly used, little is known about the inner mechanisms of chest physiotherapy and controversies about its use are coming out regularly. Thus, a scientific validation of chest physiotherapy is needed to evaluate its effects on secretions. We setup a quasi-static numerical model of chest physiotherapy based on thorax and lung physiology and on their respective biophysics. We modeled the lung with an idealized deformable symmetric bifurcating tree. Bronchi and their inner fluids mechanics are assumed axisymmetric. Static data from the literature is used to build a model for the lung's mechanics. Secretions motion is the consequence of the shear constraints apply by the air flow. The input of the model is the pressure on the chest wall at each time, and the output is the bronchi geometry and air and secretions properties. In the limit of our model, we mimicked manual and mechanical chest physiotherapy techniques. We show that for secretions to move, air flow has to be high enough to overcome secretion resistance to motion. Moreover, the higher the pressure or the quicker it is applied, the higher is the air flow and thus the mobilization of secretions. However, pressures too high are efficient up to a point where airways compressions prevents air flow to increase any further. Generally, the first effects of manipulations is a decrease of the airway tree hydrodynamic resistance, thus improving ventilation even if secretions do not get out of the lungs. Also, some secretions might be pushed deeper into the lungs; this effect is stronger for high pressures and for mechanical chest physiotherapy. Finally, we propose and tested two a dimensional numbers that depend on lung properties and that allow to measure the efficiency and comfort of a manipulation. PMID:26300780

  3. Oestrus synchronisation and superovulation alter the production and biochemical constituents of ovine cervicovaginal mucus.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Jessie W; Rickard, Jessica P; Mooney, Ethan; Bernecic, Naomi C; Soleilhavoup, Clement; Tsikis, Guillaume; Druart, Xavier; Leahy, Tamara; de Graaf, Simon P

    2016-09-01

    Controlled breeding programmes utilising exogenous hormones are common in the Australian sheep industry, however the effects of such programmes on cervicovaginal mucus properties are lacking. As such, the aim of this study was to investigate cervicovaginal (CV) mucus from naturally cycling (NAT), progesterone synchronised (P4), prostaglandin synchronised (PGF2α), and superovulated (SOV) Merino ewes. Experiment 1; volume, colour, spinnbarkeit, chemical profile and protein concentration of mucus (NAT, P4, PGF2α and SOV; n=5 ewes/treatment) during the follicular (5 d) and luteal phases (8 d) was investigated. Experiment 2; in vivo mucus pH and in vitro mucus penetration by frozen-thawed spermatozoa (NAT, P4 and SOV; n=11 ewes/treatment) was investigated over oestrus (2 d) and the mid-luteal phase (pH only, 2 d). Oestrus mucus was more abundant, clearer in colour and less proteinaceous than luteal phase mucus (p<0.05). SOV increased mucus production and protein concentration (p<0.05) while PGF2α reduced mucus volume (p<0.05). Mucus pH (oestrus 6.2-6.5), chemical profile and mucus penetration by sperm were unchanged (p>0.05). Results indicate that exogenous hormones used for controlled breeding affect cervicovaginal mucus production, but few other tested characteristics. Further research is required to explain fertility differences between synchronised and naturally cycling animals following cervical AI. PMID:27496692

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin causes airway goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia and mucus hypersecretion by inactivating the transcriptional factor FoxA2.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yonghua; Kuang, Zhizhou; Walling, Brent E; Bhatia, Shikha; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen, Yin; Gaskins, H Rex; Lau, Gee W

    2012-03-01

    The redox-active exotoxin pyocyanin (PCN) can be recovered in 100 µM concentrations in the sputa of bronchiectasis patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). However, the importance of PCN within bronchiectatic airways colonized by PA remains unrecognized. Recently, we have shown that PCN is required for chronic PA lung infection in mice, and that chronic instillation of PCN induces goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH), pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema and influx of immune cells in mouse airways. Many of these pathological features are strikingly similar to the mouse airways devoid of functional FoxA2, a transcriptional repressor of GCH and mucus biosynthesis. In this study, we postulate that PCN causes and exacerbates GCH and mucus hypersecretion in bronchiectatic airways chronically infected by PA by inactivating FoxA2. We demonstrate that PCN represses the expression of FoxA2 in mouse airways and in bronchial epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface or conventionally, resulting in GCH, increased MUC5B mucin gene expression and mucus hypersecretion. Immunohistochemical and inhibitor studies indicate that PCN upregulates the expression of Stat6 and EGFR, both of which in turn repress the expression of FoxA2. These studies demonstrate that PCN induces GCH and mucus hypersecretion by inactivating FoxA2.

  5. Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis correlates to increasing chloride channel accessory 1 (hCLCA1) suggesting a pathway for up-regulation of airway mucus responses, in infant lungs

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Francisco J.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Rojas, Diego A.; Iturra, Pablo A.; Bustamante, Rebeca I.; Gallo, Myriam; Hananias, Karime; Vargas, Sergio L.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis is associated with increased airway mucus in infants during their primary Pneumocystis infection, and to severity of COPD in adults. The pathogenic mechanisms are under investigation. Interestingly, increased levels of hCLCA1 – a member of the calcium-sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins that drives mucus hypersecretion – have been associated with increased mucus production in patients diagnosed with COPD and in immunocompetent rodents with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis is highly prevalent in infants; therefore, the contribution of Pneumocystis to hCLCA1 expression was examined in autopsied infant lungs. Respiratory viruses that may potentially increase mucus, were also examined. hCLCA1 expression was measured using actin-normalized Western-blot, and the burden of Pneumocystis organisms was quantified by qPCR in 55 autopsied lungs from apparently healthy infants who died in the community. Respiratory viruses were diagnosed using RT-PCR for RSV, metapneumovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza viruses; and by PCR for adenovirus. hCLCA1 levels in virus positive samples were comparable to those in virus-negative samples. An association between Pneumocystis and increased hCLCA1 expression was documented (P=0.028). Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017). Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs. Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted. PMID:25379375

  6. Effects of acid aerosol exposure on the surface properties of airway mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.M.; Schuerch, S.; Roth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    It was hypothesized that the mucous layer lining the tracheas of rats and guinea pigs contains surfactant material capable of lowering the air/mucus surface tension, {gamma}, and that exposure to an irritant aerosol would raise the {gamma}. The {gamma} of the surface film was measured directly by a spreading droplet technique and indirectly by displacement of polymethyl methacrylate particles into the aqueous layer. The morphology of the mucous film was examined by electron microscopy after nonaqueous fixation. {gamma} was 33.3 {plus_minus} 0.70 (SE) mN/m and 32.3 {plus_minus} 0.68 (SE) mN/m for the normal rat and guinea pig trachea, respectively. Exposure for 4 h to aerosols of sulfuric acid (94.1 {plus_minus} 18.68 (SD) and 43.3 {plus_minus} 4.57 (SD) mg/m{sup 3}) caused a several-fold increase in thickness of the mucous layer with exudation of protein-like material. The osmiophilic surfactant film at the air/mucus interface became irregularly thickened and multilayered. Despite these morphological changes {gamma} remained low, 33.2 {plus_minus} 0.43 (SE) mN/m and 32.6 {plus_minus} 0.60 (SE) mN/m for rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and displacement of particles into the subphase was not compromised. The results indicate that rodent tracheas are able to maintain a low surface tension in the presence of injury. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  7. A comparison of a new mucolytic N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate with N-acetylcysteine: airway epithelial function and mucus changes in dog.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, R P; App, E M; De Sanctis, G T; Coffiner, M; Maes, P; Rubin, B K; King, M

    1995-12-01

    A newly synthesized mucolytic agent, N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate (Nacystelyn) was studied. Tracheal mucus velocity (TMV), transepithelial potential difference (PD), rheological properties, and ion content of collected airway secretions were evaluated in six healthy mongrel dogs after placebo, Nacystelyn (NAL) and acetylcysteine (NAC) metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols. Although TMV was increased and viscoelasticity decreased after both treatments, the treatment effect with NAL was significantly greater. Furthermore, NAL increased the negative PD and CI- content of secretions in the trachea, an effect not observed after NAC. Both compounds increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) on the frog palate at a concentration range similar to that approximated in dog airways. The increased mucociliary clearance could be partially explained by favourable rheological changes combined with stimulation of CBF. Since both compounds break disulfide bonds in mucus polymers, the greater change in mucus rheology and clearance rate after NAL, without change in water content, could be explained by the increase in CI- content. Nacystelyn appears to combine different modes of action which synergistically cause an increase in the clearance rate of airway secretions. PMID:8819180

  8. A comparison of a new mucolytic N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate with N-acetylcysteine: airway epithelial function and mucus changes in dog.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, R P; App, E M; De Sanctis, G T; Coffiner, M; Maes, P; Rubin, B K; King, M

    1995-12-01

    A newly synthesized mucolytic agent, N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate (Nacystelyn) was studied. Tracheal mucus velocity (TMV), transepithelial potential difference (PD), rheological properties, and ion content of collected airway secretions were evaluated in six healthy mongrel dogs after placebo, Nacystelyn (NAL) and acetylcysteine (NAC) metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols. Although TMV was increased and viscoelasticity decreased after both treatments, the treatment effect with NAL was significantly greater. Furthermore, NAL increased the negative PD and CI- content of secretions in the trachea, an effect not observed after NAC. Both compounds increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) on the frog palate at a concentration range similar to that approximated in dog airways. The increased mucociliary clearance could be partially explained by favourable rheological changes combined with stimulation of CBF. Since both compounds break disulfide bonds in mucus polymers, the greater change in mucus rheology and clearance rate after NAL, without change in water content, could be explained by the increase in CI- content. Nacystelyn appears to combine different modes of action which synergistically cause an increase in the clearance rate of airway secretions.

  9. Alteration in Pimephales promelas mucus production after exposure to nanosilver or silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Adam D; Thornton, Cammi; Steevens, Jeffery A; Willett, Kristine L

    2014-12-01

    The fish gill's ability to produce mucus effectively is a critical part of the stress response and protection against xenobiotic toxicity. Adult fathead minnows were exposed to silver nitrate (0.82 µg/L or 13.2 µg/L), polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (11.1 µg/L or 208 µg/L), and citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (10.1 µg/L or 175 µg/L) for 96 h. Mucus concentrations based on glucose as a surrogate were determined at 0 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h and 24 h after re-dosing each day. Higher mucus production rates following silver treatment were observed at the beginning as compared to controls and compared to after 3 d of exposure. Control fish produced consistent mucus concentrations throughout the exposure (0.62 mg/L and 0.40 mg/L at 24 h and 96 h, respectively). Following 24 h of exposure, all silver treatment groups produced significantly more mucus than controls. Following 96 h of exposure, mucus concentrations in treatment groups were significantly reduced compared with each respective treatment at 24 h. Reduced mucus production following long-term silver exposure could prevent the gills from removing silver, and thus increase toxicity. PMID:25262928

  10. Effect of guaifenesin on mucin production, rheology, and mucociliary transport in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seagrave, JeanClare; Albrecht, Helmut; Park, Yong Sung; Rubin, Bruce; Solomon, Gail; Kim, K Chul

    2011-12-01

    Guaifenesin is widely used to alleviate symptoms of excessive mucus accumulation in the respiratory tract. However, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. The authors hypothesized that guaifenesin improves mucociliary clearance in humans by reducing mucin release, by decreasing mucus viscoelasticity, and by increasing mucociliary transport. To test these hypotheses, human differentiated airway epithelial cells, cultured at an air-liquid interface, were treated with clinically relevant concentrations of guaifenesin by addition to the basolateral medium. To evaluate the effect on mucin secretion, the authors used an anzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the amounts of MUC5AC protein in apical surface fluid and cell lysates. To measure mucociliary transportability, additional cultures were treated for 1 or 6 hours with guaifenesin, and the movement of cell debris was measured from video data. Further, the authors measured mucus dynamic viscoelasticity using a micro cone and plate rheometer with nondestructive creep transformation. Guaifenesin suppressed mucin production in a dose-dependent manner at clinically relevant concentrations. The reduced mucin production was associated with increased mucociliary transport and decreased viscoelasticity of the mucus. Viability of the cultures was not significantly affected. These results suggest that guaifenesin could improve mucociliary clearance in humans by reducing the release and/or production of mucins, thereby altering mucus rheology. PMID:22044398

  11. Viscous airflow through a rigid tube with a compliant lining: a simple model for the air-mucus interaction in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Evrensel, C A; Khan, R U; Elli, S; Krumpe, P E

    1993-08-01

    The respiratory tract of mammals is lined with a layer of mucus, described as viscoelastic semi-solid, above a layer of watery serous fluid. The interaction of these compliant layers with pulmonary airflow plays a major role in lung clearance by two-phase gas-liquid flow and in increased flow resistance in patients with obstructive airway diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and asthma. Experiments have shown that such coupled systems of flow-compliant-layers are quite susceptible to sudden shear instabilities, leading to formation of relatively large amplitude waves at the interface. Although these waves enhance the lung clearance by mobilizing the secretions, they increase the flow resistance in airways. The objective of this paper is to understand the basic interaction mechanism between the two media better by studying airflow through a rigid pipe that is lined by a compliant layer. The mathematical model that has been developed for this purpose is capable of explaining some of the published experimental observations. Wave instability theory is applied to the coupled air-mucus system to explore the stability of the interface. The results show that the onset flow speed for the initiation of unstable surface waves, and the resulting wavelength, are both very sensitive to mucus thickness. The model predicts that the instabilities initiate in the form of propagating waves for the elastic mucus where the wave speed is about 40 percent of the flow speed. The wavelength and phase speed to air velocity ratio are shown to increase with increasing mucus thickness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from the human lung: role of the geometry of the airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Fausser, Christian; Pelca, Dominique; Merckx, Jacques; Flaud, Patrice

    2011-10-01

    Mucociliary clearance and cough are the two main natural mucus draining methods in the bronchial tree. If they are affected by a pathology, they can become insufficient or even ineffective, then therapeutic draining of mucus plays a critical role to keep mucus levels in the lungs acceptable. The manipulations of physical therapists are known to be very efficient clinically but they are mostly empirical since the biophysical mechanisms involved in these manipulations have never been studied. We develop in this work a model of mucus clearance in idealized rigid human bronchial trees and focus our study on the interaction between (1) tree geometry, (2) mucus physical properties and (3) amplitude of flow rate in the tree. The mucus is considered as a Bingham fluid (gel-like) which is moved upward in the tree thanks to its viscous interaction with air flow. Our studies point out the important roles played both by the geometry and by the physical properties of mucus (yield stress and viscosity). More particularly, the yield stress has to be overcome to make mucus flow. Air flow rate and yield stress determine the maximal possible mucus thickness in each branch of the tree at equilibrium. This forms a specific distribution of mucus in the tree whose characteristics are strongly related to the multi-scaled structure of the tree. The behavior of any mucus distribution is then dependent on this distribution. Finally, our results indicate that increasing air flow rates ought to be more efficient to drain mucus out of the bronchial tree while minimizing patient discomfort.

  13. Therapeutic approaches to mucus hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Yuta, Atsushi; Baraniuk, James N

    2005-05-01

    Mucolytic and related agents have been in use since prehistoric times. Although widely prescribed and used extensively in over-the-counter preparations, their efficacy and mechanisms of action remain in doubt. These agents belong to several distinct chemical classes. Mucolytic agents such as N-acetyl-cysteine are thiols with a free-sulfhydryl group. They are assumed to break disulfide bonds between gel-forming mucins and thus reduce mucus viscosity. Mucokinetic agents are thiols with a blocked sulfhydryl group. Expectorants such as guaifenesin increase mucus secretion. They may act as irritants to gastric vagal receptors, and recruit efferent parasympathetic reflexes that cause glandular exocytosis of a less viscous mucus mixture. Cough may be provoked. This combination may flush tenacious, congealed mucopurulent material from obstructed small airways and lead to a temporary improvement in dyspnea or the work of breathing. The roles of anticholinergic agents, DNase, and other drugs are also discussed with regard to their roles in reducing mucus production in rhinitis and other airway diseases. PMID:15842963

  14. Therapeutic approaches to mucus hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Yuta, Atsushi; Baraniuk, James N

    2005-05-01

    Mucolytic and related agents have been in use since prehistoric times. Although widely prescribed and used extensively in over-the-counter preparations, their efficacy and mechanisms of action remain in doubt. These agents belong to several distinct chemical classes. Mucolytic agents such as N-acetyl-cysteine are thiols with a free-sulfhydryl group. They are assumed to break disulfide bonds between gel-forming mucins and thus reduce mucus viscosity. Mucokinetic agents are thiols with a blocked sulfhydryl group. Expectorants such as guaifenesin increase mucus secretion. They may act as irritants to gastric vagal receptors, and recruit efferent parasympathetic reflexes that cause glandular exocytosis of a less viscous mucus mixture. Cough may be provoked. This combination may flush tenacious, congealed mucopurulent material from obstructed small airways and lead to a temporary improvement in dyspnea or the work of breathing. The roles of anticholinergic agents, DNase, and other drugs are also discussed with regard to their roles in reducing mucus production in rhinitis and other airway diseases.

  15. Direct Visualization of Mucus Production by the Cold-Water Coral Lophelia pertusa with Digital Holographic Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Baussant, Thierry; Meysman, Filip J R; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the existing tools to study these processes are not appropriate. Using a novel microscopic technique-digital holographic microscopy (DHM)-we studied the mucus release of L. pertusa under various experimental conditions. DHM technology permits μm-scale observations and allows the visualization of transparent mucoid substances in real time without staining. Fragments of L. pertusa were first maintained in flow-through chambers without stressors and imaged with DHM, then exposed to various stressors (suspended particles, particulate food and air exposure) and re-imaged. Under non-stressed conditions no release of mucus was observed, whilst mucus strings and sheaths were produced in response to suspended particles (activated charcoal and drill cuttings sediment) i.e. in a stressed condition. Mucus strings and so-called 'string balls' were also observed in response to exposure to particulate food (brine shrimp Artemia salina). Upon air-exposure, mucus production was clearly visible once the fragments were returned to the flow chamber. Distinct optical properties such as optical path length difference (OPD) were measured with DHM in response to the various stimuli suggesting that different mucus types are produced by L. pertusa. Mucus produced to reject particles is similar in refractive index to the surrounding seawater, suggesting that the energy content of this mucus is low. In contrast, mucus produced in response to either food particle addition or air exposure had a higher refractive index, suggesting a higher metabolic investment in the production of these mucoid substances. This paper shows for the first time the potential of

  16. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) induced mucin production by airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Walters, Dianne M.; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lee, Pak-Kei

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants has been linked to various airway diseases and disease exacerbations. Almost all chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are caused by complicated interactions between gene and environment. One of the major hallmarks of those diseases is airway mucus overproduction (MO). Excessive mucus causes airway obstruction and significantly increases morbidity and mortality. Metals are major components of environmental particulate matters (PM). Among them, vanadium has been suggested to play an important role in PM-induced mucin production. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is the most common commercial source of vanadium, and it has been associated with occupational chronic bronchitis and asthma, both of which are MO diseases. However, the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear. In this study, we used both in vitro and in vivo models to demonstrate the robust inductions of mucin production by V2O5. Furthermore, the follow-up mechanistic study revealed a novel v-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1-IKK-NF-κB pathway that mediated V2O5-induced mucin production. Most interestingly, the reactive oxygen species and the classical mucin-inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-MAPK pathway appeared not to be involved in this process. Thus the V2O5-induced mucin production may represent a novel EGFR-MAPK-independent and environmental toxicant-associated MO model. Complete elucidation of the signaling pathway in this model will not only facilitate the development of the treatment for V2O5-associated occupational diseases but also advance our understanding on the EGFR-independent mucin production in other chronic airway diseases. PMID:21531775

  17. CLCA1 and TMEM16A: the link towards a potential cure for airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Brett, Tom J

    2015-10-01

    The hallmark traits of chronic obstructive airway diseases are inflammation, airway constriction due to hyperreactivity and mucus overproduction. The current common treatments for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease target the first two traits with none currently targeting mucus overproduction. The main source of obstructive mucus production is mucus cell metaplasia (MCM), the transdifferentiation of airway epithelial cells into mucus-producing goblet cells, in the small airways. Our current understanding of MCM is profusely incomplete. Few of the molecular players involved in driving MCM in humans have been identified and for many of those that have, their functions and mechanisms are unknown. This fact has limited the development of therapeutics that target mucus overproduction by inhibiting MCM. Current work in the field is aiming to change that. PMID:26296094

  18. Direct Visualization of Mucus Production by the Cold-Water Coral Lophelia pertusa with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Baussant, Thierry; Meysman, Filip J. R.; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the existing tools to study these processes are not appropriate. Using a novel microscopic technique—digital holographic microscopy (DHM)–we studied the mucus release of L. pertusa under various experimental conditions. DHM technology permits μm-scale observations and allows the visualization of transparent mucoid substances in real time without staining. Fragments of L. pertusa were first maintained in flow-through chambers without stressors and imaged with DHM, then exposed to various stressors (suspended particles, particulate food and air exposure) and re-imaged. Under non-stressed conditions no release of mucus was observed, whilst mucus strings and sheaths were produced in response to suspended particles (activated charcoal and drill cuttings sediment) i.e. in a stressed condition. Mucus strings and so-called ‘string balls’ were also observed in response to exposure to particulate food (brine shrimp Artemia salina). Upon air-exposure, mucus production was clearly visible once the fragments were returned to the flow chamber. Distinct optical properties such as optical path length difference (OPD) were measured with DHM in response to the various stimuli suggesting that different mucus types are produced by L. pertusa. Mucus produced to reject particles is similar in refractive index to the surrounding seawater, suggesting that the energy content of this mucus is low. In contrast, mucus produced in response to either food particle addition or air exposure had a higher refractive index, suggesting a higher metabolic investment in the production of these mucoid substances. This paper shows for the first time the

  19. Arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation in airway epithelial cells induces MUC5AC via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takahito; Uchi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Gaku; Gondo, Hisaki; Moroi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-02-01

    The dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in cigarette smoke regulate various immunological responses via the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR). These environmental toxicants are known to cause bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that AhR activation upregulates the expression of mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming (MUC5AC) in the airway epithelial cell line. However, the mechanism for the production of mucin has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the role and pathway of AhR in airway epithelial cells by using selective agonists and antagonists. After stimulation with or without benzopyrene (B[a]P), an AhR agonist, MUC5AC expression was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The mechanism of AhR-induced MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells was studied in terms of the production of cytokine and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with B[a]P increased ROS generation in NCI-H₂₉₂ cells. Furthermore, B[a]P-induced MUC5AC upregulation and mucin production were inhibited by AhR siRNA or the use of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that the AhR-induced increase of mucin production is partially mediated by ROS generation. An antioxidant therapy approach may help to cure AhR-induced mucus hypersecretory diseases. PMID:20709182

  20. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  1. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  2. Airway goblet cells: responsive and adaptable front-line defenders.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D F

    1994-09-01

    Goblet cells are situated in the epithelium of the conducting airways, often with their apical surfaces protruding into the lumen, a location which fits them for a rapid response to inhaled airway insults. Together with the submucosal glands, goblet cells secrete high molecular weight mucus glycoproteins (mucins), which confer upon the airway surface fluid the requisite biochemical and biophysical properties which determine the efficiency of entrapment and transportation of inhaled irritants, particles and micro-organisms. The diversity of glycosylation of airway mucins may be important in facilitating adherence of micro-organisms to mucus prior to mucociliary clearance. Other secretory products, including lipids and "small" glycoproteins, may also be produced by goblet cells. It is possible that goblet cells have the potential to produce markedly more mucus than do the glands. Mucins are tightly packed in the intracellular granules of the goblet cell. The morphology of these granules varies with fixation technique, and release of mucins may be via a combination of merocrine and apocrine secretion. Discharge of mucus is accomplished remarkably rapidly (tens of milliseconds) and vast quantities of mucus are released (size expansions from the granule of many hundredfold). Depending upon species and preparation, goblet cells discharge mucus in response to a wide variety of stimuli, including proteinases, irritant gases, inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species, nerve activation and changes in the biophysical environment. Under normal conditions, goblet cell proliferation and differentiation, particularly to ciliated cells, contributes to maintenance of the airway epithelial cell population. In addition to participating in acute airway defence, goblet cells increase in number in response to chronic airway insult, with a resultant increase in output of mucus. The increase in number of cells is via hyperplastic and metaplastic mechanisms. Early triggers for the

  3. Airway clearance therapy: finding the evidence.

    PubMed

    Volsko, Teresa A

    2013-10-01

    Disease processes can impair ciliary function, alter secretion production and mucus rheology, and interfere with the cough reflex. Airway clearance therapy has been a cornerstone of therapy aimed at minimizing the devastating effects of airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation due to mucus stasis on the conducting airways and lung parenchyma. Although challenges to performing clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of airway clearance therapeutic modalities exist, resources are available in the literature. In addition to device evaluations and original clinical research, the expert opinion, systematic reviews, and evidence-based practice guidelines can be found. These tools can be used to develop protocols and pathways to guide our practice. Monitoring and reporting patient, process, and financial outcomes are essential steps germane to the implementation of evidence-based care.

  4. Clearance of a Mucus Plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Shiyao; Zheng, Ying; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-11-01

    Mucus plugging may occur in pulmonary airways in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. How to clear the mucus plug is essential and of fundamental importance. Mucus is known to have a yield stress and a mucus plug behaves like a solid plug when the applied stresses are below its yield stress τy. When the local stresses reaches τy, the plug starts to move and can be cleared out of the lung. It is then of great importance to examine how the mucus plug deforms and what is the minimum pressure required to initiate its movement. The present study used the finite element method (FEM) to study the stress distribution and deformation of a solid mucus plug under different pressure loads using ANSYS software. The maximum shear stress is found to occur near the rear transition region of the plug, which can lead to local yielding and flow. The critical pressure increases linearly with the plug length and asymptotes when the plug length is larger than the half channel width. Experimentally a mucus simulant is used to study the process of plug deformation and critical pressure difference required for the plug to propagate. Consistently, the fracture is observed to start at the rear transition region where the plug core connects the films. However, the critical pressure is observed to be dependent on not only the plug length but also the interfacial shape.

  5. Clinical aspects of mucus and mucous plugging in asthma.

    PubMed

    Fanta, C H

    1985-01-01

    Abnormalities in the production and transport of airway secretions play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma, especially during acute exacerbations of the disease. The synthesis of mucus becomes disordered, and other constituents of airway contents, including eosinophils and shed bronchial epithelial cells, contribute to the abnormal sputum that is produced. Altered viscoelastic properties of asthmatic mucus lead to impaired mucus transport rates. In addition, ciliary function may be directly inhibited by factors within the secretions. The consequence of these derangements is often widespread plugging of small bronchi and bronchioles. Occasionally, segmental or subsegmental atelectasis develops, but in most series radiographically visible atelectasis is uncommon. A rare complication is mucoid impaction of the bronchi, in which a central masslike opacity on chest radiograph is the manifestation of a large mucous plug in a major bronchus. A hypersensitivity reaction to fungi has been implicated in the formation of at least some mucoid impactions. A variety of pharmacological and other methods have been used in attempts to modify abnormal airway secretions and to promote their clearance, but none is of proven benefit. The development of effective therapies will probably require a better understanding of the regulation of normal mucociliary transport and of the disturbances that occur in asthma.

  6. Unplugging Mucus in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A

    2016-04-01

    Airway mucus obstruction is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The thin layer of mucus that covers healthy airway surfaces has important protective functions in lung defense. However, excess mucus produces airflow obstruction and provides a nidus for bacterial infection and inflammation. Despite its importance in pathogenesis, understanding of the mechanisms underlying airway mucus obstruction, as well as therapeutic options, remain limited. Studies in the rare genetic disease CF identified airway surface dehydration due to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene dysfunction as an important disease mechanism that may explain mucus stasis and plugging in a spectrum of muco-obstructive lung diseases, including COPD. This concept is supported by the phenotype of the β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic mouse that exhibits airway surface dehydration and develops a spontaneous lung disease that shares key features with CF and COPD, such as airway mucus plugging, chronic neutrophilic inflammation, and structural lung damage. Furthermore, preclinical testing demonstrated that hydration strategies, including osmotically active hypertonic saline and preventive inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel are effective in unplugging airways in this mouse model of chronic obstructive lung disease. On the other hand, genetic deletion of neutrophil elastase, a potent stimulus for mucus hypersecretion, reduced goblet cell metaplasia and mucin expression but had no effect on mucus obstruction in vivo. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that airway surface dehydration is sufficient to produce mucus obstruction even in the absence of mucus hypersecretion and support further clinical testing of hydrating agents as a promising therapeutic strategy to unplug mucus in CF and COPD. PMID:27115954

  7. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  8. Physiological impact of abnormal lipoxin A₄ production on cystic fibrosis airway epithelium and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerard; Ringholz, Fiona; Buchanan, Paul; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation.

  9. Physiological Impact of Abnormal Lipoxin A4 Production on Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelium and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation. PMID:25866809

  10. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatised in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier. This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKS) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance. However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  11. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatized in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier, This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKs) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance, However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  12. Yield Stress Effects on Mucus Plug Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John C.; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2012-11-01

    Mucus plugs can obstruct airways, resulting in lost gas exchange and inflammation. Yield stress, one of the significant rheological properties of mucus, plays a significant role in plug rupture. We use carbopol 940 gels as mucus simulants to study dynamics of mucus plug rupture in experiments. Yield stress increases with gel concentration increasing (0.1% ~0.3%). The yield stress of the 0.2% gel is about 530 dyn/cm2, which can simulate normal mucus. A 2D PDMS channel is used to simulate a collapsed airway of the 12th generation in a human lung. Plug rupture is driven by a pressure drop of 1.6 ×104 ~ 2.0 ×104 dyn/cm2. Initial plug length varies from half to two times the half channel width. A micro-PIV technique is used to acquire velocity fields during rupture, from which wall shear stress is derived. Plug shortening velocity increases with the pressure drop, but decreases with yield stress or the initial plug length. Wall shear stress increases with yield stress, which indicates more potential damage may occur to epithelial cells when pathologic mucus has a high yield stress. Near the rupture moment, a wall shear stress peak appears at the front of the film deposited by the plug during rupture. This work is supported by NIH: HL84370 and HL85156.

  13. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF.

  14. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75–5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. PMID:25311799

  15. TMEM16A mediates the hypersecretion of mucus induced by Interleukin-13

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiachen; Jiang, Youfan; Li, Li; Liu, Yanan; Tang, Hui; Jiang, Depeng

    2015-06-10

    Previous studies showed that the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC) was involved in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion induced by Interleukin-13 (IL-13). However, the mechanisms underlying the process were unknown. Recently, transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was identified as the channel underlying the CaCC current. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the TMEM16A channel is part of the mechanism underlying IL-13-induced mucus hypersecretion. We observed that both TMEM16A mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated after treatment with IL-13 in human bronchial epithelial 16 (HBE 16) cells, which correlated with an increase in mucus production. Additionally, mucus hypersecretion in rat airways was induced by intratracheal instillation of IL-13 and similar increases were observed in the expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in the bronchial epithelium. Niflumic acid (NA), a selective antagonist of CaCC, markedly blocked IL-13-induced mucin (MUC) 5AC mRNA and protein production in vivo and in vitro. Further investigation with HBE16 cells revealed that TMEM16A overexpression clearly promoted mucus production, IκBα phosphorylation, and p65 accumulation in the nucleus. The loss of TMEM16A resulted in inhibition of mucus production, and the TMEM16A-mediated production of MUC5AC was significantly blocked by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor. Therefore, the TMEM16A channel acts upstream of NF-κB in the regulation of mucus production. This is the first demonstration that the TMEM16A-NF-κB pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced mucus production, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanism of mucin overproduction. - Highlights: • TMEM16A acts as downstream events of IL-13 signaling pathway. • Established the link between TMEM16A and mucus hypersecretion. • NF-κB activation might be responsible for TMEM16A mediated mucus secretion.

  16. Aerosol Medications for Treatment of Mucus Clearance Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2015-06-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion and secretion retention can result from inflammation, irritation, stimulation, or mucus-producing tumors. Secretion clearance can be furthered hampered by ciliary dysfunction and by weakness or restrictive lung disease, leading to an ineffective cough. There are a number of different mucoactive medications that have been used to reduce hypersecretion, make secretions easier to transport, or increase the efficiency of cough or mucus clearance. In this paper, I review the pathophysiology of secretory hyper-responsiveness and mucus hypersecretion and discuss the different aerosol medications that can be used to augment secretion clearance. PMID:26070577

  17. Aerosol Medications for Treatment of Mucus Clearance Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2015-06-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion and secretion retention can result from inflammation, irritation, stimulation, or mucus-producing tumors. Secretion clearance can be furthered hampered by ciliary dysfunction and by weakness or restrictive lung disease, leading to an ineffective cough. There are a number of different mucoactive medications that have been used to reduce hypersecretion, make secretions easier to transport, or increase the efficiency of cough or mucus clearance. In this paper, I review the pathophysiology of secretory hyper-responsiveness and mucus hypersecretion and discuss the different aerosol medications that can be used to augment secretion clearance.

  18. Structure and function of the mucus clearance system of the lung.

    PubMed

    Button, Brenda M; Button, Brian

    2013-08-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a defect in ion transport results in thick and dehydrated airway mucus, which is difficult to clear, making such patients prone to chronic inflammation and bacterial infections. Physiotherapy using a variety of airway clearance techniques (ACTs) represents a key treatment regime by helping clear the airways of thickened, adhered, mucus and, thus, reducing the impact of lung infections and improving lung function. This article aims to bridge the gap between our understanding of the physiological effects of mechanical stresses elicited by ACTs on airway epithelia and the reported effectiveness of ACTs in CF patients. In the first part of this review, the effects of mechanical stress on airway epithelia are discussed in relation to changes in ion transport and stimulation in airway surface layer hydration. The second half is devoted to detailing the most commonly used ACTs to stimulate the removal of mucus from the airways of patients with CF. PMID:23751214

  19. Structure and Function of the Mucus Clearance System of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brenda M.; Button, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a defect in ion transport results in thick and dehydrated airway mucus, which is difficult to clear, making such patients prone to chronic inflammation and bacterial infections. Physiotherapy using a variety of airway clearance techniques (ACTs) represents a key treatment regime by helping clear the airways of thickened, adhered, mucus and, thus, reducing the impact of lung infections and improving lung function. This article aims to bridge the gap between our understanding of the physiological effects of mechanical stresses elicited by ACTs on airway epithelia and the reported effectiveness of ACTs in CF patients. In the first part of this review, the effects of mechanical stress on airway epithelia are discussed in relation to changes in ion transport and stimulation in airway surface layer hydration. The second half is devoted to detailing the most commonly used ACTs to stimulate the removal of mucus from the airways of patients with CF. PMID:23751214

  20. Nanoparticle diffusion in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Benjamin S; Suk, Jung Soo; Woodworth, Graeme F; Hanes, Justin

    2013-04-01

    A major role of respiratory mucus is to trap inhaled particles, including pathogens and environmental particulates, to limit body exposure. Despite the tremendous health implications, how particle size and surface chemistry affect mobility in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease is not known. We prepared polymeric nanoparticles densely coated with low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) to minimize muco-adhesion, and compared their transport to that of uncoated particles in human respiratory mucus, which we collected from the endotracheal tubes of surgical patients with no respiratory comorbidities. We found that 100 and 200 nm diameter PEG-coated particles rapidly penetrated respiratory mucus, at rates exceeding their uncoated counterparts by approximately 15- and 35-fold, respectively. In contrast, PEG-coated particles ≥500 nm in diameter were sterically immobilized by the mucus mesh. Thus, even though respiratory mucus is a viscoelastic solid at the macroscopic level (as measured using a bulk rheometer), nanoparticles that are sufficiently small and muco-inert can penetrate the mucus as if it were primarily a viscous liquid. These findings help elucidate the barrier properties of respiratory mucus and provide design criteria for therapeutic nanoparticles capable of penetrating mucus to approach the underlying airway epithelium. PMID:23384790

  1. NADPH oxidase-dependent acid production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Christian; Machen, Terry E; Illek, Beate; Fischer, Horst

    2004-08-27

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of NADPH oxidase in H(+) secretion by airway epithelia. In whole cell patch clamp recordings primary human tracheal epithelial cells (hTE) and the human serous gland cell line Calu-3 expressed a functionally similar zinc-blockable plasma membrane H(+) conductance. However, the rate of H(+) secretion of confluent epithelial monolayers measured in Ussing chambers was 9-fold larger in hTE compared with Calu-3. In hTE H(+) secretion was blocked by mucosal ZnCl(2) and the NADPH oxidase blockers acetovanillone and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), whereas these same blockers had no effect in Calu-3. We determined levels of transcripts for the NADPH oxidase transmembrane isoforms (Nox1 through -5, Duox1 and -2, and p22(phox)) and found Duox1, -2, and p22(phox) to be highly expressed in hTE, as well as the intracellular subunits p40(phox), p47(phox), and p67(phox). In contrast, Calu-3 lacked transcripts for Duox1, p40(phox), and p47(phox). Anti-Duox antibody staining resulted in prominent apical staining in hTE but no significant staining in Calu-3. When treated with amiloride to block the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, intracellular pH in hTE acidified at significantly higher rates than in Calu-3, and treatment with AEBSF blocked acidification. These data suggest a role for an apically located Duox-based NADPH oxidase during intracellular H(+) production and H(+) secretion, but not in H(+) conduction.

  2. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jean A.; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M.; Schwindt, Adam R.; Fischer, Kay A.; Vorachek, William R.; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  3. Decreased colonic mucus in rats with loperamide-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Meguro, S; Hase, T; Tokimitsu, I; Sakata, T

    2000-06-01

    Constipation is a risk factor of colorectal cancer. Mucin is a major component of lumenal mucus, which protects the colorectal mucosa against mechanical and chemical damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate mucus production and to quantitate lumen mucus in a rat model of spastic constipation. We induced constipation with loperamide (1.5 mg/kg), and histochemically evaluated mucus production and the thickness of the mucus layer at the fecal surface. We quantitated the mucus attached to the mucosal surface using colonic perfusion with N-acetylcysteine. While more feces remained in the colon, there was less fecal excretion and lower fecal water content in loperamide-administered rats than in control rats. Crypt epithelial cells contained less mucus in constipated rats than in control rats. The mucus layer at the fecal surface was thinner and less mucus was recovered from the mucosal surface in constipated rats than in control rats. Mucus production of crypt epithelial cells and mucus at the fecal and mucosal surface were reduced by loperamide-induced constipation.

  4. S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase Inhibition Regulates Allergen-Induced Lung Inflammation and Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, David J. P.; Bradley, Matthews O.; Jaffar, Zeina

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsivenes, mucus hypersecretion and tissue remodeling. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is an alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of S-nitrosothiols. GSNOR activity has been shown to be elevated in human asthmatic lungs, resulting in diminished S-nitrosothiols and thus contributing to increased airway hyperreactivity. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we report that intranasal administration of a new selective inhibitor of GSNOR, SPL-334, caused a marked reduction in airway hyperreactivity, allergen-specific T cells and eosinophil accumulation, and mucus production in the lungs in response to allergen inhalation. Moreover, SPL-334 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and the level of the chemokine CCL11 (eotaxin-1) in the airways. Collectively, these observations reveal that GSNOR inhibitors are effective not only in reducing airway hyperresponsiveness but also in limiting lung inflammatory responses mediated by CD4+ Th2 cells. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSNOR may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:23936192

  5. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates cold air inducible airway mucin production through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxiu; Ran, Danhua; Xie, Wenyue; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and cold air stimulation has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production under cold stress remain elusive. Recently, the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) has been shown to be markedly induced after exposure to cold air. In this study, we sought to explore the expression of CIRP within bronchial biopsy specimens, the effect on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in cold air stimulation process. We found that CIRP protein expression was significantly increased in patients with COPD and in mice treated with cold air. Moreover, cold air stimulation induced MUC5AC expression in wild-type mice but not in CIRP(-/-) mice. In vitro, cold air stress significantly elevated the transcriptional and protein expression levels of MUC5AC in human bronchial epithelial cells. CIRP, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) increased significantly in response to cold stress and CIRP siRNA, TLR4 - neutralizing Ab and a specific inhibitor of NF-κB could attenuated cold stress inducible MUC5AC expression. In addition, CIRP siRNA could hindered the expression levels of TLR4 and p-p65 both induced by cold stress. Taken together, these results suggest that airway epithelial cells constitutively express CIRP in vitro and in vivo. CIRP is responsible for cold-inducible MUC5AC expression by activating TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27423012

  6. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates cold air inducible airway mucin production through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxiu; Ran, Danhua; Xie, Wenyue; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and cold air stimulation has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production under cold stress remain elusive. Recently, the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) has been shown to be markedly induced after exposure to cold air. In this study, we sought to explore the expression of CIRP within bronchial biopsy specimens, the effect on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in cold air stimulation process. We found that CIRP protein expression was significantly increased in patients with COPD and in mice treated with cold air. Moreover, cold air stimulation induced MUC5AC expression in wild-type mice but not in CIRP(-/-) mice. In vitro, cold air stress significantly elevated the transcriptional and protein expression levels of MUC5AC in human bronchial epithelial cells. CIRP, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) increased significantly in response to cold stress and CIRP siRNA, TLR4 - neutralizing Ab and a specific inhibitor of NF-κB could attenuated cold stress inducible MUC5AC expression. In addition, CIRP siRNA could hindered the expression levels of TLR4 and p-p65 both induced by cold stress. Taken together, these results suggest that airway epithelial cells constitutively express CIRP in vitro and in vivo. CIRP is responsible for cold-inducible MUC5AC expression by activating TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  7. N-Acetylcysteine and mucociliary activity in mammalian airways.

    PubMed

    Iravani, J; Melville, G N; Horstmann, G

    1978-01-01

    The effect of N-acetylcysteine on mucus trasnport velocity (MV), ciliary beat frequency (CBF), mucus production (MP), mucus lysis and on the micro-morphology of the secretory cells was studied in mammalian airways. The results showed that: 1. MV increased in healthy rats and rabbits, as well as in bronchitic rats, after concentrations as low as 10(-14) g/ml. Depression of MV occurred first at 10(-6) and 10(-5) g/ml in healthy and bronchitic animals, respectively. 2. CBF was stimulated at concentrations between 10(-12) and 10(-10) g/ml and decreased at concentrations above 10(-8) g/ml. 3. MP increased by approximately 100% over control values. 4. Lysis of stagnant mucus was evident first at a concentration of 10(-11) g/ml after 15 min incubation. 5. TEM confirmed the increased activity of the mucus secreting cells and showed that no pathological changes occurred within the cell following incubation at 10(-7) g/ml for up to 150 min. The importance of these findings on the overall mucociliary function is discussed.

  8. Airway epithelial NF-kappaB activation modulates asbestos-induced inflammation and mucin production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haegens, Astrid; Barrett, Trisha F; Gell, Joanna; Shukla, Arti; Macpherson, Maximilian; Vacek, Pamela; Poynter, Matthew E; Butnor, Kelly J; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M; Steele, Chad; Mossman, Brooke T

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the role of bronchiolar epithelial NF-kappaB activity in the development of inflammation and fibrogenesis in a murine model of asbestos inhalation, we used transgenic (Tg) mice expressing an IkappaBalpha mutant (IkappaBalphasr) resistant to phosphorylation-induced degradation and targeted to bronchial epithelium using the CC10 promoter. Sham and chrysotile asbestos-exposed CC10-IkappaBalphasr Tg(+) and Tg(-) mice were examined for altered epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation, cytokine profiles, lung inflammation, and fibrogenesis at 3, 9, and 40 days. KC, IL-6 and IL-1beta were increased (p < or = 0.05) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from asbestos-exposed mice, but to a lesser extent (p < or = 0.05) in Tg(+) vs Tg(-) mice. Asbestos also caused increases in IL-4, MIP-1beta, and MCP-1 in BALF that were more elevated (p < or = 0.05) in Tg(+) mice at 9 days. Differential cell counts revealed eosinophils in BALF that increased (p < or = 0.05) in Tg(+) mice at 9 days, a time point corresponding with significantly increased numbers of bronchiolar epithelial cells staining positively for mucus production. At all time points, asbestos caused increased numbers of distal bronchiolar epithelial cells and peribronchiolar cells incorporating the proliferation marker, Ki-67. However, bronchiolar epithelial cell and interstitial cell labeling was diminished at 40 days (p < or = 0.05) in Tg(+) vs Tg(-) mice. Our findings demonstrate that airway epithelial NF-kappaB activity plays a role in orchestrating the inflammatory response as well as cell proliferation in response to asbestos.

  9. Corneal mucus plaques.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Wright, P; Tripathi, R C

    1977-02-01

    Corneal mucus plaques adhered to the anterior corneal surface in 17 of 67 advanced cases of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The plaques were translucent to opaque and varied in size and shape, from multiple isolated islands to bizarre patterns involving more than half the corneal surface. Ultrastructurally, they consisted of mucus mixed with desquamated degenerating epithelial cells and proteinaceous and lipoidal material. The condition may be symptomatic but can be controlled and prevented in most cases by topical ocular application of 10% acetylcysteine.

  10. Mucus layers in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V

    2014-11-01

    The intestinal epithelium is covered with mucus with the main structural building block being the densely O-glycosylated MUC2 mucin. The intestinal epithelium is exposed to ingested material, our digestive machinery, and large amounts of microorganisms. Mucus is the first line of defense and aids to limit exposure to all these threats to the epithelium. In the small intestine, mucus acts as a matrix, which contains antimicrobial products, such as defensins and immunoglobulin A that limit epithelial exposure to the luminal bacteria. In the colon, the stratified inner mucus layer acts as a physical barrier excluding bacteria from the epithelium. Bacterial penetration of this normally restricted zone is observed in many colitis models and also in patients with ulcerative colitis. Mucus defects that allow bacteria to reach the epithelium and to stimulate an immune system response can lead to the development of intestinal inflammation. The current state of our knowledge concerning the function of the mucus layers and the main mucin component, MUC2, in inflammatory bowel disease is described in this review.

  11. Methyl Protodioscin from the Roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Inhibiting Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lim, Hun Jai; Lee, Chan Woo; Son, Kun-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to find pharmacologically active compound against airway inflammation from the roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis. The 70% ethanol extract of the roots of A. cochinchinensis (ACE) was found to inhibit IL-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) and the major constituent, methyl protodioscin (MP), also strongly inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α from A549 cells at 10-100 μM. This downregulating effect of proinflammatory cytokine production was found to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun activation pathway. When examined on an in vivo model of airway inflammation in mice, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury, ACE, and MP significantly inhibited cell infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by the oral treatment at doses of 100-400 mg/kg and 30-60 mg/kg, respectively. MP also inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lung tissue. All of these findings provide scientific evidence supporting the role of A. cochinchinensis as a herbal remedy in treating airway inflammation and also suggest a therapeutic value of MP on airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:26379748

  12. Methyl Protodioscin from the Roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Inhibiting Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lim, Hun Jai; Lee, Chan Woo; Son, Kun-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to find pharmacologically active compound against airway inflammation from the roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis. The 70% ethanol extract of the roots of A. cochinchinensis (ACE) was found to inhibit IL-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) and the major constituent, methyl protodioscin (MP), also strongly inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α from A549 cells at 10–100 μM. This downregulating effect of proinflammatory cytokine production was found to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun activation pathway. When examined on an in vivo model of airway inflammation in mice, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury, ACE, and MP significantly inhibited cell infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by the oral treatment at doses of 100–400 mg/kg and 30–60 mg/kg, respectively. MP also inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lung tissue. All of these findings provide scientific evidence supporting the role of A. cochinchinensis as a herbal remedy in treating airway inflammation and also suggest a therapeutic value of MP on airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:26379748

  13. Transport of metal oxide nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes in human mucus.

    PubMed

    Jachak, Ashish; Lai, Samuel K; Hida, Kaoru; Suk, Jung Soo; Markovic, Nina; Biswal, Shyam; Breysse, Patrick N; Hanes, Justin

    2012-09-01

    Whether mucus layers lining entrance points into the body, including the lung airways, provide protection against the penetration of engineered nanoparticles remains poorly understood. We measured the diffusion coefficients of hundreds of individual nanoparticles of three different metal oxides (nMeOs) and two types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in undiluted human mucus. We found that the vast majority of these nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in human mucus and, further, that the mechanism of trapping is adhesive interactions as opposed to steric obstruction. However, a small fraction of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles moved at rates fast enough to penetrate airway mucus layers. We conclude that human mucus layers probably provide considerable protection for mucosal tissues from the penetration of most nMeOs and SWCNTs, and suggest that further investigation of the potential health risks of exposure to ZnO nanoparticles is warranted.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus triggers nitric oxide production in human upper airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Workman, Alan D.; Chen, Bei; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Lee, Robert J.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is an important antibacterial defense molecule produced by upper airway (sinonasal) epithelial cells. We previously showed that a bitter taste receptor expressed in airway epithelium detects quorum-sensing molecules secreted by Gram-negative bacteria and subsequently triggers bactericidal NO production. We hypothesized that the upper airway epithelium may also be able to detect the Gram-positive aerobe Staphylococcus aureus and mount an NO response. Methods Human sinonasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures were treated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)-conditioned medium (CM), and NO production was measured using fluorescence imaging. Inhibitors of bitter taste receptor signaling were used to pharmacologically determine if this pathway was involved in the production of NO. Results A low-molecular-weight, heat, and protease-stabile product found in MRSA CM induced differential, NO synthase (NOS)-mediated NO production. This response varied markedly between individual patients. The MRSA-stimulated NO production was not dependent on 2 important components of bitter taste signaling: phospholipase C isoform β-2 or the transient receptor potential melastatin isoform 5 (TRPM5) ion channel. Conclusion This study shows that a S. aureus product elicits an NO-mediated innate defense response in human upper airway epithelium. The active bacterial product is likely a small, nonpeptide molecule that triggers a pathway independent of bitter taste receptors. Patient variation in the NO response to MRSA product(s), potentially due to genetic differences, might play a role in pathophysiology of Gram-positive upper respiratory infections and/or pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:26097237

  15. Increased airway epithelial Na+ absorption produces cystic fibrosis-like lung disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus; Grubb, Barbara R; Harkema, Jack R; O'Neal, Wanda K; Boucher, Richard C

    2004-05-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene result in defective epithelial cAMP-dependent Cl(-) secretion and increased airway Na(+) absorption. The mechanistic links between these altered ion transport processes and the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease, however, are unclear. To test the hypothesis that accelerated Na(+) transport alone can produce cystic fibrosis-like lung disease, we generated mice with airway-specific overexpression of epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC). Here we show that increased airway Na(+) absorption in vivo caused airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion, increased mucus concentration, delayed mucus transport and mucus adhesion to airway surfaces. Defective mucus transport caused a severe spontaneous lung disease sharing features with cystic fibrosis, including mucus obstruction, goblet cell metaplasia, neutrophilic inflammation and poor bacterial clearance. We conclude that increasing airway Na(+) absorption initiates cystic fibrosis-like lung disease and produces a model for the study of the pathogenesis and therapy of this disease. PMID:15077107

  16. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Angeli, Giovanna Natalia; Favarin, Daniely Cornélio; Lemos de Andrade, Edinéia; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Roberto da Silva, Paulo; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water) were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation. PMID:24376308

  17. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant. PMID:17600317

  18. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant.

  19. Muc5b is required for airway defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Bowden, M. Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; de La Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; Davis, C. William; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b-/- mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  20. Muc5b Is Required for Airway Defense

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Gabriela Bowden, M.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; William Davis, C.; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them via mucociliary clearance (MCC)1,2. However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases1. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus1,3. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases4-6, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in the lungs. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally7. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and IL-23 production was reduced inMuc5b−/− mice. By contrast, in Muc5b transgenic (Tg) mice, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum1,8. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%9-11. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC. PMID:24317696

  1. Muc5b is required for airway defence.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michelle G; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A; McElwee, Melissa M; Evans, Scott E; Boerner, Ryan M; Alexander, Samantha N; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K; Song, Alfred S; Petrova, Youlia M; Tuvim, Michael J; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S; Bowden, M Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H; Woodruff, Prescott G; Thornton, David J; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M; Moghaddam, Seyed J; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R; Drouin, Scott M; Davis, C William; Terrell, Kristy A; Grubb, Barbara R; O'Neal, Wanda K; Flores, Sonia C; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A; Donnelly, Jody M; Watson, Alan M; Hennessy, Corinne E; Keith, Rebecca C; Yang, Ivana V; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M; Janssen, William J; Schwartz, David A; Boucher, Richard C; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Christopher M

    2014-01-16

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b(-/-) mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  2. [Ultrastructure of cervical mucus].

    PubMed

    Chretien, F C

    1973-09-01

    This discussion covers the chemical structure of cervical mucus, accepted thoeries of its ultrastructure, and the author's data from the scanning electron microscope. A theory of the ultrastructure of cervical mucus must explain how it can be viscous and hostile to sperm for most of the cycle, but elastic and arranged parallel to their upward migration at ovulation. Cervical mucus is a hydrogel with 2%-12% solid phase composed of glucoproteins, probably meshed noncovalently into protein chains, with oligosaccharide side chains ending in sialic acid. A popular thoery generated by nuclear magnetic resonnance studies suggests that there may be sheaves of fibers arranged into micelles, with transverse fibers forming a netwrok that enlarges at ovulation. The light microscope is useless for studying mucus structure, but transmission electron microscopes have tentatively verified this hypothesis. The author's work with the scanning electron microscope showed a tangled web of filaments approximately 500-750 Angstroms, 1000-1500 or 300-6000 Angstroms thick. Usually the margin of the specimen appeared thin, like a spider web, but the center appeared thick with open channels, like the skeleton of a sponge, with a secondary network at the level of the oblique and transverse fibers.

  3. Human cervical mucus. V. Oral contraceptives and mucus rheologic properties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Blasco, L; Khan, M A; Litt, M

    1979-08-01

    Mucus viscoelasticity on individual samples obtained from patients using combination oral contraceptives was quantitated by microrheometry. These results, in conjunction with mucus chemical characterization, indicate that combination oral contraceptive use eliminates the cyclic variations in mucus chemical, physicochemical, and rheologic properties associated with the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A correlation was demonstrated between the mucus elastic modulus and mucus nondialyzable dry weight, and the mucins produced during oral contraceptive therapy were shown to be similar to those recovered from ovulatory donors. Differences in mucus properties were noted when donors using estrogenic contraceptives were contrasted with those using androgenic contraceptives. On the basis of established relationships between sperm penetrability and mucus solids content, it was concluded that the use of contraceptives, as examined in this study, provided a secondary degree of fertility control at the cervical level.

  4. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  5. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  6. [The cleaning system of the airways: physiology, pathophysiology and effects of ambroxol].

    PubMed

    Wunderer, Horst; Morgenroth, Konrad; Weis, Günter

    2009-02-01

    The human airways are faced by a mucous membrane that keeps the airways humid and protects them. One of the main factors of this protection system is the secretion that covers the surface of the membrane. Like an escalator, secretion is moved steadily, day and night in order to eliminate germs and pollutants from the airways. Healthy people normally do not notice this transport. Infection of the airways accompanied by cough disturbs the transport. The aim of the therapy should be the reconstitution of the transport, not the unsighted suppression of mucus production. Therefore adequate rheological properties of the secretion are needed as well as the balance of its components. Ambroxol affects this system at several sites.

  7. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  8. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Modeled velopharyngeal orifice area prediction during simulated stop consonant production in the presence of increased nasal airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Maddox, C M; Kostinski, A B

    1985-07-01

    This project examined modeled velopharyngeal orifice area estimation under conditions simulating voiceless stop consonant production in the presence of nasal airway obstruction. The results indicated that accurate estimates of velopharyngeal orifice area can be obtained using Warren's hydrokinetic equation during aerodynamic events like those known to exist during speech in the presence of increased nasal airway resistance. These findings provide support for clinical and research use of Warren's pressure-flow approach to investigate velopharyngeal function during speech production.

  10. Modeled velopharyngeal orifice area prediction during simulated stop consonant production in the presence of increased nasal airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Maddox, C M; Kostinski, A B

    1985-07-01

    This project examined modeled velopharyngeal orifice area estimation under conditions simulating voiceless stop consonant production in the presence of nasal airway obstruction. The results indicated that accurate estimates of velopharyngeal orifice area can be obtained using Warren's hydrokinetic equation during aerodynamic events like those known to exist during speech in the presence of increased nasal airway resistance. These findings provide support for clinical and research use of Warren's pressure-flow approach to investigate velopharyngeal function during speech production. PMID:3860307

  11. Fisetin, a bioactive flavonol, attenuates allergic airway inflammation through negative regulation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Goh, Fera Y; Upton, Nadine; Guan, Shouping; Cheng, Chang; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Sethi, Gautam; Leung, Bernard P; Wong, W S Fred

    2012-03-15

    Persistent activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been associated with the development of asthma. Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring bioactive flavonol, has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activity. We hypothesized that fisetin may attenuate allergic asthma via negative regulation of the NF-κB activity. Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin developed airway inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was assessed for total and differential cell counts, and cytokine and chemokine levels. Lung tissues were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion, and the expression of inflammatory biomarkers. Airway hyperresponsiveness was monitored by direct airway resistance analysis. Fisetin dose-dependently inhibited ovalbumin-induced increases in total cell count, eosinophil count, and IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. It attenuated ovalbumin-induced lung tissue eosinophilia and airway mucus production, mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, chitinase, IL-17, IL-33, Muc5ac and inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung tissues, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fisetin blocked NF-κB subunit p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity in the nuclear extracts from lung tissues of ovalbumin-challenged mice. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, fisetin repressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Our findings implicate a potential therapeutic value of fisetin in the treatment of asthma through negative regulation of NF-κB pathway.

  12. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  13. Phrase-level speech simulation with an airway modulation model of speech production.

    PubMed

    Story, Brad H

    2013-06-01

    Artificial talkers and speech synthesis systems have long been used as a means of understanding both speech production and speech perception. The development of an airway modulation model is described that simulates the time-varying changes of the glottis and vocal tract, as well as acoustic wave propagation, during speech production. The result is a type of artificial talker that can be used to study various aspects of how sound is generated by humans and how that sound is perceived by a listener. The primary components of the model are introduced and simulation of words and phrases are demonstrated.

  14. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  15. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-09-08

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway.

  16. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  17. Role of upper airway dimensions in snore production: acoustical and perceptual findings.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew Keong; Koh, Tong San; Baey, Eugene; Puvanendran, Kathiravelu

    2009-09-01

    While considerable efforts have been expended to develop snore-driven markers for detecting obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), there is little emphasis on the relationship between the human upper airway (UA) dimensions and the attributes of snores. This paper aims to investigate the acoustical and perceptual impacts of changing the cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the pharynx and oral cavity on the production of snores. Synthetic snores were generated based on the source-filter theory, whereas natural snores were recorded from 40 snorers during nocturnal polysomnography. First formant frequency (F1), spectral peak frequency (PF), and psychoacoustic metrics (loudness, sharpness, roughness, fluctuation strength, and annoyance) of CSA perturbations were examined, completed with diagnostic appraisal of F1 and PF for single- and mixed-gender groupings using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results show that (1) narrowing the pharyngeal airway consistently increases F1, but not for PF; and (2) altering the airway dimensions yield no considerable differences in perception of snore sounds, but indirectly affect the psychoacoustics by changing the dynamics of snore source flow. Diagnostic outcomes for all groupings (p-value < 0.0001) demonstrate that F1 is more capable of distinguishing apneic and benign snorers than PF due to the close association of F1 with the UA anatomical structures. Correlation exists between the UA anatomy and the properties of snores; there is a promising future for developing snore-driven screening tools for OSA.

  18. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hanes, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or adhesion. Trapped particles are typically removed from the mucosal tissue within seconds to a few hours depending on anatomical location, thereby strongly limiting the duration of sustained drug delivery locally. A number of debilitating diseases could be treated more effectively and with fewer side effects if drugs and genes could be more efficiently delivered to the underlying mucosal tissues in a controlled manner. This review first describes the tenacious mucus barrier properties that have precluded the efficient penetration of therapeutic particles. It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues. PMID:19133304

  19. Micro- and macrorheology of mucus

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Wirtz, Denis; Hanes, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Mucus is a complex biological material that lubricates and protects the human lungs, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eyes, and other moist mucosal surfaces. Mucus serves as a physical barrier against foreign particles, including toxins, pathogens, and environmental ultrafine particles, while allowing rapid passage of selected gases, ions, nutrients, and many proteins. Its selective barrier properties are precisely regulated at the biochemical level across vastly different length scales. At the macroscale, mucus behaves as a non-Newtonian gel, distinguished from classical solids and liquids by its response to shear rate and shear stress, while, at the nanoscale, it behaves as a low viscosity fluid. Advances in the rheological characterization of mucus from the macroscopic to nanoscopic levels have contributed critical understanding to mucus physiology, disease pathology, and the development of drug delivery systems designed for use at mucosal surfaces. This article reviews the biochemistry that governs mucus rheology, the macro- and microrheology of human and laboratory animal mucus, rheological techniques applied to mucus, and the importance of an improved understanding of the physical properties of mucus to advancing the field of drug and gene delivery. PMID:19166889

  20. Pharmacological blockade of the DP2 receptor inhibits cigarette smoke-induced inflammation, mucus cell metaplasia, and epithelial hyperplasia in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Karin J; Broadhead, Alex R; Baccei, Christopher S; Scott, Jill M; Truong, Yen P; Coate, Heather; Stock, Nicholas S; Santini, Angelina M; Fagan, Patrick; Prodanovich, Patricia; Bain, Gretchen; Stearns, Brian A; King, Christopher D; Hutchinson, John H; Prasit, Peppi; Evans, Jilly F; Lorrain, Daniel S

    2010-03-01

    Prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) is one of a family of biologically active lipids derived from arachidonic acid via the action of COX-1 and COX-2. PGD(2) is released from mast cells and binds primarily to two G protein-coupled receptors, namely DP1 and DP2, the latter also known as chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells. DP2 is predominantly expressed on eosinophils, Th2 cells, and basophils, but it is also expressed to a lesser extent on monocytes, mast cells, and epithelial cells. Interaction of PGD(2) and its active metabolites with DP2 results in cellular chemotaxis, degranulation, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, and cytokine production. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by elevated lung neutrophils, macrophages, and CD8+ T lymphocytes and mucus hypersecretion. Cigarette smoke contributes to the etiology of COPD and was used here as a provoking agent in a murine model of COPD. In an acute model, {2'-[(cyclopropanecarbonyl-ethyl-amino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-4'-trifluoro-methyl-biphenyl-3-yl}-acetic acid, sodium salt (AM156) and (5-{2-[(benzoyloxycarbonyl-ethyl-amino)-methyl]-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl}-pyridin-3-yl)-acetic acid, sodium salt) (AM206), potent DP2 receptor antagonists, dose-dependently inhibited influx of neutrophils and lymphocytes to smoke-exposed airways. In a subchronic model, AM156 and AM206 inhibited neutrophil and lymphocyte trafficking to the airways. Furthermore, AM156 and AM206 treatment inhibited mucus cell metaplasia and prevented the thickening of the airway epithelial layer induced by cigarette smoke. These data suggest that DP2 receptor antagonism may represent a novel therapy for COPD or other conditions characterized by neutrophil influx, mucus hypersecretion, and airway remodeling.

  1. Anti-CD69 monoclonal antibody treatment inhibits airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-ying; Dai, Yu; Wang, Jiao-li; Yang, Xu-yan; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) are principle pathological manifestations of asthma. Cluster of differentiation 69 (CD69) is a well-known co-stimulatory factor associated with the activation, proliferation as well as apoptosis of immune cells. This study aims to examine the effect of anti-CD69 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the pathophysiology of a mouse model of asthma. Methods: A murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation was used in this study. Briefly, mice were injected with 20 μg chicken OVA intraperitoneally on Days 0 and 14, followed by aerosol provocation with 1% (0.01 g/ml) OVA on Days 24, 25, and 26. Anti-CD69 mAb or isotype IgG was injected intraperitoneally after OVA challenge; dexamethasone (DXM) was administrated either before or after OVA challenge. AHR, mucus production, and eosinophil infiltration in the peribronchial area were examined. The levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were also assayed as indices of airway inflammation on Day 28 following OVA injection. Results: Pretreatment with DXM together with anti-CD69 mAb treatment after OVA provocation completely inhibited AHR, eosinophil infiltration and mucus overproduction, and significantly reduced BALF IL-5. However, treatment with DXM alone after OVA challenge only partially inhibited AHR, eosinophil infiltration and mucus overproduction, and did not diminish BALF IL-5. Treatment with either DXM or anti-CD69 mAb did not alter the concentration of BALF GM-CSF. Conclusions: Anti-CD69 mAb treatment inhibits established airway inflammation as effectively as DXM pretreatment. This study provides a potential alternative therapeutic opportunity for the clinical management of asthma and its exacerbation. PMID:26160720

  2. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  3. Airway clearance strategies in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Main, Eleanor; Grillo, Lizzie; Rand, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Many patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis present with common symptoms in clinical domains that appear to benefit from airway clearance strategies. These symptoms include chronic productive cough, retention of excessive, purulent mucus in dilated airways, impairment of normal mucociliary clearance (MCC), atelectasis, breathlessness, fatigue, respiratory inflammation, fever, infection, and airflow obstruction. Airway clearance strategies may involve singular and focused interventions for the purpose of removing secretions and improving lung recruitment and gas exchange in patients with atelectasis. Strategies may also involve indirect or adjunctive interventions that facilitate or enhance effective airway clearance at different ages or stages of the disease process, for example, inhalation therapy, exercise, oxygen therapy, or noninvasive ventilation. The aim is to optimize care by selecting any one or combination of these in responding intelligently and sensitively to individual and changing patient requirements during their lifetime. Currently, a solid evidence base does not exist for airway clearance strategies in CF and non-CF bronchiectasis, and much of airway clearance clinical practice remains in the domain of clinical expertise. The paucity of evidence is partly explained by the relatively immature research machinery in allied health care internationally but is also partly to do with inadequate or inappropriate research designs. This article aims to provide an overview of the nature of, and physiological basis for, the direct and indirect airway clearance strategies in CF and non-CF bronchiectasis with reference to the best available evidence. PMID:25826592

  4. Roles and regulation of the mucus barrier in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Cornick, Steve; Tawiah, Adelaide; Chadee, Kris

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is coated by a thick layer of mucus that forms the front line of innate host defense. Mucus consists of high molecular weight glycoproteins called mucins that are synthesized and secreted by goblet cells and functions primarily to lubricate the epithelium and protect it from damage by noxious substances. Recent studies have also suggested the involvement of goblet cells and mucins in complex immune functions such as antigen presentation and tolerance. Under normal physiological conditions, goblet cells continually produce mucins to replenish and maintain the mucus barrier; however, goblet cell function can be disrupted by various factors that can affect the integrity of the mucus barrier. Some of these factors such as microbes, microbial toxins and cytokines can stimulate or inhibit mucin production and secretion, alter the chemical composition of mucins or degrade the mucus layer. This can lead to a compromised mucus barrier and subsequently to various pathological conditions like chronic inflammatory diseases. Insight into how these factors modulate the mucus barrier in the gut is necessary in order to develop strategies to combat these disorders. PMID:25838985

  5. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  6. Novel Roles for Chloride Channels, Exchangers, and Regulators in Chronic Inflammatory Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Yurtsever, Zeynep; Berry, Kayla N.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Chloride transport proteins play critical roles in inflammatory airway diseases, contributing to the detrimental aspects of mucus overproduction, mucus secretion, and airway constriction. However, they also play crucial roles in contributing to the innate immune properties of mucus and mucociliary clearance. In this review, we focus on the emerging novel roles for a chloride channel regulator (CLCA1), a calcium-activated chloride channel (TMEM16A), and two chloride exchangers (SLC26A4/pendrin and SLC26A9) in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26612971

  7. A new method to improve the clinical evaluation of cystic fibrosis patients by mucus viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rusciano, Giulia; Caserta, Sergio; Carciati, Antonio; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Abete, Pasquale; Sasso, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients airways mucus shows an increased viscoelasticity due to the concentration of high molecular weight components. Such mucus thickening eventually leads to bacterial overgrowth and prevents mucus clearance. The altered rheological behavior of mucus results in chronic lung infection and inflammation, which causes most of the cases of morbidity and mortality, although the cystic fibrosis complications affect other organs as well. Here, we present a quantitative study on the correlation between cystic fibrosis mucus viscoelasticity and patients clinical status. In particular, a new diagnostic parameter based on the correlation between CF sputum viscoelastic properties and the severity of the disease, expressed in terms of FEV1 and bacterial colonization, was developed. By using principal component analysis, we show that the types of colonization and FEV1 classes are significantly correlated to the elastic modulus, and that the latter can be used for CF severity classification with a high predictive efficiency (88%). The data presented here show that the elastic modulus of airways mucus, given the high predictive efficiency, could be used as a new clinical parameter in the prognostic evaluation of cystic fibrosis.

  8. Mechanisms of airway responses to esophageal acidification in cats.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Haworth, Steven T; Medda, Bidyut K; Forster, Hubert; Shaker, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Acid in the esophagus causes airway constriction, tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and a decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport rate. This study was designed to investigate the neuropharmacological mechanisms controlling these responses. In chloralose-anesthetized cats (n = 72), we investigated the effects of vagotomy or atropine (100 μg·kg(-1)·30 min(-1) iv) on airway responses to esophageal infusion of 0.1 M PBS or 0.1 N HCl at 1 ml/min. We quantified 1) diameter of the bronchi, 2) tracheobronchial mucociliary transport rate, 3) tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and 4) mucous content of the tracheal epithelium and submucosa. We found that vagotomy or atropine blocked the airway constriction response but only atropine blocked the increase in mucous output and decrease in mucociliary transport rate caused by esophageal acidification. The mucous cells of the mucosa produced more Alcian blue- than periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained mucosubstances, and the mucous cells of the submucosa produced more PAS- than Alcian blue-stained mucosubstances. Selective perfusion of the different segments of esophagus with HCl or PBS resulted in significantly greater production of PAS-stained mucus in the submucosa of the trachea adjacent to the HCl-perfused esophagus than in that adjacent to the PBS-perfused esophagus. In conclusion, airway constriction caused by esophageal acidification is mediated by a vagal cholinergic pathway, and the tracheobronchial transport response is mediated by cholinergic receptors. Acid perfusion of the esophagus selectively increases production of neutral mucosubstances of the apocrine glands by a local mechanism. We hypothesize that the airway responses to esophageal acid exposure are part of the innate, rather than acute emergency, airway defense system. PMID:26846551

  9. Dietary Mannan Oligosaccharides: Counteracting the Side Effects of Soybean Meal Oil Inclusion on European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Gut Health and Skin Mucosa Mucus Production?

    PubMed Central

    Torrecillas, Silvia; Montero, Daniel; Caballero, Maria José; Pittman, Karin A.; Custódio, Marco; Campo, Aurora; Sweetman, John; Izquierdo, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effects of 4 g kg−1 dietary mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) inclusion in soybean oil (SBO)- and fish oil (FO)-based diets on the gut health and skin mucosa mucus production of European sea bass juveniles after 8 weeks of feeding. Dietary MOS, regardless of the oil source, promoted growth. The intestinal somatic index was not affected, however dietary SBO reduced the intestinal fold length, while dietary MOS increased it. The dietary oil source fed produced changes on the posterior intestine fatty acid profiles irrespective of MOS dietary supplementation. SBO down-regulated the gene expression of TCRβ, COX2, IL-1β, TNFα, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, TGFβ, and Ig and up-regulated MHCII. MOS supplementation up-regulated the expression of MHCI, CD4, COX2, TNFα, and Ig when included in FO-based diets. However, there was a minor up-regulating effect on these genes when MOS was supplemented in the SBO-based diet. Both dietary oil sources and MOS affected mean mucous cell areas within the posterior gut, however the addition of MOS to a SBO diet increased the mucous cell size over the values shown in FO fed fish. Dietary SBO also trends to reduce mucous cell density in the anterior gut relative to FO, suggesting a lower overall mucosal secretion. There are no effects of dietary oil or MOS in the skin mucosal patterns. Complete replacement of FO by SBO, modified the gut fatty acid profile, altered posterior gut-associated immune system (GALT)-related gene expression and gut mucous cells patterns, induced shorter intestinal folds and tended to reduce European sea bass growth. However, when combined with MOS, the harmful effects of SBO appear to be partially balanced by moderating the down-regulation of certain GALT-related genes involved in the functioning of gut mucous barrier and increasing posterior gut mucous cell diffusion rates, thus helping to preserve immune homeostasis. This denotes the importance of a balanced

  10. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  11. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  12. A new paradigm in respiratory hygiene: modulating respiratory secretions to contain cough bioaerosol without affecting mucus clearance

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Gustavo; Valle, Juan C; Alonso, Mauricio; Alfaro, Henry; Vega, Daniel; Bonilla, Gloria; Reyes, Miguel; King, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Background Several strategies and devices have been designed to protect health care providers from acquiring transmissible respiratory diseases while providing care. In modulating the physical characteristics of the respiratory secretions to minimize the aerosolization that facilitates transmission of airborne diseases, a fundamental premise is that the prototype drugs have no adverse effect on the first line of respiratory defense, clearance of mucus by ciliary action. Methods To assess and demonstrate the primary mechanism of our mucomodulators (XLs), we have built our evidence moving from basic laboratory studies to an ex-vivo model and then to an in-vivo large animal model. We exposed anesthetized dogs without hypersecretion to different dose concentrations of aerosolized XL "B", XL "D" and XL "S". We assessed: cardio-respiratory pattern, tracheal mucus clearance, airway patency, and mucus viscoelastic changes. Results Exposure of frog palate mucus to XLs did not affect the clearance of mucus by ciliary action. Dogs maintained normal cardio-respiratory pattern with XL administration. Tracheal mucociliary clearance in anesthetized dogs indicated a sustained 40% mean increase. Tracheal mucus showed increased filance, and there was no mucus retention in the airways. Conclusion The ex-vivo frog palate and the in-vivo mammalian models used in this study, appear to be appropriate and complement each other to better assess the effects that our mucomodulators exert on the mucociliary clearance defence mechanism. The physiological function of the mucociliary apparatus was not negatively affected in any of the two epithelial models. Airway mucus crosslinked by mucomodulators is better cleared from an intact airway and normally functioning respiratory system, either due to enhanced interaction with cilia or airflow-dependent mechanisms. Data obtained in this study allow us to assure that we have complied with the fundamental requirement criteria established in the initial

  13. Acebrophylline: an airway mucoregulator and anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E

    2007-06-01

    Acebrophylline is an airway mucus regulator with antiinflammatory action. The drug's approach involves several points of attack in obstructive airway disease. The molecule contains ambroxol, which facilitates various steps in the biosynthesis of pulmonary surfactant, theophylline-7 acetic acid whose carrier function raises blood levels of ambroxol, thus rapidly and intensely stimulating surfactant production. The resulting reduction in the viscosity and adhesivity of the mucus greatly improves ciliary clearance. By deviating phosphatidylcholine towards surfactant synthesis, making it no longer available for the synthesis of inflammatory mediators such as the leukotrienes, acebrophylline also exerts an inflammatory effect. This is confirmed in vivo by the reduction in aspecific bronchial hyper-responsiveness in patients with stable bronchial asthma. On a clinical level, acebrophylline is therapeutically effective in patients with acute or chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive or asthma-like bronchitis and recurrence of chronic bronchitis; it reduces the frequency of episodes of bronchial obstruction and reduces the need for beta2-agonists, and improves indexes of ventilatory function.

  14. Involvement of Syk kinase in TNF-induced nitric oxide production by airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ulanova, Marina . E-mail: marina.ulanova@normed.ca; Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Munoz, Samira; Asfaha, Samuel; Kim, Moo-Kyung; Schreiber, Alan D.; Befus, A. Dean

    2006-12-15

    We have recently found that Syk is widely expressed in lung epithelial cells (EC) and participates in {beta}1 integrin signaling. In this study, we assessed the role of Syk in regulation of NO production. Stimulation of human bronchial EC line HS-24 by TNF caused an increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Inhibition of Syk using siRNA or piceatannol down-regulated the iNOS expression and reduced NO production. This effect occurred in EC simultaneously stimulated via {beta}1 integrins, suggesting that TNF and {beta}1 integrins provide co-stimulatory signals. Inhibition of Syk down-regulated TNF-induced p38 and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 NF-{kappa}B. Thus, TNF-induced activation of pro-inflammatory signaling in EC leading to enhanced expression of iNOS and NO production was dependent on Syk. Syk-mediated signaling regulates NO production at least partly via activating the MAPK cascade. Understanding the role of Syk in airway EC may help in developing new therapeutic tools for inflammatory lung disorders.

  15. GM-CSF production from human airway smooth muscle cells is potentiated by human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Sukkar, M B; Hughes, J M; Johnson, P R; Armour, C L

    2000-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) actively participate in the airway inflammatory process in asthma. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induce ASMC to release inflammatory mediators in vitro. ASMC mediator release in vivo, however, may be influenced by features of the allergic asthmatic phenotype. We determined whether; (1) allergic asthmatic serum (AAS) modulates ASMC mediator release in response to IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, and (2) IL-1beta/TNF-alpha prime ASMC to release mediators in response to AAS. IL-5 and GM-CSF were quantified by ELISA in culture supernatants of; (1) ASMC pre-incubated with either AAS, nonallergic non-asthmatic serum (NAS) or Monomed (a serum substitute) and subsequently stimulated with IL-1beta and TNF-alpha and (2) ASMC stimulated with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and subsequently exposed to either AAS, NAS or Monomed. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha induced GM-CSF release in ASMC pre-incubated with AAS was not greater than that in ASMC pre-incubated with NAS or Monomed. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, however, primed ASMC to release GM-CSF in response to human serum. GM-CSF production following IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and serum exposure (AAS or NAS) was significantly greater than that following IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and Monomed exposure or IL-1beta/TNF-alpha exposure only. Whilst the potentiating effects of human serum were not specific to allergic asthma, these findings suggest that the secretory capacity of ASMC may be up-regulated during exacerbations of asthma, where there is evidence of vascular leakage. PMID:11132773

  16. GS143, an I{kappa}B ubiquitination inhibitor, inhibits allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Koichi; Wakashin, Hidefumi; Oki, Mie; Kagami, Shin-ichiro; Suto, Akira; Ikeda, Kei; Watanabe, Norihiko; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-26

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation with intense eosinophil infiltration and mucus hyper-production, in which antigen-specific Th2 cells play critical roles. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway has been demonstrated to be essential for the production of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the airways in murine asthma models. In the present study, we examined the effect of GS143, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of I{kappa}B ubiquitination, on antigen-induced airway inflammation and Th2 cytokine production in mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 prior to antigen challenge suppressed antigen-induced NF-{kappa}B activation in the lung of sensitized mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 also inhibited antigen-induced eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment into the airways as well as the expression of Th2 cytokines and eotaxin in the airways. Moreover, GS143 inhibited antigen-induced differentiation of Th2 cells but not of Th1 cells in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that I{kappa}B ubiquitination inhibitor may have therapeutic potential against asthma.

  17. THE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RAT: AN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF SULFUR DIOXIDE-INDUCED AIRWAYS DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airway obstruction, inflammation and mucus hypersecretion; features that capture bronchitis, emphysema and often asthma. However, current rodent models do not reflect this human disease. Because genetically predisp...

  18. Mathematical modeling of molecular diffusion through mucus

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The rate of molecular transport through the mucus gel can be an important determinant of efficacy for therapeutic agents delivered by oral, intranasal, intravaginal/rectal, and intraocular routes. Transport through mucus can be described by mathematical models based on principles of physical chemistry and known characteristics of the mucus gel, its constituents, and of the drug itself. In this paper, we review mathematical models of molecular diffusion in mucus, as well as the techniques commonly used to measure diffusion of solutes in the mucus gel, mucus gel mimics, and mucosal epithelia. PMID:19135488

  19. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  20. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  1. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  2. MUC5AC mucin release from human airways in vitro: effects of indomethacin and Bay X1005.

    PubMed Central

    Roger, P; Gascard, J P; Bara, J; de Montpreville, V T; Brink, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased secretion of mucus is a hallmark of many respiratory diseases and contributes significantly to the airflow limitation experienced by many patients. While the current pharmacological approach to reducing mucus and sputum production in patients is limited, clinical studies have suggested that drugs which inhibit the cyclooxygenase and/or 5-lipoxygenase enzymatic pathways may reduce secretory activity in patients with airway disease. AIM: This study was performed to investigate the effects of indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and Bay x 1005 (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor) on MUC5AC release from human airways in vitro. METHODS: An immunoradiometric assay was used to determine the quantities of MUC5AC present in the biological fluids derived from human airways in vitro. The measurements were made with a mixture of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; PM8) of which the 21 M1 MAb recognized a recombinant M1 mucin partially encoded by the MUC5AC gene. RESULTS: The quantities of MUC5AC detected in the biological fluids derived from human bronchial preparations were not modified after treatment with indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and/or an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathway (BAY x 1005). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathways play little or no role in the release of MUC5AC from human airways. PMID:11324902

  3. Diffusion-sensitive optical coherence tomography for real-time monitoring of mucus thinning treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sears, Patrick R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Hill, David B.; Chapman, Brian S.; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mucus hydration (wt%) has become an increasingly useful metric in real-time assessment of respiratory health in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD, with higher wt% indicative of diseased states. However, available in vivo rheological techniques are lacking. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are attractive biological probes whose diffusion through tissue is sensitive to the correlation length of comprising biopolymers. Through employment of dynamic light scattering theory on OCT signals from GNRs, we find that weakly-constrained GNR diffusion predictably decreases with increasing wt% (more disease-like) mucus. Previously, we determined this method is robust against mucus transport on human bronchial epithelial (hBE) air-liquid interface cultures (R2=0.976). Here we introduce diffusion-sensitive OCT (DS-OCT), where we collect M-mode image ensembles, from which we derive depth- and temporally-resolved GNR diffusion rates. DS-OCT allows for real-time monitoring of changing GNR diffusion as a result of topically applied mucus-thinning agents, enabling monitoring of the dynamics of mucus hydration never before seen. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cell) with a layer of endogenous mucus were doped with topically deposited GNRs (80x22nm), and subsequently treated with hypertonic saline (HS) or isotonic saline (IS). DS-OCT provided imaging of the mucus thinning response up to a depth of 600μm with 4.65μm resolution, over a total of 8 minutes in increments of >=3 seconds. For both IS and HS conditions, DS-OCT captured changes in the pattern of mucus hydration over time. DS-OCT opens a new window into understanding mechanisms of mucus thinning during treatment, enabling real-time efficacy feedback needed to optimize and tailor treatments for individual patients.

  4. Endotoxin-induced nitric oxide production rescues airway growth and maturation in atrophic fetal rat lung explants

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, C.; Cherry, J.I.; Land, F.M.; Land, S.C. . E-mail: s.c.land@dundee.ac.uk

    2006-10-13

    Inflammation induces premature maturation of the fetal lung but the signals causing this effect remain unclear. We determined if nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 {mu}g ml{sup -1}), participated in this process. Fetal rat lung airway surface complexity rose 2.5-fold over 96 h in response to LPS and was associated with increased iNOS protein expression and activity. iNOS inhibition by N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine-2HCl (L-NIL) abolished this and induced airway atrophy similar to untreated explants. Surfactant protein-C (SP-C) expression was also induced by LPS and abolished by L-NIL. As TGF{beta} suppresses iNOS activity, we determined if feedback regulation modulated NO-dependent maturation. LPS induced TGF{beta}1 release and SMAD4 nuclear translocation 96 h after treatment. Treatment of explants with a blocking antibody against TGF{beta}1 sustained NO production and airway morphogenesis whereas recombinant TGF{beta}1 antagonized these effects. Feedback regulation of NO synthesis by TGF{beta} may, thus, modulate airway branching and maturation of the fetal lung.

  5. Innate immune response in CF airway epithelia: hyperinflammatory?

    PubMed

    Machen, Terry E

    2006-08-01

    The lack of functional cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the apical membranes of CF airway epithelial cells abolishes cAMP-stimulated anion transport, and bacteria, eventually including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bind to and accumulate in the mucus. Flagellin released from P. aeruginosa triggers airway epithelial Toll-like receptor 5 and subsequent NF-kappaB signaling and production and release of proinflammatory cytokines that recruit neutrophils to the infected region. This response has been termed hyperinflammatory because so many neutrophils accumulate; a response that damages CF lung tissue. We first review the contradictory data both for and against the idea that epithelial cells exhibit larger-than-normal proinflammatory signaling in CF compared with non-CF cells and then review proposals that might explain how reduced CFTR function could activate such proinflammatory signaling. It is concluded that apparent exaggerated innate immune response of CF airway epithelial cells may have resulted not from direct effects of CFTR on cellular signaling or inflammatory mediator production but from indirect effects resulting from the absence of CFTRs apical membrane channel function. Thus, loss of Cl-, HCO3-, and glutathione secretion may lead to reduced volume and increased acidification and oxidation of the airway surface liquid. These changes concentrate proinflammatory mediators, reduce mucociliary clearance of bacteria and subsequently activate cellular signaling. Loss of apical CFTR will also hyperpolarize basolateral membrane potentials, potentially leading to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+], intracellular Ca2+, and NF-kappaB signaling. This hyperinflammatory effect of CF on intracellular Ca2+ and NF-kappaB signaling would be most prominently expressed during exposure to both P. aeruginosa and also endocrine, paracrine, or nervous agonists that activate Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelia. PMID:16825601

  6. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  7. Growth of Escherichia coli K88 in piglet ileal mucus: protein expression as an indicator of type of metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, L; Gustafsson, L; Cohen, P S; Conway, P L; Blomberg, A

    1995-01-01

    The physiological and molecular responses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 strain Bd 1107/7508 during growth in piglet ileal mucus and lipids extracted from mucus were studied in terms of growth rate, protein expression, and rate of heat production. E. coli K88 multiplied at maximum speed in mucus and in lipids extracted from mucus. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine-labelled cells, it was demonstrated that the synthesis of a subclass of 13 proteins was changed at least fourfold during exponential growth in mucus compared with growth in M9 minimal medium. Ten of these proteins were repressed, while three were induced, and one of the induced proteins was identified as heat shock protein GroEL. Furthermore, two-dimensional analysis of E. coli K88 cells grown on lipids extracted from mucus revealed a set of lipid utilization-associated proteins. None of these was induced fourfold during exponential growth in mucus. Microcalorimetric measurements (monitoring the rate of heat production) of E. coli K88 grown in mucus indicated metabolic shifts in the stationary phase, in which five of the lipid utilization-associated proteins were expressed at a higher level. An isogenic E. coli K88 fadAB mutant deficient in fatty acid degradation genes grew as well as the wild type on mucus and mucus lipids. The heat production rate curve of the mutant grown in mucus differed from that of the wild type only during the stationary phase. From these results it was concluded that protein expression is influenced when E. coli K88 is grown in piglet ileal mucus rather than in M9 minimal medium. Lipids extracted from ileal mucus can serve as a substrate for E. coli K88 but appear not to be utilized during exponential growth in mucus. Stationary-phase cells metabolize fatty acids; however, the functional purpose of this is unclear. PMID:7592456

  8. Hyper-osmolarity and calcium chelation: Effects on cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N.; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2015-01-01

    A non-functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) leads to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the CFTR is expressed in multiple organs, pulmonary disease is the major cause of illness and death in patients with CF. Stagnant mucus, causing airway obstruction, bacterial overgrowth, persistent inflammation and tissue destruction characterizes the disease, but how the defect in CFTR function is coupled to the mucus phenotype is still controversial. We have recently shown that bicarbonate ions passing through CFTR are necessary for proper unfolding of the MUC2 mucin, thus highlighting the importance of bicarbonate ion transport via the CFTR and the ability of these ions to raise the pH and chelate calcium bound to the mucin as the important steps in forming normal mucus. In order to find potential CF treatments and expand our knowledge about the usefulness of bicarbonate as an active ingredient in formulations to alleviate mucus plugging, we used an Ussing-type chamber and explants from the F508del-CFTR mutant mouse ileum to test the effect of calcium chelators on mucus attachment, either in isolation or in combination with osmolytes such as mannitol or hypertonic saline. We found that increasing the concentration of bicarbonate, both alone or in combination with increased osmolarity of the solution, detached the otherwise attached CF mucus. PMID:26134505

  9. Role of mucus in ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mojzis, J; Hegedüsová, R; Mirossay, L

    2000-01-01

    Gastric mucus plays an important role in gastric mucosal protection. Apart from its "barrier" function, it has been demonstrated that mucus protects gastric epithelial cells against toxic oxygen metabolites derived from the xanthine/ xanthine oxidase system. In this study, we investigated the effect of malotilate and sucralfate (mucus production stimulators) and N-acetylcysteine (mucolytic agent) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury. Gastric ischemia was induced by 30 min clamping of the coeliac artery followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The mucus content was determined by the Alcian blue method. Sucralfate (100 mg/kg), malotilate (100 mg/kg), and N-acetylcysteine (100 mg/kg) were given orally 30 min before surgery. Both sucralfate and malotilate increased the mucus production in control rats. On the other hand, N-acetyloysteine significantly decreased mucus content in control (sham) group. A significant decrease of mucus content was found in the control and the N-acetylcysteine pretreated group during the period of ischemia. On the other hand, sucralfate and malotilate prevented the decrease the content of mucus during ischemia. A similar result can be seen after ischemia/reperfusion. In the control group and N-acetylcysteine pretreated group a significant decrease of adherent mucus content was found. However, sucralfate and malotilate increased mucus production (sucralfate significantly). Sucralfate and malotilate also significantly protected the gastric mucosa against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury. However, N-acetylcysteine significantly increased gastric mucosal injury after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that gastric mucus may be involved in the protection of gastric mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion.

  10. Activation of immune responses in mice by an oral administration of bunching onion (Allium fistulosum) mucus.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Wako, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Bunching onion [Allium fistulosum L. (Liliaceae)] secretes mucus in the cavities of its green leaves. The effects of the mucus, which is consumed as food, were examined. The mucus augmented the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 from RAW 264 cells and of interleukin (IL)-12 from J774.1 cells; however, extracts from green leaves and white sheaths did not. An oral administration of this mucus to mice augmented the immune functions of peritoneal cells by increasing TNF-α and IL-12 production and phagocytosis. It also augmented interferon (IFN)-γ production from spleen cells and natural killer (NK) activity. These results suggest that an oral administration of the A. fistulosum mucus can enhance natural immunity. PMID:24018671

  11. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  12. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  13. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  14. Effects of drugs on mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Houtmeyers, E; Gosselink, R; Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    1999-08-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), the process in which airway mucus together with substances trapped within are moved out of the lungs, is an important defence mechanism of the human body. Drugs may alter this process, such that it is necessary to know the effect of the drugs on MCC. Indeed, agents stimulating MCC may be used therapeutically in respiratory medicine, especially in patients suspected of having an impairment of their mucociliary transport system. In contrast, caution should be taken with drugs depressing MCC as an undesired side-effect, independently of their therapeutic indication. Since cough clearance (CC) serves as a back-up system when MCC fails, the influence of drugs must be examined not only on MCC but also on CC. Ultimately, the clinical repercussions of alterations in mucus transport induced by drug administration must be studied. Tertiary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), aspirin, anaesthetic agents and benzodiazepines have been shown to be capable of depressing the mucociliary transport system. Cholinergics, methylxanthines, sodium cromoglycate, hypertonic saline, saline as well as water aerosol have been shown to increase MCC. Adrenergic antagonists, guaifenesin, S-carboxymethylcysteine, sodium 2-mercapto-ethane sulphonate and frusemide have been reported not to alter the mucociliary transport significantly. Amiloride, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), quaternary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), adrenergic agonists, corticosteroids, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), N-acetylcysteine, bromhexine and ambroxol have been reported either not to change or to augment MCC. Indirect data suggest that surfactant as well as antibiotics may improve the mucociliary transport system. As for the influence of drugs on CC, amiloride and rhDNase have been demonstrated to increase the effectiveness of cough. A trend towards an improved CC was noted after treatment with adrenergic agonists. The anticholinergic agent ipratropium bromide, which

  15. Coral mucus functions as an energy carrier and particle trap in the reef ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wild, Christian; Huettel, Markus; Klueter, Anke; Kremb, Stephan G; Rasheed, Mohammed Y M; Jørgensen, Bo B

    2004-03-01

    Zooxanthellae, endosymbiotic algae of reef-building corals, substantially contribute to the high gross primary production of coral reefs, but corals exude up to half of the carbon assimilated by their zooxanthellae as mucus. Here we show that released coral mucus efficiently traps organic matter from the water column and rapidly carries energy and nutrients to the reef lagoon sediment, which acts as a biocatalytic mineralizing filter. In the Great Barrier Reef, the dominant genus of hard corals, Acropora, exudes up to 4.8 litres of mucus per square metre of reef area per day. Between 56% and 80% of this mucus dissolves in the reef water, which is filtered through the lagoon sands. Here, coral mucus is degraded at a turnover rate of at least 7% per hour. Detached undissolved mucus traps suspended particles, increasing its initial organic carbon and nitrogen content by three orders of magnitude within 2 h. Tidal currents concentrate these mucus aggregates into the lagoon, where they rapidly settle. Coral mucus provides light energy harvested by the zooxanthellae and trapped particles to the heterotrophic reef community, thereby establishing a recycling loop that supports benthic life, while reducing loss of energy and nutrients from the reef ecosystem.

  16. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  17. Antibody diffusion in human cervical mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, W M; Radomsky, M L; Whaley, K J; Cone, R A

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal immune system actively transports large quantities of antibodies into all mucus secretions, and these secreted antibodies help prevent infectious entry of many pathogens. Mucus is generally thought to protect epithelial cells by forming a diffusional barrier through which only small molecules can pass. However, electron microscopy indicates that the pore size in mucus is approximately 100 nm, which suggests that antibodies as well as other large molecules might also diffuse through mucus. We measured the diffusion coefficients for antibodies and other proteins within human midcycle cervical mucus using two techniques: fluorescence imaging of concentration profiles and fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The two techniques are complementary, since the rates of diffusion are observed over millimeter distances with fluorescence imaging of concentration profiles and micron distances with fluorescence photobleaching recovery. Both methods yielded essentially the same diffusion coefficients. In contrast to previous reports indicating mucus significantly impedes diffusion of small molecules, antibody diffusion in mucus was relatively unimpeded. In our observations IgG, IgG fragments, IgA, and IgM diffused almost as rapidly in cervical mucus as in water (1.0 > Dmucus/Dwater > 0.7). Simple models for diffusion through water-filled pores suggest that the hydrodynamic pore size for cervical mucus is approximately 100 nm, smaller than the approximately 1000 nm pore size of a collagen gel (at 1 mg/ml) and larger than the approximately 10 nm pore size of gelatin (at 100 mg/ml). This estimated pore size is consistent both with electron micrographs and geometric models of interfiber spacing. Based on these results, we predict that particles as large as viruses can diffuse rapidly through human midcycle cervical mucus, provided the particle forms no adhesive interactions with mucus glycoproteins. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8161703

  18. Sputum Leucine-Rich Alpha-2 Glycoprotein as a Marker of Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Serada, Satoshi; Hattori, Noboru; Nomura, Shintaro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Yokoyama, Akihito; Naka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways, but an ideal biomarker that accurately reflects ongoing airway inflammation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of sputum leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein (LRG) as a new biomarker for airway inflammation in asthma. Methods We obtained induced sputum samples from patients with asthma (N = 64) and healthy volunteers (N = 22) and measured LRG concentration by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model mice were used to investigate the mechanism of LRG production during airway inflammation. The LRG concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from mice were determined by ELISA and mouse lung sections were stained with anti-LRG antibody and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent. Results Sputum LRG concentrations were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.00686). Consistent with patients’ data, BALF LRG levels in asthma model mice were significantly higher than in control mice (p = 0.00013). Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from asthma model mice revealed that LRG was intensely expressed in a subpopulation of bronchial epithelial cells, which corresponded with PAS-positive mucus producing cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that sputum LRG is a promising biomarker of local inflammation in asthma. PMID:27611322

  19. The dissolution of urinary mucus after cystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gillon, G; Mundy, A R

    1989-04-01

    Three agents have been tested for mucolytic activity to prevent or treat difficulties in bladder emptying following augmentation and substitution cystoplasty, particularly in patients emptying by intermittent self-catheterisation. Carbocysteine produced precipitation of mucus, which was found not to be helpful. N-acetylcysteine and urea both dissolved mucus, but urea proved to be more effective.

  20. Nicotine suppresses inflammatory factors in HBE16 airway epithelial cells after exposure to cigarette smoke extract and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2010-12-01

    Cigarette smoke is a major cause of chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease, leading to inflammation, mucin (MUC) production, tissue damage, and remodeling. It is also well known that the major addictive component of cigarette smoke is nicotine. This study focused on the role of nicotine in the development of inflammatory pulmonary disease induced by cigarette smoke. HBE16 human airway epithelial cells were treated with serial dilutions of cigarette smoke chloroform extract (CE), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and nicotine. The release of MUC5AC, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-8, and IL-6 protein were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MUC5AC protein also was observed by immunofluorescence. The expression of MUC5AC, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6 mRNA were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that the mRNA of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6, as well as MUC5AC was highly expressed after CE and LPS stimulation. Nicotine did not cause an excessive expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6, nor did it affect protein production from the MUC5AC gene. Nicotine not only failed to stimulate production of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6, but its presence was shown to suppress the activation resulting from exposure to CE and LPS (P < 0.05). Preincubation with nicotine also would reduce the level of MUC5AC protein in culture supernatants of CE- and LPS-treated cells. However, mRNA expression of MUC5AC showed no significant change in nicotine-treated cells when compared with normal control cells. This distinctive pattern implies that nicotine may have potential to suppress airway inflammation and maintain the mucus over retention in airway secretory cells to some extent, thus forming a balance between mucus hyperproduction and hypersecretion in airways exposed to smoking and LPS. PMID:21078494

  1. Effects of Lupenone, Lupeol, and Taraxerol Derived from Adenophora triphylla on the Gene Expression and Production of Airway MUC5AC Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong Pill; Lee, Hyun Jae; Lee, Dong-Ung; Lee, Sang Kook; Hong, Jang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenophora triphylla var. japonica is empirically used for controlling airway inflammatory diseases in folk medicine. We evaluated the gene expression and production of mucin from airway epithelial cells in response to lupenone, lupeol and taraxerol derived from Adenophora triphylla var. japonica. Methods Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with lupenone, lupeol or taraxerol for 30 minutes and then stimulated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) for 24 hours. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression and production were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Additionally, we examined whether lupenone, lupeol or taraxerol affects MUC5AC mucin production induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the other 2 stimulators of airway mucin production. Results Lupenone, lupeol, and taraxerol inhibited the gene expression and production of MUC5AC mucin induced by TNF-α from NCI-H292 cells, respectively. The 3 compounds inhibited the EGF or PMA-induced production of MUC5AC mucin in NCI-H292 cells. Conclusion These results indicated that lupenone, lupeol and taraxerol derived from Adenophora triphylla var. japonica regulates the production and gene expression of mucin, by directly acting on airway epithelial cells. In addition, the results partly explain the mechanism of of Adenophora triphylla var. japonica as a traditional remedy for diverse inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:26175774

  2. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  3. Roflumilast combined with adenosine increases mucosal hydration in human airway epithelial cultures after cigarette smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Jean; Qian, Xiaozhong; Freire, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent studies have shown that cigarette smoke (CS) induces cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction, which leads to airway-surface liquid (ASL) dehydration. This in turn contributes to the mucus dehydration and impaired mucociliary clearance that are seen in the chronic bronchitis form of COPD. Roflumilast is a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that may improve lung function and reduce the frequency of exacerbations in patients with COPD. Although roflumilast can affect cAMP metabolism, little is known about the downstream pharmacological effects in the airways. We hypothesized that roflumilast would increase ASL rehydration in human bronchial epithelial cultures (HBECs) after chronic CS exposure. cAMP production was measured by Förster resonance energy transfer in HEK293T cells and by ELISA in HBECs. ASL height was measured by xz-confocal microscopy after air exposure or following HBEC exposure to freshly produced CS. Roflumilast had little effect on cAMP or ASL height when applied on its own; however, roflumilast significantly potentiated adenosine-induced increases in cAMP and ASL height in CS-exposed HBECs. Roflumilast increased the rate of ASL height recovery in cultures after CS exposure compared with controls. In contrast, the β2-adrenergic receptor agonists isoproterenol and salmeterol failed to increase ASL height after CS exposure. Our data suggest that roflumilast can increase ASL hydration in CS-exposed HBECs, which is predicted to be beneficial for the treatment of mucus dehydration/mucus stasis in patients with COPD chronic bronchitis. PMID:25795727

  4. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  5. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  6. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  7. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  8. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  9. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  10. Interfacial dilational properties of tea polyphenols and milk proteins with gut epithelia and the role of mucus in nutrient adsorption.

    PubMed

    Guri, Anilda; Li, Yang; Corredig, Milena

    2015-12-01

    By interacting with nutrients, the mucus layer covering the intestinal epithelium may mediate absorption. This study aimed to determine possible interactions between epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), skim milk proteins or their complexes with human intestinal mucin films. The films were extracted from postconfluent monolayers of HT29-MTX, a human intestinal cell line, and a model system was created using drop shape tensiometry. The EGCG uptake tested in vitro on postconfluent Caco-2 cells or co-cultures of Caco-2/HT29-MTX (mucus producing) showed recovery of bioavailable EGCG only for Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting an effect of mucus on absorption. Interfacial dilational rheology was employed to characterize the properties of the interface mixed with mucus dispersion. Adsorption of polyphenols greatly enhanced the viscoelastic modulus of the mucus film, showing the presence of interactions between the nutrient molecules and mucus films. On the other hand, in situ digestion of milk proteins using trypsin showed higher surface activities as a result of protein unfolding and competitive adsorption of the hydrolyzed products. There was an increase of viscoelastic modulus over the drop ageing time for the mixed interfaces, indicating the formation of a stiffer interfacial network. These results bring new insights into the role of the mucus layer in nutrient absorption and the interactions of mucus and dairy products. PMID:26328543

  11. Interfacial dilational properties of tea polyphenols and milk proteins with gut epithelia and the role of mucus in nutrient adsorption.

    PubMed

    Guri, Anilda; Li, Yang; Corredig, Milena

    2015-12-01

    By interacting with nutrients, the mucus layer covering the intestinal epithelium may mediate absorption. This study aimed to determine possible interactions between epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), skim milk proteins or their complexes with human intestinal mucin films. The films were extracted from postconfluent monolayers of HT29-MTX, a human intestinal cell line, and a model system was created using drop shape tensiometry. The EGCG uptake tested in vitro on postconfluent Caco-2 cells or co-cultures of Caco-2/HT29-MTX (mucus producing) showed recovery of bioavailable EGCG only for Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting an effect of mucus on absorption. Interfacial dilational rheology was employed to characterize the properties of the interface mixed with mucus dispersion. Adsorption of polyphenols greatly enhanced the viscoelastic modulus of the mucus film, showing the presence of interactions between the nutrient molecules and mucus films. On the other hand, in situ digestion of milk proteins using trypsin showed higher surface activities as a result of protein unfolding and competitive adsorption of the hydrolyzed products. There was an increase of viscoelastic modulus over the drop ageing time for the mixed interfaces, indicating the formation of a stiffer interfacial network. These results bring new insights into the role of the mucus layer in nutrient absorption and the interactions of mucus and dairy products.

  12. Work of adhesion of respiratory tract mucus.

    PubMed

    Pillai, R S; Chandra, T; Miller, I F; Lloyd-Still, J; Yeates, D B

    1992-04-01

    A method was devised to measure the work of adhesion (WA) to a substrate of mucus, a viscoelastic gel, from the measured contact angle of glycerol on a mucus substrate and the known physical properties of a Teflon surface. Fifteen sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were compared with 25 mucus samples from canine tracheal pouches (CP), studied in the hydrated and partially dehydrated states. Apparent viscosity (eta A) and recoverable shear strain (SR) were measured by fluxgate magnetometry, and water content was inferred from vapor pressure osmometry. Na+, K+, and Ca2+ concentrations were measured with specific ion electrodes and Cl- with a chloridimeter. The Cl- concentration of the CP mucus was inversely proportional to its osmolality, and the Cl- concentration of the CP mucus was 102.5 +/- 1.6 meq/l compared with 55.6 +/- 2.5 meq/l for CF sputum. When CP mucus osmolality was increased from 316.0 +/- 5.5 to 430.0 +/- 7.5 mosmol/kg, WA increased from 25.1 +/- 1.8 to 31.1 +/- 1.2 ergs/cm2 and eta A increased from 391 +/- 55 to 622 +/- 121 P, respectively. CF sputum WA was 30.2 +/- 0.6 ergs/cm2, eta A was 1,110 +/- 316 P, and osmolality was 466.0 +/- 14.0 mosmol/kg. The increased WA and eta A of mucus in CF patients may thus be dependent on the hydration of mucus, which is related to the documented Cl- transport defect. PMID:1592754

  13. The interplay of increased urea synthesis and reduced ammonia production in the African lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus during 46 days of aestivation in a mucus cocoon.

    PubMed

    Ip, Yuen Kwong; Yeo, Pei Jia; Loong, Ai May; Hiong, Kum Chew; Wong, Wai Peng; Chew, Shit Fun

    2005-12-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the rate of urea synthesis in Protopterus aethiopicus was up-regulated to detoxify ammonia during the initial phase of aestivation in air (day 1-day 12), and that a profound suppression of ammonia production occurred at a later phase of aestivation (day 35-day 46) which eliminated the need to sustain the increased rate of urea synthesis. Fasting apparently led to a greater rate of nitrogenous waste excretion in P. aethiopicus in water, which is an indication of increases in production of endogenous ammonia and urea probably as a result of increased proteolysis and amino acid catabolism for energy production. However, 46 days of fasting had no significant effects on the ammonia or urea contents in the muscle, liver, plasma and brain. In contrast, there were significant decreases in the muscle ammonia content in fish after 12, 34 or 46 days of aestivation in air when compared with fish fasting in water. Ammonia was apparently detoxified to urea because urea contents in the muscle, liver, plasma and brain of P. aethiopicus aestivated for 12, 34 or 46 days were significantly greater than the corresponding fasting control; the greatest increases in urea contents occurred during the initial 12 days. There were also significant increases in activities of some of the hepatic ornithine-urea cycle enzymes from fish aestivated for 12 or 46 days. Therefore, contrary to a previous report on P. aethiopicus, our results demonstrated an increase in the estimated rate of urea synthesis (2.8-fold greater than the day 0 fish) in this lungfish during the initial 12 days of aestivation. However, the estimated rate of urea synthesis decreased significantly during the next 34 days. Between day 35 and day 46 (12 days), urea synthesis apparently decreased to 42% of the day 0 control value, and this is the first report of such a phenomenon in African lungfish undergoing aestivation. On the other hand, the estimated rate of ammonia

  14. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  15. Localization of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs and Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hypoxic Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Lubna H.; Perlmutt, Olivia S.; Albert, Daniel; Davis, C. William; Arnold, Roland R.; Yankaskas, James R.; Gilligan, Peter; Neubauer, Heiner; Randell, Scott H.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs, alone or during coinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is poorly understood. We performed immunohistochemistry for Bcc and P. aeruginosa bacteria on 21 coinfected or singly infected CF lungs obtained at transplantation or autopsy. Parallel in vitro experiments examined the growth of two Bcc species, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans, in environments similar to those occupied by P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. Bcc bacteria were predominantly identified in the CF lung as single cells or small clusters within phagocytes and mucus but not as “biofilm-like structures.” In contrast, P. aeruginosa was identified in biofilm-like masses, but densities appeared to be reduced during coinfection with Bcc bacteria. Based on chemical analyses of CF and non-CF respiratory secretions, a test medium was defined to study Bcc growth and interactions with P. aeruginosa in an environment mimicking the CF lung. When test medium was supplemented with alternative electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans used fermentation rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of fermentation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both Bcc species also expressed mucinases that produced carbon sources from mucins for growth. In the presence of P. aeruginosa in vitro, both Bcc species grew anaerobically but not aerobically. We propose that Bcc bacteria (i) invade a P. aeruginosa-infected CF lung when the airway lumen is anaerobic, (ii) inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm-like growth, and (iii) expand the host bacterial niche from mucus to also include macrophages. PMID:25156735

  16. Clinical application of expectorant therapy in chronic inflammatory airway diseases (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, TING; ZHOU, XIANGDONG

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a significant clinical and pathological feature of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Its clinical presentations include recurrent coughing and phlegm. Airway mucus is closely associated with the occurrence, development and prognosis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases and critically affects the lung function, quality of life, hospitalization rate and mortality of patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Therefore, expectorant therapies targeting the potential mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion have been the focus of numerous studies. Conventional expectorants are mainly mucoactive medicines, including nausea-stimulating expectorants, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and proteases and nucleases. In addition, certain traditional Chinese herbal medicines and non-mucoactive agents, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists and macrolide antibiotics, have also shown expectorant effects. Several novel medicines for expectorant therapy have emerged, including cholesterol-lowering statins, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, stanozolol, surfactants, flavonoids, tachykinin receptor antagonists, protease inhibitors, cytokine antagonists and purinergic agonists. With the increasing number of multidisciplinary studies, the effectiveness of expectorant therapy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases has been confirmed. Therefore, the development of novel expectorants and the standardization of expectorant therapy are the direction and focus of future studies, thus benefiting patients who have a chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:24660026

  17. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo. PMID:7665977

  18. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo.

  19. New developments in goblet cell mucus secretion and function

    PubMed Central

    Birchenough, George M.H.; Johansson, Malin E.V.; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Bergström, Joakim H.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2015-01-01

    Goblet cells and their main secretory product, mucus, have long been poorly appreciated; however, recent discoveries have changed this and placed these cells at the center stage of our understanding of mucosal biology and the immunology of the intestinal tract. The mucus system differs substantially between the small and large intestine, although it is built around MUC2 mucin polymers in both cases. Furthermore, that goblet cells and the regulation of their secretion also differ between these two parts of the intestine is of fundamental importance for a better understanding of mucosal immunology. There are several types of goblet cell which can be delineated based on their location and function. The surface colonic goblet cells secrete continuously to maintain the inner mucus layer, whereas goblet cells of the colonic and small intestinal crypts secrete upon stimulation, for example after endocytosis or in response to acetyl choline. However, despite much progress in recent years our understanding of goblet cell function and regulation is still in its infancy. PMID:25872481

  20. Coral Mucus Is a Hot Spot for Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh; Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvier, Thierry; Bouvier, Corinne; Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Nguyen-Thanh, Thuy; Tran-Quang, Huy; Brune, Justine

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing suspicion that viral communities play a pivotal role in maintaining coral health, yet their main ecological traits still remain poorly characterized. In this study, we examined the seasonal distribution and reproduction pathways of viruses inhabiting the mucus of the scleractinians Fungia repanda and Acropora formosa collected in Nha Trang Bay (Vietnam) during an 11-month survey. The strong coupling between epibiotic viral and bacterial abundance suggested that phages are dominant among coral-associated viral communities. Mucosal viruses also exhibited significant differences in their main features between the two coral species and were also remarkably contrasted with their planktonic counterparts. For example, their abundance (inferred from epifluorescence counts), lytic production rates (KCN incubations), and the proportion of lysogenic cells (mitomycin C inductions) were, respectively, 2.6-, 9.5-, and 2.2-fold higher in mucus than in the surrounding water. Both lytic and lysogenic indicators were tightly coupled with temperature and salinity, suggesting that the life strategy of viral epibionts is strongly dependent upon environmental circumstances. Finally, our results suggest that coral mucus may represent a highly favorable habitat for viral proliferation, promoting the development of both temperate and virulent phages. Here, we discuss how such an optimized viral arsenal could be crucial for coral viability by presumably forging complex links with both symbiotic and adjacent nonsymbiotic microorganisms. PMID:26092456

  1. Coral Mucus Is a Hot Spot for Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh; Bouvier, Thierry; Bouvier, Corinne; Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Nguyen-Thanh, Thuy; Tran-Quang, Huy; Brune, Justine

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing suspicion that viral communities play a pivotal role in maintaining coral health, yet their main ecological traits still remain poorly characterized. In this study, we examined the seasonal distribution and reproduction pathways of viruses inhabiting the mucus of the scleractinians Fungia repanda and Acropora formosa collected in Nha Trang Bay (Vietnam) during an 11-month survey. The strong coupling between epibiotic viral and bacterial abundance suggested that phages are dominant among coral-associated viral communities. Mucosal viruses also exhibited significant differences in their main features between the two coral species and were also remarkably contrasted with their planktonic counterparts. For example, their abundance (inferred from epifluorescence counts), lytic production rates (KCN incubations), and the proportion of lysogenic cells (mitomycin C inductions) were, respectively, 2.6-, 9.5-, and 2.2-fold higher in mucus than in the surrounding water. Both lytic and lysogenic indicators were tightly coupled with temperature and salinity, suggesting that the life strategy of viral epibionts is strongly dependent upon environmental circumstances. Finally, our results suggest that coral mucus may represent a highly favorable habitat for viral proliferation, promoting the development of both temperate and virulent phages. Here, we discuss how such an optimized viral arsenal could be crucial for coral viability by presumably forging complex links with both symbiotic and adjacent nonsymbiotic microorganisms. PMID:26092456

  2. New developments in goblet cell mucus secretion and function.

    PubMed

    Birchenough, G M H; Johansson, M E V; Gustafsson, J K; Bergström, J H; Hansson, G C

    2015-07-01

    Goblet cells and their main secretory product, mucus, have long been poorly appreciated; however, recent discoveries have changed this and placed these cells at the center stage of our understanding of mucosal biology and the immunology of the intestinal tract. The mucus system differs substantially between the small and large intestine, although it is built around MUC2 mucin polymers in both cases. Furthermore, that goblet cells and the regulation of their secretion also differ between these two parts of the intestine is of fundamental importance for a better understanding of mucosal immunology. There are several types of goblet cell that can be delineated based on their location and function. The surface colonic goblet cells secrete continuously to maintain the inner mucus layer, whereas goblet cells of the colonic and small intestinal crypts secrete upon stimulation, for example, after endocytosis or in response to acetyl choline. However, despite much progress in recent years, our understanding of goblet cell function and regulation is still in its infancy.

  3. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children.

  4. Intranasal sirna targeting c-kit reduces airway inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Hui; Li, Ya-Ming; Wang, Sheng-Yu; Diao, Xin; Liu, Kai-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway inflammation caused by infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells that produce cytokines. Many studies have revealed that c-kit, a proto-oncogene, and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in the development of asthmatic inflammation. Intranasal small interference RNA (siRNA) nanoparticles targeting specific viral gene could inhibit airway inflammation. In this study, we assessed whether silencing of c-kit with intranasal small interference RNA could reduce inflammation in allergic asthma. A mouse model of experimental asthma was treated with intranasal administration of anti-c-kit siRNA to inhibit the expression of the c-kit gene. We assessed the inflammatory response in both anti-c-kit siRNA-treated and control mice. Local administration of siRNA effectively inhibited the expression of the c-kit gene and reduced airway mucus secretion and the infiltration of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, c-kit siRNA reduced the production of SCF, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-5, but had no effect on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) generation. These results show that intranasal siRNA nanoparticles targeting c-kit can decrease the inflammatory response in experimental allergic asthma.

  5. Comprehensive evaluation of poly(I:C) induced inflammatory response in an airway epithelial model.

    PubMed

    Lever, Amanda R; Park, Hyoungshin; Mulhern, Thomas J; Jackson, George R; Comolli, James C; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Hayden, Patrick J; Prantil-Baun, Rachelle

    2015-04-01

    Respiratory viruses invade the upper airway of the lung, triggering a potent immune response that often exacerbates preexisting conditions such as asthma and COPD. Poly(I:C) is a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA that induces the characteristic inflammatory response associated with viral infection, such as loss of epithelial integrity, and increased production of mucus and inflammatory cytokines. Here, we explore the mechanistic responses to poly(I:C) in a well-defined primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) model that recapitulates in vivo functions and responses. We developed functional and quantifiable methods to evaluate the physiology of our model in both healthy and inflamed states. Through gene and protein expression, we validated the differentiation state and population of essential cell subtypes (i.e., ciliated, goblet, club, and basal cells) as compared to the human lung. Assays for total mucus production, cytokine secretion, and barrier function were used to evaluate in vitro physiology and response to viral insult. Cells were treated apically with poly(I:C) and evaluated 48 h after induction. Results revealed a dose-dependent increase in goblet cell differentiation, as well as, an increase in mucus production relative to controls. There was also a dose-dependent increase in secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and RANTES. Epithelial barrier function, as measured by TEER, was maintained at 1501 ± 355 Ω*cm² postdifferentiation, but dropped significantly when challenged with poly(I:C). This study provides first steps toward a well-characterized model with defined functional methods for understanding dsRNA stimulated inflammatory responses in a physiologically relevant manner.

  6. Acute airway effects of airborne formaldehyde in sensitized and non-sensitized mice housed in a dry or humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Søren Thor Wolkoff, Peder Hammer, Maria Kofoed-Sørensen, Vivi Clausen, Per Axel Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the role of air humidity and allergic sensitization on the acute airway response to inhaled formaldehyde (FA) vapor. Mice were sensitized to the immunogen ovalbumin (OVA) by three intraperitoneal injections followed by two aerosol challenges, giving rise to allergic airway inflammation. Control mice were sham sensitized by saline injections and challenged by saline aerosols. Once sensitized, the mice were housed at high (85–89%) or low (< 10%) relative humidity, respectively for 48 h prior to a 60-min exposure to either 0.4, 1.8 or about 5 ppm FA. Before, during and after exposure, breathing parameters were monitored. These included the specific markers of nose and lung irritations as well as the expiratory flow rate, the latter being a marker of airflow limitation. The sensory irritation response in the upper airways was not affected by allergic inflammation or changes in humidity. At high relative humidity, the OVA-sensitized mice had a decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to the saline control mice after exposure to approximately 5 ppm FA. This is in accordance with the observations that asthmatics are more sensitive than non-asthmatics to higher concentrations of airway irritants including FA. In the dry environment, the opposite trend was seen; here, the saline control mice had a significantly decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to OVA-sensitized mice when exposed to 1.8 and 4 ppm FA. We speculate that increased mucus production in the OVA-sensitized mice has increased the “scrubber effect” in the nose, consequently protecting the conducting and lower airways. - Highlights: ► Role of air humidity and allergy on sensitivity to an airway irritant was studied. ► In the humid environment, allergy amplified the effects of formaldehyde. ► In the dry environment, allergy reduced the effect of formaldehyde. ► Neither allergy nor humidity changed the formaldehyde-induced nasal irritation.

  7. Use of mucolytics to enhance magnetic particle retention at a model airway surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Javed; Roa, Wilson; Amirfazli, A.

    A previous study has shown that retention of magnetic particles at a model airway surface requires prohibitively strong magnetic fields. As mucus viscoelasticity is the most significant factor contributing to clearance of magnetic particles from the airway surface, mucolytics are considered in this study to reduce mucus viscoelasticity and enable particle retention with moderate strength magnetic fields. The excised frog palate model was used to simulate the airway surface. Two mucolytics, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dextran sulfate (DS) were tested. NAC was found to enable retention at moderate field values (148 mT with a gradient of 10.2 T/m), whereas DS was found to be effective only for sufficiently large particle concentrations at the airway surface. The possible mechanisms for the observed behavior with different mucolytics are also discussed based on aggregate formation and the loading of cilia.

  8. The tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, is involved in bronchial mucin production during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Kyoung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Keun Ae; Park, Chan Sun; Bae, Yun Jeong; Zhu, Zhou; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2010-02-26

    Mucus hypersecretion is a clinically important manifestation of chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucin production in airway epithelia is increased under conditions of oxidative stress. Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 suppression is related to the development of airway inflammation and increased ROS levels. In this study, we investigated the role of SHP-1 in mucin secretion triggered by oxidative stress. Human lung mucoepidermoid H292 carcinoma cells were transfected with specific siRNA to eliminate SHP-1 gene expression. Cultured cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and Mucin 5AC(MUC5AC) gene expression and mucin production were determined. Activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in association with MUC5AC production was evaluated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was employed to determine whether antioxidants could block MUC5AC production. To establish the precise role of p38, mucin expression was observed after pre-treatment of SHP-1-depleted H292 cells with the p38 chemical blocker. We investigated the in vivo effects of oxidative stress on airway mucus production in SHP-1-deficient heterozygous (mev/+) mice. MUC5AC expression was enhanced in SHP-1 knockdown H292 cells exposed to H(2)O(2), compared to that in control cells. The ratio between phosphorylated and total p38 was significantly increased in SHP-1-deficient cells under oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with NAC suppressed both MUC5AC production and p38 activation. Blockage of p38 MAPK led to suppression of MUC5AC mRNA expression. Notably, mucin production was enhanced in the airway epithelia of mev/+ mice exposed to oxidative stress. Our results clearly indicate that SHP-1 plays an important role in airway mucin production through regulating oxidative stress. PMID:20117097

  9. The tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, is involved in bronchial mucin production during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Kyoung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Keun Ae; Park, Chan Sun; Bae, Yun Jeong; Zhu, Zhou; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2010-02-26

    Mucus hypersecretion is a clinically important manifestation of chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucin production in airway epithelia is increased under conditions of oxidative stress. Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 suppression is related to the development of airway inflammation and increased ROS levels. In this study, we investigated the role of SHP-1 in mucin secretion triggered by oxidative stress. Human lung mucoepidermoid H292 carcinoma cells were transfected with specific siRNA to eliminate SHP-1 gene expression. Cultured cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and Mucin 5AC(MUC5AC) gene expression and mucin production were determined. Activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in association with MUC5AC production was evaluated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was employed to determine whether antioxidants could block MUC5AC production. To establish the precise role of p38, mucin expression was observed after pre-treatment of SHP-1-depleted H292 cells with the p38 chemical blocker. We investigated the in vivo effects of oxidative stress on airway mucus production in SHP-1-deficient heterozygous (mev/+) mice. MUC5AC expression was enhanced in SHP-1 knockdown H292 cells exposed to H(2)O(2), compared to that in control cells. The ratio between phosphorylated and total p38 was significantly increased in SHP-1-deficient cells under oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with NAC suppressed both MUC5AC production and p38 activation. Blockage of p38 MAPK led to suppression of MUC5AC mRNA expression. Notably, mucin production was enhanced in the airway epithelia of mev/+ mice exposed to oxidative stress. Our results clearly indicate that SHP-1 plays an important role in airway mucin production through regulating oxidative stress.

  10. Impact of Helicobacter Pylori on Mucus Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Keates, Sarah; Kelly, Ciaran; Turner, Bradley; Bansil, Rama; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that the viscoelastic properties of gastric mucin are crucial to the protection of the lining of the stomach against its own acidic secretions and other agents. Helicobacter Pylori, a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that dwells in the mucus layer of approximately 50% of the world's population is a class I carcinogen and is associated with gastric ulcers and severe gastritis. The structural damage to the mucus layer caused by H. Pylori is an important aspect of infection with this bacteria. We are examining the impact of H. Pylori on mucin and mucus rheology quantitatively using a combination of dynamic light scattering and multiple particle tracking experiments. Video microscopy data will also be presented on the motility of this bacteria in mucin at different pH and in other viscoelastic gels.

  11. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Lucy A.; Davies, Catrin M.; Coakley, Raymond D.; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Henderson, Ashley G.; Zeman, Kirby L.; Worthington, Erin N.; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D.; Riordan, John R.; Boucher, Richard C.; Tarran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB.—Clunes, L. A., Davies, C. M., Coakley, R. D., Aleksandrov, A. A., Henderson, A. G., Zeman, K. L., Worthington, E. N., Gentzsch, M., Kreda, S. M., Cholon, D., Bennett, W. D., Riordan, J. R., Boucher, R. C., Tarran, R. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration. PMID:21990373

  12. IL13 activates autophagy to regulate secretion in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, John D; Alevy, Yael; Malvin, Nicole P; Patel, Khushbu K; Gunsten, Sean P; Holtzman, Michael J; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine modulation of autophagy is increasingly recognized in disease pathogenesis, and current concepts suggest that type 1 cytokines activate autophagy, whereas type 2 cytokines are inhibitory. However, this paradigm derives primarily from studies of immune cells and is poorly characterized in tissue cells, including sentinel epithelial cells that regulate the immune response. In particular, the type 2 cytokine IL13 (interleukin 13) drives the formation of airway goblet cells that secrete excess mucus as a characteristic feature of airway disease, but whether this process is influenced by autophagy was undefined. Here we use a mouse model of airway disease in which IL33 (interleukin 33) stimulation leads to IL13-dependent formation of airway goblet cells as tracked by levels of mucin MUC5AC (mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel forming), and we show that these cells manifest a block in mucus secretion in autophagy gene Atg16l1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control mice. Similarly, primary-culture human tracheal epithelial cells treated with IL13 to stimulate mucus formation also exhibit a block in MUC5AC secretion in cells depleted of autophagy gene ATG5 (autophagy-related 5) or ATG14 (autophagy-related 14) compared to nondepleted control cells. Our findings indicate that autophagy is essential for airway mucus secretion in a type 2, IL13-dependent immune disease process and thereby provide a novel therapeutic strategy for attenuating airway obstruction in hypersecretory inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis lung disease. Taken together, these observations suggest that the regulation of autophagy by Th2 cytokines is cell-context dependent.

  13. IL13 activates autophagy to regulate secretion in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, John D; Alevy, Yael; Malvin, Nicole P; Patel, Khushbu K; Gunsten, Sean P; Holtzman, Michael J; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokine modulation of autophagy is increasingly recognized in disease pathogenesis, and current concepts suggest that type 1 cytokines activate autophagy, whereas type 2 cytokines are inhibitory. However, this paradigm derives primarily from studies of immune cells and is poorly characterized in tissue cells, including sentinel epithelial cells that regulate the immune response. In particular, the type 2 cytokine IL13 (interleukin 13) drives the formation of airway goblet cells that secrete excess mucus as a characteristic feature of airway disease, but whether this process is influenced by autophagy was undefined. Here we use a mouse model of airway disease in which IL33 (interleukin 33) stimulation leads to IL13-dependent formation of airway goblet cells as tracked by levels of mucin MUC5AC (mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel forming), and we show that these cells manifest a block in mucus secretion in autophagy gene Atg16l1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control mice. Similarly, primary-culture human tracheal epithelial cells treated with IL13 to stimulate mucus formation also exhibit a block in MUC5AC secretion in cells depleted of autophagy gene ATG5 (autophagy-related 5) or ATG14 (autophagy-related 14) compared to nondepleted control cells. Our findings indicate that autophagy is essential for airway mucus secretion in a type 2, IL13-dependent immune disease process and thereby provide a novel therapeutic strategy for attenuating airway obstruction in hypersecretory inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis lung disease. Taken together, these observations suggest that the regulation of autophagy by Th2 cytokines is cell-context dependent. PMID:26062017

  14. Bacteria associated with obstructive pulmonary disease elaborate extracellular products that stimulate mucin secretion by explants of guinea pig airways.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, K. B.; Hendley, D. D.; Davis, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    Certain cell-free filtrates from broth cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Hemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae stimulate secretion of glycoconjugates by explants of guinea pig trachea. The stimulatory effect is not related to toxicity or damage to the respiratory mucosa, as well as could be determined by ultrastructural examination of the explants after exposure. Bacteria isolated from patients with a history of chronic obstructive lung disease (P aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis, H influenzae, and S pneumoniae from chronic bronchitis) do not demonstrate increased frequency of positive strains or greater stimulation of secretion than organisms isolated from other individuals. At least three stimulatory substances are found in cell-free filtrates of P aeruginosa. They appear to be proteins of molecular weight 60,000-100,000 as determined by gel filtration. Within the crude filtrate, they are relatively stable to heat, proteolysis, and storage at 4 C and in liquid nitrogen. The stimulatory activity is not lost upon subculture of the bacteria. When isolated from the filtrate by column chromatography, they become labile to heat and trypsin. Isolated active fractions show proteolytic activity coinciding with mucin-stimulating capacity, suggesting a relationship with Pseudomonas proteases. Stimulatory substances released by S pneumoniae and H influenzae appear to be different from those elaborated by Pseudomonas. They are extremely labile to heat and storage, and the capacity to stimulate secretion is lost on subculture. Preliminary gel filtration indicates the S pneumoniae stimulatory substance(s) is in a molecular weight range of 100,000-300,000 daltons, while that of H influenzae is between 50,000 and 200,000. The results suggest bacteria which chronically infect or colonize respiratory airways of individuals suffering from obstructive lung disease can elaborate extracellular product(s) capable of stimulating secretion of mucin. Thus, the bacteria

  15. Serine Protease(s) Secreted by the Nematode Trichuris muris Degrade the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Grencis, Richard K.; Thornton, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The polymeric mucin component of the intestinal mucus barrier changes during nematode infection to provide not only physical protection but also to directly affect pathogenic nematodes and aid expulsion. Despite this, the direct interaction of the nematodes with the mucins and the mucus barrier has not previously been addressed. We used the well-established Trichuris muris nematode model to investigate the effect on mucins of the complex mixture of immunogenic proteins secreted by the nematode called excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Different regimes of T. muris infection were used to simulate chronic (low dose) or acute (high dose) infection. Mucus/mucins isolated from mice and from the human intestinal cell line, LS174T, were treated with ESPs. We demonstrate that serine protease(s) secreted by the nematode have the ability to change the properties of the mucus barrier, making it more porous by degrading the mucin component of the mucus gel. Specifically, the serine protease(s) acted on the N-terminal polymerising domain of the major intestinal mucin Muc2, resulting in depolymerisation of Muc2 polymers. Importantly, the respiratory/gastric mucin Muc5ac, which is induced in the intestine and is critical for worm expulsion, was protected from the depolymerising effect exerted by ESPs. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitors (Serpins) which may protect the mucins, in particular Muc2, from depolymerisation, were highly expressed in mice resistant to chronic infection. Thus, we demonstrate that nematodes secrete serine protease(s) to degrade mucins within the mucus barrier, which may modify the niche of the parasite to prevent clearance from the host or facilitate efficient mating and egg laying from the posterior end of the parasite that is in intimate contact with the mucus barrier. However, during a TH2-mediated worm expulsion response, serpins, Muc5ac and increased levels of Muc2 protect the barrier from degradation by the nematode secreted protease(s). PMID

  16. Vocal Fold Mucus Aggregation in Persons with Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; White, Lisa; Kuckhahn, Kelsey; Gerlach, Terri Treman; Deliyski, Dimitar D.

    2012-01-01

    Mucus aggregation on the vocal folds is a common finding from laryngeal endoscopy. Patients with voice disorders report the presence of mucus aggregation. Patients also report that mucus aggregation causes them to clear their throat, a behavior believed to be harmful to vocal fold mucosa. Even though clinicians and patients report and discuss…

  17. IL-13 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Have Critical but Distinct Roles in Epithelial Cell Mucin Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Guohua; Park, Sung Woo; Nguyenvu, Louis T.; Rodriguez, Madeleine W.; Barbeau, Rebecca; Paquet, Agnes C.; Erle, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Overproduction of mucus is a central feature of asthma. The cytokine, IL-13, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and transcription factor, FOXA2, have each been implicated in mucus production, but the mechanistic relationships between these molecules are not yet well understood. To address this, we established a primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell culture system with IL-13–induced mucus production and gene transcript expression changes similar to those seen in vivo in mice. IL-13 did not stimulate release of the EGFR ligand, transforming growth factor (TGF)-α. However, there was constitutive release of TGF-α from normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and inhibition of TGF-α or EGFR reduced both constitutive and IL-13–induced mucin production. Microarray analysis revealed that IL-13 and the EGFR pathway appear to have almost completely independent effects on transcript expression. IL-13 induced a relatively small set of transcripts, including several novel transcripts that might play a role in pathogenesis of allergic airway disease. In contrast, EGFR activity had extensive effects, including altered expression of many transcripts associated with cell metabolism, survival, transcription, and differentiation. One of the few common effects of IL-13 and EGFR signaling was decreased expression of FOXA2, which is known to prevent mucus production. We conclude that the IL-13 and EGFR pathways make critical but quite distinct contributions to gene regulation in airway epithelial cells, and that both pathways affect expression of the key transcription factor, FOXA2, a known regulator of mucus production. PMID:16980555

  18. New research method looks at fish mucus

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a new way to analyze fish tissues to understand fish ecology. Instead of killing the fish to collect the sample for analysis, we collect body mucus from the fish and analyze that. The fish can then be returned alive to the stream or lake.

  19. Flow cytometry of sputum: assessing inflammation and immune response elements in the bronchial airways**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The evaluation of sputum leukocytes by flow cytometry is an opportunity to assess characteristics of cells residing in the central airways, yet it is hampered by certain inherent properties of sputum including mucus and large amounts of contaminating cells and debris. ...

  20. Biodiesel exhaust-induced cytotoxicity and proinflammatory mediator production in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Kicic, Anthony; Ling, Kak-Ming; Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Larcombe, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Increasing use of biodiesel has prompted research into the potential health effects of biodiesel exhaust exposure. Few studies directly compare the health consequences of mineral diesel, biodiesel, or blend exhaust exposures. Here, we exposed human epithelial cell cultures to diluted exhaust generated by the combustion of Australian ultralow-sulfur-diesel (ULSD), unprocessed canola oil, 100% canola biodiesel (B100), and a blend of 20% canola biodiesel mixed with 80% ULSD. The physicochemical characteristics of the exhaust were assessed and we compared cellular viability, apoptosis, and levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) in exposed cultured cells. Different fuel types produced significantly different amounts of exhaust gases and different particle characteristics. All exposures resulted in significant apoptosis and loss of viability when compared with control, with an increasing proportion of biodiesel being correlated with a decrease in viability. In most cases, exposure to exhaust resulted in an increase in mediator production, with the greatest increases most often in response to B100. Exposure to pure canola oil (PCO) exhaust did not increase mediator production, but resulted in a significant decrease in IL-8 and RANTES in some cases. Our results show that canola biodiesel exhaust exposure elicits inflammation and reduces viability of human epithelial cell cultures in vitro when compared with ULSD exhaust exposure. This may be related to an increase in particle surface area and number in B100 exhaust when compared with ULSD exhaust. Exposure to PCO exhaust elicited the greatest loss of cellular viability, but virtually no inflammatory response, likely due to an overall increase in average particle size.

  1. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans. PMID:24979223

  2. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans.

  3. Polygonum multiflorum Decreases Airway Allergic Symptoms in a Murine Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Wang, Chien-N; Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Chiu, Chun-Lung; Liu, Leroy F; Lin, Hung-Yun; Wu, Reen

    2016-01-01

    The root of Polygonum multiflorum (also called He-Shou-Wu in Chinese) is a common herb and medicinal food in Asia used for its anti-aging properties. Our study investigated the therapeutic potential of an extract of the root of Polygonum multiflorum (PME) in allergic asthma by using a mouse model. Feeding of 0.5 and 1 mg/mouse PME inhibited ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma symptoms, including airway inflammation, mucus production, and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), in a dose-dependent manner. To discern PME's mechanism of action, we examined the profile and cytokine production of inflammatory cells in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We found that eosinophils, the main inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lung of OVA-immunized mice, significantly decreased after PME treatment. Th2 cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin, and the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], decreased in PME-treated mice. Elevated mRNA expression of Th2 transcription factor GATA-3 in the lung tissue was also inhibited after oral feeding of PME in OVA-immunized mice. Thus, we conclude that PME produces anti-asthma activity through the inhibition of Th2 cell activation. PMID:26916919

  4. Alternaria Fungus Induces the Production of GM-CSF, Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 and Calcium Signaling in Human Airway Epithelium through Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies suggest that host immune responses to environmental fungi may play an important role in the development of allergic diseases, such as human asthma. Epithelium is considered an active participant in allergic inflammation. We previously reported that aspartate protease from Alternaria induces the activation and degranulation of human eosinophils that are mediated through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). However, our current knowledge on the innate immune responses of epithelium to environmental fungi is very limited. We investigated the responses of epithelium to fungi and the mechanisms of these responses. Methods Human airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and Calu-3 (both from American Type Culture Collection) were incubated with PAR-2 peptides and extracts of various fungi. The cellular responses, including GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, eotaxin, eotaxin-2 and RANTES production as well as increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), were examined. To characterize the proteases involved in these responses, protease inhibitors such as pepstatin A and alkalo-thermophilic Bacillus inhibitor (ATBI), HIV protease inhibitors and 4-amidinophenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride were used. To investigate the role of PAR-2, PAR-2-agonistic and PAR-2-antagonistic peptides were used. Results PAR-2-activating peptide, but not the control peptide, induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production; these cellular responses were accompanied by a quick and marked increase in [Ca2+]i. Among 7 common environmental fungi, only Alternaria induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production and increased [Ca2+]i response. Both cytokine production and increased [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited by PAR-2 antagonist peptide and by aspartate protease inhibitors (pepstatin A, ritonavir, nelfinavir and ATBI), but not by the PAR-2 control peptide or by other protease inhibitors. Conclusions Aspartate proteases from Alternaria induce cytokine production and

  5. 17beta-Estradiol inhibits Ca2+-dependent homeostasis of airway surface liquid volume in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Ray D; Sun, Hengrui; Clunes, Lucy A; Rasmussen, Julia E; Stackhouse, James R; Okada, Seiko F; Fricks, Ingrid; Young, Steven L; Tarran, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Normal airways homeostatically regulate the volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) through both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of ion and water transport. In cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect causes a lack of cAMP-regulated CFTR activity, leading to diminished Cl- and water secretion from airway epithelial cells and subsequent mucus plugging, which serves as the focus for infections. Females with CF exhibit reduced survival compared with males with CF, although the mechanisms underlying this sex-related disadvantage are unknown. Despite the lack of CFTR, CF airways retain a limited capability to regulate ASL volume, as breathing-induced ATP release activates salvage purinergic pathways that raise intracellular Ca2+ concentration to stimulate an alternate pathway to Cl- secretion. We hypothesized that estrogen might affect this pathway by reducing the ability of airway epithelia to respond appropriately to nucleotides. We found that uridine triphosphate-mediated (UTP-mediated) Cl- secretion was reduced during the periovulatory estrogen maxima in both women with CF and normal, healthy women. Estrogen also inhibited Ca2+ signaling and ASL volume homeostasis in non-CF and CF airway epithelia by attenuating Ca2+ influx. This inhibition of Ca2+ signaling was prevented and even potentiated by estrogen antagonists such as tamoxifen, suggesting that antiestrogens may be beneficial in the treatment of CF lung disease because they increase Cl- secretion in the airways. PMID:19033671

  6. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  7. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  8. Mucolytic treatment with N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate metered dose inhaler in dogs: airway epithelial function changes.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, R P; App, E M; Coffiner, M; Fossion, J; Maes, P; King, M

    1994-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate Nacystelyn (L-NAC) is a newly synthesized mucolytic agent, of which the action in vivo has not been well defined. In six healthy mongrel dogs, the rheological properties of mucus, its mucociliary and cough clearability, and the transepithelial potential difference (PD) of the tracheobronchial epithelium were evaluated after placebo and L-NAC metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols. The principal index of mucus rigidity, log G*, decreased at all airway sites with L-NAC administration, i.e. the mucus became less rigid and more deformable (the overall change in G* was 0.29 log units, i.e. ca. twofold decrease). The viscoelasticity-derived mucus transportability parameters, mucociliary (MCI) and cough (CCI) clearability indices, increased with L-NAC MDI, particularly CCI, which predicts the effect of mucus rheology on cough clearability. PD increased significantly with L-NAC administration at all measurement sites, which appears to be a novel effect for a direct acting mucolytic agent. Tracheal mucus linear velocity (TMV) increased after L-NAC compared with placebo, as did the normalized frog palate transport rate (NFPTR). The increase in NFPTR was greater than that predicted from the mucus rheological properties alone, suggesting that L-NAC still resident in the collected mucus stimulated the frog palate cilia. The index of mucus flux, the collection rate in mg.min-1, was higher with L-NAC compared with placebo. From our results, we conclude that L-NAC shows potential benefit in terms of improving mucus rheological properties and clearability. It may act, in part, by stimulating the fresh secretion of mucus of lower viscoelasticity. The stimulation of mucociliary clearance could be related to ion flux changes, as indicated by the increase in PD. PMID:8143836

  9. Mucolytic treatment with N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate metered dose inhaler in dogs: airway epithelial function changes.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, R P; App, E M; Coffiner, M; Fossion, J; Maes, P; King, M

    1994-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine L-lysinate Nacystelyn (L-NAC) is a newly synthesized mucolytic agent, of which the action in vivo has not been well defined. In six healthy mongrel dogs, the rheological properties of mucus, its mucociliary and cough clearability, and the transepithelial potential difference (PD) of the tracheobronchial epithelium were evaluated after placebo and L-NAC metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols. The principal index of mucus rigidity, log G*, decreased at all airway sites with L-NAC administration, i.e. the mucus became less rigid and more deformable (the overall change in G* was 0.29 log units, i.e. ca. twofold decrease). The viscoelasticity-derived mucus transportability parameters, mucociliary (MCI) and cough (CCI) clearability indices, increased with L-NAC MDI, particularly CCI, which predicts the effect of mucus rheology on cough clearability. PD increased significantly with L-NAC administration at all measurement sites, which appears to be a novel effect for a direct acting mucolytic agent. Tracheal mucus linear velocity (TMV) increased after L-NAC compared with placebo, as did the normalized frog palate transport rate (NFPTR). The increase in NFPTR was greater than that predicted from the mucus rheological properties alone, suggesting that L-NAC still resident in the collected mucus stimulated the frog palate cilia. The index of mucus flux, the collection rate in mg.min-1, was higher with L-NAC compared with placebo. From our results, we conclude that L-NAC shows potential benefit in terms of improving mucus rheological properties and clearability. It may act, in part, by stimulating the fresh secretion of mucus of lower viscoelasticity. The stimulation of mucociliary clearance could be related to ion flux changes, as indicated by the increase in PD.

  10. [Computed tomography in endobronchial mucus accumulation].

    PubMed

    Gaeta, M; Barone, M; Loria, G; Minutoli, F; Stroscio, S

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the value of CT in depicting endobronchial mucoid collections, the authors retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 22 patients, 14 with mucous plugs, 7 with mucoid pseudotumors, and one with a bronchocele due to bronchial atresia. Atelectasis could be seen in 11 of 14 patients with mucous plugs. In 12 of 14 patients with mucous plugs CT showed the involved bronchi filled by fluid representing abnormal mucus accumulation. In the patients with atelectasis CT showed mucus-filled bronchi as low-attenuation branching structures (mucoid bronchogram). All the mucoid pseudotumors appeared as low-attenuation (< 20 HU) polypoid wall lesions with no involvement of the bronchial walls. In a patient with bronchial atresia CT showed a solitary pulmonary nodule (representing the obstructed and dilated bronchus filled by mucus) surrounded by peripheral pulmonary hyperinflation. Characteristically, the endobronchial mucoid collections never enhanced after bolus contrast medium. Endobronchial mucoid collections had to be differentiated from endobronchial neoplasms. In some cases bronchoscopy was necessary to make the differential diagnosis. In conclusion, CT is a valuable tool with good sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing endobronchial mucoid collections.

  11. Direct Measurement of Macromolecule-Coated Colloid-Mucus Interactions.

    PubMed

    Swavola, Julia C; Edwards, Tara D; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-08-25

    We report measurements of macromolecule-coated colloids interacting with mucus to understand colloidal particle diffusion near mucus-coated surfaces. Total internal reflection microscopy is used to measure colloids with adsorbed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and polyelectrolyte bilayers (PEB) interacting with mucus to obtain kT-scale energy landscapes and nanometer-scale diffusivity landscapes. Energy landscapes are quantified as a superposition of van der Waals, steric, and tethering potentials, and diffusivity landscapes are modeled by considering lubrication in the presence of permeable layers. PEG- and BSA-coated colloids have soft repulsion with mucus that could enable diffusion of small particles within mucus pores. PEB-coated colloids display attractive tethers to mucus that produce irreversible binding. Different interaction potentials for each particle coating confirm that the ζ-potential is not a successful predictor of particle-mucus interactions and diffusion. Diffusivity landscapes show thick mucus layers are permeable to the solvent and dominate particle-mucus hydrodynamic interactions relative to the thin, impermeable particle coatings. Our results show direct measurements and models to understand how particle coating properties (e.g., elasticity, porosity) control particle interactions and transport near mucus films to potentially aid the design of better particle-based therapeutics and diagnostics.

  12. Model of ciliary clearance and the role of mucus rheology.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michael M; Robinson, Risa J; Weinstein, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the transportability of mucus by cilial mats is dependent on the rheological properties of the mucus. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid that exhibits a plethora of phenomena such as stress relaxation, tensile stresses, shear thinning, and yielding behavior. These observations motivate the analysis in this paper that considers the first two attributes in order to construct a transport model. The model developed here assumes that the mucus is transported as a rigid body, the metachronal wave exhibits symplectic behavior, that the mucus is thin compared to the metachronal wavelength, and that the effects of individual cilia can be lumped together to impart an average strain to the mucus during contact. This strain invokes a stress in the mucus, whose non-Newtonian rheology creates tensile forces that persist into unsheared regions and allow the unsupported mucus to move as a rigid body whereas a Newtonian fluid would retrograde. This work focuses primarily on the Doi-Edwards model but results are generalized to the Jeffrey's and Maxwell fluids as well. The model predicts that there exists an optimal mucus rheology that maximizes the shear stress imparted to the mucus by the cilia for a given cilia motion. We propose that this is the rheology that the body strives for in order to minimize energy consumption. Predicted optimal rheologies are consistent with results from previous experimental studies when reasonable model parameters are chosen.

  13. Model of ciliary clearance and the role of mucus rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael M.; Robinson, Risa J.; Weinstein, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the transportability of mucus by cilial mats is dependent on the rheological properties of the mucus. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid that exhibits a plethora of phenomena such as stress relaxation, tensile stresses, shear thinning, and yielding behavior. These observations motivate the analysis in this paper that considers the first two attributes in order to construct a transport model. The model developed here assumes that the mucus is transported as a rigid body, the metachronal wave exhibits symplectic behavior, that the mucus is thin compared to the metachronal wavelength, and that the effects of individual cilia can be lumped together to impart an average strain to the mucus during contact. This strain invokes a stress in the mucus, whose non-Newtonian rheology creates tensile forces that persist into unsheared regions and allow the unsupported mucus to move as a rigid body whereas a Newtonian fluid would retrograde. This work focuses primarily on the Doi-Edwards model but results are generalized to the Jeffrey's fluid as well. The model predicts that there exists an optimal mucus rheology that maximizes the shear stress imparted to the mucus by the cilia for a given cilia motion. We propose that this is the rheology that the body strives for in order to minimize energy consumption. Predicted optimal rheologies are consistent with results from previous experimental studies when reasonable model parameters are chosen.

  14. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sujit S; Preska Steinberg, Asher; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-06-28

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host-microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer-mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory-Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice-whose microbiota degrade gut polymers-did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes.

  15. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  16. Cigarette smoke causes acute airway disease and exacerbates chronic obstructive lung disease in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Conlon, Thomas M; Ballester Lopez, Carolina; Seimetz, Michael; Bednorz, Mariola; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Weissmann, Norbert; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates a strong link between postnatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and increased respiratory morbidity in young children. However, how CS induces early onset airway disease in young children, and how it interacts with endogenous risk factors, remains poorly understood. We, therefore, exposed 10-day-old neonatal wild-type and β-epithelial sodium ion channel (β-ENaC)-transgenic mice with cystic fibrosis-like lung disease to CS for 4 days. Neonatal wild-type mice exposed to CS demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), which was accompanied by increased levels of Mmp12 and Cxcl1 BALF from β-ENaC-transgenic mice contained greater numbers of macrophages, which did not increase following acute CS exposure; however, there was significant increase in airway neutrophilia compared with filtered air transgenic and CS-exposed wild-type controls. Interestingly, wild-type and β-ENaC-transgenic mice demonstrated epithelial airway and vascular remodeling following CS exposure. Morphometric analysis of lung sections revealed that CS exposure caused increased mucus accumulation in the airway lumen of neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice compared with wild-type controls, which was accompanied by an increase in the number of goblet cells and Muc5ac upregulation. We conclude that short-term CS exposure 1) induces acute airway disease with airway epithelial and vascular remodeling in neonatal wild-type mice; and 2) exacerbates airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and mucus plugging in neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice with chronic lung disease. Our results in neonatal mice suggest that young children may be highly susceptible to develop airway disease in response to tobacco smoke exposure, and that adverse effects may be aggravated in children with underlying chronic lung diseases. PMID:27448665

  17. Role of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae and coral mucus in the adhesion of the coral-bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi to its host.

    PubMed

    Banin, E; Israely, T; Fine, M; Loya, Y; Rosenberg, E

    2001-05-15

    Vibrio shiloi, the causative agent of bleaching the coral Oculina patagonica in the Mediterranean Sea, adheres to its coral host by a beta-D-galactopyranoside-containing receptor on the coral surface. The receptor is present in the coral mucus, since V. shiloi adhered avidly to mucus-coated ELISA plates. Adhesion was inhibited by methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside. Removal of the mucus from O. patagonica resulted in a delay in adhesion of V. shiloi to the coral, corresponding to regeneration of the mucus. DCMU inhibited the recovery of adhesion of the bacteria to the mucus-depleted corals, indicating that active photosynthesis by the endosymbiotic zooxanthellae was necessary for the synthesis or secretion of the receptor. Further evidence of the role of the zooxanthellae in producing the receptor came from a study of adhesion of V. shiloi to different species of corals. The bacteria failed to adhere to bleached corals and white (azooxanthellate) O. patagonica cave corals, both of which lacked the algae. In addition, V. shiloi adhered to two Mediterranean corals (Madracis and Cladocora) that contained zooxanthellae and did not adhere to two azooxanthellate Mediterranean corals (Phyllangia and Polycyathus). V. shiloi demonstrated positive chemotaxis towards the mucus of O. patagonica. The data demonstrate that endosymbiotic zooxanthellae contribute to the production of coral mucus and that V. shiloi infects only mucus-containing, zooxanthellate corals.

  18. Capacity of the bovine intestinal mucus and its components to support growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Aperce, C C; Heidenreich, J M; Drouillard, J S

    2014-05-01

    Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli increases the risk of contamination of food products at slaughter. Our study aimed to shed more light on the mechanisms used by E. coli O157:H7 to thrive and compete with other bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle. We evaluated, in vitro, bovine intestinal mucus and its constituents in terms of their capacity to support growth of E. coli O157:H7 in presence or absence of fecal inoculum, with and without various enzymes. Growth of E. coli O157:H7 and total anaerobic bacteria were proportionate to the amount of mucus added as substrate. Growth of E. coli O157:H7 was similar for small and large intestinal mucus as substrate, and was partially inhibited with addition of fecal inoculum to cultures, presumably due to competition from other organisms. Whole mucus stimulated growth to the greatest degree compared with other compounds evaluated, but the pathogen was capable of utilizing all substrates to some extent. Addition of enzymes to cultures failed to impact growth of E. coli O157:H7 except for neuraminidase, which resulted in greater growth of E. coli O157 when combined with sialic acid as substrate. In conclusion, E. coli O157 has capacity to utilize small or large intestinal mucus, and growth is greatest with whole mucus compared with individual mucus components. There are two possible explanations for these findings (i) multiple substrates are needed to optimize growth, or alternatively, (ii) a component of mucus not evaluated in this experiment is a key ingredient for optimal growth of E. coli O157:H7.

  19. Oral Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanoparticles: The Gastrointestinal Mucus Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery is the most common method for drug administration. However, poor solubility, stability, and bioavailability of many drugs make achieving therapeutic levels via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract challenging. Drug delivery must overcome numerous hurdles, including the acidic gastric environment and the continuous secretion of mucus that protects the GI tract. Nanoparticle drug carriers that can shield drugs from degradation and deliver them to intended sites within the GI tract may enable more efficient and sustained drug delivery. However, the rapid secretion and shedding of GI tract mucus can significantly limit the effectiveness of nanoparticle drug delivery systems. Many types of nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in and rapidly removed by mucus, making controlled release in the GI tract difficult. This review addresses the protective barrier properties of mucus secretions, how mucus affects the fate of orally administered nanoparticles, and recent developments in nanoparticles engineered to penetrate the mucus barrier. PMID:22212900

  20. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  1. Food-associated stimuli enhance barrier properties of gastrointestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Hasan M; Speciner, Lauren; Ozdemir, Cafer; Cohen, David E; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Orally delivered drugs and nutrients must diffuse through mucus to enter the circulatory system, but the barrier properties of mucus and their modulation by physiological factors are generally poorly characterized. The main objective of this study was to examine the impact of physicochemical changes occurring upon food ingestion on gastrointestinal (GI) mucus barrier properties. Lipids representative of postprandial intestinal contents enhanced mucus barriers, as indicated by a 10-142-fold reduction in the transport rate of 200 nm microspheres through mucus, depending on surface chemistry. Physiologically relevant increases in [Ca(2+)] resulted in a 2-4-fold reduction of transport rates, likely due to enhanced cross-linking of the mucus gel network. Reduction of pH from 6.5 to 3.5 also affected mucus viscoelasticity, reducing particle transport rates approximately 5-10-fold. Macroscopic visual observation and micro-scale lectin staining revealed mucus gel structural changes, including clumping into regions into which particles did not penetrate. Histological examination indicated food ingestion can prevent microsphere contact with and endocytosis by intestinal epithelium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GI mucus barriers are significantly altered by stimuli associated with eating and potentially dosing of lipid-based delivery systems; these stimuli represent broadly relevant variables to consider upon designing oral therapies. PMID:25907034

  2. Comparison of human cervical mucus and artificial sperm penetration media.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Garrett, C; Baker, H W

    1999-11-01

    The cervical mucus penetration tests aid research and determine the clinical importance of positive sperm antibody tests. Limited availability and variability of human cervical mucus have instigated the search for mucus substitutes for these tests. This study compares sperm migration in cervical mucus with that in artificial media including hyaluronate solution, egg white and albumin Tyrode solution. Results were quantified by measuring the migration distance (the maximum distance of capillary migration from a semen reservoir by spermatozoa after 1 h) and the sperm concentration at half the migration distance. The mean of both measures for cervical mucus and hyaluronate solution were equivalent [4.4 +/- 1.1 (SD) versus 4.3 +/- 1.0 cm and 118 +/- 51 versus 111 +/- 44x10(3)/ml], and higher than in egg white and albumin Tyrode solution. Antisperm antibodies impaired sperm penetration in cervical mucus and hyaluronate solution in a similar manner (r = 0.92). These results suggest that hyaluronate solution sufficiently resembles human cervical mucus in terms of penetrability that it may be used as a substitute for mucus in capillary tube tests of sperm function. The higher penetrability of cervical mucus and hyaluronate solution is probably related to a channelling effect due to their polymeric structure. PMID:10548628

  3. Acinar origin of CFTR-dependent airway submucosal gland fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin V; Krouse, Mauri E; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease arises from defective innate defenses, especially defective mucus clearance of microorganisms. Airway submucosal glands secrete most airway mucus, and CF airway glands do not secrete in response to VIP or forskolin. CFTR, the protein that is defective in CF, is expressed in glands, but immunocytochemistry finds the highest expression of CFTR in either the ciliated ducts or in the acini, depending on the antibodies used. CFTR is absolutely required for forskolin-mediated gland secretion; we used this finding to localize the origin of forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent gland fluid secretion. We tested the hypothesis that secretion to forskolin might originate from the gland duct rather than or in addition to the acini. We ligated gland ducts at various points, stimulated the glands with forskolin, and monitored the regions of the glands that swelled. The results supported an acinar rather than ductal origin of secretion. We tracked particles in the mucus using Nomarski time-lapse imaging; particles originated in the acini and traveled toward the duct orifice. Estimated bulk flow accelerated in the acini and mucus tubules, consistent with fluid secretion in those regions, but was constant in the unbranched duct, consistent with a lack of fluid secretion or absorption by the ductal epithelium. We conclude that CFTR-dependent gland fluid secretion originates in the serous acini. The failure to observe either secretion or absorption from the CFTR and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-rich ciliated ducts is unexplained, but may indicate that this epithelium alters the composition rather than the volume of gland mucus. PMID:16997881

  4. Transport of Particles in Intestinal Mucus under Simulated Infant and Adult Physiological Conditions: Impact of Mucus Structure and Extracellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R.; Bajka, Balazs H.; Rigby, Neil M.; Nau, Françoise; Dupont, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The final boundary between digested food and the cells that take up nutrients in the small intestine is a protective layer of mucus. In this work, the microstructural organization and permeability of the intestinal mucus have been determined under conditions simulating those of infant and adult human small intestines. As a model, we used the mucus from the proximal (jejunal) small intestines of piglets and adult pigs. Confocal microscopy of both unfixed and fixed mucosal tissue showed mucus lining the entire jejunal epithelium. The mucus contained DNA from shed epithelial cells at different stages of degradation, with higher amounts of DNA found in the adult pig. The pig mucus comprised a coherent network of mucin and DNA with higher viscosity than the more heterogeneous piglet mucus, which resulted in increased permeability of the latter to 500-nm and 1-µm latex beads. Multiple-particle tracking experiments revealed that diffusion of the probe particles was considerably enhanced after treating mucus with DNase. The fraction of diffusive 500-nm probe particles increased in the pig mucus from 0.6% to 64% and in the piglet mucus from ca. 30% to 77% after the treatment. This suggests that extracellular DNA can significantly contribute to the microrheology and barrier properties of the intestinal mucus layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the structure and permeability of the small intestinal mucus have been compared between different age groups and the contribution of extracellular DNA highlighted. The results help to define rules governing colloidal transport in the developing small intestine. These are required for engineering orally administered pharmaceutical preparations with improved delivery, as well as for fabricating novel foods with enhanced nutritional quality or for controlled calorie uptake. PMID:24755941

  5. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  6. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:22640851

  7. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  8. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  9. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... efforts to assist with breathing have failed. A hollow needle or tube can be inserted into the ...

  10. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors. PMID:17525704

  11. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  12. Programmed Death Ligand 1 Promotes Early-Life Chlamydia Respiratory Infection-Induced Severe Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Starkey, Malcolm R; Nguyen, Duc H; Brown, Alexandra C; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Kim, Richard Y; Yagita, Hideo; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia infections are frequent causes of respiratory illness, particularly pneumonia in infants, and are linked to permanent reductions in lung function and the induction of asthma. However, the immune responses that protect against early-life infection and the mechanisms that lead to chronic lung disease are incompletely understood. In the current study, we investigated the role of programmed death (PD)-1 and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 in promoting early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection, and infection-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and severe allergic airway disease in later life. Infection increased PD-1 and PD-L1, but not PD-L2, mRNA expression in the lung. Flow cytometric analysis of whole lung homogenates identified monocytes, dendritic cells, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells as major sources of PD-1 and PD-L1. Inhibition of PD-1 and PD-L1, but not PD-L2, during infection ablated infection-induced AHR in later life. Given that PD-L1 was the most highly up-regulated and its targeting prevented infection-induced AHR, subsequent analyses focused on this ligand. Inhibition of PD-L1 had no effect on Chlamydia load but suppressed infection-induced pulmonary inflammation. Infection decreased the levels of the IL-13 decoy receptor in the lung, which were restored to baseline levels by inhibition of PD-L1. Finally, inhibition of PD-L1 during infection prevented subsequent infection-induced severe allergic airways disease in later life by decreasing IL-13 levels, Gob-5 expression, mucus production, and AHR. Thus, early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection-induced PD-L1 promotes severe inflammation during infection, permanent reductions in lung function, and the development of more severe allergic airway disease in later life.

  13. Mucus secretion by single tracheal submucosal glands from normal and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Ianowski, Juan P; Choi, Jae Young; Wine, Jeffrey J; Hanrahan, John W

    2007-01-01

    Submucosal glands line the cartilaginous airways and produce most of the antimicrobial mucus that keeps the airways sterile. The glands are defective in cystic fibrosis (CF), but how this impacts airway health remains uncertain. Although most CF mouse strains exhibit mild airway defects, those with the C57Bl/6 genetic background have increased airway pathology and susceptibility to Pseudomonas. Thus, they offer the possibility of studying whether, and if so how, abnormal submucosal gland function contributes to CF airway disease. We used optical methods to study fluid secretion by individual glands in tracheas from normal, wild-type (WT) mice and from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice (Cftrm1UNC/Cftrm1UNC; CF mice). Glands from WT mice qualitatively resembled those in humans by responding to carbachol and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), although the relative rates of VIP- and forskolin-stimulated secretion were much lower in mice than in large mammals. The pharmacology of mouse gland secretion was also similar to that in humans; adding bumetanide or replacement of HCO3− by Hepes reduced the carbachol response by ∼50%, and this inhibition increased to 80% when both manoeuvres were performed simultaneously. It is important to note that glands from CFTR knockout mice responded to carbachol but did not secrete when exposed to VIP or forskolin, as has been shown previously for glands from CF patients. Tracheal glands from WT and CF mice both had robust secretory responses to electrical field stimulation that were blocked by tetrodotoxin. It is interesting that local irritation of the mucosa using chili pepper oil elicited secretion from WT glands but did not stimulate glands from CF mice. These results clarify the mechanisms of murine submucosal gland secretion and reveal a novel defect in local regulation of glands lacking CFTR which may also compromise airway defence in CF patients. PMID:17204498

  14. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  15. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  16. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.

  17. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, C.M.; Waldes, R.; Sampson, D.; Newhouse, M.T.

    1982-07-01

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a /sup 99/mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet.

  18. Studies of mucus in mouse stomach, small intestine, and colon. I. Gastrointestinal mucus layers have different properties depending on location as well as over the Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Schütte, André; Johansson, Malin E V; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2013-09-01

    Colon has been shown to have a two-layered mucus system where the inner layer is devoid of bacteria. However, a complete overview of the mouse gastrointestinal mucus system is lacking. We now characterize mucus release, thickness, growth over time, adhesive properties, and penetrability to fluorescent beads from stomach to distal colon. Colon displayed spontaneous mucus release and all regions released mucus in response to carbachol and PGE2, except the distal colon and domes of Peyer's patches. Stomach and colon had an inner mucus layer that was adherent to the epithelium. In contrast, the small intestine and Peyer's patches had a single mucus layer that was easily aspirated. The inner mucus layer of the distal colon was not penetrable to beads the size of bacteria and the inner layer of the proximal colon was only partly penetrable. In contrast, the inner mucus layer of stomach was fully penetrable, as was the small intestinal mucus. This suggests a functional organization of the intestinal mucus system, where the small intestine has loose and penetrable mucus that may allow easy penetration of nutrients, in contrast to the stomach, where the mucus provides physical protection, and the colon, where the mucus separates bacteria from the epithelium. This knowledge of the mucus system and its organization improves our understanding of the gastrointestinal tract physiology.

  19. A new method of separation and quantitation of mucus glycoprotein in rat gastric mucus gel layer and its application to mucus secretion induced by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Y; Ishihara, K; Ohara, S; Saigenji, K; Hotta, K

    1991-10-01

    A method was established for recovering the mucus gel layer of rat gastric mucosa without damage to underlying surface epithelium. The mucus gel was solubilized by stirring the gastric mucosa in a solution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent. Optimal mucus gel solubilization was possible by treatment with 2% NAC for 5 minutes at room temperature. Mucus glycoprotein was quantitatively extracted and measured from the mucus gel sample obtained by the NAC treatment. This treatment caused no damage to surface epithelial cells, as observed by a light microscope. Besides NAC, pronase solution was also adequate for solubilizing the mucus gel layer without any damage to the surface epithelium. However, extraction and measurement of mucus glycoprotein from the pronase-treated mucus gel sample was not possible due to contamination by high molecular hexose-containing substances which were eluted along with the mucus glycoprotein from the column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. This NAC method was used to examine changes in mucus glycoprotein content in the mucus gel at one hour following the oral administration of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2. A significant increase in mucus glycoprotein of the gel was brought about by the prostaglandin treatment. Thus, the present method was suitable for estimating the amount of mucus secreted in to the mucus gel layer. PMID:1752389

  20. A new method of separation and quantitation of mucus glycoprotein in rat gastric mucus gel layer and its application to mucus secretion induced by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Y; Ishihara, K; Ohara, S; Saigenji, K; Hotta, K

    1991-10-01

    A method was established for recovering the mucus gel layer of rat gastric mucosa without damage to underlying surface epithelium. The mucus gel was solubilized by stirring the gastric mucosa in a solution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent. Optimal mucus gel solubilization was possible by treatment with 2% NAC for 5 minutes at room temperature. Mucus glycoprotein was quantitatively extracted and measured from the mucus gel sample obtained by the NAC treatment. This treatment caused no damage to surface epithelial cells, as observed by a light microscope. Besides NAC, pronase solution was also adequate for solubilizing the mucus gel layer without any damage to the surface epithelium. However, extraction and measurement of mucus glycoprotein from the pronase-treated mucus gel sample was not possible due to contamination by high molecular hexose-containing substances which were eluted along with the mucus glycoprotein from the column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. This NAC method was used to examine changes in mucus glycoprotein content in the mucus gel at one hour following the oral administration of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2. A significant increase in mucus glycoprotein of the gel was brought about by the prostaglandin treatment. Thus, the present method was suitable for estimating the amount of mucus secreted in to the mucus gel layer.

  1. Diallyl-disulfide, an organosulfur compound of garlic, attenuates airway inflammation via activation of the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway and NF-kappaB suppression.

    PubMed

    Shin, In-Sik; Hong, Jumi; Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, Na-Rae; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Hui-Seong; Kim, Jong-Choon; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2013-12-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a major organosulfur compound found in garlic oil that is widely used as a flavoring agent. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DADS on airway inflammation using an ovalbumin-induced model of allergic asthma and RAW264.7 cells. DADS decreased nitric oxide production with a reduction in the levels of interleukins (IL)-1β and IL-6 in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with LPS. DADS also reduced the expression of proinflammatory proteins including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and it enhanced the expression of antioxidant proteins including Nrf-2 and hemeoxygenase (HO)-1. In in vivo experiments, DADS decreased the inflammatory cell count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) with IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and immunoglobulin (Ig) E. These results were consistent with the histological analysis. DADS attenuated the airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion induced by OVA challenge. In addition, DADS induced the activation of Nrf-2 and the expression of HO-1. In contrast, DADS reduced the activation of NF-κB, iNOS and MMP-9. In conclusion, DADS reduced the airway inflammation via regulation of Nrf-2/HO-1 and NF-κB. These results suggest that DADS might represent a useful new oral therapy to treat allergic asthma.

  2. Nanocomplexes for gene therapy of respiratory diseases: Targeting and overcoming the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Sante; Trapani, Adriana; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Belgiovine, Giuliana; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Puglisi, Giovanni; Cavallaro, Gennara; Trapani, Giuseppe; Conese, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy, i.e. the delivery and expression of therapeutic genes, holds great promise for congenital and acquired respiratory diseases. Non-viral vectors are less toxic and immunogenic than viral vectors, although they are characterized by lower efficiency. However, they have to overcome many barriers, including inflammatory and immune mediators and cells. The respiratory and airway epithelial cells, the main target of these vectors, are coated with a layer of mucus, which hampers the effective reaching of gene therapy vectors carrying either plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA. This barrier is thicker in many lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. This review summarizes the most important advancements in the field of non-viral vectors that have been achieved with the use of nanoparticulate (NP) systems, composed either of polymers or lipids, in the lung gene delivery. In particular, different strategies of targeting of respiratory and airway lung cells will be described. Then, we will focus on the two approaches that attempt to overcome the mucus barrier: coating of the nanoparticulate system with poly(ethylene glycol) and treatment with mucolytics. Our conclusions are: 1) Ligand and physical targeting can direct therapeutic gene expression in specific cell types in the respiratory tract; 2) Mucopenetrating NPs are endowed with promising features to be useful in treating respiratory diseases and should be now advanced in pre-clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the development of such polymer- and lipid-based NPs in the context of in vitro and in vivo disease models, such as lung cancer, as well as in clinical trials. PMID:26192479

  3. Nanocomplexes for gene therapy of respiratory diseases: Targeting and overcoming the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Sante; Trapani, Adriana; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Belgiovine, Giuliana; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Puglisi, Giovanni; Cavallaro, Gennara; Trapani, Giuseppe; Conese, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy, i.e. the delivery and expression of therapeutic genes, holds great promise for congenital and acquired respiratory diseases. Non-viral vectors are less toxic and immunogenic than viral vectors, although they are characterized by lower efficiency. However, they have to overcome many barriers, including inflammatory and immune mediators and cells. The respiratory and airway epithelial cells, the main target of these vectors, are coated with a layer of mucus, which hampers the effective reaching of gene therapy vectors carrying either plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA. This barrier is thicker in many lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. This review summarizes the most important advancements in the field of non-viral vectors that have been achieved with the use of nanoparticulate (NP) systems, composed either of polymers or lipids, in the lung gene delivery. In particular, different strategies of targeting of respiratory and airway lung cells will be described. Then, we will focus on the two approaches that attempt to overcome the mucus barrier: coating of the nanoparticulate system with poly(ethylene glycol) and treatment with mucolytics. Our conclusions are: 1) Ligand and physical targeting can direct therapeutic gene expression in specific cell types in the respiratory tract; 2) Mucopenetrating NPs are endowed with promising features to be useful in treating respiratory diseases and should be now advanced in pre-clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the development of such polymer- and lipid-based NPs in the context of in vitro and in vivo disease models, such as lung cancer, as well as in clinical trials.

  4. Cilia-driven particle and fluid transport over mucus-free mice tracheae.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Lindken, R; Faulhammer, P; Noreikat, K; Sharp, K V; Kummer, W; Westerweel, J

    2013-02-01

    To date, there is only a fragmentary understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of airway mucociliary transport. Application of the latest measurement techniques can aid in deciphering the complex interplay between ciliary beat and airway surface liquid (ASL) transport. In the present study, direct, quasi-simultaneous measurements of the cilia-induced fluid and bead transport were performed to gain a better insight into both transport mechanisms. In this study cilia-induced periciliary liquid (PCL) transport is measured by means of micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) with neutrally buoyant tracers. Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) with heavier polystyrene-ferrite beads is performed to simulate particle transport. Contrary to recent literature, in which the presence of mucus was deemed necessary to maintain periciliary liquid (PCL) transport, effective particle and fluid transport was measured in our experiments in the absence of mucus. In response to muscarine or ATP stimulation, maximum fluid transport rates of 250 μm/s at 15 μm distance to the tracheal epithelia were measured while bead transport rates over the epithelia surfaces reached 200 μm/s. We estimated that the mean bead transport is dominated by viscous drag compared to inertial fluid forces. Furthermore, mean bead transport velocities appear to be two orders of magnitude larger compared to bead sedimentation velocities. Therefore, beads are expected to closely follow the mean PCL flow in non-ciliated epithelium regions. Based on our results, we have shown that PCL transport can be directly driven by the cilia beat and that the PCL motion may be capable of driving bead transport by fluid drag.

  5. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sujit S.; Preska Steinberg, Asher

    2016-01-01

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host–microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer–mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory–Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice—whose microbiota degrade gut polymers—did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes. PMID:27303035

  6. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sujit S; Preska Steinberg, Asher; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-06-28

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host-microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer-mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory-Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice-whose microbiota degrade gut polymers-did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes. PMID:27303035

  7. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc. PMID:14533798

  8. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  9. The Influence of Mucus Microstructure and Rheology in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bansil, Rama; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hardcastle, Joseph M.; Turner, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), has evolved to survive in the highly acidic environment of the stomach and colonize on the epithelial surface of the gastric mucosa. Its pathogenic effects are well known to cause gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. In order to infect the stomach and establish colonies on the mucus epithelial surface, the bacterium has to move across the gel-like gastric mucus lining of the stomach under acidic conditions. In this review we address the question of how the bacterium gets past the protective mucus barrier from a biophysical perspective. We begin by reviewing the molecular structure of gastric mucin and discuss the current state of understanding concerning mucin polymerization and low pH induced gelation. We then focus on the viscoelasticity of mucin in view of its relevance to the transport of particles and bacteria across mucus, the key first step in H. pylori infection. The second part of the review focuses on the motility of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels, and how infection with H. pylori in turn impacts the viscoelastic properties of mucin. We present recent microscopic results tracking the motion of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels. We then discuss how the biochemical strategy of urea hydrolysis required for survival in the acid is also relevant to the mechanism that enables flagella-driven swimming across the mucus gel layer. Other aspects of the influence of H. pylori infection such as, altering gastric mucin expression, its rate of production and its composition, and the influence of mucin on factors controlling H. pylori virulence and proliferation are briefly discussed with references to relevant literature. PMID:24133493

  10. Early cystic fibrosis lung disease: Role of airway surface dehydration and lessons from preventive rehydration therapies in mice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Graeber, Simon Y; Stahl, Mirjam; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease starts in the first months of life and remains one of the most common fatal hereditary diseases. Early therapeutic interventions may provide an opportunity to prevent irreversible lung damage and improve outcome. Airway surface dehydration is a key disease mechanism in CF, however, its role in the in vivo pathogenesis and as therapeutic target in early lung disease remains poorly understood. Mice with airway-specific overexpression of the epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC-Tg) recapitulate airway surface dehydration and phenocopy CF lung disease. Recent studies in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration produces early mucus plugging in the absence of mucus hypersecretion, which triggers airway inflammation, promotes bacterial infection and causes early mortality. Preventive rehydration therapy with hypertonic saline or amiloride effectively reduced mucus plugging and mortality in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice. These results support clinical testing of preventive/early rehydration strategies in infants and young children with CF. PMID:24561284

  11. Magnetic Nanodrug Delivery Through the Mucus Layer of Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Primary Normal Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Economou, E. C.; Marinelli, S.; Smith, M. C.; Routt, A. A.; Kravets, V. V.; Chu, H. W.; Spendier, K.; Celinski, Z. J.

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and highly anisotropic barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoparticles were coated with an anti-inflammatory drug and magnetically transported through mucus produced by primary human airway epithelial cells. Using wet planetary ball milling, dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid-coated BaFe12O19 nano-particles (BaNPs) of 1–100 nm in diameter were prepared in water. BaNPs and conventional 20–30-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (FeNPs) were then encased in a polymer (PLGA) loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) and tagged for imaging. PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Both PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were transferred to the surface of a ~100-μm thick mucus layer of air-liquid interface cultured primary normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTE) cells. Within 30 min, the nanoparticles were pulled successfully through the mucus layer by a permanent neodymium magnet. The penetration time of the nanomedicine was monitored using confocal microscopy and tailored by varying the thickness of the PLGA-Dex coating around the particles. PMID:27774374

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin modulates mucin glycosylation with sialyl-Lewisx to increase binding to airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woosuk; Choe, Shawn; Miao, Jinfeng; Xu, Ying; Powell, Rebecca; Lin, Jingjun; Kuang, Zhizhou; Gaskins, H Rex; Lau, Gee W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients battle life-long pulmonary infections with the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). An overabundance of mucus in CF airways provides a favorable niche for PA growth. When compared to that of non-CF individuals, mucus of CF airways is enriched in sialyl-Lewisx, a preferred binding receptor for PA. Notably, the levels of sialyl-Lewisx directly correlate with infection severity in CF patients. However, the mechanism by which PA causes increased sialylation remains uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the ability of PA virulence factors to modulate sialyl-Lewisx modification in airway mucins. We found pyocyanin (PCN) to be a potent inducer of sialyl-Lewisx in both mouse airways and in primary and immortalized CF and non-CF human airway epithelial cells. PCN increased the expression of C2/4GnT and ST3Gal-IV, two of the glycosyltransferases responsible for the stepwise biosynthesis of sialyl-Lewisx, through a TNF-α-mediated phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) dependent pathway. Furthermore, PA bound more efficiently to airway epithelial cells pre-exposed to PCN through a flagellar cap-dependent manner. Importantly, antibodies against sialyl-Lewisx and anti-TNF-α attenuated PA binding. These results indicate that PCN secretes PCN to induce a favorable environment for chronic colonization of CF lungs by increasing the glycosylation of airway mucins with sialyl-Lewisx. PMID:26555707

  13. The innate immune properties of airway mucosal surfaces are regulated by dynamic interactions between mucins and interacting proteins: the mucin interactome

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Amina A.; Wang, Tiffany; Li, Lily; Kesimer, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and asthma, are characterized by hypersecretion and poor clearance of mucus, which are associated with poor prognosis and mortality. Little is known about the relationship between the biophysical properties of mucus and its molecular composition. The mucins MUC5B and MUC5AC are traditionally believed to generate the characteristic biophysical properties of airway mucus. However, the contribution of hundreds of globular proteins to the biophysical properties of mucus is not clear. Approximately one-third of the total mucus proteome comprises distinct, multi-protein complexes centered around airway mucins. These complexes constitute a discrete entity we call the “mucin interactome”. The data suggest that while the majority of these proteins interact with mucins via electrostatic and weak interactions, some interact through very strong hydrophobic and/or covalent interactions. Using reagents that interfere with protein-protein interactions, the complexes can be disassembled, and mucus rheology can be dramatically altered. Using MUC5B-glutathione S-transferase (GST) and MUC5B-galectin-3 as a representative of these interactions, we provide evidence that individual mucin protein interactions can alter the biophysical properties of mucus and modulate the biological function of the protein. We propose that the key mechano- and bio-active functions of mucus depend on the dynamic interactions between mucins and globular proteins. These observations challenge the paradigm that mucins are the only molecules that confer biophysical properties of mucus. These observations may ultimately lead to a greater understanding of the system and guide the development of strategies for more effective interventions using better therapeutic agents. PMID:27072609

  14. Pathogen bacteria adhesion to skin mucus of fishes.

    PubMed

    Benhamed, Said; Guardiola, Francisco A; Mars, Mohammed; Esteban, María Ángeles

    2014-06-25

    Fish are always in intimate contact with their environment; therefore they are permanently exposed to very vary external hazards (e.g. aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, viruses, parasites, pollutants). To fight off pathogenic microorganisms, the epidermis and its secretion, the mucus acts as a barrier between the fish and the environment. Fish are surrounded by a continuous layer of mucus which is the first physical, chemical and biological barrier from infection and the first site of interaction between fish's skin cells and pathogens. The mucus composition is very complex and includes numerous antibacterial factors secreted by fish's skin cells, such as immunoglobulins, agglutinins, lectins, lysins and lysozymes. These factors have a very important role to discriminate between pathogenic and commensal microorganisms and to protect fish from invading pathogens. Furthermore, the skin mucus represents an important portal of entry of pathogens since it induces the development of biofilms, and represents a favorable microenvironment for bacteria, the main disease agents for fish. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the interaction between bacteria and fish skin mucus, the adhesion mechanisms of pathogens and the major factors influencing pathogen adhesion to mucus. The better knowledge of the interaction between fish and their environment could inspire other new perspectives to study as well as to exploit the mucus properties for different purposes.

  15. Synthetic tracheal mucus with native rheological and surface tension properties.

    PubMed

    Hamed, R; Fiegel, J

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the development of a model tracheal mucus with chemical composition and physical properties (bulk viscoelasticity and surface tension) matched to that of native tracheal mucus is described. The mucus mimetics (MMs) were formulated using components that are abundant in tracheal mucus (glycoproteins, proteins, lipids, ions, and water) at concentrations similar to those found natively. Pure solutions were unable to achieve the gel behavior observed with native mucus. The addition of a bifunctional cross-linking agent enabled control over the viscoelastic properties of the MMs by tailoring the concentration of the cross-linking agent and the duration of cross-linking. Three MM formulations with different bulk viscoelastic properties, all within the normal range for nondiseased tracheal mucus, were chosen for investigation of surfactant spreading at the air-mimetic interface. Surfactant spread quickly and completely on the least viscoelastic mimetic surface, enabling the surface tension of the mimetic to be lowered to match native tracheal mucus. However, surfactant spreading on the more viscoelastic mimetics was hindered, suggesting that the bulk properties of the mimetics dictate the range of surface properties that can be achieved.

  16. Proteomics of Buccal Cavity Mucus in Female Tilapia Fish (Oreochromis spp.): A Comparison between Parental and Non-Parental Fish

    PubMed Central

    Iq, Koe Chun; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2011-01-01

    Mouthbrooding is an elaborate form of parental care displayed by many teleost species. While the direct benefits of mouthbrooding such as protection and transportation of offsprings are known, it is unclear if mouthbrooding offers additional benefits to embryos during incubation. In addition, mouthbrooding could incur negative costs on parental fish, due to limited feeding opportunities. Parental tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp.) display an elaborated form of parental care by incubating newly hatched embryos in oral buccal cavity until the complete adsorption of yolk sac. In order to understand the functional aspects of mouthbrooding, we undertake a proteomics approach to compare oral mucus sampled from mouthbrooders and non-mouthbrooders, respectively. Majority of the identified proteins have also been previously identified in other biological fluids or mucus-rich organs in different organisms. We also showed the upregulation of 22 proteins and down regulation of 3 proteins in mucus collected from mouthbrooders. Anterior gradient protein, hemoglobin beta-A chain and alpha-2 globin levels were lower in mouthbrooder samples. Mouthbrooder oral mucus collectively showed increase levels of proteins related to cytoskeletal properties, glycolytic pathway and mediation of oxidative stress. Overall the findings suggest cellular stress response, probably to support production of mucus during mouthbrooding phase. PMID:21533134

  17. Proteomics of buccal cavity mucus in female tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp.): a comparison between parental and non-parental fish.

    PubMed

    Iq, Koe Chun; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2011-01-01

    Mouthbrooding is an elaborate form of parental care displayed by many teleost species. While the direct benefits of mouthbrooding such as protection and transportation of offsprings are known, it is unclear if mouthbrooding offers additional benefits to embryos during incubation. In addition, mouthbrooding could incur negative costs on parental fish, due to limited feeding opportunities. Parental tilapia fish (Oreochromis spp.) display an elaborated form of parental care by incubating newly hatched embryos in oral buccal cavity until the complete adsorption of yolk sac. In order to understand the functional aspects of mouthbrooding, we undertake a proteomics approach to compare oral mucus sampled from mouthbrooders and non-mouthbrooders, respectively. Majority of the identified proteins have also been previously identified in other biological fluids or mucus-rich organs in different organisms. We also showed the upregulation of 22 proteins and down regulation of 3 proteins in mucus collected from mouthbrooders. Anterior gradient protein, hemoglobin beta-A chain and alpha-2 globin levels were lower in mouthbrooder samples. Mouthbrooder oral mucus collectively showed increase levels of proteins related to cytoskeletal properties, glycolytic pathway and mediation of oxidative stress. Overall the findings suggest cellular stress response, probably to support production of mucus during mouthbrooding phase. PMID:21533134

  18. The emergency airway.

    PubMed

    Goon, Serena S H; Stephens, Robert C M; Smith, Helen

    2009-12-01

    The 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario is a nightmare for all clinicians who manage airways. Cricothyroidotomy is one of several emergency airway management techniques. Cricothyroidotomy is a short-term solution which provides oxygenation, not ventilation, and is not a definitive airway. Although there are tests which can help predict whether an intubation will be difficult, they are not always good predictors. As the can't intubate, can't ventilate scenario is rare, cricothyroidotomy is an unfamiliar procedure to many. In this situation, expert help must be called for early on. In the meantime, it is vital that all other simple airway manoeuvres have been attempted, such as good positioning of the patient with head tilt and chin lift, and use of airway adjuncts like the oral (Guedel) airway or nasopharyngeal airway, and the laryngeal mask airway. However, if attempts to secure the airway are unsuccessful, there may be no other option than to perform a cricothyroidotomy. It is a difficult decision to make, but with increasing hypoxia, it is essential that one oxygenates the patient. Cricothyroidotomy provides an opening in the pace between the anterior inferior border of the thyroid cartilage and the anterior superior border of the cricoid cartilage, allowing access to the airway below the glottis. The anatomical considerations are important when performing this procedure (Ellis, 2009), and there are other scenarios when it is used. It is not without consequence, as with any procedure.

  19. Variable beta-glucans production by different states of Eurotium amstelodami explains differences in inflammatory responses in airway cells.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Millon, Laurence; Rognon, Bénédicte; Roussel, Sandrine; Botterel, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane; Reboux, Gabriel

    2011-09-01

    Eurotium amstelodami, a mold frequently identified in housing and farm air samples, is a suspected cause of respiratory diseases such as allergic alveolitis, atopic asthma, and organic dust toxic syndrome. This fungus is present in the air in three different states (ascospores, conidia, and hyphae). The aim of this study was to test in vitro the differential inflammatory response of airway cells exposed to 1,3 betaglucanase-treated protein extract (BGPE), from E. amstelodami ascospores, conidia, and hyphae. Confluent cells from the A549 cell line were inoculated with calibrated BGPE issued from the three fungal forms. The levels of eight cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammatory responses were measured after 8 h of exposure. Beta-d-glucan (BDG) was quantified in total fungal extract as well as in the BGPE from the three fungal states. Hyphal BGPE were the only ones to induce a marked inflammatory response and they contain higher quantities of BDG. The present study adds to the growing body of evidence that beta-glucan from fungal hyphae play a crucial role in respiratory diseases. PMID:21851418

  20. Alteration of cervical mucus by vanguard human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Katz, D F; Brofeldt, B T; Overstreet, J W; Hanson, F W

    1982-05-01

    Movement characteristics of 'vanguard' and 'following' human spermatozoa within cervical mucus were measured using high-speed cinemicrography. The data were applied to a mathematical model of the hydrodynamics of sperm-mucus interaction, using the methods of analysis of covariance and stepwise multiple regression. Vanguard spermatozoa swam more rapidly and more efficiently than did following spermatozoa, although the flagellar beat frequencies and amplitudes of the spermatozoa in the two populations did not differ. This distinction in sperm-mucus hydrodynamics could be due to reduced flagellar thrust and/or increased mucous resistance experienced by the following spermatozoa.

  1. REGULATION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN RESPONSE TO AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: FURTHER MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endp...

  2. What's in a name? Inflammatory airway disease in racehorses in training.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, J M; Christley, R M; Gerber, V; Malikides, N; Wood, J L N; Newton, J R; Hodgson, J L

    2011-11-01

    The term 'inflammatory airway disease' (IAD) is often used to describe the syndrome of lower airway inflammation that frequently affects young racehorses in training around the world. In practice, this inflammation is generally diagnosed using a combination of endoscopic tracheal examination, including grading of amounts of mucus present and tracheal wash sampling. However, a recent consensus statement from the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) sampling, rather than tracheal wash (TW) sampling, is required for cytological diagnosis of IAD and that tracheal mucus is not an essential criterion. However, as BAL is a relatively invasive procedure that is not commonly used on racing yards, this definition can only be applied routinely to a biased referral population. In contrast, many practitioners continue to diagnose IAD using endoscopic tracheal examination and sampling. We argue that, rather than restricting the use of the term IAD to phenotypes diagnosed by BAL, it is important to distinguish in the literature between airway inflammation diagnosed by BAL and that identified in the field using TW sampling. We suggest the use of the term brIAD for the former and trIAD for the latter. It is essential that we continue to endeavour to improve our understanding of the aetiology, pathogenesis and clinical relevance of airway inflammation identified in racehorses in training using tracheal examination and sampling. Future studies should focus on investigations of the component signs of airway inflammation.

  3. Near-Universal Prevalence of Pneumocystis and Associated Increase in Mucus in the Lungs of Infants With Sudden Unexpected Death

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Sergio L.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Gallo, Miriam; Pérez, Francisco; Astorga, J.-Felipe; Bustamante, Rebeca; Chabé, Magali; Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Iturra, Pablo; Miller, Robert F.; Aliouat, El Moukthar; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pneumocystis without obvious accompanying pathology is occasionally reported in autopsied infant lungs. Its prevalence and significance are unknown. Interestingly, this mild infection induces a strong activation of mucus secretion–related genes in young immunocompetent rodents that has not been explored in infants. Excess mucus is induced by multiple airway offenders through nonspecific pathways and would explain a cofactor role of Pneumocystis in respiratory disease. We undertook characterization of the prevalence of Pneumocystis and associated mucus in infant lungs. Methods. Samples from 128 infants (mean age, 101 days) who died suddenly and unexpectedly in Santiago during 1999–2004 were examined for Pneumocystis using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) amplification of the P. jirovecii mtLSU ribosomal RNA gene and immunofluorescence microscopy (IF). Pneumocystis-negative infants 28 days and older and their age-closest positives were studied for MUC5AC expression and Pneumocystis burden by Western blot and quantitative PCR, respectively. Results. Pneumocystis DNA was detected by nPCR in 105 of the 128 infants (82.0%) and Pneumocystis organisms were visualized by IF in 99 (94.3%) of the DNA-positive infants. The infection was commonest at 3–4 months with 40 of 41 (97.6%) infants of that age testing positive. MUC5AC was significantly increased in Pneumocystis-positive tissue specimens (P = .013). Death was unexplained in 113 (88.3%) infants; Pneumocystis was detected in 95 (84.0%) of them vs 10 of 15 (66.7%) with explained death (P = .28). Conclusions. A highly focal Pneumocystis infection associated to increased mucus expression is almost universally present in the lungs of infants dying unexpectedly in the community regardless of autopsy diagnosis. PMID:23074306

  4. Staphylococcus aureus adheres to human intestinal mucus but can be displaced by certain lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vesterlund, Satu; Karp, Matti; Salminen, Seppo; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that Staphylococcus aureus may colonize the intestinal tract, especially among hospitalized patients. As Staph. aureus has been found to be associated with certain gastrointestinal diseases, it has become important to study whether this bacterium can colonize the intestinal tract and if so, whether it is possible to prevent colonization. Adhesion is the first step in colonization; this study shows that Staph. aureus adheres to mucus from resected human intestinal tissue. Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mainly commercial probiotics, were able to reduce adhesion and viability of adherent Staph. aureus. In displacement assays the amount of adherent Staph. aureus in human intestinal mucus was reduced 39-44% by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. Moreover, adherent Lactobacillus reuteri, Lc. lactis and P. freudenreichii reduced viability of adherent Staph. aureus by 27-36%, depending on the strain, after 2 h incubation. This was probably due to the production of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide and possibly in the case of L. reuteri to the production of reuterin. This study shows for the first time that Staph. aureus can adhere to human intestinal mucus and adherent bacteria can be displaced and killed by certain LAB strains via in situ production of antimicrobial substances.

  5. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  6. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  7. Reversal of established CD4+ type 2 T helper-mediated allergic airway inflammation and eosinophilia by therapeutic treatment with DNA vaccines limits progression towards chronic inflammation and remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R; Lamb, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    Immunostimulatory DNA-based vaccines can prevent the induction of CD4+ type 2 T helper (Th2) cell-mediated airway inflammation in experimental models, when administered before or at the time of allergen exposure. Here we demonstrate their efficacy in limiting the progression of an established response to chronic pulmonary inflammation and airway remodelling on subsequent allergen challenge. Mice exhibiting Th2-mediated airway inflammation induced following sensitization and challenge with group 1 allergen derived from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group species (Der p 1), a major allergen of house dust mite, were treated with pDNA vaccines. Their airways were rechallenged and the extent of inflammation assessed. In plasma DNA (pDNA)-vaccinated mice, infiltration of inflammatory cells, goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus production were reduced and subepithelial fibrosis attenuated. The reduction in eosinophil numbers correlated with a fall in levels of the profibrotic mediator transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue. In addition to lung epithelial cells and resident alveolar macrophages, infiltrating eosinophils, the principle inflammatory cells recruited following allergen exposure, were a major source of TGF-β1. Protection, conferred irrespective of the specificity of the pDNA construct, did not correlate with a sustained increase in systemic interferon (IFN)-γ production but in a reduction in levels of the Th2 pro-inflammatory cytokines. Notably, there was a reduction in levels of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 produced by systemic Der p 1 reactive CD4+ Th2 cells on in vitro stimulation as well as in IL-4 and IL-5 levels in BAL fluid. These data suggest that suppression of CD4+ Th2-mediated inflammation and eosinophilia were sufficient to attenuate progression towards airway remodelling. Immunostimulatory DNA may therefore have a therapeutic application in treatment of established allergic asthma in patients. PMID

  8. The outer mucus layer hosts a distinct intestinal microbial niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Limenitakis, Julien P.; Fuhrer, Tobias; Geuking, Markus B.; Lawson, Melissa A.; Wyss, Madeleine; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Keller, Irene; Macpherson, Jamie A.; Rupp, Sandra; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V.; Stecher, Bärbel; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The overall composition of the mammalian intestinal microbiota varies between individuals: within each individual there are differences along the length of the intestinal tract related to host nutrition, intestinal motility and secretions. Mucus is a highly regenerative protective lubricant glycoprotein sheet secreted by host intestinal goblet cells; the inner mucus layer is nearly sterile. Here we show that the outer mucus of the large intestine forms a unique microbial niche with distinct communities, including bacteria without specialized mucolytic capability. Bacterial species present in the mucus show differential proliferation and resource utilization compared with the same species in the intestinal lumen, with high recovery of bioavailable iron and consumption of epithelial-derived carbon sources according to their genome-encoded metabolic repertoire. Functional competition for existence in this intimate layer is likely to be a major determinant of microbiota composition and microbial molecular exchange with the host. PMID:26392213

  9. Respiratory mucus hypersecretion really an innocent disorder. A 22-year mortality survey of 1061 working men

    SciTech Connect

    Annesi, I.; Kauffmann, F.

    1986-10-01

    The relation of chronic air-flow limitation and respiratory mucus hypersecretion to all causes of mortality was studied in a population of 1,061 men working in the Paris area, surveyed initially in 1960/1961, and followed for 22 yr. During this period, 369 deaths occurred; VC, FEV1, FEV1/H3, and FEV1/VC were significantly associated with mortality, even when age, smoking, occupational dust exposure, and chronic phlegm were taken into account. Besides the obstructive disorder, the hypersecretory disorder (chronic phlegm) was significantly associated with mortality. Controlling, using Cox's model, for age, FEV1/H3, smoking habits, and dust exposure, all factors associated with chronic mucus hypersecretion and mortality, showed that phlegm production remained significantly related to death (relative risk, = 1.35; p less than 0.01). Although relatively weak, this relationship is not negligible in terms of public health because of the high prevalence of chronic phlegm.

  10. Catecholamine concentrations in rat nasal mucus are modulated by trigeminal stimulation of the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Lucero, M T; Squires, A

    1998-10-01

    Olfactory mucus provides the perireceptor environment in which the initial steps of olfactory signal transduction occur [5]. Extrinsic autonomic and trigeminal innervation controls mucus secretion and may release neurotransmitters into nasal mucus [13]. We quantitated catecholamines in rat nasal mucus and found that catecholamine levels first increased and then declined with trigeminal stimulation. These data indicate that catecholamine levels are regulated in nasal mucus and could modulate the odor sensitivity of olfactory sensory neurons.

  11. Mimicking microbial strategies for the design of mucus-permeating nanoparticles for oral immunization.

    PubMed

    Gamazo, Carlos; Martín-Arbella, Nekane; Brotons, Ana; Camacho, Ana I; Irache, J M

    2015-10-01

    Dealing with mucosal delivery systems means dealing with mucus. The name mucosa comes from mucus, a dense fluid enriched in glycoproteins, such as mucin, which main function is to protect the delicate mucosal epithelium. Mucus provides a barrier against physiological chemical and physical aggressors (i.e., host secreted digestive products such as bile acids and enzymes, food particles) but also against the potentially noxious microbiota and their products. Intestinal mucosa covers 400m(2) in the human host, and, as a consequence, is the major portal of entry of the majority of known pathogens. But, in turn, some microorganisms have evolved many different approaches to circumvent this barrier, a direct consequence of natural co-evolution. The understanding of these mechanisms (known as virulence factors) used to interact and/or disrupt mucosal barriers should instruct us to a rational design of nanoparticulate delivery systems intended for oral vaccination and immunotherapy. This review deals with this mimetic approach to obtain nanocarriers capable to reach the epithelial cells after oral delivery and, in parallel, induce strong and long-lasting immune and protective responses.

  12. Airway-Resident Memory CD8 T Cells Provide Antigen-Specific Protection against Respiratory Virus Challenge through Rapid IFN-γ Production.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Sean R; Wilson, Jarad J; Wang, Hong; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2015-07-01

    CD8 airway resident memory T (TRM) cells are a distinctive TRM population with a high turnover rate and a unique phenotype influenced by their localization within the airways. Their role in mediating protective immunity to respiratory pathogens, although suggested by many studies, has not been directly proven. This study provides definitive evidence that airway CD8 TRM cells are sufficient to mediate protection against respiratory virus challenge. Despite being poorly cytolytic in vivo and failing to expand after encountering Ag, airway CD8 TRM cells rapidly express effector cytokines, with IFN-γ being produced most robustly. Notably, established airway CD8 TRM cells possess the ability to produce IFN-γ faster than systemic effector memory CD8 T cells. Furthermore, naive mice receiving intratracheal transfer of airway CD8 TRM cells lacking the ability to produce IFN-γ were less effective at controlling pathogen load upon heterologous challenge. This direct evidence of airway CD8 TRM cell-mediated protection demonstrates the importance of these cells as a first line of defense for optimal immunity against respiratory pathogens and suggests they should be considered in the development of future cell-mediated vaccines.

  13. Store-Operated Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ Channels Regulate PAR2-Activated Ca2+ Signaling and Cytokine Production in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Yamashita, Megumi; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2015-09-01

    The G-protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and auto-immune disorders. In airway epithelial cells (AECs), stimulation of PAR2 by allergens and proteases triggers the release of a host of inflammatory mediators to regulate bronchomotor tone and immune cell recruitment. Activation of PAR2 turns on several cell signaling pathways of which the mobilization of cytosolic Ca(2+) is likely a critical but poorly understood event. In this study, we show that Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by stromal interaction molecule 1 and Orai1 are a major route of Ca(2+) entry in primary human AECs and drive the Ca(2+) elevations seen in response to PAR2 activation. Activation of CRAC channels induces the production of several key inflammatory mediators from AECs including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-6, and PGE2, in part through stimulation of gene expression via nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Furthermore, PAR2 stimulation induces the production of many key inflammatory mediators including PGE2, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF in a CRAC channel-dependent manner. These findings indicate that CRAC channels are the primary mechanism for Ca(2+) influx in AECs and a vital checkpoint for the induction of PAR2-induced proinflammatory cytokines.

  14. Binding of type 1-piliated Escherichia coli to vaginal mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Venegas, M F; Navas, E L; Gaffney, R A; Duncan, J L; Anderson, B E; Schaeffer, A J

    1995-01-01

    To better understand the interactions involved in bacterial adherence and the role of mucus in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, we developed a system to study the binding of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, HB101/pWRS1-17, expressing type 1 pili, to vaginal mucus collected from 28 women. Bacteria bound to differing extents to all specimens examined, and preincubation of bacteria with mannose inhibited binding by 50 to 89%. Additionally, all mucus samples showed reactivity with anti-mannose antibody, and the levels of reactivity correlated with the levels of bacterial binding, suggesting that the mannose-terminal saccharides present on these glycoproteins are the receptors for the binding of type 1-piliated bacteria. Mucus specimens collected over periods of 5 days and 12 weeks exhibited significant variation in bacterial binding, indicating temporal differences in the ability of vaginal mucus to act as a receptor for type 1-piliated E. coli. The results show that vaginal mucus can bind bacteria and may thus influence the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of the vaginal and urinary tract epithelium by E. coli. PMID:7822005

  15. Structural basis for adaptation of lactobacilli to gastrointestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Etzold, Sabrina; Kober, Olivia I; Mackenzie, Donald A; Tailford, Louise E; Gunning, A Patrick; Walshaw, John; Hemmings, Andrew M; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    The mucus layer covering the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is critical in selecting and maintaining homeostatic interactions with our gut bacteria. However, the underpinning mechanisms of these interactions are not understood. Here, we provide structural and functional insights into the canonical mucus-binding protein (MUB), a multi-repeat cell-surface adhesin found in Lactobacillus inhabitants of the GI tract. X-ray crystallography together with small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrated a 'beads on a string' arrangement of repeats, generating 174 nm long protein fibrils, as shown by atomic force microscopy. Each repeat consists of tandemly arranged Ig- and mucin-binding protein (MucBP) modules. The binding of full-length MUB was confined to mucus via multiple interactions involving terminal sialylated mucin glycans. While individual MUB domains showed structural similarity to fimbrial proteins from Gram-positive pathogens, the particular organization of MUB provides a structural explanation for the mechanisms in which lactobacilli have adapted to their host niche by maximizing interactions with the mucus receptors, potentiating the retention of bacteria within the mucus layer. Together, this study reveals functional and structural features which may affect tropism of microbes across mucus and along the GI tract, providing unique insights into the mechanisms adopted by commensals and probiotics to adapt to the mucosal environment. PMID:24373178

  16. Airway Clearance Devices for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis is to examine the safety and efficacy of airway clearance devices (ACDs) for cystic fibrosis and attempt to differentiate between devices, where possible, on grounds of clinical efficacy, quality of life, safety and/or patient preference. Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common, inherited, life-limiting disease that affects multiple systems of the human body. Respiratory dysfunction is the primary complication and leading cause of death due to CF. CF causes abnormal mucus secretion in the airways, leading to airway obstruction and mucus plugging, which in turn can lead to bacterial infection and further mucous production. Over time, this almost cyclical process contributes to severe airway damage and loss of respiratory function. Removal of airway secretions, termed airway clearance, is thus an integral component of the management of CF. A variety of methods are available for airway clearance, some requiring mechanical devices, others physical manipulation of the body (e.g. physiotherapy). Conventional chest physiotherapy (CCPT), through the assistance of a caregiver, is the current standard of care for achieving airway clearance, particularly in young patients up to the ages of six or seven. CF patients are, however, living much longer now than in decades past. The median age of survival in Canada has risen to 37.0 years for the period of 1998-2002 (5-year window), up from 22.8 years for the 5-year window ending in 1977. The prevalence has also risen accordingly, last recorded as 3,453 in Canada in 2002, up from 1,630 in 1977. With individuals living longer, there is a greater need for independent methods of airway clearance. Airway Clearance Devices There are at least three classes of airway clearance devices: positive expiratory pressure devices (PEP), airway oscillating devices (AOD; either handheld or stationary) and high frequency chest compression (HFCC)/mechanical percussion (MP

  17. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae modulates STAT3-STAT6/EGFR-FOXA2 signaling to induce overexpression of airway mucins.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yonghua; Kuang, Zhizhou; Jing, Jia; Miao, Jinfeng; Mei, Li Yu; Lee, Ryan J; Kim, Susie; Choe, Shawn; Krause, Duncan C; Lau, Gee W

    2014-12-01

    Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in the airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, long appreciated as one of the triggers of acute exacerbations of chronic pulmonary diseases, has recently been reported to promote excessive mucus secretion. However, the mechanism of mucin overproduction induced by M. pneumoniae remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the mechanism by which M. pneumoniae induces mucus hypersecretion by using M. pneumoniae infection of mouse lungs, human primary bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells cultured at the air-liquid interface, and the conventionally cultured airway epithelial NCI-H292 cell line. We demonstrated that M. pneumoniae induced the expression of mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B by activating the STAT6-STAT3 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal pathways, which in turn downregulated FOXA2, a transcriptional repressor of mucin biosynthesis. The upstream stimuli of these pathways, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, and IL-13, increased dramatically upon exposure to M. pneumoniae. Inhibition of the STAT6, STAT3, and EGFR signaling pathways significantly restored the expression of FOXA2 and attenuated the expression of airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B. Collectively, these studies demonstrated that M. pneumoniae induces airway mucus hypersecretion by modulating the STAT/EGFR-FOXA2 signaling pathways. PMID:25287927

  19. Phytonutrient diet supplementation promotes beneficial Clostridia species and intestinal mucus secretion resulting in protection against enteric infection

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarska, Marta; Willing, Benjamin P.; Bravo, David M.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Plant extracts, or phytonutrients, are used in traditional medicine practices as supplements to enhance the immune system and gain resistance to various infectious diseases and are used in animal production as health promoting feed additives. To date, there are no studies that have assessed their mechanism of action and ability to alter mucosal immune responses in the intestine. We characterized the immunomodulatory function of six phytonutrients: anethol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, capsicum oleoresin and garlic extract. Mice were treated with each phytonutrient to assess changes to colonic gene expression and mucus production. All six phytonutrients showed variable changes in expression of innate immune genes in the colon. However only eugenol stimulated production of the inner mucus layer, a key mucosal barrier to microbes. The mechanism by which eugenol causes mucus layer thickening likely involves microbial stimulation as analysis of the intestinal microbiota composition showed eugenol treatment led to an increase in abundance of specific families within the Clostridiales order. Further, eugenol treatment confers colonization resistance to the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. These results suggest that eugenol acts to strengthen the mucosal barrier by increasing the thickness of the inner mucus layer, which protects against invading pathogens and disease. PMID:25787310

  20. Repurposing tromethamine as inhaled therapy to treat CF airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Launspach, Janice L.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Rivera, Jade A.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Thorne, Peter S.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel activity causes airway surface liquid (ASL) pH to become acidic, which impairs airway host defenses. One potential therapeutic approach is to correct the acidic pH in CF airways by aerosolizing HCO3− and/or nonbicarbonate pH buffers. Here, we show that raising ASL pH with inhaled HCO3− increased pH. However, the effect was transient, and pH returned to baseline values within 30 minutes. Tromethamine (Tham) is a buffer with a long serum half-life used as an i.v. formulation to treat metabolic acidosis. We found that Tham aerosols increased ASL pH in vivo for at least 2 hours and enhanced bacterial killing. Inhaled hypertonic saline (7% NaCl) is delivered to people with CF in an attempt to promote mucus clearance. Because an increased ionic strength inhibits ASL antimicrobial factors, we added Tham to hypertonic saline and applied it to CF sputum. We found that Tham alone and in combination with hypertonic saline increased pH and enhanced bacterial killing. These findings suggest that aerosolizing the HCO3−-independent buffer Tham, either alone or in combination with hypertonic saline, might be of therapeutic benefit in CF airway disease. PMID:27390778

  1. Repurposing tromethamine as inhaled therapy to treat CF airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Launspach, Janice L.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Rivera, Jade A.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Thorne, Peter S.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel activity causes airway surface liquid (ASL) pH to become acidic, which impairs airway host defenses. One potential therapeutic approach is to correct the acidic pH in CF airways by aerosolizing HCO3– and/or nonbicarbonate pH buffers. Here, we show that raising ASL pH with inhaled HCO3– increased pH. However, the effect was transient, and pH returned to baseline values within 30 minutes. Tromethamine (Tham) is a buffer with a long serum half-life used as an i.v. formulation to treat metabolic acidosis. We found that Tham aerosols increased ASL pH in vivo for at least 2 hours and enhanced bacterial killing. Inhaled hypertonic saline (7% NaCl) is delivered to people with CF in an attempt to promote mucus clearance. Because an increased ionic strength inhibits ASL antimicrobial factors, we added Tham to hypertonic saline and applied it to CF sputum. We found that Tham alone and in combination with hypertonic saline increased pH and enhanced bacterial killing. These findings suggest that aerosolizing the HCO3–-independent buffer Tham, either alone or in combination with hypertonic saline, might be of therapeutic benefit in CF airway disease. PMID:27390778

  2. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  3. NLRP6 inflammasome orchestrates the colonic host-microbial interface by regulating goblet cell mucus secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarska, Marta; Thaiss, Christoph A.; Nowarski, Roni; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Brown, Eric M.; Frankel, Gad; Levy, Maayan; Katz, Meirav N.; Philbrick, William M.; Elinav, Eran; Finlay, B. Brett; Flavell, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mucus production by goblet cells of the large intestine serves as a crucial anti microbial protective mechanism at the interface between the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells of the mammalian intestinal ecosystem. However, the regulatory pathways involved in goblet cell-induced mucus secretion remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the NLRP6 inflammasome, a recently described regulator of colonic microbiota composition and bio-geographical distribution, is a critical orchestrator of goblet cell mucin granule exocytosis. NLRP6 deficiency leads to defective autophagy in goblet cells and abrogated mucin secretion into the large intestinal lumen. Consequently, NLRP6 inflammasome-deficient mice are unable to clear enteric pathogens from the mucosal surface, rendering them highly susceptible to persistent infection. This study identifies the first innate immune regulatory pathway governing goblet cell mucus secretion, linking non-hematopoietic inflammasome signaling to autophagy and highlighting the goblet cell as a critical innate immune player in the control of intestinal host-microbial mutualism. PMID:24581500

  4. Molecular basis for pH-dependent mucosal dehydration in cystic fibrosis airways.

    PubMed

    Garland, Alaina L; Walton, William G; Coakley, Raymond D; Tan, Chong D; Gilmore, Rodney C; Hobbs, Carey A; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Clunes, Lucy A; Bencharit, Sompop; Stutts, M Jackson; Betts, Laurie; Redinbo, Matthew R; Tarran, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The ability to maintain proper airway surface liquid (ASL) volume homeostasis is vital for mucus hydration and clearance, which are essential aspects of the mammalian lung's innate defense system. In cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common life-threatening genetic disorders, ASL dehydration leads to mucus accumulation and chronic infection. In normal airways, the secreted protein short palate lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) effectively inhibits epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-dependent Na(+) absorption and preserves ASL volume. In CF airways, it has been hypothesized that increased ENaC-dependent Na(+) absorption contributes to ASL depletion, and hence increased disease. However, this theory is controversial, and the mechanism for abnormal ENaC regulation in CF airways has remained elusive. Here, we show that SPLUNC1 is a pH-sensitive regulator of ENaC and is unable to inhibit ENaC in the acidic CF airway environment. Alkalinization of CF airway cultures prevented CF ASL hyperabsorption, and this effect was abolished when SPLUNC1 was stably knocked down. Accordingly, we resolved the crystal structure of SPLUNC1 to 2.8 Å. Notably, this structure revealed two pH-sensitive salt bridges that, when removed, rendered SPLUNC1 pH-insensitive and able to regulate ASL volume in acidic ASL. Thus, we conclude that ENaC hyperactivity is secondary to reduced CF ASL pH. Together, these data provide molecular insights into the mucosal dehydration associated with a range of pulmonary diseases, including CF, and suggest that future therapy be directed toward alkalinizing the pH of CF airways. PMID:24043776

  5. Interleukin-19: A Constituent of the Regulome That Controls Antigen Presenting Cells in the Lungs and Airway Responses to Microbial Products

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Carol; Park, Sung-Hyun; Daley, Eleen; Emson, Claire; Louten, Jennifer; Sisco, Maureen; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Grunig, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+) alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. Methodology/Principal Findings IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/-) mice were studied at baseline (naïve) and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII) in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2) expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. Conclusions/Significance Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T lymphocytes and Notch2

  6. Effect of adrenergic stimulation on clearance from small ciliated airways in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, K; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Camner, P

    1998-01-01

    Mucociliary transport is an important clearance mechanism of larger airways, but in the smallest ciliated airways (bronchioles) it may be less effective. The present study aimed at investigating whether clearance from the bronchioles in subjects with healthy airways was stimulated by an adrenergic agonist (terbutaline sulphate). Tracheobronchial clearance was studied twice in 10 healthy subjects after inhalation of 6-micron (aerodynamic diameter) monodisperse Teflon particles labeled with 111In. At one exposure, oral treatment with terbutaline sulphate, known to stimulate clearance in large airways, began immediately after inhalation of the particles. The other exposure was a control measurement. The particles were inhaled at an extremely slow flow, 0.05 L/s, which gave deposition mainly in the small ciliated airways (bronchioles). Lung retention was measured at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h. Clearance was significant every 24 h for both exposures (p < .05, two-tailed paired t-test), with similar fractions of retained particles at all time points. During treatment with terbutaline sulphate, the subjects' pulse rates tended to be higher, but clearance rates did not increase. We found, as expected, no significant correlation between lung retention and lung function in either exposure. This study shows that an adrenergic agonist does not significantly influence overall clearance from the bronchiolar region in healthy subjects. This suggests that mucociliary transport does not significantly contribute to clearance from the smallest ciliated airways. Other mechanisms may be more important for the transportation of mucus from these airways. PMID:9555573

  7. Characterization of shed medicinal leech mucus reveals a diverse microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brittany M.; Rickards, Allen; Gehrke, Lauren; Rio, Rita V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial transmission through mucosal-mediated mechanisms is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. One example of this occurs with Hirudo verbana, the medicinal leech, where host attraction to shed conspecific mucus facilitates horizontal transmission of a predominant gut symbiont, the Gammaproteobacterium Aeromonas veronii. However, whether this mucus may harbor other bacteria has not been examined. Here, we characterize the microbiota of shed leech mucus through Illumina deep sequencing of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Additionally, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) typing with subsequent Sanger Sequencing of a 16S rRNA gene clone library provided qualitative confirmation of the microbial composition. Phylogenetic analyses of full-length 16S rRNA sequences were performed to examine microbial taxonomic distribution. Analyses using both technologies indicate the dominance of the Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla within the mucus microbiota. We determined the presence of other previously described leech symbionts, in addition to a number of putative novel leech-associated bacteria. A second predominant gut symbiont, the Rikenella-like bacteria, was also identified within mucus and exhibited similar population dynamics to A. veronii, suggesting persistence in syntrophy beyond the gut. Interestingly, the most abundant bacterial genus belonged to Pedobacter, which includes members capable of producing heparinase, an enzyme that degrades the anticoagulant, heparin. Additionally, bacteria associated with denitrification and sulfate cycling were observed, indicating an abundance of these anions within mucus, likely originating from the leech excretory system. A diverse microbiota harbored within shed mucus has significant potential implications for the evolution of microbiomes, including opportunities for gene transfer and utility in host capture of a diverse group of symbionts. PMID:25620963

  8. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Robert A; Noordhoek, Roseanna

    2010-03-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon frequently encounters and manages difficult airways. Knowledge of and calm progression by practitioner and staff through different means to ventilate and manage a difficult airway are crucial. Practitioners should become comfortable with different types of alternative or rescue airways in order to intervene quickly in case of emergent or unanticipated airway compromise.

  9. Intraluminal inflammation in the airways of patients with chronic bronchitis after treatment with Ambroxol.

    PubMed

    Lusuardi, M; Capelli, A; Salmona, M; Tacconi, M T; Cerutti, C G; Donner, C F

    1995-10-01

    Ambroxol is a mucus-modifying drug with a known ability to stimulate surfactant secretion and inhibit, in vitro, the production of proinflammatory cytokines, neutrophil chemotaxis, and Na+ absorption by the airway epithelium. In dogs inhaling ozone, bronchial hyperreactivity can be inhibited by aerosolized Ambroxol. To verify the possibility of producing anti-inflammatory effects in a clinically relevant condition, 20 patients with chronic bronchitis, randomly divided into two balanced matched groups, were submitted to a 14 day trial with Ambroxol, 150 mg.day-1, or placebo, according to a double-blind design. A bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed the day before starting treatment (T0) and at the 14th day (T14). The analysis of the cellular and soluble (total proteins, albumin, immunoglobulin G and A (IgG and IgA)) BAL components demonstrated no clear modifications. In particular, neutrophil values from the bronchial aliquot showed a large dispersion, with no significant differences (Ambroxol: T0 = 13.7 +/- 5.2%, T14 = 14.0 +/- 6.8%; placebo: T0 = 3.6 +/- 1.1%, T14 = 5.5 +/- 2.2%). We found a nonsignificant increase of phospholipids in BAL supernatants from Ambroxol-treated patients (2.5 +/- 1.9 vs 3.0 +/- 1.9 micrograms.mg-1 of protein); whilst in the placebo group data before and after treatment were superimposable (2.2 +/- 1.5 vs 2.3 +/- 1.9 micrograms.mg-1 of protein). In conclusion, we have failed to demonstrate that conventional treatment with oral Ambroxol can modify surfactant and BAL cell populations in the airways of patients with chronic bronchitis.

  10. Adam8 Limits the Development of Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Knolle, Martin D.; Nakajima, Takahiro; Hergrueter, Anja; Gupta, Kushagra; Polverino, Francesca; Craig, Vanessa J.; Fyfe, Susanne E.; Zahid, Muhammad; Permaul, Perdita; Cernadas, Manuela; Montano, Gilbert; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Sholl, Lynette; Kobzik, Lester; Israel, Elliot; Owen, Caroline A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase-8 (Adam8) regulates allergic airway inflammation (AAI) and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), we compared AAI and AHR in wild type (WT) versus Adam8−/− mice in different genetic backgrounds sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite protein extract (HDM). OVA- and HDM-treated Adam8−/− mice had higher lung leukocyte counts, more airway mucus metaplasia, greater lung levels of some TH2 cytokines, and higher methacholine-induced increases in central airway resistance than allergen-treated WT mice. Studies of OVA-treated Adam8 bone marrow chimeric mice confirmed that leukocyte-derived Adam8 predominantly mediated Adam8’s anti-inflammatory activities in murine airways. Airway eosinophils and macrophages both expressed Adam8 in WT mice with AAI. Adam8 limited AAI and AHR in mice by reducing leukocyte survival because: 1) Adam8−/− mice with AAI had fewer apoptotic eosinophils and macrophages in their airways than WT mice with AAI; and 2) Adam8−/− macrophages and eosinophils had reduced rates of apoptosis compared with WT leukocytes when the intrinsic (but not the extrinsic) apoptosis pathway was triggered in the cells in vitro. ADAM8 was robustly expressed by airway granulocytes in lung sections from human asthma patients but, surprisingly, airway macrophages had less ADAM8 staining than airway eosinophils. Thus, ADAM8 has anti-inflammatory activities during AAI in mice by activating the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in myeloid leukocytes. Strategies that increase ADAM8 levels in myeloid leukocytes may have therapeutic efficacy in asthma. PMID:23670189

  11. Complex rheological behaviors of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) skin mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang Su, Heng Lv, Weiyang Du, Miao Song, Yihu Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    The functions and structures of biological mucus are closely linked to rheology. In this article, the skin mucus of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) was proved to be a weak hydrogel susceptible to shear rate, time, and history, exhibiting: (i) Two-region breakdown of its gel structure during oscillatory strain sweep; (ii) rate-dependent thickening followed by three-region thinning with increased shear rate, and straight thinning with decreased shear rate; and (iii) time-dependent rheopexy at low shear rates, and thixotropy at high shear rates. An interesting correlation between the shear rate- and time-dependent rheological behaviors was also revealed, i.e., the rheopexy-thixotropy transition coincided with the first-second shear thinning region transition. Apart from rheology, a structure of colloidal network was observed in loach skin mucus using transmission electron microscopy. The complex rheology was speculated to result from inter- and intracolloid structural alterations. The unique rheology associated with the colloidal network structure, which has never been previously reported in vertebrate mucus, may play a key role in the functions (e.g., flow, reannealing, lubrication, and barrier) of the mucus.

  12. Identification of Glycosaminoglycans in Human Airway Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Maria E.; Casalino-Matsuda, Susana M.; Forteza, Rosanna M.

    2006-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), known to be present in airway mucus, are macromolecules with a variety of structural and biological functions. In the present work, we used fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) to identify and relatively quantify GAGs in human tracheal aspirates (HTA) obtained from healthy volunteers. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and submucosal gland (SMG) cells were used to assess their differential contribution to GAGs in mucus. Distribution was further assessed by immunofluorescence in human trachea tissue sections and in cell cultures. HTA samples contained keratan sulfate (KS), chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS), and hyaluronan (HA), whereas heparan sulfate (HS) was not detected. SMG cultures secreted CS/DS and HA, CS/DS being the most abundant GAGs in these cultures. NHBE cells synthesized KS, HA, and CS/DS. Confocal microscopy showed that KS was exclusively found at the apical border of NHBE cells and on the apical surface of ciliated epithelial cells in tracheal tissues. CS/DS and HA were present in both NHBE and SMG cells. HS was only found in the extracellular matrix in trachea tissue sections. In summary, HTA samples contain KS, CS/DS, and HA, mirroring a mixture of secretions originated in surface epithelial cells and SMGs. We conclude that surface epithelium is responsible for most HA and all KS present in secretions, whereas glands secrete most of CS/DS. These data suggest that, in diseases where the contribution to secretions of glands versus epithelial cells is altered, the relative concentration of individual GAGs, and therefore their biological activities, will also be affected. PMID:16195536

  13. Skin mucus proteome map of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Cordero, Héctor; Brinchmann, Monica F; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María A

    2015-12-01

    Skin mucus is the first barrier of fish defence. Proteins from skin mucus of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were identified by 2DE followed by LC-MS/MS. From all the identified proteins in the proteome map, we focus on the proteins associated with several immune pathways in fish. Furthermore, the real-time PCR transcript levels in skin are shown. Proteins found include apolipoprotein A1, calmodulin, complement C3, fucose-binding lectin, lysozyme and several caspases. To our knowledge, this is the first skin mucus proteome study and further transcriptional profiling of the identified proteins done on this bony fish species. This not only contributes knowledge on the routes involved in mucosal innate immunity, but also establishes a non-invasive technique based on locating immune markers with a potential use for prevention and/or diagnosis of fish diseases.

  14. A new Thraustochytrid, strain Fng1, isolated from the surface mucus of the hermatypic coral Fungia granulosa.

    PubMed

    Harel, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Rasoulouniriana, Diana; Siboni, Nachshon; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Loya, Yossi; Barak, Ze'ev; Wiesman, Zeev; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2008-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that there is a dynamic microbial biota living on the surface and in the mucus layer of many hermatypic coral species that plays an essential role in coral well-being. Most of the studies published to date emphasize the importance of prokaryotic communities associated with the coral mucus in coral health and disease. In this study, we report the presence of a protist (Fng1) in the mucus of the hermatypic coral Fungia granulosa from the Gulf of Eilat. This protist was identified morphologically and molecularly as belonging to the family Thraustochytridae (phylum Stramenopile, order Labyrinthulida), a group of heterotrophs widely distributed in the marine environment. Morphological examination of this strain revealed a nonmotile organism c. 35 mum in diameter, which is able to thrive on carbon-deprived media, and whose growth and morphology are inoculum dependent. Its fatty acid production profile revealed an array of polyunsaturated fatty acids. A similar protist was also isolated from the mucus of the coral Favia sp. In light of these findings, its possible contribution to the coral holobiont is discussed. PMID:18393989

  15. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  16. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems.

  17. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  18. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  19. Differential Gene Expression Profiles and Selected Cytokine Protein Analysis of Mediastinal Lymph Nodes of Horses with Chronic Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO) Support an Interleukin-17 Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is a pulmonary inflammatory condition that afflicts certain mature horses exposed to organic dust particulates in hay. Its clinical and pathological features, manifested by reversible bronchoconstriction, excessive mucus production and airway neutrophilia, resemble the pulmonary alterations that occur in agricultural workers with occupational asthma. The immunological basis of RAO remains uncertain although its chronicity, its localization to a mucosal surface and its domination by a neutrophilic, non-septic inflammatory response, suggest involvement of Interleukin-17 (IL-17). We examined global gene expression profiles in mediastinal (pulmonary-draining) lymph nodes isolated from RAO-affected and control horses. Differential expression of > 200 genes, coupled with network analysis, supports an IL-17 response centered about NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analysis of mediastinal lymph node sections demonstrated increased IL-17 staining intensity in diseased horses. This result, along with the finding of increased IL-17 concentrations in lymph node homogenates from RAO-affected horses (P = 0.1) and a down-regulation of IL-4 gene and protein expression, provides additional evidence of the involvement of IL-17 in the chronic stages of RAO. Additional investigations are needed to ascertain the cellular source of IL-17 in this equine model of occupational asthma. Understanding the immunopathogenesis of this disorder likely will enhance the development of therapeutic interventions beneficial to human and animal pulmonary health. PMID:26561853

  20. Nrf2 reduces allergic asthma in mice through enhanced airway epithelial cytoprotective function.

    PubMed

    Sussan, Thomas E; Gajghate, Sachin; Chatterjee, Samit; Mandke, Pooja; McCormick, Sarah; Sudini, Kuladeep; Kumar, Sarvesh; Breysse, Patrick N; Diette, Gregory B; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K; Biswal, Shyam

    2015-07-01

    Asthma development and pathogenesis are influenced by the interactions of airway epithelial cells and innate and adaptive immune cells in response to allergens. Oxidative stress is an important mediator of asthmatic phenotypes in these cell types. Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that is the key regulator of the response to oxidative and environmental stress. We previously demonstrated that Nrf2-deficient mice have heightened susceptibility to asthma, including elevated oxidative stress, inflammation, mucus, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) (Rangasamy T, Guo J, Mitzner WA, Roman J, Singh A, Fryer AD, Yamamoto M, Kensler TW, Tuder RM, Georas SN, Biswal S. J Exp Med 202: 47-59, 2005). Here we dissected the role of Nrf2 in lung epithelial cells and tested whether genetic or pharmacological activation of Nrf2 reduces allergic asthma in mice. Cell-specific activation of Nrf2 in club cells of the airway epithelium significantly reduced allergen-induced AHR, inflammation, mucus, Th2 cytokine secretion, oxidative stress, and airway leakiness and increased airway levels of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and E-cadherin. In isolated airway epithelial cells, Nrf2 enhanced epithelial barrier function and increased localization of zonula occludens-1 to the cell surface. Pharmacological activation of Nrf2 by 2-trifluoromethyl-2'-methoxychalone during the allergen challenge was sufficient to reduce allergic inflammation and AHR. New therapeutic options are needed for asthma, and this study demonstrates that activation of Nrf2 in lung epithelial cells is a novel potential therapeutic target to reduce asthma susceptibility.

  1. The role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the response of airway epithelium to particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L D; Krunkosky, T M; Dye, J A; Fischer, B M; Jiang, N F; Rochelle, L G; Akley, N J; Dreher, K L; Adler, K B

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies indicate adverse health effects due to inhalation of particulate air pollutants, but precise biologic mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully established. The tracheobronchial epithelium forms the body's first physiologic barrier to such airborne pollutants, where ciliary movement functions to remove the offending substances caught in the overlying mucus layer. Resident and infiltrating phagocytic cells also function in this removal process. In this paper, we examine the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the response of airway epithelium to particulates. Some particulates themselves can generate ROS, as can the epithelial cells, in response to appropriate stimulation. In addition, resident macrophages in the airways and the alveolar spaces can release ROS/RNS after phagocytosis of inhaled particles. These macrophages also release large amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine that can generate responses within the airway epithelium dependent upon intracellular generation of ROS/RNS. As a result, signal transduction pathways are set in motion that may contribute to inflammation and other pathobiology in the airway. Such effects include increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1, interleukin-6, cytosolic and inducible nitric oxide synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase, cytosolic phospholipase A2, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ultimately, ROS/RNS may play a role in the global response of the airway epithelium to particulate pollutants via activation of kinases and transcription factors common to many response genes. Thus, defense mechanisms involved in responding to offending particulates may result in a complex cascade of events that can contribute to airway pathology. PMID:9400742

  2. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Y.S.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known roles in the nervous system, there is increasing recognition that neurotrophins such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as their receptors are expressed in peripheral tissues including the lung, and can thus potentially contribute to both normal physiology and pathophysiology of several diseases. The relevance of this family of growth factors lies in emerging clinical data indicating altered neurotrophin levels and function in a range of diseases including neonatal and adult asthma, sinusitis, influenza, and lung cancer. The current review focuses on 1) the importance of BDNF expression and signaling mechanisms in early airway and lung development, critical to both normal neonatal lung function and also its disruption in prematurity and insults such as inflammation and infection; 2) how BDNF, potentially derived from airway nerves modulate neurogenic control of airway tone, a key aspect of airway reflexes as well as dysfunctional responses to allergic inflammation; 3) the emerging idea that local BDNF production by resident airway cells such as epithelium and airway smooth muscle can contribute to normal airway structure and function, and to airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in diseases such as asthma. Furthermore, given its pleiotropic effects in the airway, BDNF may be a novel and appealing therapeutic target. PMID:24560686

  3. A distinct carbonic anhydrase in the mucus of the colon of humans and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Kleinke, Tanja; Wagner, Siegfried; John, Harald; Hewett-Emmett, David; Parkkila, Seppo; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Gros, Gerolf

    2005-02-01

    We have collected gastrointestinal, mainly colonic, mucus from humans, guinea pigs, rats, and normal and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII)-deficient mice. In the mucus of all species, substantial CA activity was present. Using antibodies against human CA isoforms we found that the human mucus CA differs from cytosolic CAI and CAII, membrane-bound CAIV, and the secreted CAVI of saliva. The high sensitivity of mucus CA to acetazolamide rules out its identity with cytosolic CAIII. Partial sequences obtained from the purified human mucus CA show similarity, but not identity, with human CAI, and clear differences from the other known CAs. Additional evidence concerning the CA isoform present in mucus was obtained for the mucus CA of other species and was derived from: (1) the mucus of CAII-deficient mice, whose high CA activity confirms that it is not CAII that is responsible; (2) the inhibitory effect of iodide, which shows that mucus CA from mice, guinea pig and humans does not have the high anion sensitivity of CAI; (3) the inactivating effect of 0.2% SDS on guinea pig, mouse and human mucus CA, ruling out the SDS-resistant CAIV; and (4) the partitioning of guinea-pig mucus CA into the water phase in Triton X114 phase separation experiments, which also argues against its identity with membrane-bound CAs, such as CAIV. A comparison of colonic mucus CA activity in normal and germ-free rats indicates that the mucus CA is not of bacterial origin but is produced by the gastrointestinal tissues. We conclude (from its immunoreactivity, from iodide inhibition and from partial amino acid sequences) that mucus CA of human origin probably represents an isozyme, which is specific for mucus and is not identical with the known CA isozymes. The results obtained for mucus CA of other species collectively point in the same direction. PMID:15671337

  4. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Hoegger, Mark J; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; McMenimen, James D; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3- concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF.

  5. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Philip H.; McMenimen, James D.; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3– concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator–dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  6. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Shawna L; Rubin, Bruce K; Haas, Carl F; Volsko, Teresa A; Drescher, Gail S; O'Malley, Catherine A

    2015-07-01

    Aerosolized medications are used as airway clearance therapy to treat a variety of airway diseases. These guidelines were developed from a systematic review with the purpose of determining whether the use of these medications to promote airway clearance improves oxygenation and respiratory mechanics, reduces ventilator time and ICU stay, and/or resolves atelectasis/consolidation compared with usual care. Recombinant human dornase alfa should not be used in hospitalized adult and pediatric patients without cystic fibrosis. The routine use of bronchodilators to aid in secretion clearance is not recommended. The routine use of aerosolized N-acetylcysteine to improve airway clearance is not recommended. Aerosolized agents to change mucus biophysical properties or promote airway clearance are not recommended for adult or pediatric patients with neuromuscular disease, respiratory muscle weakness, or impaired cough. Mucolytics are not recommended to treat atelectasis in postoperative adult or pediatric patients, and the routine administration of bronchodilators to postoperative patients is not recommended. There is no high-level evidence related to the use of bronchodilators, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and novel therapy to promote airway clearance in these populations. PMID:26113566

  7. Cystic fibrosis airway epithelial Ca2+ i signaling: the mechanism for the larger agonist-mediated Ca2+ i signals in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla M Pedrosa; Paradiso, Anthony M; Carew, Mark A; Shears, Stephen B; Boucher, Richard C

    2005-03-18

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, abnormal epithelial ion transport likely initiates mucus stasis, resulting in persistent airway infections and chronic inflammation. Mucus clearance is regulated, in part, by activation of apical membrane receptors coupled to intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilization. We have shown that Ca(2+)(i) signals resulting from apical purinoceptor (P2Y(2)-R) activation are increased in CF compared with normal human airway epithelia. The present study addressed the mechanism for the larger apical P2Y(2)-R-dependent Ca(2+)(i) signals in CF human airway epithelia. We show that the increased Ca(2+)(i) mobilization in CF was not specific to P2Y(2)-Rs because it was mimicked by apical bradykinin receptor activation, and it did not result from a greater number of P2Y(2)-R or a more efficient coupling between P2Y(2)-Rs and phospholipase C-generated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Rather, the larger apical P2Y(2)-R activation-promoted Ca(2+)(i) signals in CF epithelia resulted from an increased density and Ca(2+) storage capacity of apically confined endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores. To address whether the ER up-regulation resulted from ER retention of misfolded DeltaF508 CFTR or was an acquired response to chronic luminal airway infection/inflammation, three approaches were used. First, ER density was studied in normal and CF sweat duct human epithelia expressing high levels of DeltaF508 CFTR, and it was found to be the same in normal and CF epithelia. Second, apical ER density was morphometrically analyzed in airway epithelia from normal subjects, DeltaF508 homozygous CF patients, and a disease control, primary ciliary dyskinesia; it was found to be greater in both CF and primary ciliary dyskinesia. Third, apical ER density and P2Y(2)-R activation-mobilized Ca(2+)(i), which were investigated in airway epithelia in a long term culture in the absence of luminal infection, were similar in normal and CF epithelia. To directly test whether

  8. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  9. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  10. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future.

  11. Chemotaxis of Flavobacterium columnare: To Channel Catfish Mucus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is the etiological agent of columnaris disease in fresh water fish. The disease is characterized by chronic skin lesions and severe mortality. The skin mucus constitutes a large portion of body and many infectious organisms including F. columnare, is believed to invade throu...

  12. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Alan R.; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M.; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A.; Harding, Stephen E.; Bajka, Balazs H.

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia. PMID:26726279

  13. Horned lizards (Phrynosoma) incapacitate dangerous ant prey with mucus.

    PubMed

    Sherbrooke, Wade C; Schwenk, Kurt

    2008-10-01

    Horned lizards (Iguanidae, Phrynosomatinae, Phrynosoma) are morphologically specialized reptiles characterized by squat, tank-like bodies, short limbs, blunt snouts, spines and cranial horns, among other traits. They are unusual among lizards in the degree to which they specialize on a diet of ants, but exceptional in the number of pugnacious, highly venomous, stinging ants they consume, especially harvester ants (genus Pogonomyrmex). Like other iguanian lizards, they capture insect prey on the tongue, but unlike other lizards, they neither bite nor chew dangerous prey before swallowing. Instead, they employ a unique kinematic pattern in which prey capture, transport and swallowing are combined. Nevertheless, horned lizards consume dozens of harvester ants without harm. We show that their derived feeding kinematics are associated with unique, mucus-secreting pharyngeal papillae that apparently serve to immobilize and incapacitate dangerous ants as they are swallowed by compacting them and binding them in mucus strands. Radially branched esophageal folds provide additional mucus-secreting surfaces the ants pass through as they are swallowed. Ants extracted from fresh-killed horned lizard stomachs are curled ventrally into balls and bound in mucus. We conclude that the pharyngeal papillae, in association with a unique form of hyolingual prey transport and swallowing, are horned lizard adaptations related to a diet of dangerous prey. Harvester ant defensive weapons, along with horned lizard adaptations against such weapons, suggest a long-term, predator-prey, co-evolutionary arms race between Phrynosoma and Pogonomyrmex.

  14. [Airway clearance techniques in chronic obstructive pulmonary syndrome : 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Opdekamp, C

    2011-09-01

    For many years the airway clearance techniques used in chest physical therapy were assimilated with the singular technique of postural drainage, percussions and vibrations. However the side effects and counter indications and the lack of scientific proof regarding this technique have forced reflection and development of other techniques more comfortable and without deleterious effects. If all these techniques show a high efficiency in terms of improved mucociliary clearance, the literature is unanimous on how little effect these techniques have in the short and the long-term with regards to lung function and arterial blood gases. In view of the scientific literature, it is clear that the airway clearance techniques don't have the same recognition concerning their efficiency in all obstructive pulmonary diseases. As the cornerstone in the management of cystic fibrosis, the efficiency of the bronchial hygiene techniques are in general poorly documented in the management of the non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, bronchitis or emphysema. The use of the chest physical therapy seems more to do with the interpretation of the imagery and symptomatology. The airway clearance techniques should be individualised according to symptoms, the amount of expectorated mucus and the objectives signs of secretions retention or subjective signs of difficulty expectorating secretions with progression of the disease. PMID:22034769

  15. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  16. Indirect airway challenges.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; O'Connor, B; Anderson, S D; Chung, F; Cockcroft, D W; Dahlén, B; DiMaria, G; Foresi, A; Hargreave, F E; Holgate, S T; Inman, M; Lötvall, J; Magnussen, H; Polosa, R; Postma, D S; Riedler, J

    2003-06-01

    Indirect challenges act by causing the release of endogenous mediators that cause the airway smooth muscle to contract. This is in contrast to the direct challenges where agonists such as methacholine or histamine cause airflow limitation predominantly via a direct effect on airway smooth muscle. Direct airway challenges have been used widely and are well standardised. They are highly sensitive, but not specific to asthma and can be used to exclude current asthma in a clinic population. Indirect bronchial stimuli, in particular exercise, hyperventilation, hypertonic aerosols, as well as adenosine, may reflect more directly the ongoing airway inflammation and are therefore more specific to identify active asthma. They are increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and to assess specific problems in patients with known asthma, e.g. exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, evaluation before scuba diving. Direct bronchial responsiveness is only slowly and to a modest extent, influenced by repeated administration of inhaled steroids. Indirect challenges may reflect more closely acute changes in airway inflammation and a change in responsiveness to an indirect stimulus may be a clinically relevant marker to assess the clinical course of asthma. Moreover, some of the indirect challenges, e.g. hypertonic saline and mannitol, can be combined with the assessment of inflammatory cells by induction of sputum.

  17. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  18. Mucoadhesive Nanoparticles May Disrupt the Protective Human Mucus Barrier by Altering Its Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K.; So, Conan; Schneider, Craig; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Mucus secretions typically protect exposed surfaces of the eyes and respiratory, gastrointestinal and female reproductive tracts from foreign entities, including pathogens and environmental ultrafine particles. We hypothesized that excess exposure to some foreign particles, however, may cause disruption of the mucus barrier. Many synthetic nanoparticles are likely to be mucoadhesive due to hydrophobic, electrostatic or hydrogen bonding interactions. We therefore sought to determine whether mucoadhesive particles (MAP) could alter the mucus microstructure, thereby allowing other foreign particles to more easily penetrate mucus. We engineered muco-inert probe particles 1 µm in diameter, whose diffusion in mucus is limited only by steric obstruction from the mucus mesh, and used them to measure possible MAP-induced changes to the microstructure of fresh human cervicovaginal mucus. We found that a 0.24% w/v concentration of 200 nm MAP in mucus induced a ∼10-fold increase in the average effective diffusivity of the probe particles, and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the fraction capable of penetrating physiologically thick mucus layers. The same concentration of muco-inert particles, and a low concentration (0.0006% w/v) of MAP, had no detectable effect on probe particle penetration rates. Using an obstruction-scaling model, we determined that the higher MAP dose increased the average mesh spacing (“pore” size) of mucus from 380 nm to 470 nm. The bulk viscoelasticity of mucus was unaffected by MAP exposure, suggesting MAP may not directly impair mucus clearance or its function as a lubricant, both of which depend critically on the bulk rheological properties of mucus. Our findings suggest mucoadhesive nanoparticles can substantially alter the microstructure of mucus, highlighting the potential of mucoadhesive environmental or engineered nanoparticles to disrupt mucus barriers and cause greater exposure to foreign particles, including pathogens and other potentially

  19. Airway statuses and nasopharyngeal airway use for airway obstruction in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Kouga, Takeshi; Tanoue, Koji; Matsui, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is associated with a high rate of respiratory difficulty, due mainly to midfacial hypoplasia. Nasopharyngeal airway establishment has been reported as the first-line approach to airway obstruction and may obviate the need for a highly invasive tracheotomy. No previous studies have compared airway obstruction status in syndromic craniosynostosis between cases requiring and not requiring airway managements. We focus on nasopharyngeal airway use and airway status outcomes to assess respiratory difficulty in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. A retrospective data analysis of 51 cases with syndromic craniosynostosis was carried out. We divided 30 of the 51 cases with lateral pharyngeal x-rays taken before operations affecting airway diameters into 2 groups, one with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and the other with one or both of these interventions, and the mean diameters for 8 indices related to the pharyngeal space were compared. Cases with respiratory difficulty due to nasopharyngeal stenosis and requiring airway managements comprised a significantly higher proportion of those with Pfeiffer syndrome than patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Comparative examination of lateral x-ray cephalometry between cases with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and cases with one or both revealed oropharyngeal diameters tended to be smaller in those with interventions. Cases requiring nasopharyngeal airway insertion were able to continue nasopharyngeal airway use for more than 1 year and a considerable number avoided tracheotomy. It may be worth considering an oropharyngeal-bypass nasopharyngeal airway before performing a tracheotomy. PMID:24820706

  20. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  1. Intranasal Administration of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Inducing IL-17A Autoantibody Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanting; Chen, Ling; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Liangxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, previous studies have shown that IL-17A contributes to the development of asthma, and there is a positive correlation between the level of IL-17A and the severity of disease. Here, we constructed recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing fusion protein Ag85A-IL-17A (rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a) and evaluated whether it could attenuate allergic airway inflammation, and further investigated the underlying mechanism. In this work, the murine model of asthma was established with ovalbumin, and mice were intranasally vaccinated with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a. Autoantibody of IL-17A in sera was detected, and the airway inflammatory cells infiltration, the local cytokines and chemokines production and the histopathological changes of lung tissue were investigated. We found that the administration of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a induced the autoantibody of IL-17A in sera. The vaccination of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a remarkably reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of mucus in lung tissue and significantly decreased the numbers of the total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in BALF. Th1 cells count in spleen, Th1 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and T-bet mRNA in lung tissue were significantly increased with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a administration. Meanwhile, rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a vaccination markedly decreased Th2 cells count, Th2 cytokine and Th17 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and chemokines mRNA expression in lung tissue. These data confirmed that recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis in vivo could induce autoantibody of IL-17A, which attenuated asthmatic airway inflammation.

  2. Intranasal Administration of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Inducing IL-17A Autoantibody Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanting; Chen, Ling; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Liangxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, previous studies have shown that IL-17A contributes to the development of asthma, and there is a positive correlation between the level of IL-17A and the severity of disease. Here, we constructed recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing fusion protein Ag85A-IL-17A (rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a) and evaluated whether it could attenuate allergic airway inflammation, and further investigated the underlying mechanism. In this work, the murine model of asthma was established with ovalbumin, and mice were intranasally vaccinated with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a. Autoantibody of IL-17A in sera was detected, and the airway inflammatory cells infiltration, the local cytokines and chemokines production and the histopathological changes of lung tissue were investigated. We found that the administration of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a induced the autoantibody of IL-17A in sera. The vaccination of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a remarkably reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of mucus in lung tissue and significantly decreased the numbers of the total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in BALF. Th1 cells count in spleen, Th1 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and T-bet mRNA in lung tissue were significantly increased with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a administration. Meanwhile, rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a vaccination markedly decreased Th2 cells count, Th2 cytokine and Th17 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and chemokines mRNA expression in lung tissue. These data confirmed that recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis in vivo could induce autoantibody of IL-17A, which attenuated asthmatic airway inflammation. PMID:26974537

  3. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  4. Ineffective correction of PPARγ signaling in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells undergoing repair.

    PubMed

    Bou Saab, J; Bacchetta, M; Chanson, M

    2016-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) represents a potential target to treat airway mucus hypersecretion in cystic fibrosis (CF). We aimed to determine if PPARγ is altered in CF human airway epithelial cells (HAECs), if PPARγ contributes to mucin expression and HAEC differentiation, and if PPARγ ligand therapy corrects the CF phenotype. To this end, well-differentiated CF and NCF HAEC primary cultures were wounded to monitor the expression of key genes involved in PPARγ activation and mucus homeostasis, and to evaluate the effect of a PPARγ agonist, at different times of repair. Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) converts prostaglandin E2 to 15-keto PGE2 (15kPGE2), an endogenous PPARγ ligand. Interestingly, PPARγ and HPGD expression dramatically decreased in CF HAECs. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the expression of MUC5B. The correlation between PPARγ and MUC5B was confirmed in an airway epithelial cell line after CFTR knock-down. Exposure of HAECs to 15kPGE2 did not correct the CF phenotype but revealed a defect in the process of basal cell (BC) differentiation. The HPGD/PPARγ axis is deregulated in primary HAEC cultures from CF patients, which may impact the maturation of BCs to differentiated luminal cells. Importantly, PPARγ therapy was inefficient in correcting the CF defect. PMID:27484450

  5. Detection of mucus glycoconjugates in human conjunctiva by using the lectin-colloidal gold technique in TEM. III. A quantitative study in asymptomatic contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Versura, P; Maltarello, M C; Cellini, M; Marinelli, F; Caramazza, R; Laschi, R

    1987-12-01

    We characterized the mucus glycoconjugates produced by goblet and non-goblet epithelial cells in asymptomatic contact lens (CL) wearers. We employed four lectins (proteins of vegetal origin which specifically recognize glycosidic residues: WGA, PNA, SBA and ConA) conjugated with colloidal gold as ultrastructural marker, at Transmission Electron Microscopy. A computerized quantitative analysis was carried out in order to compare the results from the CL wearers to those from the control patients. Goblet cells produce different amount of glycosidic residues, in particular, a significant decrease in the distribution of sialic acid, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine and mannose was observed. The content of glycosidic residues in the mucus vesicles of the non-goblet epithelial cells appeared unchanged as to the normal situation. We speculate that the CL could possibly contribute to the failure of the tear film stability by altering the production of mucus.

  6. Airway inflammation and IgE production induced by dust mite allergen-specific memory/effector Th2 cell line can be effectively attenuated by IL-35.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Hui; Loo, Evelyn Xiu-Ling; Kuo, I-Chun; Soh, Gim Hooi; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Lee, Bee Wah; Chua, Kaw Yan

    2011-07-01

    CD4(+) memory/effector T cells play a central role in orchestrating the rapid and robust immune responses upon re-encounter with specific Ags. However, the immunologic mechanism(s) underlying these responses are still not fully understood. To investigate this, we generated an allergen (major house dust mite allergen, Blo t 5)-specific murine Th2 cell line that secreted IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13, but not IL-9 or TNF-α, upon activation by the cognate Ag. These cells also exhibited CD44(high)CD62L(-) and CD127(+) (IL-7Rα(+)) phenotypes, which are characteristics of memory/effector T cells. Experiments involving adoptive transfer of this Th2 cell line in mice, followed by three intranasal challenges with Blo t 5, induced a dexamethasone-sensitive eosinophilic airway inflammation. This was accompanied by elevation of Th2 cytokines and CC- and CXC-motif chemokines, as well as recruitment of lymphocytes and polymorphic mononuclear cells into the lungs. Moreover, Blo t 5-specific IgE was detected 4 d after the last intranasal challenge, whereas elevation of Blo t 5-specific IgG1 was found at week two. Finally, pulmonary delivery of the pVAX-IL-35 DNA construct effectively downregulated Blo t 5-specific allergic airway inflammation, and i.m. injection of pVAX-IL-35 led to long-lasting suppression of circulating Blo t 5-specific and total IgE. This model provides a robust research tool to elucidate the immunopathogenic role of memory/effector Th2 cells in allergic airway inflammation. Our results suggested that IL-35 could be a potential therapeutic target for allergic asthma through its attenuating effects on allergen-specific CD4(+) memory/effector Th2 cell-mediated airway inflammation.

  7. Expression and function of a novel variant of estrogen receptor-α36 in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuping; Zhang, Xintian; He, David Z Z; Segal, Manav; Berro, Abdo; Gerson, Trevor; Wang, Zhaoyi; Casale, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen signaling is involved in sex differences in the prevalence rates and control of asthma, but the expression patterns of estrogen receptor variants and estrogen function in the lung are not well established. We investigated the expression of major estrogen receptor variants occurring naturally and after the development of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic asthma, along with the role of estrogen signaling in small-airway ciliary motion and smooth muscle contraction. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin, and estrogen receptor expression patterns were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Time-lapse video and photodiode-based displacement measurement systems were used to assess the effects of estrogen signaling on airway ciliary beat frequency and smooth muscle contraction. We found that a novel variant of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-α36, is expressed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. ER-α36 was predominately localized on the plasma membranes of airway cells. After sensitization to allergen, the expression levels of ER-α36 increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of ER-β and ER-α66 did not significantly change. Estrogen treatment in vitro resulted in a rapid increase in airway cilia motion in a dose-dependent fashion, but did not exert any effect on airway smooth muscle contraction. We speculate that the up-regulation of estrogen receptor expression associated with allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may constitute a protective mechanism to facilitate the clearance of mucus. The identification and localization of specific estrogen receptor subtypes in the lung could lead to newer therapeutic avenues aimed at addressing sex differences of asthma susceptibility. PMID:21642591

  8. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  9. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry.

  10. A mechanism of airway injury in an epithelial model of mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Darryl W; Morris, Melanie I; Ding, Jie; Zayas, J Gustavo; Tai, Shusheng; King, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    We studied the action of sodium metabisulphite on mucociliary transport in a frog palate epithelial injury model, hypothesizing that it may be useful for the study of mechanisms of airway injury. Sodium metabisulphite (MB) releases SO2 on contact with water. SO2 is a pollutant in automobile fumes and may play a role in the exacerbation of airway disease symptoms. We first investigated its effect on mucociliary clearance. MB 10-1 M, increased mucociliary clearance time (MCT) by 254.5 ± 57.3% of control values, (p < 0.001, n = 7). MB 10-4 and 10-2 M did not interfere with mucus clearance time compared to control values. In MB-treated frog palates, MCT did not return to control values after one hour (control, 97.3 ± 6.3% vs. MB, 140.9 ± 46.3%, p < 0.001, n = 7). Scanning EM images of epithelial tissue were morphometrically analyzed and showed a 25 ± 12% loss of ciliated cells in MB palates compared to controls with an intact ciliary blanket. Intact cells or groups of ciliated cells were found in scanning EM micrographs of mucus from MB-treated palates. This was associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9) activity in epithelial tissue and mucus. We suggest that the loss of ciliated cells as a result of MMP-9 activation prevented full recovery of MCT after MB 10-1 M. The mechanism of action may be on epithelial cell-cell or cell-matrix attachments leading to cell loss and a disruption of MCT. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this is an inflammatory mediated response or the result of a direct action on epithelial cells and what role this mechanism may play in the progression to chronic airway diseases with impaired mucociliary clearance. PMID:15357883

  11. Aerobic training reverses airway inflammation and remodelling in an asthma murine model.

    PubMed

    Silva, R A; Vieira, R P; Duarte, A C S; Lopes, F D T Q S; Perini, A; Mauad, T; Martins, M A; Carvalho, C R F

    2010-05-01

    Aerobic training (AT) decreases dyspnoea and exercise-induced bronchospasm, and improves aerobic capacity and quality of life; however, the mechanisms for such benefits remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the AT effects in a chronic model of allergic lung inflammation in mice after the establishment of airway inflammation and remodelling. Mice were divided into the control group, AT group, ovalbumin (OVA) group or OVA+AT group and exposed to saline or OVA. AT was started on day 28 for 60 min five times per week for 4 weeks. Respiratory mechanics, specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG(1), collagen and elastic fibres deposition, smooth muscle thickness, epithelial mucus, and peribronchial density of eosinophils, CD3+ and CD4+, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, interferon-gamma, IL-2, IL-1ra, IL-10, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and Foxp3 were evaluated. The OVA group showed an increase in IgE and IgG(1), eosinophils, CD3+, CD4+, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, NF-kappaB, collagen and elastic, mucus synthesis, smooth muscle thickness and lung tissue resistance and elastance. The OVA+AT group demonstrated an increase of IgE and IgG(1), and reduction of eosinophils, CD3+, CD4+, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, NF-kappaB, airway remodelling, mucus synthesis, smooth muscle thickness and tissue resistance and elastance compared with the OVA group (p<0.05). The OVA+AT group also showed an increase in IL-10 and IL-1ra (p<0.05), independently of Foxp3. AT reversed airway inflammation and remodelling and T-helper cell 2 response, and improved respiratory mechanics. These results seem to occur due to an increase in the expression of IL-10 and IL-1ra and a decrease of NF-kappaB. PMID:19897558

  12. Mucus barrier-triggered disassembly of siRNA nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Troels B.; Li, Leon; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-10-01

    The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the mucus, potentiated by the large surface area of the nanocarrier. We have developed a fluorescence activation-based reporter system showing that the interaction between polyanionic mucins and the cationic chitosan/small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocarriers (polyplexes) results in the disassembly and consequent triggered release of fluorescent siRNA. The quantity of release was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between chitosan amino groups and siRNA phosphate groups (NP ratio) of the polyplexes with a maximal estimated 48.6% release of siRNA over 30 min at NP 60. Furthermore, a microfluidic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal mucus barrier was used to visualize the dynamic interaction between chitosan/siRNA nanocarriers and native purified porcine stomach mucins. We observed strong interactions and aggregations at the mucin-liquid interface, followed by an NP ratio dependent release and consequent diffusion of siRNA across the mucin barrier. This work describes a new model of interaction at the nanocarrier-mucin interface and has important implications for the design and development of nucleic acid-based nanocarrier therapeutics for mucosal disease treatments and also provides insights into nanoscale pathogenic processes.The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the

  13. ENaC inhibitors and airway re-hydration in cystic fibrosis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Althaus, Mike

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the chloride channel "cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator" (CFTR). The lack of functional CFTR in CF airways leads to impaired ion and fluid homeostasis of the fluid layer which lines the airway surfaces (ASL). The ASL is important for proper ciliary beat and clearance of mucus from the airways. According to the "low volume hypothesis", CF airway epithelia hyperabsorb sodium via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Although the contribution of ENaC to CF pathogenesis is still under debate, there is convincing data demonstrating that re-hydration of the ASL might improve mucociliary clearance in CF patients. ASL re-hydration might, amongst other things, be achieved by a block of airway transepithelial sodium absorption with inhibitors of ENaC. This mini-review article describes the role of ENaC in ASL fluid homeostasis and rehydration, and summarizes the current state of the art in the discovery and establishment of compounds which inhibit ENaC activity and may represent pharmacological tools for the treatment of CF. PMID:23547930

  14. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected. PMID:25758122

  15. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26241918

  16. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected.

  17. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus

    PubMed Central

    Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Andreas; Abou, Bérengère; Hopf, Alexander; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Schneider, Marc; Schall, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the mobility of nanoparticles in mucus and similar hydrogels as model systems was assessed to elucidate the link between microscopic diffusion behavior and macroscopic penetration of such gels. Differences in particle adhesion to mucus components were strongly dependent on particle coating. Particles coated with 2 kDa PEG exhibited a decreased adhesion to mucus components, whereas chitosan strongly increased the adhesion. Despite such mucoinert properties of PEG, magnetic nanoparticles of both coatings did not penetrate through native respiratory mucus, resisting high magnetic forces (even for several hours). However, model hydrogels were, indeed, penetrated by both particles in dependency of particle coating, obeying the theory of particle mobility in an external force field. Comparison of penetration data with cryogenic scanning EM images of mucus and the applied model systems suggested particularly high rigidity of the mucin scaffold and a broad pore size distribution in mucus as reasons for the observed particle immobilization. Active probing of the rigidity of mucus and model gels with optical tweezers was used in this context to confirm such properties of mucus on the microscale, thus presenting the missing link between micro- and macroscopical observations. Because of high heterogeneity in the size of the voids and pores in mucus, on small scales, particle mobility will depend on adhesive or inert properties. However, particle translocation over distances larger than a few micrometers is restricted by highly rigid structures within the mucus mesh. PMID:23091027

  19. Kinetics of airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia in BALB/c mice and their modulation by different dexamethasone treatment regimens.

    PubMed

    El-Hashim, A Z; Wyss, D; Zuany-Amorim, C

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) are still poorly understood. In this study we have established a model of persistent AHR and eosinophilia and evaluated the prophylactic vs. therapeutic effects of dexamethasone on these parameters. Mice were immunised with ovalbumin (OVA) on day 0 and challenged intranasally on days 10, 11, 12 and 13 with OVA or phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Airway responsiveness to methacholine, measured 24-h post multiple intranasal OVA challenges, was significantly increased compared to time matched PBS-controls (P<0.05). AHR could be detected for up to 14 days after the last OVA challenge although the magnitude of the AHR had diminished by day 14 compared to day 1. OVA challenge of mice induced a significant airway eosinophilia at 24h (P<0.05); this persisted for 2 weeks after the challenge. Prophylactic treatment with dexamethasone (1mg x kg (-1)) reduced the OVA induced AHR, eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia/metaplasia measured 24h post challenge. Therapeutic treatment, with dexamethasone (2 mg x kg(-1)), significantly inhibited established airway eosinophilia, measured at 72 h post OVA challenge, only when treatment was initiated at 24h but not 48 h after challenge. In contrast, AHR measured at 72 h post OVA challenge was significantly reduced when treatment was started at either 24 or 48 h post challenge. Our data shows that the immunization and challenge procedures employed resulted in a persistent type of AHR. Prophylactic intervention with steroids almost completely inhibited its development; however therapeutic intervention only partially resolved AHR.

  20. Broncho-Vaxom Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation by Restoring GSK3β-Related T Regulatory Cell Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Yu, Dehong; Zeng, Xianping; Deng, Mengxia; Sun, Yueqi; Wen, Weiping; Li, Huabin

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral administration of bacterial extracts (eg, Broncho-Vaxom (BV)) has been proposed to attenuate asthma through modulating Treg cells. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully characterized. This study sought to assess the effects of oral administration of BV on GSK-3β expression and Treg cells in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthmatic mice models. Method Asthmatic mice models were established with OVA challenge and treated with oral administration of BV. Next, infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophil and neutrophils, mucous metaplasia, levels of Th1/Th2/Treg-typed cytokines and expression of GSK3β and Foxp3 were examined in asthmatic mice models by histological analysis, Bio-Plex and western blot, respectively. Moreover, the frequencies of Treg cells were evaluated in cultured splenocytes by flow cytometry in the presence of BV or GSK3β siRNA interference. Results We found significant decrease of infiltrated inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in asthmatic mice models after oral administration of BV. Oral administration of BV was shown to significantly suppress mucus metaplasia, Th2-typed cytokine levels and GSK3β expression while increasing Foxp3 production in asthmatic mice models. Moreover, BV significantly enhanced GSK3β-related expansion of Treg cells in cultured spleen cells in vitro. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence that oral administration of BV is capable of attenuating airway inflammation in asthmatic mice models, which may be associated with GSK3β-related expansion of Treg cells. PMID:24667347

  1. Fast renewal of the distal colonic mucus layers by the surface goblet cells as measured by in vivo labeling of mucin glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V

    2012-01-01

    The enormous bacterial load and mechanical forces in colon create a special requirement for protection of the epithelium. In the distal colon, this problem is largely solved by separation of the bacteria from the epithelium by a firmly attached inner mucus layer. In addition, an outer mucus layer entraps bacteria to be cleared by distal transport. The mucus layers contain a network of Muc2 mucins as the main structural component. Here, the renewal rate of the inner protective mucus layer was studied as well as the production and secretion of Muc2 mucin in the distal colon. This was performed by intraperitoneal injection of N-azidoacetyl-galactosamine (GalNAz) that was in vivo incorporated during biosynthesis of O-glycosylated glycoproteins. The only gel-forming mucin produced in the colon is the Muc2 mucin and as it carries numerous O-glycans, the granulae of the goblet cells producing Muc2 mucin were intensely stained. The GalNAz-labeled glycoproteins were first observed in the Golgi apparatus of most cells. Goblet cells in the luminal surface epithelium had the fastest biosynthesis of Muc2 and secreted material already three hours after labeling. This secreted GalNAz-labeled Muc2 mucin formed the inner mucus layer. The goblet cells along the crypt epithelium accumulated labeled mucin vesicles for a longer period and secretion of labeled Muc2 mucin was first observed after 6 to 8 h. This study reveals a fast turnover (1 h) of the inner mucus layer in the distal colon mediated by goblet cells of the luminal surface epithelium.

  2. The Effects of Uygur Herb Hyssopus officinalis L. on the Process of Airway Remodeling in Asthmatic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Wang, Jing; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could affect the levels of some cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ) in asthmatic mice. By detection of the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the morphological changes, the aim of this research is to reveal the mechanism of Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. in the process of airway remodeling. It was observed that the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 increased, but the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1 decreased in airway remodeling group. However, the expression of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1 decreased after being treated with dexamethasone and Hyssopus offcinalis L., accompanied by the relieved pathological changes, including collagen deposition, mucus secretion, and smooth muscle proliferation. It is suggested that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could inhibit airway remodeling by correcting imbalance of MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. PMID:25383084

  3. The Effects of Uygur Herb Hyssopus officinalis L. on the Process of Airway Remodeling in Asthmatic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Wang, Jing; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could affect the levels of some cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ) in asthmatic mice. By detection of the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the morphological changes, the aim of this research is to reveal the mechanism of Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. in the process of airway remodeling. It was observed that the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 increased, but the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1 decreased in airway remodeling group. However, the expression of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1 decreased after being treated with dexamethasone and Hyssopus offcinalis L., accompanied by the relieved pathological changes, including collagen deposition, mucus secretion, and smooth muscle proliferation. It is suggested that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could inhibit airway remodeling by correcting imbalance of MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio.

  4. The Effects of Uygur Herb Hyssopus officinalis L. on the Process of Airway Remodeling in Asthmatic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Wang, Jing; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    It has been proved that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could affect the levels of some cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ) in asthmatic mice. By detection of the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the morphological changes, the aim of this research is to reveal the mechanism of Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. in the process of airway remodeling. It was observed that the expressions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 increased, but the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1 decreased in airway remodeling group. However, the expression of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1 decreased after being treated with dexamethasone and Hyssopus offcinalis L., accompanied by the relieved pathological changes, including collagen deposition, mucus secretion, and smooth muscle proliferation. It is suggested that Uygur herb Hyssopus offcinalis L. could inhibit airway remodeling by correcting imbalance of MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. PMID:25383084

  5. Managing upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Innes, M H

    A complete respiratory obstruction can lead to death in 3 minutes. The first and constant duty of the nurse aider is to check that the person is breathing by looking, listening and feeling. Partial obstruction is no less serious than complete obstruction. The nurse aider, in any situation, should assess the problem and attempt to overcome the airway obstruction using the measures described. PMID:1490067

  6. Comparative permeability of some acyclovir derivatives through native mucus and crude mucin dispersions.

    PubMed

    Legen; Kristl, A

    2001-08-01

    The permeability of some guanine derivatives (acyclovir [ACV], deoxyacyclovir [DCV], and their N-acetyl congeners) through native porcine mucus and crude porcine mucin dispersions (30% and 50% w/v) was investigated in two-compartment dialysis cells. High correlation between apparent permeability coefficients Papp of tested substances determined in these two models was observed, although the examined compounds permeated faster through the native mucus. It was also established that Papp values decrease with increasing hydrophilicity and molecular mass of the tested substances. Furthermore, the influence of some substances that affect mucus structure (cysteine, N-acetylcysteine [NCY], sodium taurocholate [ST], and sodium chloride) on the permeation rate of the examined compounds through mucus and mucin dispersions was examined. It was shown that the Papp values of guanine derivatives were generally lower after the addition of these substances to the native mucus and mucin dispersions, although the lowering effect was more pronounced in the case of native mucus.

  7. DNA Supercoiling Regulates the Motility of Campylobacter jejuni and Is Altered by Growth in the Presence of Chicken Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, Claire; Scanlan, Eoin; Hilliard, Amber; Cotroneo, Chiara E.; Bourke, Billy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but relatively little is known about the global regulation of virulence factors during infection of chickens or humans. This study identified DNA supercoiling as playing a key role in regulating motility and flagellar protein production and found that this supercoiling-controlled regulon is induced by growth in chicken mucus. A direct correlation was observed between motility and resting DNA supercoiling levels in different strains of C. jejuni, and relaxation of DNA supercoiling resulted in decreased motility. Transcriptional analysis and Western immunoblotting revealed that a reduction in motility and DNA supercoiling affected the two-component regulatory system FlgRS and was associated with reduced FlgR expression, increased FlgS expression, and aberrant expression of flagellin subunits. Electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar structure remained intact. Growth in the presence of porcine mucin resulted in increased negative supercoiling, increased motility, increased FlgR expression, and reduced FlgS expression. Finally, this supercoiling-dependent regulon was shown to be induced by growth in chicken mucus, and the level of activation was dependent on the source of the mucus from within the chicken intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study reports for the first time the key role played by DNA supercoiling in regulating motility in C. jejuni and indicates that the induction of this supercoiling-induced regulon in response to mucus from different sources could play a critical role in regulating motility in vivo. PMID:27624126

  8. Airway gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jane C; Alton, Eric W F W

    2005-01-01

    Given both the accessibility and the genetic basis of several pulmonary diseases, the lungs and airways initially seemed ideal candidates for gene therapy. Several routes of access are available, many of which have been refined and optimized for nongene drug delivery. Two respiratory diseases, cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency, are relatively common; the single gene responsible has been identified and current treatment strategies are not curative. This type of inherited disease was the obvious initial target for gene therapy, but it has become clear that nongenetic and acquired diseases, including cancer, may also be amenable to this approach. The majority of preclinical and clinical studies in the airway have involved viral vectors, although for diseases such as CF, likely to require repeated application, non-viral delivery systems have clear advantages. However, with both approaches a range of barriers to gene expression have been identified that are limiting success in the airway and alveolar region. This chapter reviews these issues, strategies aimed at overcoming them, and progress into clinical trials with non-viral vectors in a variety of pulmonary diseases.

  9. The chitinase-like protein YKL-40 increases mucin5AC production in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P.; Perelman, Juliy M.

    2013-11-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production remain elusive. Recently, the level of YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein, has been found to be significantly increased in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. In this study, we sought to explore the effect of YKL-40 on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that elevated YKL-40 levels increased the mRNA and protein expression of MUC5AC in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in association with the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), reflecting their activation. These responses were significantly suppressed by the knockdown of protease-activating receptor 2 (PAR2) with specific small interfering RNA or the inhibitors of ERK and NF-κB. YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overproduction was also effectively attenuated by the inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Taken together, these results imply that YKL-40 can stimulate excessive MUC5AC production through PAR2- and FAK-mediated mechanisms. - Highlights: • MUC5AC is the major secreted mucin in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 is a prototype of the chitinase-like protein in mammals. • YKL-40 is an active player in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 can increase MUC5AC production via PAR2-mediated pathway. • FAK is another candidate to mediate YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overexpression.

  10. Causes of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway.

  11. Fish mucus versus parasitic gnathiid isopods as sources of energy and sunscreens for a cleaner fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckes, Maxi; Dove, Sophie; Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Grutter, Alexandra S.

    2015-09-01

    The cleaning behaviour of the bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus is extensively used as a model system for understanding cooperation. It feeds mainly on blood-sucking gnathiid isopods and also on the epidermal mucus of client fish; the nutritional quality of these foods, however, is unknown. The epidermal mucus of reef fish contains ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (mycosporine-like amino acids, MAAs), which are only obtained via the diet; nevertheless, while La. dimidiatus has high amounts of MAAs in its mucus, their source is unknown. Therefore, the energetic value (calories and protein estimated using carbon and nitrogen) and MAA level in gnathiids and mucus from several clients [parrotfishes, wrasses (Labridae), and a snapper (Lutjanidae)] were determined. The energetic value of mucus and gnathiids varied among fishes. Overall, carbon, nitrogen, calories, and protein per dry weight were higher in the mucus of most client species compared to gnathiids. Thus, depending on the client species, mucus may be energetically more advantageous for cleaner wrasse to feed on than gnathiids. UV absorbance, a confirmed proxy for MAA levels, indicated high MAA levels in mucus, whereas gnathiids had no detectable MAAs. This suggests that La. dimidiatus obtain MAAs from mucus but not from gnathiids. Hence, in addition to energy, the mucus of some clients also provides La. dimidiatus with the added bonus of UV-absorbing compounds. This may explain why cleaner fish prefer to feed on mucus over gnathiid isopods. The likely costs and benefits to clients of the removal of UV protecting mucus and parasitic gnathiids, respectively, and the variation in benefits gained by cleaner fish from feeding on these foods may explain some variation in cooperation levels in cleaning interactions.

  12. Different macro- and micro-rheological properties of native porcine respiratory and intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Bokkasam, Harish; Ernst, Matthias; Guenther, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-08-20

    Aim of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences at macro- and microscale in the viscoelastic properties of mucus that covers the epithelia of the intestinal and respiratory tract. Natural mucus was collected from pulmonary and intestinal regions of healthy pigs. Macro-rheological investigations were carried out through conventional plate-plate rheometry. Microrheology was investigated using optical tweezers. Our data revealed significant differences both in macro- and micro-rheological properties between respiratory and intestinal mucus.

  13. Motorcycle exhaust particles induce airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in BALB/C mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2004-06-01

    A number of large studies have reported that environmental pollutants from fossil fuel combustion can cause deleterious effects to the immune system, resulting in an allergic reaction leading to respiratory tract damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP), a major pollutant in the Taiwan urban area, on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in laboratory animals. BALB/c mice were instilled intratracheally (i.t.) with 1.2 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg of MEP, which was collected from two-stroke motorcycle engines. The mice were exposed 3 times i.t. with MEP, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness were sequentially analyzed. We found that MEP would induce airway and pulmonary inflammation characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung. In addition, MEP treatment enhanced BALF interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine levels and serum IgE production. Bronchial response measured by unrestrained plethysmography with methacholine challenge showed that MEP treatment induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in BALB/c mice. The chemical components in MEP were further fractionated with organic solvents, and we found that the benzene-extracted fraction exerts a similar biological effect as seen with MEP, including airway inflammation, increased BALF IL-4, serum IgE production, and induction of AHR. In conclusion, we present evidence showing that the filter-trapped particles emitted from the unleaded-gasoline-fueled two-stroke motorcycle engine may induce proinflammatory and proallergic response profiles in the absence of exposure to allergen.

  14. Active microrheology reveals molecular-level variations in the viscoelastic properties of Chaetopterus mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, William; Messmore, Ashley; Anderson, Rae

    The sea annelid, Chaetopterus Variopedatus, secretes a bioluminescent mucus that also exhibits complex viscoelastic properties. The constituents of the mucus are relatively unknown but it does play an important role in the development of the worms' parchment-like housing tubes. In order to determine how and why this mucus can exhibit material properties ranging from fluidity to rigidity we perform microrheology experiments. We determine the microscale viscoelastic properties by using optical tweezers to produce small oscillations in the mucus which allow us to determine both the linear storage and loss moduli (G',G'') along with the viscosity of the fluid. By varying the size of the microspheres (2-10 µm) and oscillation amplitude (.5-10 µm) we are able to determine the dominant intrinsic length scales of the molecular mesh comprising the mucus. By varying the oscillation frequency (1-15Hz) we determine the crossover frequency at which G' surpasses G'', to quantify the longest relaxation time of the mesh network. Initial results show a strong dependence on bead size which indicate that the dominant entanglement lengthscale of the mucus mesh is ~5 um. Microspheres of this size exhibit a wide variety of stress responses in different regions of the mucus demonstrating the substantial microscale heterogeneity of the mucus. We carry out measurements on a population of worms of varying size and age to determine mucus variability between worms.

  15. Nonpharmacologic airway clearance techniques in hospitalized patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jeff; Sathe, Nila A; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; McPheeters, Melissa L

    2013-12-01

    Nonpharmacologic airway clearance techniques are used to reduce the sequelae of obstructive secretions. We systematically reviewed comparative studies of nonpharmacologic interventions that health professionals can employ to achieve mucus clearance in hospitalized or postoperative patients without cystic fibrosis, over the age of 12 months. We searched MEDLINE and other databases from 1990 to 2012 to identify relevant literature. Two reviewers independently assessed each study against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two reviewers also independently extracted data regarding subject and intervention characteristics and outcomes, and assigned overall quality ratings. The 32 studies meeting the review criteria included 24 randomized controlled trials, 7 crossover randomized controlled trials, and one prospective cohort study. Studies were typically small and together included a total of 2,453 subjects (mean 76/study). Studies generally examined chest physical therapy/physiotherapy modalities in postoperative or critically ill subjects or those with COPD. Interventions, comparators, and populations varied considerably across studies, hampering our ability to draw firm conclusions. Interventions, including conventional chest physical therapy/physiotherapy, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and positive expiratory pressure, typically provided small benefits in pulmonary function, gas exchange, oxygenation, and need for/duration of ventilation, among other outcomes, but differences between groups were generally small and not significant. Harms of the techniques were not consistently reported, though airway clearance techniques were generally considered safe in studies that did comment on adverse effects. Further research with clearly characterized populations and interventions is needed to understand the potential benefits and harms of these techniques. PMID:24222708

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers CFTR-mediated airway surface liquid secretion in swine trachea.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiaojie; Campanucci, Verónica A; Nair, Manoj; Yilmaz, Orhan; Belev, George; Machen, Terry E; Chapman, Dean; Ianowski, Juan P

    2014-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several organs are affected in CF, but most of the morbidity and mortality comes from lung disease. Recent data show that the initial consequence of CFTR mutation is the failure to eradicate bacteria before the development of inflammation and airway remodeling. Bacterial clearance depends on a layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) consisting of both a mucus layer that traps, kills, and inactivates bacteria and a periciliary liquid layer that keeps the mucus at an optimum distance from the underlying epithelia, to maximize ciliary motility and clearance of bacteria. The airways in CF patients and animal models of CF demonstrate abnormal ASL secretion and reduced antimicrobial properties. Thus, it has been proposed that abnormal ASL secretion in response to bacteria may facilitate the development of the infection and inflammation that characterize CF airway disease. Whether the inhalation of bacteria triggers ASL secretion, and the role of CFTR, have never been tested, however. We developed a synchrotron-based imaging technique to visualize the ASL layer and measure the effect of bacteria on ASL secretion. We show that the introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria into the lumen of intact isolated swine tracheas triggers CFTR-dependent ASL secretion by the submucosal glands. This response requires expression of the bacterial protein flagellin. In patients with CF, the inhalation of bacteria would fail to trigger ASL secretion, leading to infection and inflammation. PMID:25136096

  17. Linking increased airway hydration, ciliary beating, and mucociliary clearance through ENaC inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerling, Martin; Root, James; Wingren, Cecilia; Pesic, Jelena; Johansson, Edvin; Garland, Alaina L.; Ghosh, Arunava; Tarran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Airway dehydration causes mucus stasis and bacterial overgrowth in cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis (CB). Rehydration by hypertonic saline is efficacious but suffers from a short duration of action. We tested whether epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) inhibition would rehydrate normal and dehydrated airways to increase mucociliary clearance (MCC) over a significant time frame. For this, we used a tool compound (Compound A), which displays nanomolar ENaC affinity and retention in the airway surface liquid (ASL). Using normal human bronchial epithelial cultures (HBECs) grown at an air-liquid interface, we evaluated in vitro potency and efficacy using short-circuit current (Isc) and ASL height measurements where it inhibited Isc and increased ASL height by ∼50% (0.052 μM at 6 h), respectively. The in vivo efficacy was investigated in a modified guinea pig tracheal potential difference model, where we observed an effective dose (ED50) of 5 μg/kg (i.t.), and by MCC measures in rats and sheep, where we demonstrated max clearance rates at 100 μg/kg (i.t.) and 75 μg/kg (i.t.), respectively. Acute cigarette smoke-induced ASL height depletion in HBECs was used to mimic the situation in patients with CB, and pretreatment prevented both cigarette smoke-induced ASL dehydration and lessened the decrease in ciliary beat frequency. Furthermore, when added after cigarette smoke exposure, Compound A increased the rate of ASL rehydration. In conclusion, Compound A demonstrated significant effects and a link between increased airway hydration, ciliary function, and MCC. These data support the hypothesis that ENaC inhibition may be efficacious in the restoration of mucus hydration and transport in patients with CB. PMID:25361567

  18. Linking increased airway hydration, ciliary beating, and mucociliary clearance through ENaC inhibition.

    PubMed

    Åstrand, Annika B M; Hemmerling, Martin; Root, James; Wingren, Cecilia; Pesic, Jelena; Johansson, Edvin; Garland, Alaina L; Ghosh, Arunava; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Airway dehydration causes mucus stasis and bacterial overgrowth in cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis (CB). Rehydration by hypertonic saline is efficacious but suffers from a short duration of action. We tested whether epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) inhibition would rehydrate normal and dehydrated airways to increase mucociliary clearance (MCC) over a significant time frame. For this, we used a tool compound (Compound A), which displays nanomolar ENaC affinity and retention in the airway surface liquid (ASL). Using normal human bronchial epithelial cultures (HBECs) grown at an air-liquid interface, we evaluated in vitro potency and efficacy using short-circuit current (I(sc)) and ASL height measurements where it inhibited I(sc) and increased ASL height by ∼ 50% (0.052 μM at 6 h), respectively. The in vivo efficacy was investigated in a modified guinea pig tracheal potential difference model, where we observed an effective dose (ED50) of 5 μg/kg (i.t.), and by MCC measures in rats and sheep, where we demonstrated max clearance rates at 100 μg/kg (i.t.) and 75 μg/kg (i.t.), respectively. Acute cigarette smoke-induced ASL height depletion in HBECs was used to mimic the situation in patients with CB, and pretreatment prevented both cigarette smoke-induced ASL dehydration and lessened the decrease in ciliary beat frequency. Furthermore, when added after cigarette smoke exposure, Compound A increased the rate of ASL rehydration. In conclusion, Compound A demonstrated significant effects and a link between increased airway hydration, ciliary function, and MCC. These data support the hypothesis that ENaC inhibition may be efficacious in the restoration of mucus hydration and transport in patients with CB. PMID:25361567

  19. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  20. Activation of transcription factor IL-6 (NF-IL-6) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) by lipid ozonation products is crucial to interleukin-8 gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kafoury, Ramzi M; Hernandez, Jazmir M; Lasky, Joseph A; Toscano, William A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2007-04-01

    Ozone (O(3)) is a major component of smog and an inhaled toxicant to the lung. O(3) rapidly reacts with the airway epithelial cell membrane phospholipids to generate lipid ozonation products (LOP). 1-Hydroxy-1-hydroperoxynonane (HHP-C9) is an important LOP, produced from the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine. This LOP, at a biologically relevant concentration (100 microM), increases the activity of phospholipase C, nuclear factors-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and interleukin-6 (NF-IL-6) and the expression of the inflammatory gene, interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a cultured human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). The signaling pathways of ozone and its biologically-active products are as yet undefined. In the present study, we report that the HHP LOP, HHP-C9 (100 microM x 4 h), activated the expression of IL-8 (218 +/- 26% increase over control, n = 4, P < 0.01) through an apparent interaction between the two transcription factors, NF-kappaB and NF-IL-6. Transfection studies using luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in NF-kappaB-DNA binding activity (37 +/- 7% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). Inhibition of NF-kappaB showed a statistically significant but modest decrease in IL-8 release, which suggested a role for another transcription factor, NF-IL-6. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in the DNA binding activity of NF-IL-6 (45 +/- 11% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). The results of the present study indicate that NF-IL-6 interacts with NF-kappaB in regulating the expression of IL-8 in cultured human airway epithelial cells exposed to LOP, the biological products of ozone in the lung. PMID:17366569

  1. Hsp72 Induces Inflammation and Regulates Cytokine Production in Airway Epithelium through a TLR4- and NF-κB-Dependent Mechanism1

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Margaret A.; Wheeler, Derek S.; Lierl, Kristin M.; Hughes, Valerie S.; Wong, Hector R.; Page, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are generally regarded as intracellular proteins acting as molecular chaperones; however, Hsp72 is also detected in the extracellular compartment. Hsp72 has been identified in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with acute lung injury. To address whether Hsp72 directly activated airway epithelium, human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were treated with recombinant Hsp72. Hsp72 induced a dose-dependent increase in IL-8 expression, which was inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor parthenolide. Hsp72 induced activation of NF-κB, as evidenced by NF-κB trans-activation and by p65 RelA and p50 NF-κB1 binding to DNA. Endotoxin contamination of the Hsp72 preparation was not responsible for these effects. Next, BALB/c mice were challenged with a single intratracheal inhalation of Hsp72 and killed 4 h later. Hsp72 induced significant up-regulation of KC, TNF-α, neutrophil recruitment, and myeloperoxidase in the BALF. A similar challenge with Hsp72 in TLR4 mutant mice did not stimulate the inflammatory response, stressing the importance of TLR4 in Hsp72-mediated lung inflammation. Last, cultured mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC) from BALB/c and TLR4 mutant and wild-type mice were treated ex vivo with Hsp72. Hsp72 induced a significant increase in KC expression from BALB/c and wild-type MTEC in an NF-κB-dependent manner; however, TLR4 mutant MTEC had minimal cytokine release. Taken together, these data suggest that Hsp72 is released and biologically active in the BALF and can regulate airway epithelial cell cytokine expression in a TLR4 and NF-κB-dependent mechanism. PMID:17947709

  2. Linoleic acid supplementation results in increased arachidonic acid and eicosanoid production in CF airway cells and in cftr−/− transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Munir M.; Martin, Camilia R.; Andersson, Charlotte; Bhutta, Abdul Q.; Cluette-Brown, Joanne E.; Laposata, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients display a fatty acid imbalance characterized by low linoleic acid levels and variable changes in arachidonic acid. This led to the recommendation that CF patients consume a high-fat diet containing >6% linoleic acid. We hypothesized that increased conversion of linoleic acid to arachidonic acid in CF leads to increased levels of arachidonate-derived proinflammatory metabolites and that this process is exacerbated by increasing linoleic acid levels in the diet. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effect of linoleic acid supplementation on downstream proinflammatory biomarkers in two CF models: 1) in vitro cell culture model using 16HBE14o− sense [wild-type (WT)] and antisense (CF) human airway epithelial cells; and 2) in an in vivo model using cftr−/− transgenic mice. Fatty acids were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and IL-8 and eicosanoids were measured by ELISA. Neutrophils were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from knockout mice following linoleic acid supplementation and exposure to aerosolized Pseudomonas LPS. Linoleic acid supplementation increased arachidonic acid levels in CF but not WT cells. IL-8, PGE2, and PGF2α secretion were increased in CF compared with WT cells, with a further increase following linoleic acid supplementation. cftr−/− Mice supplemented with 100 mg of linoleic acid had increased arachidonic acid levels in lung tissue associated with increased neutrophil infiltration into the airway compared with control mice. These findings support the hypothesis that increasing linoleic acid levels in the setting of loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function leads to increased arachidonic acid levels and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:20656894

  3. Comparison of antimicrobial activity in the epidermal mucus extracts of fish.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sangeetha; Ross, Neil W; MacKinnon, Shawna L

    2008-05-01

    The mucus layer on the surface of fish consists of several antimicrobial agents that provide a first line of defense against invading pathogens. To date, little is known about the antimicrobial properties of the mucus of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), brook trout (S. fontinalis), koi carp (Cyprinus carpio sub sp. koi), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and hagfish (Myxine glutinosa). The epidermal mucus samples from these fish were extracted with acidic, organic and aqueous solvents to identify potential antimicrobial agents including basic peptides, secondary metabolites, aqueous and acid soluble compounds. Initial screening of the mucus extracts against a susceptible strain of Salmonella enterica C610, showed a significant variation in antimicrobial activity among the fish species examined. The acidic mucus extracts of brook trout, haddock and hagfish exhibited bactericidal activity. The organic mucus extracts of brook trout, striped bass and koi carp showed bacteriostatic activity. There was no detectable activity in the aqueous mucus extracts. Further investigations of the activity of the acidic mucus extracts of brook trout, haddock and hagfish showed that these fish species had specific activity for fish and human pathogens, demonstrating the role of fish mucus in antimicrobial protection. In comparison to brook trout and haddock, the minimum bactericidal concentrations of hagfish acidic mucus extracts were found to be approximately 1.5 to 3.0 times lower against fish pathogens and approximately 1.6 to 6.6 folds lower for human pathogens. This preliminary information suggests that the mucus from these fish species may be a source of novel antimicrobial agents for fish and human health related applications.

  4. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sonny T M; Davy, Simon K; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral's mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose, and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont. PMID:27047481

  5. Mucus Sugar Content Shapes the Bacterial Community Structure in Thermally Stressed Acropora muricata

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonny T. M.; Davy, Simon K.; Tang, Sen-Lin; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26 to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose, and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont. PMID:27047481

  6. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. PMID:27274324

  8. Mechanics of airflow in the human nasal airways.

    PubMed

    Doorly, D J; Taylor, D J; Schroter, R C

    2008-11-30

    The mechanics of airflow in the human nasal airways is reviewed, drawing on the findings of experimental and computational model studies. Modelling inevitably requires simplifications and assumptions, particularly given the complexity of the nasal airways. The processes entailed in modelling the nasal airways (from defining the model, to its production and, finally, validating the results) is critically examined, both for physical models and for computational simulations. Uncertainty still surrounds the appropriateness of the various assumptions made in modelling, particularly with regard to the nature of flow. New results are presented in which high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) and direct numerical simulation are applied to investigate the development of flow instability in the nasal cavity. These illustrate some of the improved capabilities afforded by technological developments for future model studies. The need for further improvements in characterising airway geometry and flow together with promising new methods are briefly discussed.

  9. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. PMID:27274324

  10. Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01-3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

  11. Impact of gut passage and mucus secretion by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on mobility and speciation of arsenic in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sizmur, Tom; Watts, Michael J; Brown, Geoffrey D; Palumbo-Roe, Barbara; Hodson, Mark E

    2011-12-15

    Earthworms inhabiting arsenic contaminated soils may accelerate the leaching of As into surface and ground waters. We carried out three experiments to determine the impact of passage of As contaminated soil (1150 mg As kg(-1)) through the gut of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on the mobility and speciation of As and the effects of earthworm mucus on As mobility. The concentration of water soluble As in soil increased (from 1.6 to 18 mg kg(-1)) after passage through the earthworm gut. Casts that were aged for 56 days still contained more than nine times greater water soluble As than bulk earthworm inhabited soil. Changes were due to increases in As(V) mobility, with no change in As(III). Dilute mucus extracts reduced As mobility through the formation of As-amino acid-iron oxide ternary complexes. More concentrated mucus extracts increased As mobility. These changes, together with those due to the passage through the gut, were due to increases in pH, phosphate and soluble organic carbon. The mobilisation of As from contaminated soils in the environment by cast production and mucus secretion may allow for accelerated leaching or uptake into biota which is underestimated when bulk soil samples are analysed and the influence of soil biota ignored. PMID:21996620

  12. Stomatin immunoreactivity in ciliated cells of the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Britta; Stewart, Gordon W; Treharne, Kathryn J; Mehta, Anil; Knöpfle, Gisela; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Müller, Klaus-Michael; von Düring, Monika

    2003-07-01

    Stomatin is a widely distributed 32kD membrane protein of unknown function. In biochemical studies it is associated with cholesterol+sphingomyelin-rich 'rafts' in the cytomembrane. Genetic studies in C. elegans, supported by microscopic studies in mammalian tissue and co-expression studies in oocytes, suggest a functional link with the DEG/ENaC (degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel) superfamily of monovalent ion channels. Since ENaC channels play a prominent role in the physiology of the respiratory epithelium, we have studied the immunolocalization of stomatin in mature and developing human airway epithelium by means of Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Stomatin immunoreactivity (stomatin-IR) was found in the ciliated cells of the conductive airway epithelium in a distinct distribution pattern with the strongest signal along the cilia. Immunogold labelling revealed immunogold particles at the basal bodies, along the cilia, and at the membrane of the microvilli. The presence of stomatin-IR paralleled the stages of ciliogenesis in airway development, and its appearance preceded the elongation of the axoneme and the cilial outgrowth. Due to its presence in the different cellular locations in the ciliated cell, we suggest that stomatin is involved in various cellular functions. From its ultrastructural position, stomatin could be a candidate for a membrane-associated mechanotransducer with a role in the control of ciliary motility. Stomatin as a raft protein might be a microtubule associated protein moving along the outer surface of the microtubules to its terminal site of action in the cilia. Stomatin-IR in microvilli supports the hypothesis of a co-localization with beta- and gamma- ENaC and, in conclusion, their potential functional interaction to control the composition of periciliary mucus electrolytes. PMID:12759749

  13. Airway and lung pathology due to mucosal surface dehydration in β-Epithelial Na+ Channel-overexpressing mice: role of TNFα and IL-4Rα signaling, influence of neonatal development, and limited efficacy of glucocorticoid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Livraghi, Alessandra; Grubb, Barbara R.; Hudson, Elizabeth J.; Wilkinson, Kristen J.; Sheehan, John K.; Mall, Marcus A.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Boucher, Richard C.; Randell, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the epithelial Na+ channel β subunit (Scnn1b gene, βENaC protein) in transgenic (Tg) mouse airways dehydrates mucosal surfaces, producing mucus obstruction, inflammation, and neonatal mortality. Airway inflammation includes macrophage activation, neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and elevated KC, TNFα and chitinase levels. These changes recapitulate aspects of complex human obstructive airway diseases, but their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to identify pathways relevant to the development of Scnn1b-Tg mouse lung pathology. Genetic deletion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) or its receptor, TNFR1, had no measurable effect on the phenotype. Deletion of the interleukin-4 receptor alpha subunit (IL-4Rα) abolished transient mucous secretory cell (MuSC) abundance and eosinophilia normally observed in neonatal wild-type (WT) mice. Similarly, IL-4Rα deficiency decreased MuSC and eosinophils in neonatal Scnn1b-Tg mice, which correlated with improved neonatal survival. However, chronic lung pathology in adult Scnn1b-Tg mice was not affected by IL-4Rα status. Prednisolone treatment ablated eosinophilia and MuSC in adult Scnn1b-Tg mice, but did not decrease mucus plugging or neutrophilia. These studies demonstrate that: 1) normal neonatal mouse airway development entails an IL-4Rα-dependent, transient abundance of MuSC and eosinophils; 2) absence of IL-4Rα improved neonatal survival of Scnn1b-Tg mice, likely reflecting decreased formation of asphyxiating mucus plugs; and 3) in Scnn1b-Tg mice, neutrophilia, mucus obstruction, and airspace enlargement are IL-4Rα- and TNFα-independent, and only MuSC and eosinophilia are sensitive to glucocorticoids. Thus, manipulation of multiple pathways will likely be required to treat the complex pathogenesis caused by airway surface dehydration. PMID:19299736

  14. [Effect of heparin on airway goblet cell secretion in sensitized guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Nakata, J; Tamaoki, J; Takeyama, K; Takeda, Y; Yamawaki, I; Kondo, M; Nagai, A

    1998-10-01

    Heparin and related proteoglycans are released from mast cells and possess anti-inflammatory and anti-complement activities. To elucidate whether heparin affects goblet cell secretion in asthmatic airways and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, we studied guinea pigs sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) by determining the mucus score (MS) of tracheal goblet cells stained with Alcian blue and PAS. Inhalation of OVA caused a rapid decrease in MS in a dose-dependent manner, with the maximal decrease being from 545 +/- 26 to 192 +/- 35 (p < 0.001), indicating an increase in goblet cell mucus discharge. This effect was selectively inhibited by the histamine H2 receptor blockade with cimetidine. Prior inhalation of heparin inhibited OVA-induced goblet cell secretion in a dose-dependent fashion, but had no effect on histamine-induced goblet cell secretion. The OVA-induced histamine release from the tracheal tissue was likewise inhibited by heparin. These results suggest that allergic challenge stimulates airway goblet cell secretion mainly through the release of histamine and the concomitant activation of histamine H2 receptors on goblet cells, and that heparin protects against this effect by inhibiting the histamine release from mast cells.

  15. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-03-01

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients. PMID:19947928

  16. Altered Sputum Microstructure as a Marker of Airway Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg; Jung, James; West, Natalie; Boyle, Michael; Suk, Jung Soo; Hanes, Justin

    In the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, highly viscoelastic mucus remains stagnant in the lung leading to obstructed airways prone to recurrent infections. Bulk-fluid rheological measurement is primarily used to assess the pathological features of mucus. However, this approach is limited in detecting microscopic properties on the length scale of pathogens and immune cells. We have shown in prior work based on the transport of muco-inert nanoparticles (MIP) in CF sputum that patients can carry significantly different microstructural properties. In this study, we aimed to determine the factors leading to variations between patients in sputum microstructure and their clinical implications. The microrheological properties of CF sputum were measured using multi-particle tracking experiments of MIP. MIP were made by grafting polyethylene glycol onto the surface of polystyrene nanoparticles which prior work has shown prevents adhesion to CF sputum. Biochemical analyses show that sputum microstructure was significantly altered by elevated mucin and DNA content. Reduction in sputum pore size is characteristic of patients with obstructed airways as indicated by measured pulmonary function tests. Our microstructural read-out may serve as a novel biomarker for CF.

  17. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-01-27

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients.

  18. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  19. Airway surface liquid homeostasis in cystic fibrosis: pathophysiology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Haq, Iram J; Gray, Michael A; Garnett, James P; Ward, Christopher; Brodlie, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease characterised by recurrent respiratory infections, inflammation and lung damage. The volume and composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) are important in maintaining ciliary function, mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial properties of the airway. In CF, these homeostatic mechanisms are impaired, leading to a dehydrated and acidic ASL. ASL volume depletion in CF is secondary to defective anion transport by the abnormal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Abnormal CFTR mediated bicarbonate transport creates an unfavourable, acidic environment, which impairs antimicrobial function and alters mucus properties and clearance. These disease mechanisms create a disordered airway milieu, consisting of thick mucopurulent secretions and chronic bacterial infection. In addition to CFTR, there are additional ion channels and transporters in the apical airway epithelium that play a role in maintaining ASL homeostasis. These include the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the solute carrier 26A (SLC26A) family of anion exchangers, and calcium-activated chloride channels. In this review we discuss how the ASL is abnormal in CF and how targeting these alternative channels and transporters could provide an attractive therapeutic strategy to correct the underlying ASL abnormalities evident in CF. PMID:26719229

  20. Airway surface liquid homeostasis in cystic fibrosis: pathophysiology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Haq, Iram J; Gray, Michael A; Garnett, James P; Ward, Christopher; Brodlie, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease characterised by recurrent respiratory infections, inflammation and lung damage. The volume and composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) are important in maintaining ciliary function, mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial properties of the airway. In CF, these homeostatic mechanisms are impaired, leading to a dehydrated and acidic ASL. ASL volume depletion in CF is secondary to defective anion transport by the abnormal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Abnormal CFTR mediated bicarbonate transport creates an unfavourable, acidic environment, which impairs antimicrobial function and alters mucus properties and clearance. These disease mechanisms create a disordered airway milieu, consisting of thick mucopurulent secretions and chronic bacterial infection. In addition to CFTR, there are additional ion channels and transporters in the apical airway epithelium that play a role in maintaining ASL homeostasis. These include the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the solute carrier 26A (SLC26A) family of anion exchangers, and calcium-activated chloride channels. In this review we discuss how the ASL is abnormal in CF and how targeting these alternative channels and transporters could provide an attractive therapeutic strategy to correct the underlying ASL abnormalities evident in CF.

  1. In Vitro Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Colonization of Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Oliver A.; Krunkosky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important cause of respiratory disease, especially in school-age children and young adults. We employed normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in air-liquid interface culture to study the interaction of M. pneumoniae with differentiated airway epithelium. These airway cells, when grown in air-liquid interface culture, polarize, form tight junctions, produce mucus, and develop ciliary function. We examined both qualitatively and quantitatively the role of mycoplasma gliding motility in the colonization pattern of developing airway cells, comparing wild-type M. pneumoniae and mutants thereof with moderate to severe defects in gliding motility. Adherence assays with radiolabeled mycoplasmas demonstrated a dramatic reduction in binding for all strains with airway cell polarization, independent of acquisition of mucociliary function. Adherence levels dropped further once NHBE cells achieved terminal differentiation, with mucociliary activity strongly selecting for full gliding competence. Analysis over time by confocal microscopy demonstrated a distinct colonization pattern that appeared to originate primarily with ciliated cells, but lateral spread from the base of the cilia was slower than expected. The data support a model in which the mucociliary apparatus impairs colonization yet cilia provide a conduit for mycoplasma access to the host cell surface and suggest acquisition of a barrier function, perhaps associated with tethered mucin levels, with NHBE cell polarization. PMID:24478073

  2. Ambroxol suppresses influenza-virus proliferation in the mouse airway by increasing antiviral factor levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Yao, D F; Ohuchi, M; Ide, M; Yano, M; Okumura, Y; Kido, H

    2002-05-01

    The protective effect of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent which has antioxidant properties and stimulates the release of pulmonary surfactant, against influenza-virus proliferation in the airway was investigated in mice. Ambroxol or the vehicle was administered intraperitoneally twice a day for 5-7 days to mice shortly after intranasal infection with a lethal dose of influenza A/Aichi/68 (H3N2) virus, and the survival rate, virus titre and levels of factors regulating virus proliferation in the airway fluid were analysed. Ambroxol significantly suppressed virus multiplication and improved the survival rate of mice. The effect of ambroxol reached a peak at 10 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), higher doses being less effective. Ambroxol stimulated the release of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication, such as pulmonary surfactant, mucus protease inhibitor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-A and IgG, although it stimulated the release of a trypsin-type protease that potentiates virus proliferation. In addition, ambroxol transiently suppressed release of the cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-12, into airway fluid. Although ambroxol had several negative effects on the host defence system, overall it strikingly increased the concentrations of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication in the airway.

  3. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  4. The mechanics of airway closure.

    PubMed

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2008-11-30

    We describe how surface-tension-driven instabilities of the lung's liquid lining may lead to pulmonary airway closure via the formation of liquid bridges that occlude the airway lumen. Using simple theoretical models, we demonstrate that this process may occur via a purely fluid-mechanical "film collapse" or through a coupled, fluid-elastic "compliant collapse" mechanism. Both mechanisms can lead to airway closure in times comparable with the breathing cycle, suggesting that surface tension is the primary mechanical effect responsible for the closure observed in peripheral regions of the human lungs. We conclude by discussing the influence of additional effects not included in the simple models, such as gravity, the presence of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory flow and wall motion, the airways' geometry, and the mechanical structure of the airway walls. PMID:18595784

  5. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  6. Smoking produced mucus and clearance of particulates in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, T.D.; Poland, T.M.

    1992-12-31

    Some studies of miners have shown a lesser relative lung-cancer risk for smokers than for nonsmokers. For example, experiments by Cross and associates with dogs have shown an apparent protective effect of cigarette smoke against radon-daughter and dust exposure. One reason for these changes may be the thickened mucus layer in the tracheobronchial region of smokers. Physiological changes in the lung due to smoking may decrease the effects of radioactive particles in cancers in the bronchial region by apparently promoting faster clearance, in that region, of radioactive particles and by decreasing the radiation dose through reduced penetration to the sensitive basal epithelial cells. Because of the short half-life of radon daughters, even if there is possible tobacco-related delay of particle clearance from the alveolar region it cannot affect radon clearance. Therefore, the possible mitigating effect of tobacco on radon-produced cancer appears to be limited to the tracheobronchial region. It would be of value to a number of occupations if the same changes in the lungs due to smoking could be produced in exposed workers in the absence of cigarette-smoking. Beta-carotene and vitamin A, which affect maintenance and secretion of the mucosal lining, appear to thicken mucus, thereby providing protection against radon-induced lung cancers that is similar to smoking-related changes in the lung.

  7. Movements of HIV-virions in human cervical mucus

    PubMed Central

    Boukari, Hacène; Brichacek, Beda; Stratton, Pamela; Mahoney, Sheila F.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Margolis, Leonid; Nossal, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy were used to examine the movements of fluorescently-labeled HIV virions (~100 nm) added to samples of human cervical mucus. Particle-tracking analysis indicates that the motion of most virions is decreased 200-fold compared to that in aqueous solution and is not driven by typical diffusion. Rather, the time-dependence of their ensemble-averaged mean-square displacements is proportional to τα + v2τ2, describing a combination of anomalous diffusion (α~ 0.3) and flow-like behavior, τ being the lag time. We attribute the flow-like behavior to slowly-relaxing mucus matrix that follows mechanical perturbations such as stretching and twisting of the sample. Further analysis of the tracks and displacements of individual virions indicates differences in the local movements among the virions, including constrained motion and infrequent jumps, perhaps due to abrupt changes in matrix structure. Changes in the microenvironments due to slow structural changes may facilitate movement of the virions, allowing them to reach the epithelial layer. PMID:19711976

  8. Bacterial decomposition of coral mucus as evaluated by long-term and quantitative observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Miyajima, T.

    2011-06-01

    Coral mucus released from Acropora formosa and Montipora digitata was incubated with bacteria under dark conditions for 1 year to evaluate the quantitative degradability. All the mucus samples showed a similar decomposition pattern: about 80% of total organic carbon (TOC) in the mucus was mineralized within 1 month, while some mucus was slowly decomposed over the 1 year. Regression analysis using an exponential curve considering three degradability pools (labile, semilabile, and refractory) fitted the changes of the TOC concentrations very well ( r 2 > 0.99). Compiling the data on the two coral species, the labile organic C in the coral mucus had mineralization rates of 10-18% d-1 and accounted for 79-87% of the initial TOC in the mucus. Semilabile organic C had mineralization rates of 0.3-1.6% d-1 and accounted for 11-18% of the initial TOC. Refractory organic C accounted for 6% at most. These results suggest that not all coral mucus is rapidly decomposed by bacteria but some mucus remains as semilabile and refractory organic matter for several months.

  9. Preliminary Results on the Influence of Engineered Artificial Mucus Layer on Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Döllinger, Michael; Gröhn, Franziska; Berry, David A.; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Luegmair, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have confirmed the influence of dehydration and an altered mucus (e.g., due to pathologies) on phonation. However, the underlying reasons for these influences are not fully understood. This study was a preliminary inquiry into the influences of mucus architecture and concentration on vocal fold oscillation. Method: Two…

  10. 76 FR 52961 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Devices for Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS...-061-2004/0 ``Mucus Shaving Apparatus for Endotracheal Tubes''; U.S. Patent 7,051,737 to EndOclear, LLC... endotracheal tubes. DATES: Only written comments and/or applications for a license received by the NIH...

  11. An Autoregulatory Mechanism Governing Mucociliary Transport Is Sensitive to Mucus Load

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linbo; Shastry, Suresh; Byan-Parker, Suzanne; Houser, Grace; K. Chu, Kengyeh; Birket, Susan E.; Fernandez, Courtney M.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Grizzle, William E.; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance, characterized by mucus secretion and its conveyance by ciliary action, is a fundamental physiological process that plays an important role in host defense. Although it is known that ciliary activity changes with chemical and mechanical stimuli, the autoregulatory mechanisms that govern ciliary activity and mucus transport in response to normal and pathophysiological variations in mucus are not clear. We have developed a high-speed, 1-μm-resolution, cross-sectional imaging modality, termed micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), which provides the first integrated view of the functional microanatomy of the epithelial surface. We monitored invasion of the periciliary liquid (PCL) layer by mucus in fully differentiated human bronchial epithelial cultures and full thickness swine trachea using μOCT. We further monitored mucociliary transport (MCT) and intracellular calcium concentration simultaneously during invasion of the PCL layer by mucus using colocalized μOCT and confocal fluorescence microscopy in cell cultures. Ciliary beating and mucus transport are up-regulated via a calcium-dependent pathway when mucus causes a reduction in the PCL layer and cilia height. When the load exceeds a physiological limit of approximately 2 μm, this gravity-independent autoregulatory mechanism can no longer compensate, resulting in diminished ciliary motion and abrogation of stimulated MCT. A fundamental integrated mechanism with specific operating limits governs MCT in the lung and fails when periciliary layer compression and mucus viscosity exceeds normal physiologic limits. PMID:24937762

  12. Soluble mediators, not cilia, determine airway surface liquid volume in normal and cystic fibrosis superficial airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Trout, Laura; Donaldson, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C

    2006-05-01

    A key aspect of the lung's innate defense system is the ability of the superficial epithelium to regulate airway surface liquid (ASL) volume to maintain a 7-mum periciliary liquid layer (PCL), which is required for cilia to beat and produce mucus flow. The mechanisms whereby airway epithelia regulate ASL height to >or=7 microm are poorly understood. Using bumetanide as an inhibitor of Cl- secretion, and nystatin as an activator of Na+ absorption, we found that a coordinated "blending" of both Cl- secretion and Na+ absorption must occur to effect ASL volume homeostasis. We then investigated how ASL volume status is regulated by the underlying epithelia. Cilia were not critical to this process as (a) ASL volume was normal in cultures from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia with immotile cilia, and (b) in normal cultures that had not yet undergone ciliogenesis. However, we found that maneuvers that mimic deposition of excess ASL onto the proximal airways, which occurs during mucociliary clearance and after glandular secretion, acutely stimulated Na+ absorption, suggesting that volume regulation was sensitive to changes in concentrations of soluble mediators in the ASL rather than alterations in ciliary beating. To investigate this hypothesis further, we added potential "soluble mediators" to the ASL. ASL volume regulation was sensitive to a channel-activating protein (CAP; trypsin) and a CAP inhibitor (aprotinin), which regulated Na+ absorption via changes in epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity in both normal and cystic fibrosis cultures. ATP was also found to acutely regulate ASL volume by inducing secretion in normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) cultures, while its metabolite adenosine (ADO) evoked secretion in normal cultures but stimulated absorption in CF cultures. Interestingly, the amount of ASL/Cl- secretion elicited by ATP/ADO was influenced by the level of CAP-induced Na+ absorption, suggesting that there are important interactions between the soluble

  13. Efficient mucus permeation and tight junction opening by dissociable "mucus-inert" agent coated trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Xi; Shan, Wei; Li, Lian; Zhong, Jiaju; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2016-01-28

    Oral administration of protein drugs is greatly impeded by the lack of drug carriers that can efficiently overcome the absorption barriers of mucosa tissue, which consists of not only epithelium but also a blanket of mucus gel. We herein report a novel self-assembled nanoparticle (NP) platform for oral delivery of insulin by facilitating the efficient permeation through both of these two barriers. The NP possesses a core composed of insulin and trimethyl chitosan (TMC), and a dissociable "mucus-inert" hydrophilic coating of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer (pHPMA) derivative. The NPs exhibited free Brownian motion and excellent permeability in mucus, which enabled the access of the NP core to the epithelial cell surface underneath the mucus. Moreover, investigation of NP behavior showed that the pHPMA molecules started to dissociate as the NP permeates through mucus, and the TMC NP core was then exposed to facilitate transepithelial transport via paracellular pathway. The pHPMA coating significantly improved transepithelial transport of TMC-based NP and their ability to open tight junctions between the mucus-secreting epithelial cells. Moreover, in diabetic rats, pHPMA coated NPs generated a prominent hypoglycemic response following oral administration, and exhibited a relative bioavailability 2.8-fold higher than that of uncoated TMC-based NPs. Our study provided the evidence of using pHPMA as "mucus-inert" agent to enhance mucus permeation of TMC-based NPs, and validated a novel strategy to overcome the multiple absorption barriers using NP platform with dissociable hydrophilic coating and TMC-based core possessing tight junction-opening ability.

  14. High-frequency and low-frequency chest compression: effects on lung water secretion, mucus transport, heart rate, and blood pressure using a trapezoidal source pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    O'Clock, George D; Lee, Yong Wan; Lee, Jongwong; Warwick, Warren J

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC), using an appropriate source (pump) waveform for frequencies at or above 3 Hz, can enhance pulmonary clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using a trapezoidal HFCC source pressure waveform, secretion of water from epithelial tissue and transport of mucus through lung airways can be enhanced for patients with CF and COPD. At frequencies below 3 Hz, low-frequency chest compression (LFCC) appears to have a significant impact on the cardiovascular system. For a trapezoidal source pressure waveform at frequencies close to 1 Hz, LFCC produces amplitude or intensity variations in various components of the electrocardiogram time-domain waveform, produces changes at very low frequencies associated with the electrocardiogram frequency spectra (indicating enhanced parasympathetic nervous system activity), and promotes a form of heart rate synchronization. It appears that LFCC can also provide additional cardiovascular benefits by reducing peak and average systolic and diastolic blood pressure for patients with hypertension.

  15. Ultrafine carbon black particles cause early airway inflammation and have adjuvant activity in a mouse allergic airway disease model.

    PubMed

    de Haar, Colin; Hassing, Ine; Bol, Marianne; Bleumink, Rob; Pieters, Raymond

    2005-10-01

    To gain more insight into the mechanisms of particulate matter (PM)-induced adjuvant activity, we studied the kinetics of airway toxicity/inflammation and allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in response to ultrafine carbon black particles (CBP). Mice were exposed intranasally to OVA alone or in combination with different concentrations of CBP. Airway toxicity and inflammation were assessed at days 4 and 8. Immune adjuvant effects were studied in the lung draining peribronchial lymph nodes (PBLN) at day 8. Antigen-specific IgE was measured at days 21 and 28, whereas allergic airway inflammation was studied after OVA challenges (day 28). Results show that a total dose of 200 microg CBP per mouse, but not 20 microg or 2 microg, induced immediate airway inflammation. This 200 microg CBP was the only dose that had immune adjuvant activity, by inducing enlargement of the PBLN and increasing OVA-specific production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). The immune adjuvant activity of 200 microg CBP dosing was further examined. Whereas increased OVA-specific IgE levels in serum on day 21 confirms systemic sensitization, this was further supported by allergic airway inflammation after challenges with OVA. Our data show a link between early airway toxicity and adjuvant effects of CBP. In addition, results indicate that local cytokine production early after exposure to CBP is predictive of allergic airway inflammation. In addition this model appears suitable for studying the role of airway toxicity, inflammation and other mechanisms of particle adjuvant activity, and predicting the adjuvant potential of different particles.

  16. The inner of the two Muc2 mucin-dependent mucus layers in colon is devoid of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Malin EV

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that the colon is protected by an inner mucus layer that efficiently separates the bacteria in the outer mucus from the epithelial cells. The inner mucus is impervious for bacteria and built by a network formed by the MUC2 mucin. Lack or defects in this inner mucus layer allow bacteria to reach the epithelia, something that triggers colon inflammation. PMID:21327117

  17. Dynamic Changes in Mucus Thickness and Ion Secretion during Citrobacter rodentium Infection and Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Piñeiro, Ana M.; Alomran, Ala H. A.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Fernandez, Harvey R.; Banerjee, Debashish; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Lindén, Sara K.

    2013-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is an attaching and effacing pathogen used as a murine model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The mucus layers are a complex matrix of molecules, and mucus swelling, hydration and permeability are affected by many factors, including ion composition. Here, we used the C. rodentium model to investigate mucus dynamics during infection. By measuring the mucus layer thickness in tissue explants during infection, we demonstrated that the thickness changes dynamically during the course of infection and that its thickest stage coincides with the start of a decrease of bacterial density at day 14 after infection. Although quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that mucin mRNA increases during early infection, the increased mucus layer thickness late in infection was not explained by increased mRNA levels. Proteomic analysis of mucus did not demonstrate the appearance of additional mucins, but revealed an increased number of proteins involved in defense responses. Ussing chamber-based electrical measurements demonstrated that ion secretion was dynamically altered during the infection phases. Furthermore, the bicarbonate ion channel Bestrophin-2 mRNA nominally increased, whereas the Cftr mRNA decreased during the late infection clearance phase. Microscopy of Muc2 immunostained tissues suggested that the inner striated mucus layer present in the healthy colon was scarce during the time point of most severe infection (10 days post infection), but then expanded, albeit with a less structured appearance, during the expulsion phase. Together with previously published literature, the data implies a model for clearance where a change in secretion allows reformation of the mucus layer, displacing the pathogen to the outer mucus layer, where it is then outcompeted by the returning commensal flora. In conclusion, mucus and ion secretion are dynamically altered during the C. rodentium infection cycle. PMID:24386378

  18. Functional characterization of a mucus-specific LPXTG surface adhesin from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Satokari, Reetta; Reunanen, Justus; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; de Vos, Willem M; Palva, Airi

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological niche as a comparatively less stringent allochthonous intestine-dwelling bacterium. To uncover additional surface proteins involved in mucosal adhesion, we investigated the adherence properties of the only predicted protein (LGG_02337) in L. rhamnosus GG that exhibits homology with a known mucus-binding domain. We cloned a recombinant form of the gene for this putative mucus adhesin and established that the purified protein readily adheres to human intestinal mucus. We also showed that this mucus adhesin is visibly distributed throughout the cell surface and participates in the adhesive interaction between L. rhamnosus GG and mucus, although less prominently than the mucus-binding pili in this strain. Based on primary structural comparisons, we concluded that the current annotation of the LGG_02337 protein likely does not accurately reflect its predicted properties, and we propose that this mucus-specific adhesin be called the mucus-binding factor (MBF). Finally, we interpret our results to mean that L. rhamnosus GG MBF, as an active mucus-specific surface adhesin with a presumed ancillary involvement in pilus-mediated mucosal adhesion, plays a part in the adherent mechanisms during intestinal colonization by this probiotic.

  19. Functional characterization of a mucus-specific LPXTG surface adhesin from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Satokari, Reetta; Reunanen, Justus; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; de Vos, Willem M; Palva, Airi

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological niche as a comparatively less stringent allochthonous intestine-dwelling bacterium. To uncover additional surface proteins involved in mucosal adhesion, we investigated the adherence properties of the only predicted protein (LGG_02337) in L. rhamnosus GG that exhibits homology with a known mucus-binding domain. We cloned a recombinant form of the gene for this putative mucus adhesin and established that the purified protein readily adheres to human intestinal mucus. We also showed that this mucus adhesin is visibly distributed throughout the cell surface and participates in the adhesive interaction between L. rhamnosus GG and mucus, although less prominently than the mucus-binding pili in this strain. Based on primary structural comparisons, we concluded that the current annotation of the LGG_02337 protein likely does not accurately reflect its predicted properties, and we propose that this mucus-specific adhesin be called the mucus-binding factor (MBF). Finally, we interpret our results to mean that L. rhamnosus GG MBF, as an active mucus-specific surface adhesin with a presumed ancillary involvement in pilus-mediated mucosal adhesion, plays a part in the adherent mechanisms during intestinal colonization by this probiotic. PMID:21602388

  20. Direct particle-to-cell deposition of coarse ambient particulate matter increases the production of inflammatory mediators from cultured human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Volckens, John; Dailey, Lisa; Walters, Glenn; Devlin, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of cultured cells to particulate matter air pollution is usually accomplished by collecting particles on a solid matrix, extracting the particles from the matrix, suspending them in liquid, and applying the suspension to cells grown on plastic and submerged in medium. The objective of this work was to develop a more physiologically and environmentally relevant model of air pollutant deposition on cultures of human primary airway epithelial cells. We hypothesize that the toxicology of inhaled particulate matter depends strongly on both the particulate dispersion state and the mode of delivery to cells. Our exposure system employs a combination of unipolar charging and electrostatic force to deposit particles directly from the air onto cells grown at an air-liquid interface in a heated, humidified exposure chamber. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to concentrated, coarse ambient particulate matter in this system expressed increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers at 1 hour following exposure and relative to controls exposed to particle-free air. More importantly, these effects are seen at particulate loadings that are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than levels applied using traditional in vitro systems. PMID:19603682

  1. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  2. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  3. Immunolocalization of NLRP3 Inflammasome in Normal Murine Airway Epithelium and Changes following Induction of Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai B; Lewis, Martin D; Tan, Lor Wai; Lester, Susan E; Baker, Leonie M; Ng, Jia; Hamilton-Bruce, Monica A; Hill, Catherine L; Koblar, Simon A; Rischmueller, Maureen; Ruffin, Richard E; Wormald, Peter J; Zalewski, Peter D; Lang, Carol J

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about innate immunity and components of inflammasomes in airway epithelium. This study evaluated immunohistological evidence for NLRP3 inflammasomes in normal and inflamed murine (Balb/c) airway epithelium in a model of ovalbumin (OVA) induced allergic airway inflammation. The airway epithelium of control mice exhibited strong cytoplasmic staining for total caspase-1, ASC, and NLRP3, whereas the OVA mice exhibited strong staining for active caspase-1, with redistribution of caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18, indicating possible activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Active caspase-1, NLRP3, and other inflammasome components were also detected in tissue eosinophils from OVA mice, and may potentially contribute to IL-1β and IL-18 production. In whole lung, inRNA expression of NAIP and procaspase-1 was increased in OVA mice, whereas NLRP3, IL-1β and IL-18 decreased. Some OVA-treated mice also had significantly elevated and tightly correlated serum levels of IL-1β and TNFα. In cultured normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LPS priming resulted in a significant increase in NLRP3 and II-lp protein expression. This study is the first to demonstrate NLRP3 inflammasome components in normal airway epithelium and changes with inflammation. We propose activation and/or luminal release of the inflammasome is a feature of allergic airway inflammation which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:22523501

  4. Occurrence of organo-arsenicals in jellyfishes and their mucus.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, K; Ohno, H; Wada, N; Ueno, S; Goessler, W; Kuehnelt, D; Schlagenhaufen, C; Kaise, T; Irgolic, K J

    2001-08-01

    Water-soluble arsenic compound fractions were extracted from seven species of jellyfishes and subjected to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for arsenicals. A low content of arsenic was found to be the characteristic of jellyfish. Arsenobetaine (AB) was the major arsenic compound without exception in the tissues of the jellyfish species and mucus-blobs collected from some of them. Although the arsenic content in Beroe cucumis, which preys on Bolinopsis mikado, was more than 13 times that in B. mikado, the chromatograms of these two species were similar in the distribution pattern of arsenicals. The nine species of jellyfishes including two species treated in the previous paper can be classified into arsenocholine (AC)-rich and AC-poor species. Jellyfishes belonging to Semaostamae were classified as AC-rich species.

  5. Occurrence of organo-arsenicals in jellyfishes and their mucus.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, K; Ohno, H; Wada, N; Ueno, S; Goessler, W; Kuehnelt, D; Schlagenhaufen, C; Kaise, T; Irgolic, K J

    2001-08-01

    Water-soluble arsenic compound fractions were extracted from seven species of jellyfishes and subjected to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for arsenicals. A low content of arsenic was found to be the characteristic of jellyfish. Arsenobetaine (AB) was the major arsenic compound without exception in the tissues of the jellyfish species and mucus-blobs collected from some of them. Although the arsenic content in Beroe cucumis, which preys on Bolinopsis mikado, was more than 13 times that in B. mikado, the chromatograms of these two species were similar in the distribution pattern of arsenicals. The nine species of jellyfishes including two species treated in the previous paper can be classified into arsenocholine (AC)-rich and AC-poor species. Jellyfishes belonging to Semaostamae were classified as AC-rich species. PMID:11482664

  6. Rheologic studies on middle ear effusions and their mucus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J E; Green, G G; Birchall, J P; Pearson, J P

    1989-04-01

    The properties of pooled thick and thin middle ear effusions, from children with otitis media with effusion, were studied by viscometry. Mucus glycoproteins were responsible for effusion viscosity. Their percentage by weight in thick and thin effusions was 25% and 8.2%, respectively. N-acetylcysteine and 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol caused a 39% viscosity drop in a 5-mg/mL glycoprotein solution, whereas S-carboxymethylcysteine had no effect. Treatment of thick effusions with 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol initially caused a viscosity decrease followed by a gradual increase. Higher reducing agent concentrations (0.5 mol/L) caused a more rapid decrease followed by a rapid increase, presumably by causing nonspecific aggregation of reduced protein molecules. These results suggest that the concentration of and the time that a mucolytic is in the middle ear would be of prime importance in achieving the desired decrease in viscosity.

  7. Investigation of mucus obtained from different fish species on the acute pain induced with scalpel incision in paw of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahtiyar; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kiran, Altan; Gencoglu, Songul; Duzgun, Ahmet; Kurtoglu, Ilker Zeki; Yarali, Oguzhan; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    No comparative study could be found for the analgesic activity of mucuses from the Oncorhynchus mykiss (OM), Salvelinus fontinalis (SF), Salmo coruhensis (SC), Acipenser gueldenstaedtii (AG), and Acipenser baerii (AB) fish species in the literature. We aimed to investigate the effects of mucuses obtained from the abovementioned fish species on scalpel incision-induced pain in the rat paw and to examine the role of oxidant/antioxidant parameters and COX-2 gene expression in the analgesic activities. Animals were divided into groups: SIC (scalpel incision; SI), SIDS (SI+25 mg/kg diclofenac sodium), SOM (SI+25 mg/kg OM mucus), SFM (SI+25 mg/kg SF mucus), SCM (SI+25 mg/kg SC mucus), SAgM (SI+25 mg/kg AG mucus), SAbM (SI+25 mg/kg AB mucus), and HG (healthy). The paw pain thresholds were measured with a Basile algesimeter before and after diclofenac sodium (DS) or mucus administration, and then the rats were euthanized with thiopental sodium. Oxidant/antioxidant and COX-2 gene expression parameters were measured in paw tissues. OM, SC, AG, and AB fish mucuses could not decrease the SI-induced pain. However, SF fish mucus prevented this pain by 69% after the first hour and by 58.3% after the third hour. DS was shown to suppress pain more weakly than SF, preventing the pain by 62.1% and 50.0% after the first and third hours, respectively. SF mucus and DS significantly inhibited increase of COX-2 gene expression, while other fish mucuses could not. None of the fish mucuses except SF mucus in conjunction with DS could significantly inhibit the increase in oxidant parameters and decrease in antioxidants. SF fish mucus should be comparatively assessed in clinical practice for treatment of postoperative pain. PMID:26490740

  8. Effect of viscosity on metachrony in mucus propelling cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we report that increasing the viscosity of the medium caused not only a decrease in the ciliary beat frequency but also changes in the metachrony and correlation between cilia. The study was performed using double and triple simultaneous photoelectric measurements on cultured ciliary cells from the frog esophagus in the viscosity range of 1-2,000 cp. We observed that increasing the viscosity intensified the fluctuations in all the measured parameters. Ciliary beat frequency decreased moderately. Even at quite high viscosities (circa 2000 cp.), cilia were still active with beating frequencies of 3-5 Hz. In addition, the degree of correlation between cilia parallel to the effective stroke direction (ESD) decreased, while that perpendicular to the ESD at a low range of viscosities remained unchanged and even increased at high viscosities. Medium viscosities in the range of 30-1,500 cp. altered the metachronal wave properties of cultured frog esophagus. The metachronal wavelength increased by up to 50%, and the wave direction changed towards more orthoplectic type of coordination. According to our recently suggested model [Gheber and Priel, 1990: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 16:167-181], these effects can be explained by a decrease in the temporal asymmetry of the ciliary beat. Since similar results were observed in water propelling cilia of Paramecium subjected to medium viscosity ranges of up to 40 cp. [Machemer, 1972: J. Exp. Biol. 57:239-259], we conclude that hydrodynamic interactions govern the metachronal wave properties of both mucus and water propelling cilia, though mucus propelling cilia, with their better adaptation to increased load, are affected at much higher viscosities than water propelling cilia.

  9. [Benzalkonium chloride tampons. Local tolerance and effects on cervix mucus].

    PubMed

    Erny, R; Siboni, C

    1983-01-01

    Cylinders of soft polyvinyl soaked in benzalkonium chloride have been used as contraceptive tampons. Benzalkonium chloride is a powerful spermicide which belongs to the cationic or saponium detergents. It does not enter the blood stream. These contraceptive sponges are more efficient and better accepted by patients than spermicides used by themselves. One of the principal advantages of the method is to be able to place the tampon in position hours before sexual intercourse. The authors wanted to test if wearing a tampon for a long time did not have an adverse effect on the cervico-vaginal epithelium. 27 women were seen before and after having worn one of these contraceptive tampons for 24 hours: neither the smears nor colposcopy had changed. 21 vaginal biopsies were taken after the tampon had been removed from the area where it had been lying. Vaginal epithelium tolerates the prolonged presence of the sponge well. The authors carried out bacteriological controls before and immediately after removing the tampon 24 hours later. Commensals were still present. Pathogenic sexually transmitted organisms are moderately sensitive to bactericidal action of benzalkonium chloride except for candida albicans, which is resistant. There was no increase in the number of germs in 69 cases studied. The authors carried out scanning electromicroscopy at different magnifications to see the effect on normal cervical mucus at the time of ovulation when it came into contact with benzalkonium chloride. Ovulatory mucus which had been translucent and fluid became thicker and coagulated and the reticulated web took on the appearance of a bunched up web.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. p110γ/δ Double-Deficiency Induces Eosinophilia and IgE Production but Protects from OVA-Induced Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ammon-Treiber, Susanne; Schwab, Matthias; Piekorz, Roland P.; Hirsch, Emilio; Nürnberg, Bernd; Beer-Hammer, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The catalytical isoforms p110γ and p110δ of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) and PI3Kδ play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Two key elements in allergic asthma are increased levels of eosinophils and IgE. Dual pharmacological inhibition of p110γ and p110δ reduces asthma-associated eosinophilic lung infiltration and ameliorates disease symptoms, whereas the absence of enzymatic activity in p110γKOδD910A mice increases IgE and basal eosinophil counts. This suggests that long-term inhibition of p110γ and p110δ might exacerbate asthma. Here, we analysed mice genetically deficient for both catalytical subunits (p110γ/δ-/-) and determined basal IgE and eosinophil levels and the immune response to ovalbumin-induced asthma. Serum concentrations of IgE, IL-5 and eosinophil numbers were significantly increased in p110γ/δ-/- mice compared to single knock-out and wildtype mice. However, p110γ/δ-/- mice were protected against OVA-induced infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, T and B cells into lung tissue and bronchoalveolar space. Moreover, p110γ/δ-/- mice, but not single knock-out mice, showed a reduced bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We conclude that increased levels of eosinophils and IgE in p110γ/δ-/- mice do not abolish the protective effect of p110γ/δ-deficiency against OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27442134

  11. Towards a versatile technique for tracking nanoparticle-mucus interaction: a step on the road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafee, N.; Schneider, M.

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory mucus is one of the main barriers for nanoparticle-based pulmonary delivery systems. This holds true especially for lung diseases like cystic fibrosis, where a very tenacious thick mucus layer hinders particle diffusion to the lung epithelium or the target area. Typically, mean square displacement of particles is used for mobility evaluation. In contrast, our objective is to develop a feasible technique to track directed particle penetration as a prerequisite for efficient pulmonary nanotherapy. Therefore, particle diffusion in artificial mucus was monitored based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and particle-mucus interaction was observed. As pharmaceutical relevant and benign materials, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by hot-melt emulsification using glyceryl behenate and different stabilizing agents such as poloxamer-407, tween-80, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The diffusion of labeled SLNs in stained artificial sputum representing CF-patient sputum was verified by 3D time laps imaging. Thus, the effect of coating, particle size and mucus viscosity on nanoparticle diffusion was studied. Using image analysis software "Image J", the total fluorescent signal after 30 min in case of poloxamer-coated SLNs was 5 and 100 folds higher than tween- and PVA-coated SLNs, respectively. Nevertheless, increasing mucus viscosity reduced the diffusion of tweencoated SLNs by a factor of 10. Studying particle-mucus interaction by CLSM can be considered a promising and versatile technique.

  12. Therapeutic Potential to Modify the Mucus Barrier in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Shen, Xiao; Li, Yi; Guo, Zhen; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Zhao, Jie; Gu, Lili; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Recently, numerous studies have shown that disruption of the mucus barrier plays an important role in the exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in ulcerative colitis. Alterations in the mucus barrier are well supported by published data and are widely accepted. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and Carnoy’s fixation has revealed the importance of the mucus barrier in maintaining a mutualistic relationship between host and bacteria. Studies have raised the possibility that modulation of the mucus barrier may provide therapies for the disease, using agents such as short-chain fatty acids, prebiotics and probiotics. This review describes changes in the mucus barrier of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in animal models of the disease. We also review the involvement of the mucus barrier in the exacerbation of the disease and explore the therapeutic potential of modifying the mucus barrier with short-chain fatty acids, prebiotics, probiotics, fatty acid synthase, H2S, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and phophatidyl choline. PMID:26784223

  13. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  14. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  15. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  16. Blockade of CD49d (alpha4 integrin) on intrapulmonary but not circulating leukocytes inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, W R; Chi, E Y; Albert, R K; Chu, S J; Lamm, W J; Rochon, Y; Jonas, M; Christie, P E; Harlan, J M

    1997-01-01

    Immunized mice after inhalation of specific antigen have the following characteristic features of human asthma: airway eosinophilia, mucus and Th2 cytokine release, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. A model of late-phase allergic pulmonary inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice was used to address the role of the alpha4 integrin (CD49d) in mediating the airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Local, intrapulmonary blockade of CD49d by intranasal administration of CD49d mAb inhibited all signs of lung inflammation, IL-4 and IL-5 release, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In contrast, CD49d blockade on circulating leukocytes by intraperitoneal CD49d mAb treatment only prevented the airway eosinophilia. In this asthma model, a CD49d-positive intrapulmonary leukocyte distinct from the eosinophil is the key effector cell of allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. PMID:9399955

  17. Binding of Yersinia enterocolitica to rabbit intestinal brush border membranes, mucus, and mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Basaraba, L; Peacock, S C; Gall, D G

    1989-01-01

    Mucus and its gel-forming glycoprotein component, mucin, are thought to protect the gastrointestinal tract from enteric pathogens by inhibiting their attachment to enterocytes. In this study, we investigated interactions between Yersinia enterocolitica (isogenic strains of virulent and nonvirulent organisms) and crude mucus, highly purified mucin, and brush border membranes (BBMs) isolated from the upper mid-, and distal small intestine and the proximal colon of the rabbit. Adherence of radiolabeled bacteria was assessed to BBMs, mucus, and mucin immobilized in polystyrene microtiter plate wells. Virulent Y. enterocolitica showed saturable binding to mucus, mucin, and BBMs from all four regions of the intestinal tract, although adherence to BBMs was appreciably greater than that to mucus or mucin. Maximal binding of bacteria was higher to BBMs from the distal small intestine and the proximal colon than to those from the upper and mid-small intestine, which may in part explain why the organism localizes to the ileo-caecal regions of the gut. Adherence of virulent Y. enterocolitica to BBMs was significantly reduced in the presence of homologous mucus or mucin preparations. Binding of virulent bacteria appears to depend on plasmid-encoded proteins located on the outer surface membrane, since (i) the isogenic strain lacking the virulence plasmid showed markedly less binding to all BBM, mucus, and mucin preparations; (ii) growth of the virulent strain at 25 degrees C, which inactivates its plasmid, significantly diminished binding to BBMs, mucus, and mucin; and (iii) mild proteolysis substantially decreased adherence of virulent bacteria to BBMs. Compared with rabbit intestinal and colonic mucins, binding of virulent Y. enterocolitica was significantly greater to purified human intestinal mucin and significantly less to rat intestinal mucin. These findings provide support for the role of mucus and mucin in host defense by preventing adherence of virulent Y

  18. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  19. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction.

  20. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  1. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  2. Static friction of porous bioceramic beta-TCP on intestinal mucus films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Ying-Chao; Jiang, Xin; Dai, Hong-Lian; Li, Shi-Pu

    2006-09-01

    The static friction behavior between a porous bioceramic material and an intestinal mucus film was investigated in order to develop a new intestine robotic endoscope. Here, the friction couple is porous beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and an artificial intestine mucus film. The effect of pore size of the beta-TCP material on the friction behavior is investigated. The results illustrated that in this friction system there is a relatively small normal force upon the intestinal mucus film of the intestine wall during locomotion. The maximum static friction force in this friction couple varies with the pore size of the porous beta-TCP material.

  3. Vaginal mucus from ewes treated with progestogen sponges affects quality of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Manes, Jorgelina; Ríos, Glenda; Fiorentino, María Andrea; Ungerfeld, Rodolfo

    2016-03-15

    The use of intravaginal sponges (IS) to synchronize estrous onset in ewes provokes vaginitis, an increase in the vaginal bacterial load, and growth of bacterial species that are not present during spontaneous estrous behavior. The objective of the study was to compare the functional sperm parameters after incubating it with mucus collected from the vagina of ewes during spontaneous estrus or estrous synchronized with IS. Pooled spermatozoa were co-incubated with: (1) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in spontaneous estrus; (2) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in estrus pretreated with progestogen-impregnated IS; (3) synthetic mucus; and (4) medium without mucus as a control group. Sperm samples were evaluated after incubating it for 30 and 90 minutes. The number of colony-forming units (CFUs/mL), pH, and osmolality were greater in the mucus collected from ewes treated with IS than from those untreated (P = 0.046; P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). The percentage of sperm with progressive motility was lower after incubation with vaginal mucus collected from estrous ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments both, 30 and 90 minutes after incubation (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The sample incubated for 30 minutes with mucus from ewes treated with IS had a lower percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane than all the other treatments (P < 0.0001). The percentage of sperm with functional membrane was significantly lower in the sample incubated for 30 minutes with vaginal mucus from ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments (P < 0.0001). After 90 minutes, the percentage was still lower than that in the sample collected from ewes during their spontaneous estrus (P = 0.0005). The lowest percentages of sperm with acrosome damage were observed in sperm incubated with mucus collected from sheep in spontaneous estrus for 30 and 90 minutes (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.008, respectively). The percentage of apoptotic spermatozoa was

  4. [Effect of aminophylline and simvastatin on airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in rats with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Xiong, Lingling; Deng, Xue; Zhou, Qun; Li, Chunying; Ren, Wei; Zhu, Chundong

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察氨茶碱和辛伐他汀对慢性阻塞性肺疾病(慢阻肺)的防治作用并从气道炎症和气道黏液高分泌角度探讨其作用机制。方法:采用烟熏和大鼠气管内注入脂多糖的方法建立慢阻肺模型。将40只雄性SD大鼠随机均分为对照组、慢阻肺组、氨茶碱组和辛伐他汀组。对照组和慢阻肺组用生理盐水1 mL/100 g灌胃,1次/d;氨茶碱组用氨茶碱溶液(5 g/L)1 mL/100 g灌胃,1次/d;辛伐他汀组用辛伐他汀溶液(0.5 g/L)1 mL/100 g灌胃,1次/d。用肺功能仪检测大鼠肺功能,HE染色观察大鼠支气管、肺组织病理变化,酶联免疫吸附(ELISA)法检测各组大鼠支气管肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中白细胞介素(IL)-8,IL-17及肿瘤坏死因子(TNF)-α含量,Western印迹法检测大鼠支气管肺组织中黏蛋白5AC和TLR4蛋白的表达,荧光实时定量(RT)-PCR检测大鼠支气管肺组织中黏蛋白5AC mRNA和TLR4 mRNA的表达。结果:慢阻肺组支气管、肺组织改变及肺功能变化符合慢阻肺病理生理特点。与对照组相比,氨茶碱组和辛伐他汀组支气管肺组织均出现不同程度的损伤,但损伤程度轻于慢阻肺组。慢阻肺组各项肺功能指标均明显低于对照组(均P<0.01),而氨茶碱组和辛伐他汀组均明显高于慢阻肺组(均P<0.01),辛伐他汀组呼气峰值流量明显高于氨茶碱组(P<0.01)。慢阻肺组BALF中IL-8,IL-17及TNF-α含量均明显高于对照组(均P<0.01),而氨茶碱组和辛伐他汀组均明显低于慢阻肺组(均P<0.01),氨茶碱组BALF中IL-8,IL-17及TNF-α含量均明显低于辛伐他汀组(均P<0.05)。慢阻肺组支气管肺组织黏蛋白5AC mRNA和TLR4 mRNA及其蛋白的表达水平均明显高于对照组(均P<0.01);而氨茶碱组和辛伐他汀组均明显低于慢阻肺组(均P<0.05),且两组间差异无统计学意义(均P>0.05)。结论:氨茶碱和辛伐他汀可降低慢阻肺模型大鼠BALF中IL-8,IL-17及TNF-α水平,抑制支气管肺组织中黏蛋白5AC和TLR4蛋白的表达,通过减轻气道炎症和气道黏液高分泌作用来达到防治慢阻肺的目的。.

  5. Identification of genes differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency that alter lung pathophysiology and inflammation in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Troy, Niamh M; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Kicic, Anthony; Zosky, Graeme R

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with asthma risk. Vitamin D deficiency may enhance the inflammatory response, and we have previously shown that airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness is increased in vitamin D-deficient mice. In this study, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency would exacerbate house dust mite (HDM)-induced inflammation and alterations in lung structure and function. A BALB/c mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was established by dietary manipulation. Responsiveness to methacholine, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, mucus cell metaplasia, lung and airway inflammation, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were assessed. Gene expression patterns in mouse lung samples were profiled by RNA-Seq. HDM exposure increased inflammation and inflammatory cytokines in BAL, baseline airway resistance, tissue elastance, and ASM mass. Vitamin D deficiency enhanced the HDM-induced influx of lymphocytes into BAL, ameliorated the HDM-induced increase in ASM mass, and protected against the HDM-induced increase in baseline airway resistance. RNA-Seq identified nine genes that were differentially regulated by vitamin D deficiency in the lungs of HDM-treated mice. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that protein expression of midline 1 (MID1) and adrenomedullin was differentially regulated such that they promoted inflammation, while hypoxia-inducible lipid droplet-associated, which is associated with ASM remodeling, was downregulated. Protein expression studies in human bronchial epithelial cells also showed that addition of vitamin D decreased MID1 expression. Differential regulation of these genes by vitamin D deficiency could determine lung inflammation and pathophysiology and suggest that the effect of vitamin D deficiency on HDM-induced allergic airways disease is complex.

  6. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  7. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIAOJUAN; MA, XIUMIN; MA, ZHIXING; WANG, JING; SUN, ZHAN; YU, WENYAN; LI, FENGSEN; DING, JIANBING

    2014-01-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  8. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Wang, Jing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-11-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation.

  9. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Wang, Jing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-11-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  10. Effects of nasal allergen challenge on dynamic viscoelasticity of nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Majima, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1993-04-01

    The effects of nasal provocation on the rheologic properties of nasal mucus were investigated in patients with allergic rhinitis provoked by house dust. The elastic modulus (G') and the dynamic viscosity (eta') of nasal mucus were determined by an oscillating sphere magnetic rheometer. Before and after the allergen challenge, G' increased, whereas eta' decreased with increasing oscillatory frequency; these findings indicate that the nasal mucus under these conditions is a non-newtonian fluid and has the cross-linked gel-like nature typical of mucus. Both G' and eta' values after nasal provocation were significantly lower than before. The values of G' and eta' after allergen challenge were in the optimal viscoelasticity range for mucociliary transport. PMID:8476173

  11. An immunological method for quantifying antibacterial activity in Salmo salar (Linnaeus, 1758) skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Edgar; Berendsen, Jorge; Guzmán, Fanny; Gallardo, José A; Mercado, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a pivotal component of innate immunity in lower vertebrates. The aim of this study was to develop an immunological method for quantifying AMPs in Salmo salar skin mucus. A known antimicrobial peptide derived from histone H1 previously purified and described from S. salar skin mucus (SAMP H1) was chemically synthesized and used to obtain antibodies for the quantification of the molecule via ELISA. Using skin mucus samples, a correlation of bacterial growth inhibition versus SAMP H1 concentration (ELISA) was established. The results provide the first evidence for quantifying the presence of active AMPs in the skin mucus of S. salar through the use of an immunological method. PMID:19835960

  12. Lectin histochemical aspects of mucus function in the oesophagus of the reticulated python (Python reticulatus).

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Luz, S; Schnapper, A

    2009-08-01

    Using lectin histochemistry, the study characterizes basic functional aspects of the mucus produced by the oesophageal epithelium of the Reticulated python (Python reticulatus). Reaction staining varied as related to the two epithelium types present, containing goblet cells and ciliary cells. Remarkable intensities were achieved especially in the luminal mucus layer and the fine mucus covering the epithelial ciliary border for Con A (alpha-D-Man; alpha-D-Glc) as part of neutral glycoproteins, Limax flavus agglutinin (NeuNac = NeuNgc), emphasizing that water binding hyaluronan provides a hydrated interface conductive to the passage of material and UEA-I (alpha-L-Fuc), corroborating the view that fucose-rich highly viscous mucus is helpful against mechanical stress during prey transport.

  13. The effect of mucolytic agents on the rheologic and transport properties of canine tracheal mucus.

    PubMed

    Martin, R; Litt, M; Marriott, C

    1980-03-01

    The effect of several sulfhydryl and other agents on the rheologic and mucociliary transport properties of a model secretion, reconstituted canine tracheal mucus, was investigated. The mucus was obtained via the canine tracheal pouch. Rheologic properties were determined by mirorheometry, and the ciliary transport rate was determined using the frog palate technique. It was found that N-acetyl cysteine decreased the elastic modulus, leading to improved mucociliary transport at concentrations such that the mucin did not precipitate. S-carboxymethyl cysteine had no effect on either mucus properties or mucociliary transport rate, and its reported effectiveness in vivo must be due to some mechanism other than solubilization of mucin. Similar results were found with other blocked sulfhydryl compounds. Urea and potassium iodide to decrease mucus elasticity, but are harmful to cilia at the concentrations needed.

  14. The loss of Hoxa5 function promotes Notch-dependent goblet cell metaplasia in lung airways

    PubMed Central

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chakir, Jamila; Jeannotte, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hox genes encode transcription factors controlling complex developmental processes in various organs. Little is known, however, about how HOX proteins control cell fate. Herein, we demonstrate that the goblet cell metaplasia observed in lung airways from Hoxa5−/− mice originates from the transdifferentiation of Clara cells. Reduced CC10 expression in Hoxa5−/− embryos indicates that altered cell specification occurs prior to birth. The loss of Hoxa5 function does not preclude airway repair after naphthalene exposure, but the regenerated epithelium presents goblet cell metaplasia and less CC10-positive cells, demonstrating the essential role of Hoxa5 for correct differentiation. Goblet cell metaplasia in Hoxa5−/− mice is a FOXA2-independent process. However, it is associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Consistent with these findings, expression levels of activated NOTCH1 and the effector gene HEY2 are enhanced in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In vivo administration of a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates goblet cell metaplasia in Hoxa5−/− mice, highlighting the contribution of Notch signaling to the phenotype and suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy to inhibit goblet cell differentiation and mucus overproduction in airway diseases. In summary, the loss of Hoxa5 function in lung mesenchyme impacts on epithelial cell fate by modulating Notch signaling. PMID:23213461

  15. Intranasal curcumin attenuates airway remodeling in murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Subhashini; Dash, D; Singh, Rashmi

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin, phytochemical present in turmeric, rhizome of Curcuma longa, a known anti-inflammatory molecule with variety of pharmacological activities is found effective in murine model of chronic asthma characterized by structural alterations and airway remodeling. Here, we have investigated the effects of intranasal curcumin in chronic asthma where animals were exposed to allergen for longer time. In the present study Balb/c mice were sensitized by an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) and subsequently challenged with 2% OVA in aerosol twice a week for five consecutive weeks. Intranasal curcumin (5mg/kg) was administered from days 21 to 55, an hour before every nebulization and inflammatory cells recruitment, levels of IgE, EPO, IL-4 and IL-5 were found suppressed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Intranasal curcumin administration prevented accumulation of inflammatory cells to the airways, structural alterations and remodeling associated with chronic asthma like peribronchial and airway smooth muscle thickening, sloughing off of the epithelial lining and mucus secretion in ovalbumin induced murine model of chronic asthma.

  16. Spiperone, identified through compound screening, activates calcium-dependent chloride secretion in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lihua; MacDonald, Kelvin; Schwiebert, Erik M.; Zeitlin, Pamela L.; Guggino, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene producing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR functions as a Cl− channel. Its dysfunction limits Cl− secretion and enhances Na+ absorption, leading to viscous mucus in the airway. Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are coexpressed with CFTR in the airway surface epithelia. Increases in cytosolic Ca2+ activate the epithelial CaCCs, which provides an alternative Cl− secretory pathway in CF. We developed a screening assay and screened a library for compounds that could enhance cytoplasmic Ca2+, activate the CaCC, and increase Cl− secretion. We found that spiperone, a known antipsychotic drug, is a potent intracellular Ca2+ enhancer and demonstrated that it stimulates intracellular Ca2+, not by acting in its well-known role as an antagonist of serotonin 5-HT2 or dopamine D2 receptors, but through a protein tyrosine kinase-coupled phospholipase C-dependent pathway. Spiperone activates CaCCs, which stimulates Cl− secretion in polarized human non-CF and CF airway epithelial cell monolayers in vitro and in CFTR-knockout mice in vivo. In conclusion, we have identified spiperone as a new therapeutic platform for correction of defective Cl− secretion in CF via a pathway independent of CFTR. PMID:18987251

  17. [Inhibitory effect of nasal mucus on the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H

    1990-01-01

    The absorption of Dibekacin (DKB) through rabbit's tracheal mucosa with and without nasal mucus were examined in vitro. The modified double chamber method was used for the purpose of this study. DKB solution (20 mg/ml) and Hanks' balanced salt solution were put into the donor compartment (DC) and the receiver compartment (RC), respectively. A plate with a hole and the tracheal mucosa were inserted between the compartments in the order of DC, dialytic membrane, the plate, the rabbit tracheal mucosa and RC. The hole of the plate was filled with nasal mucus or Hanks' solution. The latter was used as the control. The chamber was incubated in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air for 3 hours at 37 degrees C. The absorption rate (AR) was obtained by dividing the concentration of DKB in RC by that in DC. The nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis significantly decreased the AR of DKB compared with that in the control (P less than 0.05). The AR significantly decreased with increments in the thickness of nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis. This decreased AR was improved by the addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DKB solution in DC. NAC can cleave disulfied bonds of mucus glycoprotein and this results in the decrease of viscoelasticity of nasal mucus. The results indicate that nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis intercept the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium in vitro. One of the mechanisms of the intercepter may be due to the high molecular-reticular structure of nasal mucus. PMID:2319385

  18. Degradation, Foraging, and Depletion of Mucus Sialoglycans by the Vagina-adapted Actinobacterium Gardnerella vaginalis*

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Warren G.; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Gilbert, Nicole M; Perry, Justin C.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial imbalance of the vaginal microbiota associated with reproductive infections, preterm birth, and other adverse health outcomes. Sialidase activity in vaginal fluids is diagnostic of BV and sialic acid-rich components of mucus have protective and immunological roles. However, whereas mucus degradation is believed to be important in the etiology and complications associated with BV, the role(s) of sialidases and the participation of individual bacterial species in the degradation of mucus barriers in BV have not been investigated. Here we demonstrate that the BV-associated bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis uses sialidase to break down and deplete sialic acid-containing mucus components in the vagina. Biochemical evidence using purified sialoglycan substrates supports a model in which 1) G. vaginalis extracellular sialidase hydrolyzes mucosal sialoglycans, 2) liberated sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) is transported into the bacterium, a process inhibited by excess N-glycolylneuraminic acid, and 3) sialic acid catabolism is initiated by an intracellular aldolase/lyase mechanism. G. vaginalis engaged in sialoglycan foraging in vitro, in the presence of human vaginal mucus, and in vivo, in a murine vaginal model, in each case leading to depletion of sialic acids. Comparison of sialic acid levels in human vaginal specimens also demonstrated significant depletion of mucus sialic acids in women with BV compared with women with a “normal” lactobacilli-dominated microbiota. Taken together, these studies show that G. vaginalis utilizes sialidase to support the degradation, foraging, and depletion of protective host mucus barriers, and that this process of mucus barrier degradation and depletion also occurs in the clinical setting of BV. PMID:23479734

  19. [Inhibitory effect of nasal mucus on the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H

    1990-01-01

    The absorption of Dibekacin (DKB) through rabbit's tracheal mucosa with and without nasal mucus were examined in vitro. The modified double chamber method was used for the purpose of this study. DKB solution (20 mg/ml) and Hanks' balanced salt solution were put into the donor compartment (DC) and the receiver compartment (RC), respectively. A plate with a hole and the tracheal mucosa were inserted between the compartments in the order of DC, dialytic membrane, the plate, the rabbit tracheal mucosa and RC. The hole of the plate was filled with nasal mucus or Hanks' solution. The latter was used as the control. The chamber was incubated in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air for 3 hours at 37 degrees C. The absorption rate (AR) was obtained by dividing the concentration of DKB in RC by that in DC. The nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis significantly decreased the AR of DKB compared with that in the control (P less than 0.05). The AR significantly decreased with increments in the thickness of nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis. This decreased AR was improved by the addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DKB solution in DC. NAC can cleave disulfied bonds of mucus glycoprotein and this results in the decrease of viscoelasticity of nasal mucus. The results indicate that nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis intercept the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium in vitro. One of the mechanisms of the intercepter may be due to the high molecular-reticular structure of nasal mucus.

  20. Draft genome sequence of Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from coral mucus

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Cauz, Ana Carolina G.; Magalhães, Beatriz L.; Carlos, Camila; da Costa, Fernanda L.P.; Scagion, Guilherme P.; Higa, Juliana S.; Almeida, Ludimila D.; das Neves, Meiriele da S.; Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; do Prado, Paula F.V.; da Silva, Thiago M.; Balsalobre, Thiago Willian A.; Paulino, Luciana C.; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F.C.; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the genomic features of the Actinobacteria Kocuria sp. SM24M-10 isolated from mucus of the Brazilian endemic coral Mussismilia hispida. The sequences are available under accession number LDNX01000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LDNX00000000). The genomic analysis revealed interesting information about the adaptation of bacteria to the marine environment (such as genes involved in osmotic and oxidative stress) and to the nutrient-rich environment provided by the coral mucus. PMID:26981384

  1. Dietary nitrite induces nitrosation of the gastric mucosa: the protective action of the mucus and the modulatory effect of red wine.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cassilda; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, João

    2015-05-01

    The stomach chemical environment promotes the production of new molecules that can induce post-translational modifications of endogenous proteins with physiological impact. The nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway is relevant in this process via production of nitric oxide ((•)NO) and nitric oxide-derived nitrogen oxides (NOx) at high concentrations. Using a highly sensitive and selective chemiluminescence approach, we found that exposure the stomach of rats to nitrite yielded S- and N-nitroso derivatives in gastric mucus cysteine-rich glycoproteins (mucins). To lesser extent, the underlying epithelial cell layers also suffered nitrite-driven S- and N-nitroso modifications which increased upon mucus removal, indicating that, under normal nitrite load, (•)NO and NOx can reach inner layers of the stomach wall and locally modify proteins. S-nitrosation was by large the predominant modification. In vitro and ex vivo experiments indicated that the gastric nitrosation pattern is triggered by dietary nitrite in a concentration dependent manner, encompassing the intermediary formation of (•)NO and is susceptible to modulation by dietary reductants, notably red wine polyphenols. Collectively, these results suggest a protective action of the mucus and potential (•)NO-dependent biochemical effects at deeper cells layers of the mucosa. PMID:25701398

  2. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  3. Predicting First Traversal Times for Virions and Nanoparticles in Mucus with Slowed Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Austen M.; Henry, Bruce I.; Murray, John M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Angstmann, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Particle-tracking experiments focusing on virions or nanoparticles in mucus have measured mean-square displacements and reported diffusion coefficients that are orders of magnitude smaller than the diffusion coefficients of such particles in water. Accurate description of this subdiffusion is important to properly estimate the likelihood of virions traversing the mucus boundary layer and infecting cells in the epithelium. However, there are several candidate models for diffusion that can fit experimental measurements of mean-square displacements. We show that these models yield very different estimates for the time taken for subdiffusive virions to traverse through a mucus layer. We explain why fits of subdiffusive mean-square displacements to standard diffusion models may be misleading. Relevant to human immunodeficiency virus infection, using computational methods for fractional subdiffusion, we show that subdiffusion in normal acidic mucus provides a more effective barrier against infection than previously thought. By contrast, the neutralization of the mucus by alkaline semen, after sexual intercourse, allows virions to cross the mucus layer and reach the epithelium in a short timeframe. The computed barrier protection from fractional subdiffusion is some orders of magnitude greater than that derived by fitting standard models of diffusion to subdiffusive data. PMID:26153713

  4. Analysis of gunshot residues as trace in nasal mucus by GFAAS.

    PubMed

    Aliste, Marina; Chávez, Luis Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    When a gun is fired, the majority of gunshot residues are deposited on the shooter's hands. But these residues disappear through contact with surfaces or washing. Therefore, the maximum time frame to find GSR on a suspect's hands is 8h. The mucus, inside of a nostril, forms a surface layer where they are trapped foreign particles. In this way, mucus inside of a gunshot suspect's nostrils could act like an adhesive medium to stick on it gaseous particles from a gunshot. In this study, the presence of GSR in nasal mucus and its residence time is examined. A new procedure for the sampling of possible gunshot residue accumulated in the nasal mucus is designed. Samples are taken with cotton swabs moistened with a solution of EDTA and, after an acid digestion, are analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, samples of hands are taken for comparison purposes. GSR recovery has been successful. The concentration of GSR in nasal mucus is found to be lower than on the hands, but with a longer residence time. Thus, it is possible to expand the sampling time of a suspect also, as nasal mucus cannot be contaminated by handling weapons.

  5. The Mucus of Actinia equina (Anthozoa, Cnidaria): An Unexplored Resource for Potential Applicative Purposes.

    PubMed

    Stabili, Loredana; Schirosi, Roberto; Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Piraino, Stefano; Cammarata, Matteo

    2015-08-19

    The mucus produced by many marine organisms is a complex mixture of proteins and polysaccharides forming a weak watery gel. It is essential for vital processes including locomotion, navigation, structural support, heterotrophic feeding and defence against a multitude of environmental stresses, predators, parasites, and pathogens. In the present study we focused on mucus produced by a benthic cnidarian, the sea anemone Actinia equina (Linnaeus, 1758) for preventing burial by excess sedimentation and for protection. We investigated some of the physico-chemical properties of this matrix such as viscosity, osmolarity, electrical conductivity, protein, carbohydrate, and total lipid contents. Some biological activities such as hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antibacterial lysozyme-like activities were also studied. The A. equina mucus is mainly composed by water (96.2% ± 0.3%), whereas its dry weight is made of 24.2% ± 1.3% proteins and 7.8% ± 0.2% carbohydrates, with the smallest and largest components referable to lipids (0.9%) and inorganic matter (67.1%). The A. equina mucus matrix exhibited hemolytic activity on rabbit erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell line K562 (human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia) and antibacterial lysozyme-like activity. The findings from this study improve the available information on the mucus composition in invertebrates and have implications for future investigations related to exploitation of A. equina and other sea anemones' mucus as a source of bioactive compounds of high pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest.

  6. The effects of smoking and smoking cessation on nasal mucociliary clearance, mucus properties and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Utiyama, Daniela Mitiyo Odagiri; Yoshida, Carolina Tieko; Goto, Danielle Miyuki; de Santana Carvalho, Tômas; de Paula Santos, Ubiratan; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess nasal mucociliary clearance, mucus properties and inflammation in smokers and subjects enrolled in a Smoking Cessation Program (referred to as quitters). METHOD: A total of 33 subjects with a median (IQR) smoking history of 34 (20-58) pack years were examined for nasal mucociliary clearance using a saccharine transit test, mucus properties using contact angle and sneeze clearability tests, and quantification of inflammatory and epithelial cells, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations in nasal lavage fluid. Twenty quitters (mean age: 51 years, 9 male) were assessed at baseline, 1 month, 3 months and 12 months after smoking cessation, and 13 smokers (mean age: 52 years, 6 male) were assessed at baseline and after 12 months. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02136550. RESULTS: Smokers and quitters showed similar demographic characteristics and morbidities. At baseline, all subjects showed impaired nasal mucociliary clearance (mean 17.6 min), although 63% and 85% of the quitters demonstrated significant nasal mucociliary clearance improvement at 1 month and 12 months, respectively. At 12 months, quitters also showed mucus sneeze clearability improvement (∼26%), an increased number of macrophages (2-fold) and no changes in mucus contact angle or cytokine concentrations. CONCLUSION: This study showed that smoking cessation induced early improvements in nasal mucociliary clearance independent of mucus properties and inflammation. Changes in mucus properties were observed after only 12 months of smoking cessation. PMID:27438569

  7. The Mucus of Actinia equina (Anthozoa, Cnidaria): An Unexplored Resource for Potential Applicative Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Stabili, Loredana; Schirosi, Roberto; Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Piraino, Stefano; Cammarata, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    The mucus produced by many marine organisms is a complex mixture of proteins and polysaccharides forming a weak watery gel. It is essential for vital processes including locomotion, navigation, structural support, heterotrophic feeding and defence against a multitude of environmental stresses, predators, parasites, and pathogens. In the present study we focused on mucus produced by a benthic cnidarian, the sea anemone Actinia equina (Linnaeus, 1758) for preventing burial by excess sedimentation and for protection. We investigated some of the physico-chemical properties of this matrix such as viscosity, osmolarity, electrical conductivity, protein, carbohydrate, and total lipid contents. Some biological activities such as hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antibacterial lysozyme-like activities were also studied. The A. equina mucus is mainly composed by water (96.2% ± 0.3%), whereas its dry weight is made of 24.2% ± 1.3% proteins and 7.8% ± 0.2% carbohydrates, with the smallest and largest components referable to lipids (0.9%) and inorganic matter (67.1%). The A. equina mucus matrix exhibited hemolytic activity on rabbit erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell line K562 (human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia) and antibacterial lysozyme-like activity. The findings from this study improve the available information on the mucus composition in invertebrates and have implications for future investigations related to exploitation of A. equina and other sea anemones’ mucus as a source of bioactive compounds of high pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest. PMID:26295400

  8. Gentamicin and leucine inhalable powder: what about antipseudomonal activity and permeation through cystic fibrosis mucus?

    PubMed

    Russo, Paola; Stigliani, Mariateresa; Prota, Lucia; Auriemma, Giulia; Crescenzi, Carlo; Porta, Amalia; Aquino, Rita P

    2013-01-20

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the permeation properties of gentamicin (G) in a novel dry powder form for inhalation through an artificial mucus model. Moreover, since respiratory infections sustained by Pseudomonas are a major cause of sickness and death in CF patients, the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to engineered G powders was investigated. Micronized G and G/leucine (85:15) formulations were produced by co-spray-drying, using process parameters and conditions previously set. Powders were characterized in terms of yield, drug content and aerodynamic profiles, analyzed by Andersen Cascade Impactor. Different mucus models were prepared, showing composition and viscosity similar to those of the native CF mucus. To investigate the impact on drug permeation, Franz-type vertical diffusion cells were used; the powders were applied directly on a synthetic membrane with or without the interposition of the artificial mucus layer. In buffer, gentamicin showed a diffusion controlled release; the presence of leucine reduced powder wettability and, consequently, the permeation rate. Otherwise, mucus delayed drug permeation from both G and G/leucine formulations, with a faint influence of the aminoacid. Antimicrobial tests revealed that G/leu engineered particles are able to preserve the antipseudomonal activity, even in presence of the mucus.

  9. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua; Forier, Katrien; Remaut, Katrien; Stremersch, Stephan; Guimarães, Nuno; Fontenete, Sílvia; Wengel, Jesper; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Braeckmans, Kevin; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe) have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical barriers—the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus, while remaining capable of diffusing through the mucus and delivering these nucleic acid mimics directly into the bacteria. PMID:26645765

  10. Hot channels in airways: pharmacology of the vanilloid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun Wook; Oh, Uhtaek

    2002-06-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness of the tracheobronchial path is recognized as the critical feature of bronchial asthma. Sensory nerves in the airway are implicated strongly in this hyperresponsiveness. The vanilloid VR1 receptor, a cloned capsaicin receptor and a nociceptor-specific cation channel, is known to detect and transduce various harmful stimuli to electrical signals. Recent findings suggest that bradykinin can activate VR1 through generation of lipoxygenase products and that protein kinase C and phospholipase C mediate the sensitization of VR1 by many key inflammatory mediators. Such findings will lead to a better understanding of the enigmatic etiology of asthma.

  11. Postnatal Exposure History and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Miller, Lisa A.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O3) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O3 exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O3 biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5–8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O3, HDMA, and HDMA+O3) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O3. However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O3–exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O3 exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  12. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  13. Prevention of House Dust Mite Induced Allergic Airways Disease in Mice through Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Agua-Doce, Ana; Graca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Allergic airways disease is a consequence of a Th2 response to an allergen leading to a series of manifestations such as production of allergen-specific IgE, inflammatory infiltrates in the airways, and airway hyper-reactivity