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Sample records for airway muscle activity

  1. Activation of upper airway muscles during breathing and swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2013-01-01

    The upper airway is a complex muscular tube that is used by the respiratory and digestive systems. The upper airway is invested with several small and anatomically peculiar muscles. The muscle fiber orientations and their nervous innervation are both extremely complex, and how the activity of the muscles is initiated and adjusted during complex behaviors is poorly understood. The bulk of the evidence suggests that the entire assembly of tongue and laryngeal muscles operate together but differently during breathing and swallowing, like a ballet rather than a solo performance. Here we review the functional anatomy of the tongue and laryngeal muscles, and their neural innervation. We also consider how muscular activity is altered as respiratory drive changes, and briefly address upper airway muscle control during swallowing. PMID:24092695

  2. Pressure-volume behaviour of the rat upper airway: effects of tongue muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, E Fiona; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2003-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that the simultaneous activation of tongue protrudor and retractor muscles (co-activation) would constrict and stiffen the pharyngeal airway more than the independent activation of tongue protrudor muscles. Upper airway stiffness was determined by injecting known volumes of air into the sealed pharyngeal airway of the anaesthetized rat while measuring nasal pressure under control (no-stimulus) and stimulus conditions (volume paired with hypoglossal (XII) nerve stimulation). Stimulation of the whole XII nerves (co-activation) or the medial XII branches (protrudor activation) effected similar increases in total pharyngeal airway stiffness. Importantly, co-activation produced volume compression (airway narrowing) at large airway volumes (P < 0.05), but had no effect on airway dimension at low airway volumes. In comparison, protrudor activation resulted in significant volume expansion (airway dilatation) at low airway volumes and airway narrowing at high airway volumes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, both co-activation and independent protrudor muscle activation increase airway stiffness. However, their effects on airway size are complex and depend on the condition of the airway at the time of activation. PMID:12640023

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshaw, Shona R; Henderson, Neil; Knox, Alan J; Watson, Susan A; Buttle, David J; Johnson, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of chronic asthma comprising smooth muscle hypertrophy and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) breakdown ECM, are involved in tissue remodelling and have been implicated in airway remodelling. Although mesenchymal cells are an important source of MMPs, little data are available on airway smooth muscle (ASM) derived MMPs. We therefore investigated MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production and activity in human ASM cells.MMPs and TIMPs were examined using quantitative real-time RT–PCR, Western blotting, zymography and a quench fluorescence (QF) assay of total MMP activity.The most abundant MMPs were pro-MMP-2, pro- MMP-3, active MMP-3 and MT1-MMP. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression was low in cell lysates but high in conditioned medium. High TIMP secretion was confirmed by the ability of ASM-conditioned medium to inhibit recombinant MMP-2 in a QF assay. Thrombin increased MMP activity by activation of pro-MMP-2 independent of the conventional smooth muscle thrombin receptors PAR 1 and 4.In conclusion, ASM cells express pro-MMP-2, pro and active MMP-3, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP. Unstimulated cells secrete excess TIMP 1 and 2, preventing proteolytic activity. MMP-2 can be activated by thrombin which may contribute to airway remodelling. PMID:15265805

  4. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Satoshi; Nakayama, Kiyomi; Nakamura, Shiro; Mochizuki, Ayako; Iijima, Takehiko; Inoue, Tomio

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4) and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2). Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21-35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN), the hypoglossal nerve (HGN), the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) with the phrenic nerve (PN). Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis.

  5. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tachikawa, Satoshi; Nakayama, Kiyomi; Nakamura, Shiro; Mochizuki, Ayako; Iijima, Takehiko; Inoue, Tomio

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4) and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2). Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21–35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN), the hypoglossal nerve (HGN), the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) with the phrenic nerve (PN). Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis. PMID:27832132

  6. Calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A modulates mucin secretion and airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Zhang, Hongkang; Wu, Meng; Yang, Huanghe; Kudo, Makoto; Peters, Christian J.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Solberg, Owen D.; Donne, Matthew L.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Fahy, John V.; Wolters, Paul J.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Li, Min; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Rock, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Mucous cell hyperplasia and airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness are hallmark features of inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma. Here, we show that the recently identified calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) TMEM16A is expressed in the adult airway surface epithelium and ASM. The epithelial expression is increased in asthmatics, particularly in secretory cells. Based on this and the proposed functions of CaCC, we hypothesized that TMEM16A inhibitors would negatively regulate both epithelial mucin secretion and ASM contraction. We used a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule blockers of TMEM16A-CaCC channels. We show that inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly impairs mucus secretion in primary human airway surface epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly reduces mouse and human ASM contraction in response to cholinergic agonists. TMEM16A-CaCC blockers, including those identified here, may positively impact multiple causes of asthma symptoms. PMID:22988107

  7. Release of biologically active TGF-beta from airway smooth muscle cells induces autocrine synthesis of collagen.

    PubMed

    Coutts, A; Chen, G; Stephens, N; Hirst, S; Douglas, D; Eichholtz, T; Khalil, N

    2001-05-01

    In severe or chronic asthma, there is an increase in airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) mass as well as an increase in connective tissue proteins in the smooth muscle layer of airways. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) exists in three isoforms in mammals and is a potent regulator of connective tissue protein synthesis. Using immunohistochemistry, we had previously demonstrated that ASMCs contain large quantities of TGF-beta1-3. In this study, we demonstrate that bovine ASMC-derived TGF-beta associates with the TGF-beta latency binding protein-1 (LTBP-1) expressed by the same cells. The TGF-beta associated with LTBP-1 localizes TGF-beta extracellularly. Furthermore, plasmin, a serine protease, regulates the secretion of a biologically active form of TGF-beta by ASMCs as well as the release of extracellular TGF-beta. The biologically active TGF-beta released by plasmin induces ASMCs to synthesize collagen I in an autocrine manner. The autocrine induction of collagen expression by ASMCs may contribute to the irreversible fibrosis and remodeling seen in the airways of some asthmatics.

  8. Functional expression of the TMEM16 family of calcium-activated chloride channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Kenneth E.; Danielsson, Jennifer; Funayama, Hiromi; Fu, Xiao Wen; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Yim, Peter; Xu, Dingbang; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness is a key component in the pathophysiology of asthma. Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) flux has been described in many cell types, including human airway smooth muscle (HASM), the true molecular identity of the channels responsible for this chloride conductance remains controversial. Recently, a new family of proteins thought to represent the true CaCCs was identified as the TMEM16 family. This led us to question whether members of this family are functionally expressed in native and cultured HASM. We further questioned whether expression of these channels contributes to the contractile function of HASM. We identified the mRNA expression of eight members of the TMEM16 family in HASM cells and show immunohistochemical evidence of TMEM16A in both cultured and native HASM. Functionally, we demonstrate that the classic chloride channel inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), inhibited halide flux in cultured HASM cells. Moreover, HASM cells displayed classical electrophysiological properties of CaCCs during whole cell electrophysiological recordings, which were blocked by using an antibody selective for TMEM16A. Furthermore, two distinct TMEM16A antagonists (tannic acid and benzbromarone) impaired a substance P-induced contraction in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. These findings demonstrate that multiple members of this recently described family of CaCCs are expressed in HASM cells, they display classic electrophysiological properties of CaCCs, and they modulate contractile tone in airway smooth muscle. The TMEM16 family may provide a novel therapeutic target for limiting airway constriction in asthma. PMID:23997176

  9. Resting calcium influx in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Luis M; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ leak remains the most uncertain of the cellular Ca2+ regulation pathways. During passive Ca2+ influx in non-stimulated smooth muscle cells, basal activity of constitutive Ca2+ channels seems to be involved. In vascular smooth muscle, the 3 following Ca2+ entry pathways contribute to this phenomenon: (i) via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, (ii) receptor gated Ca2+ channels, and (iii) store operated Ca2+ channels, although, in airway smooth muscle it seems only 2 passive Ca2+ influx pathways are implicated, one sensitive to SKF 96365 (receptor gated Ca2+ channels) and the other to Ni2+ (store operated Ca2+ channels). Resting Ca2+ entry could provide a sufficient amount of Ca2+ and contribute to resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), maintenance of the resting membrane potential, myogenic tone, and sarcoplasmic reticulum-Ca2+ refilling. However, further research, especially in airway smooth muscle, is required to better explore the physiological role of this passive Ca2+ influx pathway as it could be involved in airway hyperresponsiveness.

  10. Antagonists of the TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Modulate Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Jennifer; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Bernstein, Kyra; Barajas, Matthew B.; Zhang, Yi; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Pawan K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists continues to challenge anesthesiologists and intensivists. The TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulates airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We hypothesized that TMEM16A antagonists would relax ASM contraction by modulating membrane potential and calcium flux. Methods Human ASM, guinea pig tracheal rings or mouse peripheral airways were contracted with acetylcholine (Ach) or leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and then treated with the TMEM16A antagonists: benzbromarone, T16Ainh-A01, MONNA or B25. In separate studies, guinea pig tracheal rings were contracted with Ach and then exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0.01nM-10μM) ± benzbromarone. Plasma membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in human ASM cells. Results Benzbromarone was the most potent TMEM16A antagonist tested for relaxing an Ach-induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings (n=6). Further studies were done to investigate benzbromarone’s clinical utility. In human ASM, benzbromarone relaxed either an acetylcholine- or LTD4-induced contraction (n=8). Benzbromarone was also effective in relaxing peripheral airways (n=9) and potentiating relaxation by β-agonists (n=5–10). In cellular mechanistic studies, benzbromarone hyperpolarized human ASM cells (n=9–12) and attenuated intracellular calcium flux from both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum (n=6–12). Conclusions TMEM16A antagonists work synergistically with β-agonists and through a novel pathway of interrupting ion flux both at the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum to acutely relax human airway smooth muscle. PMID:26181339

  11. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  13. M2 Muscarinic Receptors Induce Airway Smooth Muscle Activation via a Dual, Gβγ-mediated Inhibition of Large Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ Channel Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Wulfsen, Iris; Lutz, Susanne; Utku, Emine; Sausbier, Ulrike; Ruth, Peter; Wieland, Thomas; Korth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle is richly endowed with muscarinic receptors of the M2 and M3 subtype. Stimulation of these receptors inhibits large conductance calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, a negative feed back regulator, in a pertussis toxinsensitive manner and thus facilitates contraction. The underlying mechanism, however, is unknown. We therefore studied the activity of bovine trachea BK channels in HEK293 cells expressing the M2 or M3 receptor (M2RorM3R). In M2R- but not M3R-expressing cells, maximal effective concentrations of carbamoylcholine (CCh) inhibited whole cell BK currents by 53%. This M2R-induced inhibition was abolished by pertussis toxin treatment or overexpression of the Gβγ scavenger transducin-α. In inside-out patches, direct application of 300 nm purified Gβγ decreased channel open probability by 55%. The physical interaction of Gβγ with BK channels was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Interestingly, inhibition of phospholipase C as well as protein kinase C activities also reversed the CCh effect but to a smaller (∼20%) extent. Mouse tracheal cells responded similarly to CCh, purified Gβγ and phospholipase C/protein kinase C inhibition as M2R-expressing HEK293 cells. Our results demonstrate that airway M2Rs inhibit BK channels by a dual, Gβγ-mediated mechanism, a direct membrane-delimited interaction, and the activation of the phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathway. PMID:18524769

  14. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  15. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  16. An imbalance in C/EBPs and increased mitochondrial activity in asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells: novel targets in asthma therapy?

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L

    2009-06-01

    The asthma prevalence was increasing over the past two decades worldwide. Allergic asthma, caused by inhaled allergens of different origin or by food, is mediated by inflammatory mechanisms. The action of non-allergic asthma, induced by cold air, humidity, temperature or exercise, is not well understood. Asthma affects up to 15% of the population and is treated with anti-inflammatory and muscle relaxing drugs which allow symptom control. Asthma was first defined as a malfunction of the airway smooth muscle, later as an imbalanced immune response of the lung. Recent studies placed the airway smooth muscle again into the focus. Here we summarize the molecular biological basis of the deregulated function of the human airway smooth muscle cell as a cause or important contributor to the pathology of asthma. In the asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells, there is: (i) a deregulation of cell differentiation due to low levels of maturation-regulating transcription factors such as CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, thereby reducing the cells threshold to proliferate and to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines under certain conditions; (ii) a higher basal energy turnover that is due to increased number and activity of mitochondria; and (iii) a modified feedback mechanism between cells and the extracellular matrix they are embedded in. All these cellular pathologies are linked to each other and to the innate immune response of the lung, but the sequence of events is unclear and needs further investigation. However, these findings may present the basis for the development of novel curative asthma drugs.

  17. Induction of ANGPTL4 expression in human airway smooth muscle cells by PMA through activation of PKC and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Cliona M; Joo, Joung Hyuck; Kim, Yong-Sik; Liao, Grace; Panettieri, Reynold A; Jetten, Anton M

    2010-02-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC) activators, including phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DOG), and platelet-derived growth factor alpha are potent inducers of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) expression in several normal lung cell types and carcinoma cell lines. In human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells induction of ANGPTL4 expression is observed as early as 2 h after the addition of PMA. PMA also increases the level of ANGPTL4 protein released in the medium. PKC inhibitors Ro31-8820 and Gö6983 greatly inhibit the induction of ANGPTL4 mRNA by PMA suggesting that this up-regulation involves activation of PKC. Knockdown of several PKCs by corresponding siRNAs suggest a role for PKCalpha. PMA does not activate MAPK p38 and p38 inhibitors have little effect on the induction of ANGPTL4 indicating that p38 is not involved in the regulation of ANGPTL4 by PMA. In contrast, treatment of HASM by PMA induces phosphorylation and activation of Ra, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, JNK, Elk-1, and c-Jun. The Ras inhibitor manumycin A, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125, greatly reduce the increase in ANGPTL4 expression by PMA. Knockdown of MEK1/2 and JNK1/2 expression by corresponding siRNAs inhibits the induction of ANGPTL4. Our observations suggest that the induction of ANGPTL4 by PMA in HASM involves the activation of PKC, ERK, and JNK pathways. This induction may play a role in tissue remodeling during lung injury and be implicated in several lung pathologies.

  18. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  19. Calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells-coupled vanilliod transient receptor potential channel 4 ca2+ sparklets stimulate airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Limin; Sullivan, Michelle N; Chase, Marlee; Gonzales, Albert L; Earley, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) contributes to the remodeling and irreversible obstruction of airways during severe asthma, but the mechanisms underlying this disease process are poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+) influx through the vanilliod transient receptor potential channel (TRPV) 4 stimulates ASMC proliferation. We found that synthetic and endogenous TRPV4 agonists increase proliferation of primary ASMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx through individual TRPV4 channels produces Ca(2+) microdomains in ASMCs, called "TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets." We also show that TRPV4 channels colocalize with the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in ASMCs. Activated calcineurin dephosphorylates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors cytosolic (c) to allow nuclear translocation and activation of synthetic transcriptional pathways. We show that ASMC proliferation in response to TRPV4 activity is associated with calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of the NFATc3 isoform tagged with green florescent protein. Our findings suggest that Ca(2+) microdomains created by TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets activate calcineurin to stimulate nuclear translocation of NFAT and ASMC proliferation. These findings further suggest that inhibition of TRPV4 could diminish asthma-induced airway remodeling.

  20. Activation of Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Airway Smooth Muscle Cells: Insight from a Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Croisier, Huguette; Tan, Xiahui; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Sneyd, James; Brook, Bindi S.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular dynamics of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) mediate ASMC contraction and proliferation, and thus play a key role in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and remodelling in asthma. We evaluate the importance of store-operated entry (SOCE) in these dynamics by constructing a mathematical model of ASMC signaling based on experimental data from lung slices. The model confirms that SOCE is elicited upon sufficient depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), while receptor-operated entry (ROCE) is inhibited in such conditions. It also shows that SOCE can sustain agonist-induced oscillations in the absence of other influx. SOCE up-regulation may thus contribute to AHR by increasing the oscillation frequency that in turn regulates ASMC contraction. The model also provides an explanation for the failure of the SERCA pump blocker CPA to clamp the cytosolic of ASMC in lung slices, by showing that CPA is unable to maintain the SR empty of . This prediction is confirmed by experimental data from mouse lung slices, and strongly suggests that CPA only partially inhibits SERCA in ASMC. PMID:23936056

  1. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  2. Mechanisms of inflammation-mediated airway smooth muscle plasticity and airways remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Amrani, Yassine

    2003-09-16

    Recent evidence points to progressive structural change in the airway wall, driven by chronic local inflammation, as a fundamental component for development of irreversible airway hyperresponsiveness. Acute and chronic inflammation is orchestrated by cytokines from recruited inflammatory cells, airway myofibroblasts and myocytes. Airway myocytes exhibit functional plasticity in their capacity for contraction, proliferation, and synthesis of matrix protein and cytokines. This confers a principal role in driving different components of the airway remodeling process, and mediating constrictor hyperresponsiveness. Functional plasticity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by an array of environmental cues, including cytokines, which mediate their effects through receptors and a number of intracellular signaling pathways. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured airway myocytes, few have identified how intracellular signaling pathways modulate or induce these cellular responses. This review summarizes current understanding of these concepts and presents a model for the effects of inflammatory mediators on functional plasticity of ASM in asthma.

  3. CD38 and airway hyper-responsiveness: studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso G P; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyper-responsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g., TNF-α) that requires the activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-κB and AP-1, and is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3' Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in Cd38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to the response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of Cd38-deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared with wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38-deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyper-responsiveness; a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and (or) activity are warranted.

  4. Bronchospasm and its biophysical basis in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Airways hyperresponsiveness is a cardinal feature of asthma but remains unexplained. In asthma, the airway smooth muscle cell is the key end-effector of bronchospasm and acute airway narrowing, but in just the past five years our understanding of the relationship of responsiveness to muscle biophysics has dramatically changed. It has become well established, for example, that muscle length is equilibrated dynamically rather than statically, and that non-classical features of muscle biophysics come to the forefront, including unanticipated interactions between the muscle and its time-varying load, as well as the ability of the muscle cell to adapt rapidly to changes in its dynamic microenvironment. These newly discovered phenomena have been described empirically, but a mechanistic basis to explain them is only beginning to emerge. PMID:15084229

  5. Sensitized airway smooth muscle plasticity and hyperreactivity: a review.

    PubMed

    Stephens, N L; Cheng, Z-Q; Fust, A

    2007-07-01

    To help elucidate the mechanisms underlying asthmatic bronchospasm, the goal of our research has been to determine whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperreactivity was the responsible factor. We reported that in a canine model of asthma, the shortening capacity (DeltaLmax) and velocity (Vo) of in vitro sensitized muscle were significantly increased. This increase was of sufficient magnitude to account for 75% narrowing of the in vivo airway, but maximal isometric force was unchanged. This last feature has been reported by others. Under lightly loaded conditions, ASM completes 75% of its isotonic shortening within the first 2 s. Furthermore, 90% of the increased shortening of ragweed pollen-sensitized ASM (SASM), compared with control (CASM), is complete within the first 2 s. The study of shortening beyond this period will apparently not yield much useful information, and studies of isotonic shortening should be focused on this interval. Although both CASM and SASM showed plasticity and adaptation with respect to isometric force, neither muscle type showed a difference in the force developed in these phases. During isotonic shortening, no evidence of plasticity was seen, but the equilibrated SASM showed increased DeltaLmax and Vo of shortening. Molecular mechanisms of changes in Vo could result from changes in the kinetics of the myosin heavy chain ATPase. Motility assay, however, showed no changes between CASM and SASM in the ability of the purified myosin molecule (SF1) to translocate a marker actin filament. On the other hand, we found that the state of activation of the ATPase by phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin light chain (molecular mass 20,000 Da) was greater in the SASM. This would account for the increased Vo. Investigating the signalling pathway, we found that whereas [Ca2+]i increased in both isometric and isotonic contraction, there was no significant difference between CASM and SASM. The content and activity of calmodulin were also not

  6. Concomitant responses of upper airway stabilizing muscles to transcranial magnetic stimulation in normal men.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric; Wang, Wei; Mélot, Christian; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Upper airway stabilizing muscles play a crucial role in the maintenance of upper airway patency. Transcranial magnetic stimulation allows the investigation of the corticomotor activation process for respiratory muscles. This technique has also been used to evaluate the genioglossus corticomotor response. The aims of this study were to characterize the response of different upper airway stabilizing muscles to focal cortical stimulation of the genioglossus. Alae nasi, genioglossus, levator palatini, palatoglossus and diaphragm motor-evoked potential responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded during expiration, tidal inspiration and deep inspiration in nine normal awake subjects. A concomitant response of the four studied upper airway muscles was observed in the majority of cortical stimuli. The response of these muscles was independent of the diaphragmatic one that was only occasionally observed. Significant positive relationships were found between alae nasi, levator palatini and palatoglossus motor-evoked potential latencies and amplitudes and the corresponding values of the genioglossus. We conclude that transcranial magnetic stimulation applied in the genioglossus area induces a concomitant motor response of upper airway stabilizing muscles with consistent changes in their motor responses during inspiratory manoeuvres.

  7. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  8. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  9. A 'Good' muscle in a 'Bad' environment: the importance of airway smooth muscle force adaptation to airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Ynuk; Chapman, David G; Paré, Peter D; King, Gregory G; Salome, Cheryl M

    2011-12-15

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, with a consequent increase in spasmogens, and exaggerated airway narrowing in response to stimuli, termed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The nature of any relationship between inflammation and AHR is less clear. Recent ex vivo data has suggested a novel mechanism by which inflammation may lead to AHR, in which increased basal ASM-tone, due to the presence of spasmogens in the airways, may "strengthen" the ASM and ultimately lead to exaggerated airway narrowing. This phenomenon was termed "force adaptation" [Bossé, Y., Chin, L.Y., Paré, P.D., Seow, C.Y., 2009. Adaptation of airway smooth muscle to basal tone: relevance to airway hyperresponsiveness. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 40, 13-18]. However, it is unknown whether the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation ex vivo could contribute to exaggerated airway narrowing in vivo. Our aim was to utilize a computational model of ASM shortening in order to quantify the potential effect of force adaptation on airway narrowing when all other mechanical factors were kept constant. The shortening in the model is dictated by a balance between physiological loads and ASM force-generating capacity at different lengths. The results suggest that the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation on ASM shortening would lead to substantially more airway narrowing during bronchial challenge at any given airway generation. We speculate that the increased basal ASM-tone in asthma, due to the presence of inflammation-derived spasmogens, produces an increase in the force-generating capacity of ASM, predisposing to AHR during subsequent challenge.

  10. TARGETING THE AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE FOR ASTHMA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a complex respiratory disease whose incidence has increased worldwide in the last decade. There is currently no cure for asthma. While bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory medications are effective medicines in some asthmatic patients, it is clear that an unmet therapeutic need persists for a subpopulation of individuals with severe asthma. This chronic lung disease is characterized by airflow limitation and lung inflammation and remodeling that includes increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition to its contractile properties, the ASM also contributes to the inflammatory process by producing active mediators, modifying the extracellular matrix composition, and interacting with inflammatory cells. These undesirable functions make interventions aimed at reducing ASM abundance an attractive strategy for novel asthma therapies. There are at least three mechanisms that could limit the accumulation of smooth muscle – decreased cell proliferation, augmented cell apoptosis, and reduced cell migration into the smooth muscle layer. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway or statins hold promise for asthma because they exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-migratory, and anti-proliferative effects in pre-clinical and clinical studies, and they can target the SM. This review will discuss current knowledge of ASM biology and identify gaps in the field in order to stimulate future investigations of the cellular mechanisms controlling ASM overabundance in asthma. Targeting ASM has the potential to be an innovative venue of treatment for patients with asthma. PMID:19766960

  11. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  12. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  13. Modeling the impairment of airway smooth muscle force by stretch

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imposed length changes of only a small percent produce transient reductions in active force in strips of airway smooth muscle (ASM) due to the temporary detachment of bound cross-bridges caused by the relative motion of the actin and myosin fibers. More dramatic and sustained reductions in active force occur following large changes in length. The Huxley two-state model of skeletal muscle originally proposed in 1957 and later adapted to include a four-state description of cross-bridge kinetics has been widely used to model the former phenomenon, but is unable to account for the latter unless modified to include mechanisms by which the contractile machinery in the ASM cell becomes appropriately rearranged. Even so, the Huxley model itself is based on the assumption that the contractile proteins are all aligned precisely in the direction of bulk force generation, which is not true for ASM. The present study derives a coarse-grained version of the Huxley model that is free of inherent assumptions about cross-bridge orientation. This simplified model recapitulates the key features observed in the force-length behavior of activated strips of ASM and, in addition, provides a mechanistically based way of accounting for the sustained force reductions that occur following large stretch. PMID:25571992

  14. Modeling the impairment of airway smooth muscle force by stretch.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2015-03-15

    Imposed length changes of only a small percent produce transient reductions in active force in strips of airway smooth muscle (ASM) due to the temporary detachment of bound cross-bridges caused by the relative motion of the actin and myosin fibers. More dramatic and sustained reductions in active force occur following large changes in length. The Huxley two-state model of skeletal muscle originally proposed in 1957 and later adapted to include a four-state description of cross-bridge kinetics has been widely used to model the former phenomenon, but is unable to account for the latter unless modified to include mechanisms by which the contractile machinery in the ASM cell becomes appropriately rearranged. Even so, the Huxley model itself is based on the assumption that the contractile proteins are all aligned precisely in the direction of bulk force generation, which is not true for ASM. The present study derives a coarse-grained version of the Huxley model that is free of inherent assumptions about cross-bridge orientation. This simplified model recapitulates the key features observed in the force-length behavior of activated strips of ASM and, in addition, provides a mechanistically based way of accounting for the sustained force reductions that occur following large stretch.

  15. Airway smooth muscle in exercise-induced bronchospasm: some speculations.

    PubMed

    Middleton, E

    1975-11-01

    Some possible neurophysiological, biochemical, and pharmacological pathways affecting the state of contractility if airway smooth muscle in exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) are described. No unifying hypothesis can be set forth at this time. Indeed, it is likely that the heterogeneous nature of EIB is a reflection of the numerous biochemical loci in smooth muscle cells that could be affected by the various metabolic changes accompanying heavy exertion.

  16. Ion channel regulation of intracellular calcium and airway smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F; Karner, Charlotta; Ito, Satoru; Shepherd, Malcolm; Alrashdan, Yazan; Sanderson, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Airway hyper-responsiveness associated with asthma is mediated by airway smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and has a complicated etiology involving increases in cell contraction and proliferation and the secretion of inflammatory mediators. Although these pathological changes are diverse, a common feature associated with their regulation is a change in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Because the [Ca(2+)](i) itself is a function of the activity and expression of a variety of ion channels, in both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum of the SMC, the modification of this ion channel activity may predispose airway SMCs to hyper-responsiveness. Our objective is to review how ion channels determine the [Ca(2+)](i) and influence the function of airway SMCs and emphasize the potential of ion channels as sites for therapeutic approaches to asthma.

  17. Human airway smooth muscle cells secrete amphiregulin via bradykinin/COX-2/PGE2, inducing COX-2, CXCL8, and VEGF expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC) contribute to asthma pathophysiology through an increased smooth muscle mass and elevated cytokine/chemokine output. Little is known about how HASMC and the airway epithelium interact to regulate chronic airway inflammation and remodeling. Amphiregulin is a member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agonists with cell growth and proinflammatory roles and increased expression in the lungs of asthma patients. Here we show that bradykinin (BK) stimulation of HASMC increases amphiregulin secretion in a mechanism dependent on BK-induced COX-2 expression, increased PGE2 output, and the stimulation of HASMC EP2 and EP4 receptors. Conditioned medium from BK treated HASMC induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 mRNA and protein accumulation in airway epithelial cells, which were blocked by anti-amphiregulin antibodies and amphiregulin siRNA, suggesting a paracrine effect of HASMC-derived amphiregulin on airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, recombinant amphiregulin induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 in airway epithelial cells. Finally, we found that conditioned media from amphiregulin-stimulated airway epithelial cells induced amphiregulin expression in HASMC and that this was dependent on airway epithelial cell COX-2 activity. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic axis of interaction between HASMC and epithelial cells that amplifies CXCL8, VEGF, COX-2, and amphiregulin production. PMID:26047642

  18. Angiogenesis is induced by airway smooth muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Lin, Richard Z; Vaday, Gayle G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2007-10-01

    Angiogenesis is an important feature of airway remodeling in both chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airways in those conditions are exposed to excessive mechanical strain during periods of acute exacerbations. We recently reported that mechanical strain of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) led to an increase in their proliferation and migration. Sustained growth in airway smooth muscle in vivo requires an increase in the nutritional supply to these muscles, hence angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical strain of HASM produces factors promoting angiogenic events in the surrounding vascular endothelial cells. Our results show: 1) a significant increase in human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) proliferation, migration, and tube formation following incubation in conditioned media (CM) from HASM cells exposed to mechanical strain; 2) mechanical strain of HASM cells induced VEGF expression and release; 3) VEGF neutralizing antibodies inhibited the proliferation, migration, and tube formations of HMVEC-L induced by the strained airway smooth muscle CM; 4) mechanical strain of HASM induced a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA and protein, a transcription factor required for VEGF gene transcription; and 5) mechanical strain of HASM induced HIF-1alpha/VEGF through dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ERK pathways. In conclusion, exposing HASM cells to mechanical strain induces signal transduction pathway through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK pathways that lead to an increase in HIF-1alpha, a transcription factor required for VEGF expression. VEGF release by mechanical strain of HASM may contribute to the angiogenesis seen with repeated exacerbation of asthma and COPD.

  19. Airway epithelial-derived factor relaxes pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Farah, Omar R; Li, Dongge; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The factors controlling the pulmonary vascular resistance under physiological conditions are poorly understood. We have previously reported on an apparent cross talk between the airway and adjacent pulmonary arterial bed where a factor likely derived from the bronchial epithelial cells reduced the magnitude of agonist-stimulated force in the vascular smooth muscle. The main purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether bronchial epithelial cells release a pulmonary arterial smooth muscle relaxant factor. Conditioned media from SPOC-1 or BEAS-2B, a rat- and a human-derived bronchial epithelial cell line, respectively, were utilized. This media significantly relaxed precontracted adult but not fetal pulmonary arterial muscle in an oxygen tension-dependent manner. This response was mediated via soluble guanylate cyclase, involving AKT/PI3-kinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media increased AKT phosphorylation in pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and reduced intracellular calcium change following ATP stimulation to a significantly greater extent than observed for bronchial SMC. The present data strongly support the evidence for bronchial epithelial cells releasing a stable and soluble factor capable of inducing pulmonary arterial SMC relaxation. We speculate that under physiological conditions, the maintenance of a low pulmonary vascular resistance, postnatally, is in part modulated by the airway epithelium.

  20. A Phosphorylatable Sphingosine Analog Induces Airway Smooth Muscle Cytostasis and Reverses Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, David R.; Lecours, Pascale B.; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Marie-Josée; Huppé, Carole-Ann; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Flamand, Nicolas; Don, Anthony S.; Bissonnette, Élyse; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laplante, Mathieu; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.; Bossé, Ynuk; Marsolais, David

    2017-01-01

    In asthma, excessive bronchial narrowing associated with thickening of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) causes respiratory distress. Numerous pharmacological agents prevent experimental airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) when delivered prophylactically. However, most fail to resolve this feature after disease is instated. Although sphingosine analogs are primarily perceived as immune modulators with the ability to prevent experimental asthma, they also influence processes associated with tissue atrophy, supporting the hypothesis that they could interfere with mechanisms sustaining pre-established AHR. We thus assessed the ability of a sphingosine analog (AAL-R) to reverse AHR in a chronic model of asthma. We dissected the pharmacological mechanism of this class of agents using the non-phosphorylatable chiral isomer AAL-S and the pre-phosphorylated form of AAL-R (AFD-R) in vivo and in human ASM cells. We found that a therapeutic course of AAL-R reversed experimental AHR in the methacholine challenge test, which was not replicated by dexamethasone or the non-phosphorylatable isomer AAL-S. AAL-R efficiently interfered with ASM cell proliferation in vitro, supporting the concept that immunomodulation is not necessary to interfere with cellular mechanisms sustaining AHR. Moreover, the sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase inhibitor SM4 and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonist VPC23019 failed to inhibit proliferation, indicating that intracellular accumulation of sphingosine-1-phosphate or interference with cell surface S1P1/S1P3 activation, are not sufficient to induce cytostasis. Potent AAL-R-induced cytostasis specifically related to its ability to induce intracellular AFD-R accumulation. Thus, a sphingosine analog that possesses the ability to be phosphorylated in situ interferes with cellular mechanisms that beget AHR. PMID:28270767

  1. Does the length dependency of airway smooth muscle force contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Pascoe, Chris D; Couture, Christian; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-11-01

    Airway wall remodeling and lung hyperinflation are two typical features of asthma that may alter the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) by affecting its operating length. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to describe in detail the "length dependency of ASM force" in response to different spasmogens; and 2) to predict, based on morphological data and a computational model, the consequence of this length dependency of ASM force on airway responsiveness in asthmatic subjects who have both remodeled airway walls and hyperinflated lungs. Ovine tracheal ASM strips and human bronchial rings were isolated and stimulated to contract in response to increasing concentrations of spasmogens at three different lengths. Ovine tracheal strips were more sensitive and generated greater force at longer lengths in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and K(+). Equipotent concentrations of ACh were approximately a log less for ASM stretched by 30% and approximately a log more for ASM shortened by 30%. Similar results were observed in human bronchi in response to methacholine. Morphometric and computational analyses predicted that the ASM of asthmatic subjects may be elongated by 6.6-10.4% (depending on airway generation) due to remodeling and/or hyperinflation, which could increase ACh-induced force by 1.8-117.8% (depending on ASM length and ACh concentration) and enhance the increased resistance to airflow by 0.4-4,432.8%. In conclusion, elongation of ASM imposed by airway wall remodeling and/or hyperinflation may allow ASM to operate at a longer length and to consequently generate more force and respond to lower concentration of spasmogens. This phenomenon could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness.

  2. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  3. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Blankman, Elizabeth; Jensen, Christopher C.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; James, Alan L.; Elliot, John G.; Green, Francis H.; Liu, Jeffrey C.; Seow, Chun Y.; Park, Jin-Ah; Beckerle, Mary C.; Paré, Peter D.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI) whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms–and their failure in asthma–remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma. PMID:28278518

  4. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Sonia R; Pascoe, Christopher D; Blankman, Elizabeth; Jensen, Christopher C; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; James, Alan L; Elliot, John G; Green, Francis H; Liu, Jeffrey C; Seow, Chun Y; Park, Jin-Ah; Beckerle, Mary C; Paré, Peter D; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Smith, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI) whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms-and their failure in asthma-remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma.

  5. Peripheral Airway Smooth Muscle, but Not the Trachealis, Is Hypercontractile in an Equine Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Bates, Genevieve; Zitouni, Nedjma; Benedetti, Andrea; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2016-05-01

    Heaves is a naturally occurring equine disease that shares many similarities with human asthma, including reversible antigen-induced bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and remodeling. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the trachealis muscle is mechanically representative of the peripheral airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an equine model of asthma. Tracheal and peripheral ASM of heaves-affected horses under exacerbation, or under clinical remission of the disease, and control horses were dissected and freed of epithelium to measure unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), stress (force/cross-sectional area), methacholine effective concentration at which 50% of the maximum response is obtained, and stiffness. Myofibrillar Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, actomyosin in vitro motility, and contractile protein expression were also measured. Horses with heaves had significantly greater Vmax and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in peripheral airway but not in tracheal smooth muscle. In addition, a significant correlation was found between Vmax and the time elapsed since the end of the corticosteroid treatment for the peripheral airways in horses with heaves. Maximal stress and stiffness were greater in the peripheral airways of the horses under remission compared with controls and the horses under exacerbation, potentially due to remodeling. Actomyosin in vitro motility was not different between controls and horses with heaves. These data demonstrate that peripheral ASM is mechanically and biochemically altered in heaves, whereas the trachealis behaves as in control horses. It is therefore conceivable that the trachealis muscle may not be representative of the peripheral ASM in human asthma either, but this will require further investigation.

  6. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  7. Accumulating evidence for increased velocity of airway smooth muscle shortening in asthmatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ijpma, Gijs; Matusovsky, Oleg; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    It remains unclear whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) mechanics is altered in asthma. While efforts have originally focussed on contractile force, some evidence points to an increased velocity of shortening. A greater rate of airway renarrowing after a deep inspiration has been reported in asthmatics compared to controls, which could result from a shortening velocity increase. In addition, we have recently shown in rats that increased shortening velocity correlates with increased muscle shortening, without increasing muscle force. Nonetheless, establishing whether or not asthmatic ASM shortens faster than that of normal subjects remains problematic. Endobronchial biopsies provide excellent tissue samples because the patients are well characterized, but the size of the samples allows only cell level experiments. Whole human lungs from transplant programs suffer primarily from poor patient characterization, leading to high variability. ASM from several animal models of asthma has shown increased shortening velocity, but it is unclear whether this is representative of human asthma. Several candidates have been suggested as responsible for increased shortening velocity in asthma, such as alterations in contractile protein expression or changes in the contractile apparatus structure. There is no doubt that more remains to be learned about the role of shortening velocity in asthma.

  8. Effects of loading on upper airway and respiratory pump muscle motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kylie; Eastwood, Peter

    2011-10-15

    The functional outcomes of respiratory muscle loading by chemical (e.g. hypercapnia), mechanical (i.e. external mechanical loading) or ventilatory (e.g. exercise) factors can be either positive, such as through an increase in pressure-generating capacity of the inspiratory muscles or detrimental, such as by fatigue. Neurophysiological responses to respiratory muscle loading can occur at one or more points along the pathway from motor cortex to muscle. This paper describes the respiratory pump and upper airway motoneuron responses to the imposition of acute loads including processes of pre-activation, respiratory reflexes, potentiation and fatigue. It also considers changes suggestive of adaptation to chronic loading either from specific respiratory muscle training programs or as part of disease processes such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or obstructive sleep apnoea.

  9. Orai channel-mediated Ca2+ signals in vascular and airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Orai (Orai1, Orai2, and Orai3) proteins form a family of highly Ca2+-selective plasma membrane channels that are regulated by stromal-interacting molecules (STIM1 and STIM2); STIM proteins are Ca2+ sensors located in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. STIM and Orai proteins are expressed in vascular and airway smooth muscle and constitute the molecular components of the ubiquitous store-operated Ca2+ entry pathway that mediate the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current. STIM/Orai proteins also encode store-independent Ca2+ entry pathways in smooth muscle. Altered expression and function of STIM/Orai proteins have been linked to vascular and airway pathologies, including restenosis, hypertension, and atopic asthma. In this review we discuss our current understanding of Orai proteins and the store-dependent and -independent signaling pathways mediated by these proteins in vascular and airway smooth muscle. We also discuss the current studies linking altered expression and function of Orai proteins with smooth muscle-related pathologies. PMID:26718630

  10. Non-Selective Cation Channels Mediate Chloroquine-Induced Relaxation in Precontracted Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle. PMID:24992312

  11. Kinematic MRI study of upper-airway biomechanics using electrical muscle stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennick, Michael J.; Margulies, Susan S.; Ford, John C.; Gefter, Warren B.; Pack, Allan I.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a new and powerful method to study the movement and function of upper airway muscles. Our method is to use direct electrical stimulation of individual upper airway muscles, while performing state of the art high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have adapted a paralyzed isolated UA cat model so that positive or negative static pressure in the UA can be controlled at specific levels while electrical muscle stimulation is applied during MRI. With these techniques we can assess the effect of muscle stimulation on airway cross-sectional area compliance and soft tissue motion. We are reporting the preliminary results and MRI techniques which have enabled us to examine changes in airway dimensions which result form electrical stimulation of specific upper airway dilator muscles. The results of this study will be relevant to the development of new clinical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea by providing new information as to exactly how upper airway muscles function to dilate the upper airway and the strength of stimulation required to prevent the airway obstruction when overall muscle tone may not be sufficient to maintain regular breathing.

  12. Could an increase in airway smooth muscle shortening velocity cause airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Siddiqui, Sana; Donovan, Graham M; Martin, James G; Sneyd, James; Bates, Jason H T; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a characteristic feature of asthma. It has been proposed that an increase in the shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) could contribute to AHR. To address this possibility, we tested whether an increase in the isotonic shortening velocity of ASM is associated with an increase in the rate and total amount of shortening when ASM is subjected to an oscillating load, as occurs during breathing. Experiments were performed in vitro using 27 rat tracheal ASM strips supramaximally stimulated with methacholine. Isotonic velocity at 20% isometric force (Fiso) was measured, and then the load on the muscle was varied sinusoidally (0.33 ± 0.25 Fiso, 1.2 Hz) for 20 min, while muscle length was measured. A large amplitude oscillation was applied every 4 min to simulate a deep breath. We found that: 1) ASM strips with a higher isotonic velocity shortened more quickly during the force oscillations, both initially (P < 0.001) and after the simulated deep breaths (P = 0.002); 2) ASM strips with a higher isotonic velocity exhibited a greater total shortening during the force oscillation protocol (P < 0.005); and 3) the effect of an increase in isotonic velocity was at least comparable in magnitude to the effect of a proportional increase in ASM force-generating capacity. A cross-bridge model showed that an increase in the total amount of shortening with increased isotonic velocity could be explained by a change in either the cycling rate of phosphorylated cross bridges or the rate of myosin light chain phosphorylation. We conclude that, if asthma involves an increase in ASM velocity, this could be an important factor in the associated AHR.

  13. Effects of Ginger and Its Constituents on Airway Smooth Muscle Relaxation and Calcium Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Siviski, Matthew E.; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Hoonjan, Bhupinder; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent years, and is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Many patients report using alternative therapies to self-treat asthma symptoms as adjuncts to short-acting and long-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). As many as 40% of patients with asthma use herbal therapies to manage asthma symptoms, often without proven efficacy or known mechanisms of action. Therefore, investigations of both the therapeutic and possible detrimental effects of isolated components of herbal treatments on the airway are important. We hypothesized that ginger and its active components induce bronchodilation by modulating intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in airway smooth muscle (ASM). In isolated human ASM, ginger caused significant and rapid relaxation. Four purified constituents of ginger were subsequently tested for ASM relaxant properties in both guinea pig and human tracheas: [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol induced rapid relaxation of precontracted ASM (100–300 μM), whereas [10]-gingerol failed to induce relaxation. In human ASM cells, exposure to [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, but not [10]-gingerol (100 μM), blunted subsequent Ca2+ responses to bradykinin (10 μM) and S-(−)-Bay K 8644 (10 μM). In A/J mice, the nebulization of [8]-gingerol (100 μM), 15 minutes before methacholine challenge, significantly attenuated airway resistance, compared with vehicle. Taken together, these novel data show that ginger and its isolated active components, [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, relax ASM, and [8]-gingerol attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, in part by altering [Ca2+]i regulation. These purified compounds may provide a therapeutic option alone or in combination with accepted therapeutics, including β2-agonists, in airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:23065130

  14. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter D.; Gallos, George; Xu, Dingbang; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is an important component of the pathophysiology of asthma. Taurine, an agonist of glycine receptor chloride (GlyR Cl−) channels, was found to relax contracted ASM, which led us to question whether functional GlyR Cl− channels are expressed in ASM. Messenger RNA for β (GLRB), α1 (GLRA1), α2 (GLRA2), and α4 (GLRA4) subunits were found in human (Homo sapiens) and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) tracheal smooth muscle. Immunoblotting confirmed the protein expression of GLRA1 and GLRB subunits in ASM. Electrical activity of cultured human ASM cells was assessed using a fluorescent potentiometric dye and electrophysiological recordings. Glycine increased current and significantly increased fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner. The GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine significantly blocked the effects of glycine on potentiometric fluorescence in ASM cells. Guinea pig airway ring relaxation of ACh-induced contractions by isoproterenol was significantly left-shifted in the presence of glycine. This effect of glycine was blocked by pretreatment with the GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine. Glycine treatment during tachykinin- and acetylcholine-induced contractions significantly decreased the maintenance of muscle force compared to control. GlyR Cl− channels are expressed on ASM and regulate smooth muscle force and offer a novel target for therapeutic relaxation of ASM.—Yim, P. D., Gallos, G., Xu, D., Zhang, Y., Emala, C. W. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle. PMID:21282206

  15. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  16. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, William H.; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K.; Liggett, Stephen B.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.; An, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma. PMID:27905542

  17. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, William H; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K; Liggett, Stephen B; Pluznick, Jennifer L; An, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma.

  18. Effect of length oscillations on airway smooth muscle reactivity and cross-bridge cycling.

    PubMed

    Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Mbikou, Prisca; Redey, Prachi R

    2012-08-15

    Excessive airway narrowing due to airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperconstriction is a major symptom in many respiratory diseases. In vitro imposition of length oscillations similar to those produced by tidal breathing on contracted ASM have shown to reduce muscle active forces, which is usually attributed to unconfirmed disruption of actomyosin cross-bridges. This research focuses on an in vitro investigation of the effect of mechanical oscillations on ASM reactivity and actomyosin cross-bridges. A computerized organ bath system was used to test maximally precontracted bovine ASM subjected to length oscillations at frequencies in the range of 10-100 Hz superimposed on tidal breathing oscillation. Using an immunofluorescence technique, two specific antibodies against the phospho-serine19 myosin light chain and the α-smooth muscle actin were used to analyze the colocalization between these two filaments. Data were processed using the plug-in "colocalization threshold" of ImageJ 1.43m software. The results demonstrate that both tidal and superimposed length oscillations reduce the active force in contracted ASM for a relatively long term and that the latter enhances the force reduction of the former. This reduction was also found to be frequency and time dependent. Additionally colocalization analysis indicates that length oscillations cause the detachment of the actomyosin connections and that this condition is sustained even after the cessation of the length oscillations.

  19. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, airway innervation, and smooth muscle are altered in Cftr null mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Luk, Catherine; Kent, Geraldine; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2006-09-01

    The amine- and peptide-producing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lung as solitary cells and innervated clusters, neuroepithelial bodies (NEB), which function as airway O2 sensors. These cells express Cftr and hence could play a role in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We performed confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis on lung sections from Cftr-/- (null), Cftr+/+, and Cftr+/- (control) mice at developmental stages E20, P5, P9, and P30 to determine the distribution, frequency, and innervation of PNEC/NEB, innervation and cell mass of airway smooth muscle, and neuromuscular junctions using synaptic vesicle protein 2, smooth muscle actin, and synaptophysin markers, respectively. The mean number of PNEC/NEB in Cftr-/- mice was significantly reduced compared with control mice at E20, whereas comparable or increased numbers were observed postnatally. NEB cells in Cftr null mice showed a significant reduction in intracorpuscular nerve endings compared with control mice, which is consistent with an intrinsic abnormality of the PNEC system. The airways of Cftr-/- mice showed reduced density (approximately 20-30%) of smooth muscle innervation, decreased mean airway smooth muscle mass (approximately 35%), and reduced density (approximately 20%) of nerve endings compared with control mice. We conclude that the airways of Cftr-/- mice exhibit heretofore unappreciated structural alterations affecting cellular and neural components of the PNEC system and airway smooth muscle and its innervation resulting in blunted O2 sensing and reduced airway tonus. Cftr could play a role in the development of the PNEC system, lung innervation, and airway smooth muscle.

  20. A Close Association of RyRs with Highly Dense Clusters of Ca2+-activated Cl− Channels Underlies the Activation of STICs by Ca2+ Sparks in Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rongfeng; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Tuft, Richard A.; Bellvé, Karl; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks are highly localized, transient releases of Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In smooth muscle, Ca2+ sparks trigger spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) by opening nearby clusters of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, and also gate Ca2+-activated Cl− (Cl(Ca)) channels to induce spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs). While the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of STOCs by Ca2+ sparks is well understood, little information is available on how Ca2+ sparks activate STICs. In the present study, we investigated the spatial organization of RyRs and Cl(Ca) channels in spark sites in airway myocytes from mouse. Ca2+ sparks and STICs were simultaneously recorded, respectively, with high-speed, widefield digital microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp. An image-based approach was applied to measure the Ca2+ current underlying a Ca2+ spark (ICa(spark)), with an appropriate correction for endogenous fixed Ca2+ buffer, which was characterized by flash photolysis of NPEGTA. We found that ICa(spark) rises to a peak in 9 ms and decays with a single exponential with a time constant of 12 ms, suggesting that Ca2+ sparks result from the nonsimultaneous opening and closure of multiple RyRs. The onset of the STIC lags the onset of the ICa(spark) by less than 3 ms, and its rising phase matches the duration of the ICa(spark). We further determined that Cl(Ca) channels on average are exposed to a [Ca2+] of 2.4 μM or greater during Ca2+ sparks. The area of the plasma membrane reaching this level is <600 nm in radius, as revealed by the spatiotemporal profile of [Ca2+] produced by a reaction-diffusion simulation with measured ICa(spark). Finally we estimated that the number of Cl(Ca) channels localized in Ca2+ spark sites could account for all the Cl(Ca) channels in the entire cell. Taken together these results lead us to propose a model in which RyRs and Cl(Ca) channels in Ca2+ spark sites localize

  1. The extract of Cordyceps sinensis inhibited airway inflammation by blocking NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ya-Ling; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2012-06-01

    Aiming the extract of Cordyceps sinensis significantly inhibits airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and the infiltration of eosinophils in the airway of rats and may be related to the modulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th2 cells functions. The mechanisms of C. sinensis involved in modulation of suppression inflammation are not yet determined. In this study, the mechanism involved in the extract of C. sinensis-C.S.3-modulated suppression of inflammation was investigated in vivo and in vitro systems. The results showed that C.S.3 reduced airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice. Furthermore, we found C.S.3 could decrease extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway to suppress activity of nuclear factor-κB in lung cells and cultured airway smooth muscle cells. Conclusion C.S.3 may provide clinical applications for asthma in the future.

  2. The Impact of Vitamin D on Asthmatic Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Fischer, Kimberly D.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  3. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C.; Pabelick, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  4. The effects of isoflurane on airway smooth muscle crossbridge kinetics in Fisher and Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Duracher, Caroline; Blanc, François-Xavier; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; David, Jean Stéphane; Riou, Bruno; Lecarpentier, Yves; Coirault, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Our aim was to determine how isoflurane modified crossbridge (CB) number and kinetics in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and to compare its effects in Fisher and Lewis rats, two strains with differences in airway responsiveness. The effects of isoflurane (2 MAC) on isotonic and isometric contractility in tracheal ASM strips were investigated after methacholine (10(-6) M)-induced contraction. CB mechanics and kinetics were analyzed using the formalism of Huxley's equations adapted to ASM. After isoflurane, maximum velocity did not differ from baseline in Lewis rats, whereas it was significantly less than baseline in Fisher rats ( approximately 25%), the most reactive strain. Isoflurane totally reversed methacholine-induced increase in active CB number in Lewis rats (2.4 +/- 0.5 versus 1.8 +/- 0.4 10(9)/mm(2) after methacholine and isoflurane, respectively) whereas reversal was only partial in Fisher rats (2.7 +/- 0.4 versus 2.1 +/- 0.3 10(9)/mm(2) after methacholine and isoflurane, respectively). Isoflurane induced a 40% increase in attachment step duration in both strains and an almost twofold increase in the CB cycle duration compared with baseline in Lewis rats. The isoflurane-induced increase in detachment step duration was less in Lewis than in Fisher rats (P < 0.05). We concluded that isoflurane modulated CB number and CB cycling rates of isolated rat ASM differently depending on the level of airway responsiveness.

  5. A study of airway smooth muscle in asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. With standard Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), imaging ASM is often not possible due to poor structural contrast between the muscle and surrounding tissues. A potential solution to this problem is to utilize additional optical contrast factors intrinsic to the tissue, such as birefringence. Due to its highly ordered structure, ASM is strongly birefringent. Previously, we demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive OCT(PS-OCT) has the potential to be used to visualize ASM as well as easily segment it from the surrounding (weakly) birefringent tissue by exploiting a property which allows it to discriminate the orientation of birefringent fibers. We have already validated our technology with a substantial set of histological comparisons made against data obtained ex vivo. In this work we present a comprehensive comparison of ASM distributions in asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers. By isolating the ASM we parameterize its distribution in terms of both thickness and band width, calculated volumetrically over centimeters of airway. Using this data we perform analyses of the asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using a broad number and variety and subjects.

  6. Contractile reactions of guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum oxide nanosized particles.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaytseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; Agev, B G; Dyakova, E Yu; Ogorodova, L M; Magaeva, A A; Terecova, O G; Itin, V I

    2012-05-01

    Contractile reactions of the guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum dioxide nanosized particles were studied. Contractile reactions to cholinergic and histaminergic stimulation were potentiated by inhalations of nanoparticle aerosol and by exposure of isolated smooth muscle segments to nanoparticle suspension.

  7. Role of non-coding RNAs in maintaining primary airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell maintains its own proliferative rate and contributes to the inflammatory response in the airways, effects that are inhibited by corticosteroids, used in the treatment of airways diseases. Objective We determined the differential expression of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNA species (lncRNAs) in primary ASM cells following treatment with a corticosteroid, dexamethasone, and fetal calf serum (FCS). Methods mRNA, miRNA and lncRNA expression was measured by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. Results A small number of miRNAs (including miR-150, −371-5p, −718, −940, −1181, −1207-5p, −1915, and −3663-3p) were decreased following exposure to dexamethasone and FCS. The mRNA targets of these miRNAs were increased in expression. The changes in mRNA expression were associated with regulation of ASM actin cytoskeleton. We also observed changes in expression of lncRNAs, including natural antisense, pseudogenes, intronic lncRNAs, and intergenic lncRNAs following dexamethasone and FCS. We confirmed the change in expression of three of these, LINC00882, LINC00883, PVT1, and its transcriptional activator, c-MYC. We propose that four of these lincRNAs (RP11-46A10.4, LINC00883, BCYRN1, and LINC00882) act as miRNA ‘sponges’ for 4 miRNAs (miR-150, −371-5p, −940, −1207-5p). Conclusion This in-vitro model of primary ASM cell phenotype was associated with the regulation of several ncRNAs. Their identification allows for in-vitro functional experimentation to establish causality with the primary ASM phenotype, and in airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:24886442

  8. cAMP-mediated secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in developing airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael A; Britt, Rodney D; Kuipers, Ine; Stewart, Alecia; Thu, James; Pandya, Hitesh C; MacFarlane, Peter; Pabelick, Christina M; Martin, Richard J; Prakash, Y S

    2015-10-01

    Moderate hyperoxic exposure in preterm infants contributes to subsequent airway dysfunction and to risk of developing recurrent wheeze and asthma. The regulatory mechanisms that can contribute to hyperoxia-induced airway dysfunction are still under investigation. Recent studies in mice show that hyperoxia increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a growth factor that increases airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and contractility. We assessed the mechanisms underlying effects of moderate hyperoxia (50% O2) on BDNF expression and secretion in developing human ASM. Hyperoxia increased BDNF secretion, but did not alter endogenous BDNF mRNA or intracellular protein levels. Exposure to hyperoxia significantly increased [Ca2+]i responses to histamine, an effect blunted by the BDNF chelator TrkB-Fc. Hyperoxia also increased ASM cAMP levels, associated with reduced PDE4 activity, but did not alter protein kinase A (PKA) activity or adenylyl cyclase mRNA levels. However, 50% O2 increased expression of Epac2, which is activated by cAMP and can regulate protein secretion. Silencing RNA studies indicated that Epac2, but not Epac1, is important for hyperoxia-induced BDNF secretion, while PKA inhibition did not influence BDNF secretion. In turn, BDNF had autocrine effects of enhancing ASM cAMP levels, an effect inhibited by TrkB and BDNF siRNAs. Together, these novel studies suggest that hyperoxia can modulate BDNF secretion, via cAMP-mediated Epac2 activation in ASM, resulting in a positive feedback effect of BDNF-mediated elevation in cAMP levels. The potential functional role of this pathway is to sustain BDNF secretion following hyperoxic stimulus, leading to enhanced ASM contractility and proliferation.

  9. Chrysin inhibits human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yun-Shi; Feng, Gan-Zhu; Du, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease characterized by an increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid, has been shown to exert multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-oxidant effects, as well as the potency to ameliorate asthma in animal models. The objective of the present study was to identify the underlying mechanism of the therapeutic effects of chrysin. The impact of chrysin on basal and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation and apoptosis of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) was investigated. Furthermore, the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway was evaluated in HASMCs. The results revealed that chrysin significantly inhibited basal as well as PDGF-induced HASMC proliferation, most likely through the suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, chrysin did not significantly reduce PDGF-induced apoptosis of HASMCs. The present study indicated that chrysin may be a promising medication for controlling airway remodeling and clinical manifestations of asthma.

  10. MiR-143-3p controls TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production in airway smooth muscle via negative regulation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells 1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Yan, Kun; Xie, Li-Yi; Chen, Feng; Yu, Hong-Chuan; Huang, Yan-Xia; Dang, Cheng-Xue

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that function in diverse biological processes. However, little is known about the precise role of microRNAs in the functioning of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Here, we investigated the potential role and mechanisms of the miR-143 -3p on proliferation and the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein production of ASMCs. We demonstrated that miR-143-3p was aberrantly lower in ASMCs isolated from individuals with asthma than in individuals without asthma. Meanwhile, TGF-β1 caused a marked decrease in a time-dependent manner in miR-143-3p expression in ASMCs from asthmatics. Additionally, the overexpression of miR- 143-3p robustly reduced TGF-β1-induced ASMCs proliferation and downregulated CDK and cyclin expression, whereas the inhibition of miR-143-3p significantly enhanced ASMCs proliferation and upregulated the level of CDKs and cyclins. Re-expression of miR-143-3p attenuated ECM protein deposition reflected as a marked decrease in the expression of type I collagen and fibronectin, whereas miR-143-3p downregulation caused an opposite effect on the expression of type I collagen and fibronectin. Moreover, qRT-PCR and western blot analysis indicated that miR-143-3p negatively regulated the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that NFATc1 was a direct and functional target of miR-143-3p, which was validated by the dual luciferase reporter assay. Most importantly, the overexpression of NFATc1 effectively reversed the inhibition of miR-143-3p on TGF-β1-induced proliferation, and strikingly abrogated the effect of miR-143-3p on the expression of CDK4 and Cyclin D1. Together, miR-143-3p may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing proliferation and ECM protein deposition in TGF-β1-mediated ASMCs via the negative regulation of NFATc1 signaling, suggesting miR-143-3p as a potential therapeutic target for asthma.

  11. Soluble guanylate cyclase modulators blunt hyperoxia effects on calcium responses of developing human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A; Kuipers, Ine; Stewart, Alecia; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thu, James; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-09-15

    Exposure to moderate hyperoxia in prematurity contributes to subsequent airway dysfunction and increases the risk of developing recurrent wheeze and asthma. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cyclic GMP (cGMP) axis modulates airway tone by regulating airway smooth muscle (ASM) intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and contractility. However, the effects of hyperoxia on this axis in the context of Ca(2+)/contractility are not known. In developing human ASM, we explored the effects of novel drugs that activate sGC independent of NO on alleviating hyperoxia (50% oxygen)-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) responses to bronchoconstrictor agonists. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 (sGC stimulator) and BAY 60-2770 (sGC activator) increased cGMP levels during exposure to 50% O2. Although 50% O2 did not alter sGCα1 or sGCβ1 expression, BAY 60-2770 did increase sGCβ1 expression. BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 blunted Ca(2+) responses to histamine in cells exposed to 50% O2. The effects of BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 were reversed by protein kinase G inhibition. These novel data demonstrate that BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 stimulate production of cGMP and blunt hyperoxia-induced increases in Ca(2+) responses in developing ASM. Accordingly, sGC stimulators/activators may be a useful therapeutic strategy in improving bronchodilation in preterm infants.

  12. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  13. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  14. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  15. Probing the viscoelastic behavior of cultured airway smooth muscle cells with atomic force microscopy: stiffening induced by contractile agonist.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin A; Tolloczko, Barbara; Martin, James G; Grütter, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Complex rheology of airway smooth muscle cells and its dynamic response during contractile stimulation involves many molecular processes, foremost of which are actomyosin cross-bridge cycling and actin polymerization. With an atomic force microscope, we tracked the spatial and temporal variations of the viscoelastic properties of cultured airway smooth muscle cells. Elasticity mapping identified stiff structural elements of the cytoskeletal network. Using a precisely positioned microscale probe, picoNewton forces and nanometer level indentation modulations were applied to cell surfaces at frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 100 Hz. The resulting elastic storage modulus (G') and dissipative modulus (G'') increased dramatically, with hysteresivity (eta = G''/G') showing a definitive decrease after stimulation with the contractile agonist 5-hydroxytryptamine. Frequency-dependent assays showed weak power-law structural damping behavior and universal scaling in support of the soft-glassy material description of cellular biophysics. Additionally, a high-frequency component of the loss modulus (attributed to cellular Newtonian viscosity) increased fourfold during the contractile process. The complex shear modulus showed a strong sensitivity to the degree of actin polymerization. Inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase activity had little effect on the stiffening response to contractile stimulation. Thus, our measurements appear to be particularly well suited for characterization of dynamic actin rheology during airway smooth muscle contraction.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 induces expression of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-07-05

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prostanoid with diverse actions in health and disease. In chronic respiratory diseases driven by inflammation, PGE2 has both positive and negative effects. An enhanced understanding of the receptor-mediated cellular signalling pathways induced by PGE2 may help us separate the beneficial properties from unwanted actions of this important prostaglandin. PGE2 is known to exert anti-inflammatory and bronchoprotective actions in human airways. To date however, whether PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) was unknown. We address this herein and use primary cultures of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to show that PGE2 increases MKP-1 mRNA and protein upregulation in a concentration-dependent manner. We explore the signalling pathways responsible and show that PGE2-induces CREB phosphorylation, not p38 MAPK activation, in ASM cells. Moreover, we utilize selective antagonists of EP2 (PF-04418948) and EP4 receptors (GW 627368X) to begin to identify EP-mediated functional outcomes in ASM cells in vitro. Taken together with earlier studies, our data suggest that PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MKP-1 via cAMP/CREB-mediated cellular signalling in ASM cells and demonstrates that EP2 may, in part, be involved.

  17. Force maintenance and myosin filament assembly regulated by Rho-kinase in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Deng, Linhong; Donovan, Graham M; Chin, Leslie Y M; Syyong, Harley T; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Christopher D; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Swyngedouw, Nicholas E; Banaem, Saleha M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction can be divided into two phases: the initial contraction determines the amount of developed force and the second phase determines how well the force is maintained. The initial phase is primarily due to activation of actomyosin interaction and is relatively well understood, whereas the second phase remains poorly understood. Force maintenance in the sustained phase can be disrupted by strains applied to the muscle; the strain causes actomyosin cross-bridges to detach and also the cytoskeletal structure to disassemble in a process known as fluidization, for which the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of airway smooth muscle to maintain force after the initial phase of contraction. Specifically, we examined the roles of Rho-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) in force maintenance. We found that for the same degree of initial force inhibition, Rho-kinase substantially reduced the muscle's ability to sustain force under static conditions, whereas inhibition of PKC had a minimal effect on sustaining force. Under oscillatory strain, Rho-kinase inhibition caused further decline in force, but again, PKC inhibition had a minimal effect. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibition led to a decrease in the myosin filament mass in the muscle cells, suggesting that one of the functions of Rho-kinase is to stabilize myosin filaments. The results also suggest that dissolution of myosin filaments may be one of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of fluidization. These findings can shed light on the mechanism underlying deep inspiration induced bronchodilation.

  18. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma.

  19. Metformin reduces airway inflammation and remodeling via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Sun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Moon, Keun-Ai; Kim, Tae-Bum; Lee, Ki-Young; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2012-12-15

    Recent reports have suggested that metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-tissue remodeling properties. We investigated the potential effect of metformin on airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma. The effect of metformin treatment on airway inflammation and pivotal characteristics of airway remodeling were examined in a murine model of chronic asthma generated by repetitive challenges with ovalbumin and fungal-associated allergenic protease. To investigate the underlying mechanism of metformin, oxidative stress levels and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were assessed. To further elucidate the role of AMPK, we examined the effect of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR) as a specific activator of AMPK and employed AMPKα1-deficient mice as an asthma model. The role of metformin and AMPK in tissue fibrosis was evaluated using a bleomycin-induced acute lung injury model and in vitro experiments with cultured fibroblasts. Metformin suppressed eosinophilic inflammation and significantly reduced peribronchial fibrosis, smooth muscle layer thickness, and mucin secretion. Enhanced AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress in lungs was found in metformin-treated asthmatic mice. Similar results were observed in the AICAR-treated group. In addition, the enhanced airway inflammation and fibrosis in heterozygous AMPKα1-deficient mice were induced by both allergen and bleomycin challenges. Fibronectin and collagen expression was diminished by metformin through AMPKα1 activation in cultured fibroblasts. Therefore metformin reduced both airway inflammation and remodeling at least partially through the induction of AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress. These data provide insight into the beneficial role of metformin as a novel therapeutic drug for chronic asthma.

  20. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  1. A novel role for RhoA GTPase in the regulation of airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang; Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction by RhoA GTPase. In ASM tissues, both myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and actin polymerization are required for active tension generation. RhoA inactivation dramatically suppresses agonist-induced tension development and completely inhibits agonist-induced actin polymerization, but only slightly reduces MLC phosphorylation. The inhibition of MLC phosphatase does not reverse the effects of RhoA inactivation on contraction or actin polymerization. Thus, RhoA regulates ASM contraction through its effects on actin polymerization rather than MLC phosphorylation. Contractile stimulation of ASM induces the recruitment and assembly of paxillin, vinculin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into membrane adhesion complexes (adhesomes) that regulate actin polymerization by catalyzing the activation of cdc42 GTPase by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting target (GIT) - p21-activated kinase (PAK) - PAK-interacting exchange factor (PIX) complex. Cdc42 is a necessary and specific activator of the actin filament nucleation activator, N-WASp. The recruitment and activation of paxillin, vinculin, and FAK is prevented by RhoA inactivation, thus preventing cdc42 and N-WASp activation. We conclude that RhoA regulates ASM contraction by catalyzing the assembly and activation of membrane adhesome signaling modules that regulate actin polymerization, and that the RhoA-mediated assembly of adhesome complexes is a fundamental step in the signal transduction process in response to a contractile agonist.

  2. Mechanism of vanadate-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Nayler, R. A.; Sparrow, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of vanadate-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle are described in isolated preparations of guinea-pig central and peripheral airways. Vanadate (1-1000 microM) induced sustained contractions of trachea and lung parenchymal strips within 1 min of challenge. It was more potent (P less than 0.001) on the lung strip (EC50 = 63 microM) than on the trachea (EC50 = 123 microM). The lung strip also developed greater maximum isometric tension (P less than 0.001) than the trachea. The efficacy on the lung strip was 2 and the trachea 0.6, relative to the response to acetylcholine (efficacy = 1). Vanadate-induced contractions of the trachea were not inhibited by atropine, mepyramine, phentolamine or indomethacin, nor after mast cell depletion by compound 48/80, showing that contractions were not mediated via specific receptors or by release of endogenous mediators of tone. Inorganic phosphate specifically inhibited vanadate responses in a dose-dependent and reversible manner, suggesting a common site of action. Contractions could be elicited in depolarized muscle and after treatment with ouabain plus propranolol, showing that membrane depolarization and inhibition of the Na, K-ATPase system were not involved in the contractile action of vanadate. Pretreatment of tracheal smooth muscle with verapamil had no influence on contractions elicited by vanadate. After removal of extracellular calcium, vanadate-induced contractions declined slowly with time, indicating that influx of extracellular calcium was not giving rise to contractions elicited by vanadate. Vanadate markedly increased the rate of calcium efflux from trachealis muscle loaded with 45Ca into both Ca2+-free and normal Krebs solutions; this is compatible with vanadate mobilizing an intracellular store of Ca2+. Such a store involving sites with Ca-ATPase activity would be consistent with the action of vanadate in isolated membrane preparations. Membrane-skinned tracheal fibres contracted by

  3. Force-EMG changes during sustained contractions of a human upper airway muscle.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Kori; DelloRusso, Christiana; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2009-02-01

    Human upper airway and facial muscles support breathing, swallowing, speech, mastication, and facial expression, but their endurance performance in sustained contractions is poorly understood. The muscular fatigue typically associated with task failure during sustained contractions has both central and intramuscular causes, with the contribution of each believed to be task dependent. Previously we failed to show central fatigue in the nasal dilator muscles of subjects that performed intermittent maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Here we test the hypothesis that central mechanisms contribute to the fatigue of submaximal, sustained contractions in nasal dilator muscles. Nasal dilator muscle force and EMG activities were recorded in 11 subjects that performed submaximal contractions (20, 35, and 65% MVC) until force dropped to or=3 s, which we defined as task failure. MVC and twitch forces (the latter obtained by applying supramaximal shocks to the facial nerve) were recorded before the trial and at several time points over the first 10 min of recovery. The time to task failure was inversely related to contraction intensity. MVC force was depressed by roughly 30% at task failure in all three trials, but recovered within 2 min. Twitch force fell by 30-44% depending on contraction intensity and remained depressed after 10 min of recovery, consistent with low-frequency fatigue. Average EMG activity increased with time, but never exceeded 75% of the maximal, pretrial level despite task failure. EMG mean power frequency declined by 20-25% in all trials, suggesting reduced action potential conduction velocity at task failure. In contrast, the maximal evoked potential did not change significantly in any of the tasks, indicating that the EMG deficit at task failure was due largely to mechanisms proximal to the neuromuscular junction. Additional experiments using the interpolated twitch technique suggest that subjects can produce about 92

  4. Modelling airway smooth muscle passive length adaptation via thick filament length distributions

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model of airway smooth muscle (ASM), which surrounds and constricts every airway in the lung and thus plays a central role in the airway constriction associated with asthma. This new model of ASM is based on an extension of sliding filament/crossbridge theory, which explicitly incorporates the length distribution of thick sliding filaments to account for a phenomenon known as dynamic passive length adaptation; the model exhibits good agreement with experimental data for ASM force–length behaviour across multiple scales. Principally these are (nonlinear) force–length loops at short timescales (seconds), parabolic force–length curves at medium timescales (minutes) and length adaptation at longer timescales. This represents a significant improvement on the widely-used cross-bridge models which work so well in or near the isometric regime, and may have significant implications for studies which rely on crossbridge or other dynamic airway smooth muscle models, and thus both airway and lung dynamics. PMID:23721681

  5. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-09

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%-99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G₁/G₀ cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  6. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials. PMID:26761017

  7. Airway smooth muscle cell tone amplifies contractile function in the presence of chronic cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Nigel J; Connolly, Sarah C; Mackinnon, James D; Wehry, Kathrin; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2008-09-01

    Chronic contractile activation, or tone, in asthma coupled with continuous stretching due to breathing may be involved in altering the contractile function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Previously, we (11) showed that cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffening responses to acute (2 h) localized stresses were modulated by the level of contractile activation of ASM. Here, we investigated if altered contractility in response to chronic mechanical strain was dependent on repeated modulation of contractile tone. Cultured human ASM cells received 5% cyclic (0.3 Hz), predominantly uniaxial strain for 5 days, with once-daily dosing of either sham, forskolin, carbachol, or histamine to alter tone. Stiffness, contractility (KCl), and "relaxability" (forskolin) were then measured as was cell alignment, myosin light-chain phosphorylation (pMLC), and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) content. Cells became aligned and baseline stiffness increased with strain, but repeated lowering of tone inhibited both effects (P < 0.05). Strain also reversed a negative tone-modulation dependence of MLCK, observed in static conditions in agreement with previous reports, with strain and tone together increasing both MLCK and pMLC. Furthermore, contractility increased 176% (SE 59) with repeated tone elevation. These findings indicate that with strain, and not without, repeated tone elevation promoted contractile function through changes in cytoskeletal organization and increased contractile protein. The ability of repeated contractile activation to increase contractility, but only with mechanical stretching, suggests a novel mechanism for increased ASM contractility in asthma and for the role of continuous bronchodilator and corticosteroid therapy in reversing airway hyperresponsiveness.

  8. [Response mechanisms of the airway smooth muscle tissue in experimental bronchial spasm].

    PubMed

    Zashikhin, A L; Agafonov, Iu V; Barmina, A O

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at the complex evaluation of the reactivity mechanisms of bronchial smooth muscle tissue (SMT) in experimental bronchial spasm. Morphometric, cytospectrophotometric and electron microscopical analysis demonstrated the presence of three types of smooth muscle cells (SMC) within the bronchial SMT (small, medium, large), that differed in their linear and metabolic parameters. The findings of this study indicate that under the conditions of experimental bronchial spasm development, the ratios of SMC in bronchial SMT are changed with the increase in proportion of small SMC and the elimination of large SMC. In the dynamics of experimental bronchial spasm development, the activation of cytoplasmic synthesis as well as of DNA synthesis was detected mainly in group of small SMC. The reactive-dystrophic changes were marked at the subcellular level, that were most often identified in large SMC resulting in their elimination from population in the dynamics of an experiment. The data obtained suggest that one of the important mechanisms of airway SMT adaptation to the bronchial spasm development is a dynamic reorganization of SMC population.

  9. Kv7 potassium channels in airway smooth muscle cells: signal transduction intermediates and pharmacological targets for bronchodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Kakad, Priyanka P.; Love, Robert B.; Solway, Julian; Dowell, Maria L.; Cribbs, Leanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Expression and function of Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-activated potassium channels in guinea pig and human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) were investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), patch-clamp electrophysiology, and precision-cut lung slices. qRT-PCR revealed expression of multiple KCNQ genes in both guinea pig and human ASMCs. Currents with electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics of Kv7 currents were measured in freshly isolated guinea pig and human ASMCs. In guinea pig ASMCs, Kv7 currents were significantly suppressed by application of the bronchoconstrictor agonists methacholine (100 nM) or histamine (30 μM), but current amplitudes were restored by addition of a Kv7 channel activator, flupirtine (10 μM). Kv7 currents in guinea pig ASMCs were also significantly enhanced by another Kv7.2–7.5 channel activator, retigabine, and by celecoxib and 2,5-dimethyl celecoxib. In precision-cut human lung slices, constriction of airways by histamine was significantly reduced in the presence of flupirtine. Kv7 currents in both guinea pig and human ASMCs were inhibited by the Kv7 channel blocker XE991. In human lung slices, XE991 induced robust airway constriction, which was completely reversed by addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil. These findings suggest that Kv7 channels in ASMCs play an essential role in the regulation of airway diameter and may be targeted pharmacologically to relieve airway hyperconstriction induced by elevated concentrations of bronchoconstrictor agonists. PMID:21964407

  10. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  11. Device for Investigation of Mechanical Tension of Isolated Smooth Muscle Vessels and Airway Segments of Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinik, A.; Karpovich, N.; Turgunova, N.; Nosarev, A.

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of testing and the search for new drug compounds, designed to heal many human diseases, it is necessary to investigate the deformation of experimental tissue samples under influence of these drugs. For this task a precision force sensor for measuring the mechanical tension, produced by isolated ring segments of blood vessels and airways was created. The hardware and software systems for the study of changes in contractile responses of the airway smooth muscles and blood vessels of experimental animals was developed.

  12. Common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus during inspiratory loading.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael J; Nicholas, Christian L; Semmler, John G; Chan, Julia K M; Jordan, Amy S; Trinder, John

    2015-11-01

    Common drive is thought to constitute a central mechanism by which the efficiency of a motor neuron pool is increased. This study tested the hypothesis that common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus (GG) would increase with increased respiratory drive in response to an inspiratory load. Respiration, GG electromyographic (EMG) activity, single-motor unit activity, and coherence in the 0-5 Hz range between pairs of GG motor units were assessed for the 30 s before an inspiratory load, the first and second 30 s of the load, and the 30 s after the load. Twelve of twenty young, healthy male subjects provided usable data, yielding 77 pairs of motor units: 2 Inspiratory Phasic, 39 Inspiratory Tonic, 15 Expiratory Tonic, and 21 Tonic. Respiratory and GG inspiratory activity significantly increased during the loads and returned to preload levels during the postload periods (all showed significant quadratic functions over load trials, P < 0.05). As hypothesized, common drive increased during the load in inspiratory modulated motor units to a greater extent than in expiratory/tonic motor units (significant load × discharge pattern interaction, P < 0.05). Furthermore, this effect persisted during the postload period. In conclusion, common drive to inspiratory modulated motor units was elevated in response to increased respiratory drive. The postload elevation in common drive was suggestive of a poststimulus activation effect.

  13. Mechanism of rhinovirus-induced changes in airway smooth muscle responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Hakonarson, H; Maskeri, N; Carter, C; Hodinka, R L; Campbell, D; Grunstein, M M

    1998-01-01

    An important interplay exists between specific viral respiratory infections and altered airway responsiveness in the development and exacerbations of asthma. However, the mechanistic basis of this interplay remains to be identified. This study addressed the hypothesis that rhinovirus (RV), the most common viral respiratory pathogen associated with acute asthma attacks, directly affects airway smooth muscle (ASM) to produce proasthmatic changes in receptor-coupled ASM responsiveness. Isolated rabbit and human ASM tissue and cultured ASM cells were inoculated with human RV (serotype 16) or adenovirus, each for 6 or 24 h. In contrast to adenovirus, which had no effect, inoculation of ASM tissue with RV induced heightened ASM tissue constrictor responsiveness to acetylcholine and attenuated the dose-dependent relaxation of ASM to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation with isoproterenol. These RV-induced changes in ASM responsiveness were largely prevented by pretreating the tissues with pertussis toxin or with a monoclonal blocking antibody to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the principal endogenous receptor for most RVs. In extended studies, we found that the RV-induced changes in ASM responsiveness were associated with diminished cAMP accumulation in response to dose-dependent administration of isoproterenol, and this effect was accompanied by autologously upregulated expression of the Gi protein subtype, Gialpha3, in the ASM. Finally, in separate experiments, we found that the RV-induced effects on ASM responsiveness were also accompanied by autologously induced upregulated mRNA and cell surface protein expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, these findings provide new evidence that RV directly induces proasthmatic phenotypic changes in ASM responsiveness, that this effect is triggered by binding of RV to its ICAM-1 receptor in ASM, and that this binding is associated with the induced endogenously upregulated expression of ICAM-1 and enhanced expression and

  14. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression.

  15. Effect of positional changes of anatomic structures on upper airway dilating muscle shortening during electro- and chemostimulation.

    PubMed

    Oliven, A; Odeh, M

    2006-09-01

    Positional changes of anatomic structures surrounding the upper airway are known to affect pharyngeal mechanics and collapsibility. We hypothesized that these alterations also affect the ability of the upper airway dilator muscles to enlarge the pharynx by altering their ability to shorten when activated. Using sonomicrometry, we evaluated in seven anesthetized dogs the effects of changes in tracheal and head position on the length of the genioglossus (GG) and the geniohyoid (GH) and the effects of these positional changes on the magnitude of shortening of the two muscles in response to electro- (ES) and chemostimulation (CS). Caudal traction of the trachea lengthened the GG and GH in all dogs, whereas cranial displacement of the trachea and flexion of the head to a vertical position shortened the muscles. Compared with the magnitude of ES-induced shortening in the neutral position, ES-induced shortening of the GG was 144.7 +/- 14.6, 49.3 +/- 4.3, and 33.5 +/- 11.6% during caudal and cranial displacement of the trachea and during head flexion, respectively. Similar effects of the positional changes were found for the GH, as well as for both muscles during respiratory stimulation with P(CO2) of 90 Torr at the end of CO(2) rebreathing, although inspiratory muscle shortening during CS reached only one-quarter to one-third of the magnitude observed during ES. We conclude that positional alterations of anatomic structures in the neck have a dramatic effect on the magnitude of shortening of the activated GG and GH, which may reduce substantially their ability to protect pharyngeal patency.

  16. Innate Immune Signaling Activated by MDR Bacteria in the Airway.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dane; Ahn, Danielle; Cohen, Taylor; Prince, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Health care-associated bacterial pneumonias due to multiple-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are an important public health problem and are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to antimicrobial resistance, these organisms have adapted to the milieu of the human airway and have acquired resistance to the innate immune clearance mechanisms that normally prevent pneumonia. Given the limited efficacy of antibiotics, bacterial clearance from the airway requires an effective immune response. Understanding how specific airway pathogens initiate and regulate innate immune signaling, and whether this response is excessive, leading to host-induced pathology may guide future immunomodulatory therapy. We will focus on three of the most important causes of health care-associated pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and review the mechanisms through which an inappropriate or damaging innate immune response is stimulated, as well as describe how airway pathogens cause persistent infection by evading immune activation.

  17. Innate Immune Signaling Activated by MDR Bacteria in the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Ahn, Danielle; Cohen, Taylor; Prince, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Health care-associated bacterial pneumonias due to multiple-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are an important public health problem and are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to antimicrobial resistance, these organisms have adapted to the milieu of the human airway and have acquired resistance to the innate immune clearance mechanisms that normally prevent pneumonia. Given the limited efficacy of antibiotics, bacterial clearance from the airway requires an effective immune response. Understanding how specific airway pathogens initiate and regulate innate immune signaling, and whether this response is excessive, leading to host-induced pathology may guide future immunomodulatory therapy. We will focus on three of the most important causes of health care-associated pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and review the mechanisms through which an inappropriate or damaging innate immune response is stimulated, as well as describe how airway pathogens cause persistent infection by evading immune activation. PMID:26582515

  18. PKC-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF Kv7.5 CHANNELS BY THE BRONCHOCONSTRICTOR HISTAMINE IN HUMAN AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Cribbs, Leanne L; Denning, Mitchell F; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Byron, Kenneth L

    2017-03-10

    Kv7 potassium channels have recently been found to be expressed and functionally important for relaxation of airway smooth muscle. Previous research suggests that native Kv7 currents are inhibited following treatment of freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells with bronchoconstrictor agonists, and in intact airways inhibition of Kv7 channels is sufficient to induce bronchiolar constriction. However, the mechanism by which Kv7 currents are inhibited by bronchoconstrictor agonists has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, native Kv7 currents in cultured human trachealis smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were observed to be inhibited upon treatment with histamine; inhibition of Kv7 currents was associated with membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt). The latter response was inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated as a mediator of bronchoconstrictor actions, though the targets of PKC are not clearly established. We found that histamine treatment significantly and dose-dependently suppressed currents through overexpressed wild-type human Kv7.5 (hKv7.5) channels in cultured HTSMCs, and this effect was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 (3 µM). The PKC-dependent suppression of hKv7.5 currents corresponded with a PKC-dependent increase in hKv7.5 channel phosphorylation. Knocking down or inhibiting PKCα, or mutating hKv7.5 serine 441 to alanine, abolished the inhibitory effects of histamine on hKv7.5 currents. These findings provide the first evidence linking PKC activation to suppression of Kv7 currents, membrane depolarization, and Ca2+ influx via L-type VSCCs as a mechanism for histamine-induced bronchoconstriction.

  19. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders.

  20. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  1. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  2. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of “force transmission pathways”; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior. PMID:24481961

  3. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Brook, Bindi S

    2014-04-15

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of "force transmission pathways"; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior.

  4. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Mediates Mucus Secretion in the Airway Submucosal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Yang, Yu-Mi; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Dong Min; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in airway epithelia and smooth muscle, plays an important role in airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that activation of PAR2 induces mucus secretion from the human airway gland and examined the underlying mechanism using the porcine and murine airway glands. The mucosa with underlying submucosal glands were dissected from the cartilage of tissues, pinned with the mucosal side up at the gas/bath solution interface of a physiological chamber, and covered with oil so that secretions from individual glands could be visualized as spherical bubbles in the oil. Secretion rates were determined by optical monitoring of the bubble diameter. The Ca2+-sensitive dye Fura2-AM was used to determine intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by means of spectrofluorometry. Stimulation of human tracheal mucosa with PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP) elevated intracellular Ca2+ and induced glandular secretion equal to approximately 30% of the carbachol response in the human airway. Porcine gland tissue was more sensitive to PAR2-AP, and this response was dependent on Ca2+ and anion secretion. When the mouse trachea were exposed to PAR2-AP, large amounts of secretion were observed in both wild type and ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant mice but there is no secretion from PAR-2 knock out mice. In conclusion, PAR2-AP is an agonist for mucus secretion from the airway gland that is Ca2+-dependent and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-independent. PMID:22916223

  5. Neutrophil-Derived Exosomes: A New Mechanism Contributing to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Amandine; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Droit, Arnaud; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils infiltrate the airways of patients with asthma of all severities, yet their role in the pathogenesis of asthma and their contribution to airway remodeling is largely unknown. We hypothesized that neutrophils modulate airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation in asthma by releasing bioactive exosomes. These newly discovered nano-sized vesicles have the capacity to modulate immune responses, cell migration, cell differentiation, and other aspects of cell-to-cell communication. The aim of the study is to determine whether bioactive exosomes are released by neutrophils, and, if so, characterize their proteomic profile and evaluate their capacity to modulate ASM cell proliferation. Exosomes were isolated from equine neutrophil supernatants by differential centrifugation and filtration methods, followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Nanovesicles were characterized using electron microscopy, particle size determination, and proteomic analyses. Exosomes were cocultured with ASM cells and analyzed for exosome internalization by confocal microscopy. ASM proliferation was measured using an impedance-based system. Neutrophils release exosomes that have characteristic size, morphology, and exosomal markers. We identified 271 proteins in exosomes from both LPS and unstimulated neutrophils, and 16 proteins that were differentially expressed, which carried proteins associated with immune response and positive regulation of cell communication. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived exosomes were rapidly internalized by ASM cells and altered their proliferative properties. Upon stimulation of LPS, neutrophil-derived exosomes can enhance the proliferation of ASM cells and could therefore play an important role in the progression of asthma and promoting airway remodeling in severe and corticosteroid-insensitive patients with asthma.

  6. Human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Erik P; Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Sun, Wenji; Luzina, Irina G; Webb, Tonya J; Atamas, Sergei P; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S; Puché, Adam C; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2014-05-01

    Sialic acids on glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in many biological processes. In the airways, sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids are strategically positioned on the plasma membranes of epithelia to regulate receptor-ligand, cell-cell, and host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. We now demonstrate, for the first time, sialidase activity for ganglioside substrates in human airway epithelia. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU3 has a substrate preference for gangliosides and is expressed at mRNA and protein levels at comparable abundance in epithelia derived from human trachea, bronchi, small airways, and alveoli. In small airway and alveolar epithelia, NEU3 protein was immunolocalized to the plasma membrane, cytosolic, and nuclear subcellular fractions. Small interfering RNA-induced silencing of NEU3 expression diminished sialidase activity for a ganglioside substrate by >70%. NEU3 immunostaining of intact human lung tissue could be localized to the superficial epithelia, including the ciliated brush border, as well as to nuclei. However, NEU3 was reduced in subepithelial tissues. These results indicate that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

  7. Mechanism regulating proasthmatic effects of prolonged homologous beta2-adrenergic receptor desensitization in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Hu, Aihua; Grunstein, Judith S; Grunstein, Michael M

    2009-10-01

    Use of long-acting beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) agonists to treat asthma incurs an increased risk of asthma morbidity with impaired bronchodilation and heightened bronchoconstriction, reflecting the adverse effects of prolonged homologous beta2AR desensitization on airway smooth muscle (ASM) function. Since phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) regulates ASM relaxation and contractility, we examined whether the changes in ASM function induced by prolonged homologous beta2AR desensitization are attributed to altered expression and action of PDE4. Cultured human ASM cells and isolated rabbit ASM tissues exposed for 24 h to the long-acting beta2AR agonist salmeterol exhibited impaired acute beta2AR-mediated cAMP accumulation and relaxation, respectively, together with ASM constrictor hyperresponsiveness. These proasthmatic-like changes in ASM function were associated with upregulated PDE4 activity due to enhanced expression of the PDE4D5 isoform and were prevented by pretreating the ASM preparations with the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram or with inhibitors of either PKA or ERK1/2 signaling. Extended studies using gene silencing and pharmacological approaches demonstrated that: 1) the mechanism underlying upregulated PDE4D5 expression following prolonged beta2AR agonist exposure involves PKA-dependent activation of G(i) protein signaling via its betagamma-subunits, which elicits downstream activation of ERK1/2 and its induction of PDE4D5 transcription; and 2) the induction of PDE4 activity and consequent changes in ASM responsiveness are prevented by pretreating the beta2AR agonist-exposed ASM preparations with inhibitors of G(i)-betagamma signaling. Collectively, these findings identify that the proasthmatic changes in ASM function resulting from prolonged homologous beta2AR desensitization are attributed to upregulated PDE4 expression induced by G(i)-betagamma-mediated cross-talk between the PKA and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

  8. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  9. Molecular cloning of magnesium-independent type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatases from airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tate, R J; Tolan, D; Pyne, S

    1999-07-01

    Members of the type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP2) family catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA), lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a Mg(2+)-independent and N-ethymaleimide-insensitive PAP2 activity in cultured guinea-pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Two PAP2 cDNAs of 923 and 926 base pairs were identified and subsequently cloned from these cells. The ORF of the 923 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 285 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa), which had 94% homology with human PAP2a (hPAP2a) and which probably represents a guinea-pig specific PAP2a (gpPAP2a1). The ORF of the 926 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 286 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa) which had 84% and 91% homology with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1, respectively. This protein, termed gpPAP2a2, has two regions (aa 21-33 and 51-74) of marked divergence and altered hydrophobicity compared with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1. This occurs in the predicted first and second transmembrane domains and at the extremes of the first outer loop. Other significant differences between gpPAP2a1/2 and hPAP2a, hPAP2b and hPAP2c occur at the cytoplasmic C-terminal. Transient expression of gpPAP2a2 in Cos-7 cells resulted in an approx. 4-fold increase in Mg(2+)-independent PAP activity, thereby confirming that gpPAP2a2 is another catalytically active member of an extended PAP2 family.

  10. Protective effect of high-dose montelukast on salbutamol-induced homologous desensitisation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Stefano; Stefanelli, Fabio; Martelli, Alma; Daniele, Simona; Testai, Lara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Montelukast (MK) is a potent cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor antagonist that causes dose-related improvements in chronic asthma. We sought to determine whether MK was able to prevent salbutamol-induced tolerance in airway smooth muscle. Homologous β2-adrenoceptor desensitisation models were established in guinea-pigs and in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) by chronic salbutamol administration. Characterisation tools included measurement of the response of tracheal smooth muscle tissues to salbutamol, analysis of gene expression and receptor trafficking, evaluation of intracellular cAMP levels and phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in human bronchial smooth muscle cells. Salbutamol-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitisation was characterised by β2-agonist hyporesponsiveness (-30%, p < 0.001) in desensitised tracheal smooth muscle, as compared to controls. MK, given intraperitoneally at 5 mg/kg/day for 6 consecutive days, completely restored tissue responsiveness to salbutamol. Prolonged salbutamol treatment significantly decreased cAMP synthesis, induced a complete removal of the β2-adrenoceptor from plasma membrane with a parallel increase in the cytosol and increased PDE4D5 gene transcription and PDE activity in human bronchial smooth muscle cells. In homologously desensitised BSMC, MK 30 μM for 24 h was able to prevent salbutamol subsensitivity and such an effect was associated with inhibition of salbutamol-induced PDE4 activity and restoration of membrane β2-adrenoceptor expression and function. These findings suggest the presence of a favourable interaction between MK and β2-adrenoceptor agonists that might improve the therapeutic index of bronchodilators in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  11. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma.

  12. Suppression of Eosinophil Integrins Prevents Remodeling of Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Januskevicius, Andrius; Gosens, Reinoud; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Vaitkiene, Simona; Janulaityte, Ieva; Halayko, Andrew J.; Hoppenot, Deimante; Malakauskas, Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is an important component of the structural changes to airways seen in asthma. Eosinophils are the prominent inflammatory cells in asthma, and there is some evidence that they contribute to ASM remodeling via released mediators and direct contact through integrin–ligand interactions. Eosinophils express several types of outer membrane integrin, which are responsible for cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. In our previous study we demonstrated that asthmatic eosinophils show increased adhesion to ASM cells and it may be important factor contributing to ASM remodeling in asthma. According to these findings, in the present study we investigated the effects of suppression of eosinophil integrin on eosinophil-induced ASM remodeling in asthma. Materials and Methods: Individual combined cell cultures of immortalized human ASM cells and eosinophils from peripheral blood of 22 asthmatic patients and 17 healthy controls were prepared. Eosinophil adhesion was evaluated using eosinophil peroxidase activity assay. Genes expression levels in ASM cells and eosinophils were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. ASM cell proliferation was measured using alamarBlue® solution. Eosinophil integrins were blocked by incubating with Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. Results: Eosinophils from the asthma group showed increased outer membrane α4β1 and αMβ2 integrin expression, increased adhesion to ASM cells, and overexpression of TGF-β1 compared with eosinophils from the healthy control group. Blockade of eosinophil RGD-binding integrins by Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide significantly reduced adhesion of eosinophils to ASM cells in both groups. Integrin-blocking decreased the effects of eosinophils on TGF-β1, WNT-5a, and extracellular matrix protein gene expression in ASM cells and ASM cell proliferation in both groups. These effects were more pronounced in the asthma group compared with the control group. Conclusion

  13. Calcineurin upregulates local Ca(2+) signaling through ryanodine receptor-1 in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Carlo P; Liu, Qing-Hua; Zheng, Yun-Min; Yadav, Vishal; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2014-11-15

    Local Ca(2+) signals (Ca(2+) sparks) play an important role in multiple cellular functions in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Protein kinase Cϵ is known to downregulate ASMC Ca(2+) sparks and contraction; however, no complementary phosphatase has been shown to produce opposite effects. Here, we for the first time report that treatment with a specific calcineurin (CaN) autoinhibitory peptide (CAIP) to block CaN activity decreases, whereas application of nickel to activate CaN increases, Ca(2+) sparks in both the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Treatment with xestospogin-C to eliminate functional inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors does not prevent CAIP from inhibiting local Ca(2+) signaling. However, high ryanodine treatment almost completely blocks spark formation and prevents the nickel-mediated increase in sparks. Unlike CAIP, the protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor endothall has no effect. Local Ca(2+) signaling is lower in CaN catalytic subunit Aα gene knockout (CaN-Aα(-/-)) mouse ASMCs. The effects of CAIP and nickel are completely lost in CaN-Aα(-/-) ASMCs. Neither CAIP nor nickel produces an effect on Ca(2+) sparks in type 1 ryanodine receptor heterozygous knockout (RyR1(-/+)) mouse ASMCs. However, their effects are not altered in RyR2(-/+) or RyR3(-/-) mouse ASMCs. CaN inhibition decreases methacholine-induced contraction in isolated RyR1(+/+) but not RyR1(-/+) mouse tracheal rings. Supportively, muscarinic contractile responses are also reduced in CaN-Aα(-/+) mouse tracheal rings. Taken together, these results provide novel evidence that CaN regulates ASMC Ca(2+) sparks specifically through RyR1, which plays an important role in the control of Ca(2+) signaling and contraction in ASMCs.

  14. Studying airway smooth muscle in vivo with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Villiger, Martin; Holz, Jasmin; Szabari, Margit V.; Bouma, Brett E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. We have developed novel techniques that we applied to Polarization Sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) in order to assess ASM, and validated our results with a substantial number of histological matches. In this work we employ our system in the study of ASM distributions in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways with data obtained in vivo from human volunteers. By isolating the ASM and performing volumetric analysis we obtain a variety of informative metrics such as ASM thickness and band width, and compare these quantities between subject types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the degree of birefringence of the ASM can be associated with contractility, allowing us to estimate pressure exerted by ASM during contraction. We apply this technique to in vivo datasets from human volunteers as well.

  15. On the terminology for describing the length-force relationship and its changes in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tony R; Bates, Jason H T; Brusasco, Vito; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Chitano, Pasquale; Deng, Lin Hong; Dowell, Maria; Fabry, Ben; Ford, Lincoln E; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Gerthoffer, William T; Gilbert, Susan H; Gunst, Susan J; Hai, Chi-Ming; Halayko, Andrew J; Hirst, Stuart J; James, Alan L; Janssen, Luke J; Jones, Keith A; King, Greg G; Lakser, Oren J; Lambert, Rodney K; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Meiss, Richard A; Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Mitchell, Howard W; Mitchell, Richard W; Mitzner, Wayne; Murphy, Thomas M; Paré, Peter D; Schellenberg, R Robert; Seow, Chun Y; Sieck, Gary C; Smith, Paul G; Smolensky, Alex V; Solway, Julian; Stephens, Newman L; Stewart, Alastair G; Tang, Dale D; Wang, Lu

    2004-12-01

    The observation that the length-force relationship in airway smooth muscle can be shifted along the length axis by accommodating the muscle at different lengths has stimulated great interest. In light of the recent understanding of the dynamic nature of length-force relationship, many of our concepts regarding smooth muscle mechanical properties, including the notion that the muscle possesses a unique optimal length that correlates to maximal force generation, are likely to be incorrect. To facilitate accurate and efficient communication among scientists interested in the function of airway smooth muscle, a revised and collectively accepted nomenclature describing the adaptive and dynamic nature of the length-force relationship will be invaluable. Setting aside the issue of underlying mechanism, the purpose of this article is to define terminology that will aid investigators in describing observed phenomena. In particular, we recommend that the term "optimal length" (or any other term implying a unique length that correlates with maximal force generation) for airway smooth muscle be avoided. Instead, the in situ length or an arbitrary but clearly defined reference length should be used. We propose the usage of "length adaptation" to describe the phenomenon whereby the length-force curve of a muscle shifts along the length axis due to accommodation of the muscle at different lengths. We also discuss frequently used terms that do not have commonly accepted definitions that should be used cautiously.

  16. Acute effects of Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure (EPAP) on different levels in ventilation and electrical activity of sternocleidomastoid and parasternal muscles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Dannuey M.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A. F.; Jost, Renan T.; Gass, Ricardo; Alberton, Cristine L.; Albuquerque, Isabella M.; Paiva, Dulciane N.; Barreto, Sérgio S. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the acute effects of EPAP on the activity of sternocleidomastoid (SCM), parasternal muscles and ventilatory parameters in COPD patients. Method Twenty-four patients with COPD were studied using surface electromyography (sEMG) and a ventilometer. Patients were randomly assigned to EPAP 10 cmH2O-EPAP10 or 15 cmH2O-EPAP15 for 20 minutes. Results The parasternal muscle sEMG activity increased during EPAP10 and EPAP15; however, a greater and significant increase was observed with EPAP10 (mean between-group difference: 12.5% RMS, 95% CI: 9.5 to 15.4, p<0.001). In relation to the baseline, at 10 and 20 minutes and upon recovery, respectively parasternal activity increased by 23.9%, 28.9% and 19.1% during EPAP10 and by 10.7% at 10 and 20 minutes and upon recovery, respectively, 11.4% and 6.9% during EPAP15 at 10 and 20 minutes and upon recovery, respectively. The sEMG activity of SCM muscle showed an opposite pattern, increasing with EPAP15 and decreasing with EPAP10 (mean between-group difference: 15.5% RMS, 95% CI: 12.6 to 18.4, p<0.001). SCM muscle activity during EPAP15, increased by 4.8% and 6.1% at 10 and 20 minutes and decreased by -4.0% upon recovery compared to decreases of –5.6%, –20.6% and –21.3% during EPAP10 at 10, 20 minutes, and recovery. Ventilation at both EPAP intensities promoted significant reductions in respiratory rate (RR) and dyspnea, more pronounced in EPAP15: RR (mean between-group difference: –3,8bpm, 95%CI: –7,5 to –0,2, p=0,015) and dyspnea (mean between-group difference: –1.01, 95%CI: –1.4 to –0.53, p=0.028) . Conclusion In COPD patients, the use of EPAP10 was more effective in reducing accessory inspiratory activity and increasing parasternal activity, which was accompanied by an improvement in ventilation and a reduction in dyspnea. PMID:27683840

  17. Airway smooth muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy correlate with glycogen synthase kinase-3(beta) phosphorylation in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Deng, Huan; Linn, Marisa J; Lei, Jing; Dokshin, Gregoriy A; Fingar, Diane C; Bitar, Khalil N; Henderson, William R; Hershenson, Marc B

    2009-02-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, a characteristic finding in asthma, may be caused by hyperplasia or hypertrophy. Cell growth requires increased translation of contractile apparatus mRNA, which is controlled, in part, by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta, a constitutively active kinase that inhibits eukaryotic initiation factor-2 activity and binding of methionyl tRNA to the ribosome. Phosphorylation of GSK-3beta inactivates it, enhancing translation. We sought to quantify the contributions of hyperplasia and hypertrophy to increased ASM mass in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged BALB/c mice and the role of GSK-3beta in this process. Immunofluorescent probes, confocal microscopy, and stereological methods were used to analyze the number and volume of cells expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin and phospho-Ser(9) GSK-3beta (pGSK). OVA treatment caused a 3-fold increase in ASM fractional unit volume or volume density (Vv) (PBS, 0.006 +/- 0.0003; OVA, 0.014 +/- 0.001), a 1.5-fold increase in ASM number per unit volume (Nv), and a 59% increase in volume per cell (Vv/Nv) (PBS, 824 +/- 76 microm(3); OVA, 1,310 +/- 183 mum(3)). In OVA-treated mice, there was a 12-fold increase in the Vv of pGSK (+) ASM, a 5-fold increase in the Nv of pGSK (+) ASM, and a 1.6-fold increase in Vv/Nv. Lung homogenates from OVA-treated mice showed increased GSK-3beta phosphorylation and lower GSK-3beta activity. Both hyperplasia and hypertrophy are responsible for increased ASM mass in OVA-treated mice. Phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3beta are associated with ASM hypertrophy, suggesting that this kinase may play a role in asthmatic airway remodeling.

  18. E-ring 8-isoprostanes are agonists at EP2- and EP4-prostanoid receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells and regulate the release of colony-stimulating factors by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Deborah L; Belvisi, Maria G; Hardaker, Elizabeth; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2005-02-01

    8-Isoprostanes are bioactive lipid mediators formed via the nonenzymatic peroxidation of arachidonic acid by free radicals and reactive oxygen species. However, their cognate receptors, biological actions, and signaling pathways are poorly studied. Here, we report the effect of a variety of E- and Falpha-ring 8-isoprostanes on the release of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) from human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The elaboration of GM-CSF and G-CSF by IL-1beta was inhibited and augmented, respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner by 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG) E(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2), but not by 8-iso-PGF(1alpha), 8-iso-PGF(2alpha), and 8-iso-PGF(3)alpha. AH 6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthine-2-carboxylic acid), an EP(1)-/EP(2)-/DP-receptor blocking drug, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2) on GM-CSF output with an affinity consistent with an interaction at prostanoid receptors of the EP(2)-subtype. In contrast, the facilitation by 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2) of G-CSF release was unaffected by AH 6809 and the selective EP(4)-receptor antagonist L-161,982 [4'-[3-butyl-5-oxo-1-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-1,5-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazol-4-ylmethyl]-biphenyl-2-sulfonic acid (3-methyl-thiophene-2-carbonyl)-amide]. However, when used in combination, AH 6809 and L-161,982 displaced 5-fold to the right the 8-iso-PGE and 8-iso-PGE concentration-response curves. The opposing (1)effect of E-ring (2)8-isoprostanes on GM-CSF and G-CSF release was mimicked by 8-bromo-cAMP and abolished in cells infected with an adenovirus vector encoding an inhibitor protein of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Together, these data demonstrate that E-ring 8-isoprostanes regulate the secretion of GM-CSF and G-CSF from HASM cells by a cAMP- and PKA-dependent mechanism. Moreover, antagonist studies revealed that 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2

  19. Length oscillation mimicking periodic individual deep inspirations during tidal breathing attenuates force recovery and adaptation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Raqeeb, Abdul; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) is able to generate maximal force under static conditions, and this isometric force can be maintained over a large length range due to length adaptation. The increased force at short muscle length could lead to excessive narrowing of the airways. Prolonged exposure of ASM to submaximal stimuli also increases the muscle's ability to generate force in a process called force adaptation. To date, the effects of length and force adaptation have only been demonstrated under static conditions. In the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung, ASM is constantly subjected to periodic stretches by the parenchyma due to tidal breathing and deep inspiration. It is not known whether force recovery due to muscle adaptation to a static environment could occur in a dynamic environment. In this study the effect of length oscillation mimicking tidal breathing and deep inspiration was examined. Force recovery after a length change was attenuated in the presence of length oscillation, except at very short lengths. Force adaptation was abolished by length oscillation. We conclude that in a healthy lung (with intact airway-parenchymal tethering) where airways are not allowed to narrow excessively, large stretches (associated with deep inspiration) may prevent the ability of the muscle to generate maximal force that would occur under static conditions irrespective of changes in mean length; mechanical perturbation on ASM due to tidal breathing and deep inspiration, therefore, is the first line of defense against excessive bronchoconstriction that may result from static length and force adaptation.

  20. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the Modulation of Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Calcium Handling.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Gene T; Chen, Jun; Choi, Christine H; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Dingbang; Fu, Xiao Wen; Sanderson, Michael J; Emala, Charles W

    2017-03-23

    Asthma is a common disorder characterized, in part, by airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed on airway nerve fibers that modulates afferent signals resulting in cough, and potentially bronchoconstriction. In the present study, the TRPV1 transcript was detected by RT-PCR in primary cultured human ASM cells, and the TRPV1 protein was detected in ASM of human trachea by immunohistochemistry. Proximity ligation assays suggest that TRPV1 is expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of human ASM cells in close association with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2. In guinea pig tracheal ring organ bath experiments, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin led to ASM contraction, but this contraction was significantly attenuated by the sodium-channel inhibitor bupivicaine (N=4, p<0.05) and the NK-2 receptor antagonist GR 159897 (N=4, p<0.05), suggesting that this contraction is neurally-mediated. However, pretreatment of guinea pig and human ASM in organ bath experiments with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine inhibited the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine-induced contraction (N=4, p<0.01 for both species). Similarly, capsazepine inhibited methacholine-induced contraction of peripheral airways in mouse precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) experiments (N=4-5, p<0.05). Although capsazepine did not inhibit store-operated calicum entry in mouse ASM cells in PCLS (N=4-7, p=NS), it did inhibit calcium oscillations (N=3, p<0.001). These studies suggest that TRPV1 is expressed on ASM, including the SR, but that ASM TRPV1 activation does not play a significant role in initiation of ASM contraction. However, capsazepine does inhibit maintenance of contraction, likely by inhibiting calcium oscillation.

  1. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  2. Laryngeal mask airway without muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    KONG, MING; LI, BEIPING; TIAN, YUNPING

    2016-01-01

    The number of elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement surgeries is on the increase. These patients often suffer from comorbidity such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications, which limits the ability of medical teams to employ anesthesia. Thus, alternative methods are required. The aim of this study was to examine the advantage of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the absence of muscle relaxant in elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement operations. Fifty patients (27 males and 23 females) undergoing femoral head replacements were selected for the study between March 2013 and May 2014. The mean value for the age in this group was 74.6±12.5 years. The patients were randomly distributed into two groups of 25. One group was designated as the treatment group and the second group as the control group. For the treatment group, LMA without muscle relaxant was used, and the control group received routine anesthesia. Variations in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SPO2) in the two groups were monitored at different times. Clinical efficacy and muscle relaxation effects were also analyzed. For the treatment group, the HR, MAP and SPO2 measurements did not reveal any significant variation while these values in the control group demonstrated important dissimilarities. Time to recovery, time to extubation and incidence of throat pain in the treatment group were all markedly decreased as compared to those in control group. The operation time in the treatment group was not significantly different to that of control group. The satisfaction of the muscle relaxation effect in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group while the incidence of adverse reactions was not considerably different. In conclusion, the use of LMA without using muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement surgeries performed on elderly patients showed to be effective and safe. PMID:26889218

  3. Birefringence Microscopy Platform for Assessing Airway Smooth Muscle Structure and Function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Wang, Yan; Cho, Josalyn L.; Villiger, Martin; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Harris, R. Scott; Griffith, Jason W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2017-01-01

    The inability to visualize airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in vivo is a major obstacle in understanding their role in normal physiology and diseases. At present, there is no imaging modality available to assess ASM in vivo. Confocal endomicroscopy lacks the penetration depth and field of view, and conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) does not have sufficient contrast to differentiate ASM from surrounding tissues. We have developed a birefringence microscopy platform which leverages the micro-organization of tissue to add further dimension to traditional OCT. We have utilized this technology to validate ASM measurements in ex vivo swine and canine studies, visualize and characterize volumetric representations of ASM in vivo, and to quantify and predict ASM contractile force as a function of optical retardation. We provide in vivo images and volumetric assessments of ASM in living humans and document structural disease variations in subjects with mild asthma. The opportunity to link inflammatory responses to ASM responses, and to link ASM responses to clinical responses and outcomes could lead to an increased understanding of diseases of the airway and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. PMID:27708064

  4. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD.

  5. Baicalin inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Li, Jian-Qiang; Bo, Jian-Ping; Wang, Bei; Tian, Xin-Rui; Liu, Tan-Zhen; Liu, Zhuo-La

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and migration play important roles in airway remodeling in asthma. In vitro platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) induced ASM cell proliferation and migration. Baicalin is one of flavonoid extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis, which has an anti-asthma effect. However, little is known about its role in PDGF-induced proliferation and migration in rat ASM (RASM) cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration. We also identified the signaling pathway by which baicalin influences RASM cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we demonstrated that baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation, arrested PDGF-induced cell-cycle progression. It also suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell migration. Furthermore, baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced expression of phosphorylated p38, ERK1/2 and JNK in RASM cells. In summary, our study is the first to show that baicalin pretreatment can significantly inhibit PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration by suppressing the MAPK signaling pathway, and baicalin may be a useful chemotherapeutic agent for asthma.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 and microRNA-155 expression are elevated in asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Comer, Brian S; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Kogut, Paul C; Halayko, Andrew J; Solway, Julian; Gerthoffer, William T

    2015-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and PGE2 secretion from human airway smooth muscle cells (hASMCs) may contribute to β2-adrenoceptor hyporesponsiveness, a clinical feature observed in some patients with asthma. hASMCs from patients with asthma exhibit elevated expression of cytokine-responsive genes, and in some instances this is attributable to an altered histone code and/or microRNA expression. We hypothesized that COX-2 expression and PGE2 secretion might be elevated in asthmatic hASMCs in response to proinflammatory signals in part due to altered histone acetylation and/or microRNA expression. hASMCs obtained from nonasthmatic and asthmatic human subjects were treated with cytomix (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). A greater elevation of COX-2 mRNA, COX-2 protein, and PGE2 secretion was observed in the asthmatic cells. We investigated histone H3/H4-acetylation, transcription factor binding, mRNA stability, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and microRNA (miR)-155 expression as potential mechanisms responsible for the differential elevation of COX-2 expression. We found that histone H3/H4-acetylation and transcription factor binding to the COX-2 promoter were similar in both groups, and histone H3/H4-acetylation did not increase after cytomix treatment. Cytomix treatment elevated NF-κB and RNA polymerase II binding to similar levels in both groups. COX-2 mRNA stability was increased in asthmatic cells. MiR-155 expression was higher in cytomix-treated asthmatic cells, and we show it enhances COX-2 expression and PGE2 secretion in asthmatic and nonasthmatic hASMCs. Thus, miR-155 expression positively correlates with COX-2 expression in the asthmatic hASMCs and may contribute to the elevated expression observed in these cells. These findings may explain, at least in part, β2-adrenoceptor hyporesponsiveness in patients with asthma.

  7. Mechanism of glucocorticoid protection of airway smooth muscle from proasthmatic effects of long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Hu, Aihua.; Grunstein, Judith S.; Grunstein, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic use of long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists (LABAs), resulting in β2AR desensitization, has been associated with increased asthma morbidity. When LABAs are used in combination with inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs), however, asthma control is improved, raising the question: Do GCs inhibit the proasthmatic mechanism that mediates altered contractility in LABA-exposed airway smooth muscle (ASM)? Objective This study aimed to identify the potential protective role and mechanism of action of GCs in mitigating the effects of prolonged LABA exposure on ASM constrictor and relaxation responsiveness. Methods Cultured human ASM (HASM) cells and isolated rabbit ASM tissues were examined for induced changes in agonist-mediated cAMP accumulation, constrictor and relaxation responsiveness, and expression of specific GC-regulated molecules following 24h exposure to the LABA, salmeterol, in the absence and presence of dexamethasone (DEX). Results Salmeterol-exposed ASM exhibited impaired cAMP and relaxation responses to isoproterenol and increased acetylcholine-induced contractility. These pro-asthmatic effects of prolonged LABA exposure were attributed to upregulated phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) activity, and ablated by pretreatment with DEX. Further studies demonstrated that: 1) DEX suppressed activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2, which upregulates PDE4 expression in salmeterol-exposed ASM; and 2) the inhibitory actions of DEX on salmeterol-induced ERK1/2 activation and resultant PDE4-mediated changes in ASM responsiveness were prevented by gene silencing or pharmacological inhibition of DEX-induced expression of MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), an endogenous deactivator of ERK1/2 signaling. Conclusion GCs prevent the adverse proasthmatic effects of prolonged LABA exposure on airway responsiveness due to GC-induced upregulation of MKP-1, which inhibits proasthmatic ERK1/2 signaling in the LABA-exposed ASM. PMID:20392484

  8. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-06

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases.

  9. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF-β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Shaw, Nicole C; Berry, Luke J; Hart, Prue H; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D-deficient or -replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five-micron sections from formalin-fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D-deficient and -replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF-β signaling pathway molecules. Eight-week-old adult vitamin D-deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D-deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D-deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF-β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D-deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D-deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D-deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease.

  11. CD4+ T cells enhance the unloaded shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle by altering the contractile protein expression.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Nakada, Emily M; Kachmar, Linda; Fixman, Elizabeth D; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-07-15

    Abundant data indicate that pathogenesis in allergic airways disease is orchestrated by an aberrant T-helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response. CD4(+) T cells have been localized to airway smooth muscle (ASM) in both human asthmatics and in rodent models of allergic airways disease, where they have been implicated in proliferative responses of ASM. Whether CD4(+) T cells also alter ASM contractility has not been addressed. We established an in vitro system to assess the ability of antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells to modify contractile responses of the Brown Norway rat trachealis muscle. Our data demonstrated that the unloaded velocity of shortening (Vmax) of ASM was significantly increased upon 24 h co-incubation with antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells, while stress did not change. Enhanced Vmax was dependent upon contact between the CD4(+) T cells and the ASM and correlated with increased levels of the fast (+)insert smooth muscle myosin heavy chain isoform. The levels of myosin light chain kinase and myosin light chain phosphorylation were also increased within the muscle. The alterations in mechanics and in the levels of contractile proteins were transient, both declining to control levels after 48 h of co-incubation. More permanent alterations in muscle phenotype might be attainable when several inflammatory cells and mediators interact together or after repeated antigenic challenges. Further studies will await new tissue culture methodologies that preserve the muscle properties over longer periods of time. In conclusion, our data suggest that inflammatory cells promote ASM hypercontractility in airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma.

  12. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 moderates airway re-epithelialization by regulating matrilysin activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter; McGuire, John K; Hackman, Robert C; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Black, Roy A; Poindexter, Kurt; Yan, Wei; Liu, Phillip; Chen, Ann J; Parks, William C; Madtes, David K

    2008-05-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is the histopathological finding in chronic lung allograft rejection. Mounting evidence suggests that epithelial damage drives the development of airway fibrosis in OB. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression increases in lung allografts and is associated with the onset of allograft rejection. Furthermore, in a mouse model of OB, airway obliteration is reduced in TIMP-1-deficient mice. Matrilysin (matrix metallproteinase-7) is essential for airway epithelial repair and is required for the re-epithelialization of airway wounds by facilitating cell migration; therefore, the goal of this study was to determine whether TIMP-1 inhibits re-epithelialization through matrilysin. We found that TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in the epithelium of human lungs with OB and both co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated in wounded primary airway epithelial cultures. TIMP-1-deficient cultures migrated faster, and epithelial cells spread to a greater extent compared with wild-type cultures. TIMP-1 also inhibited matrilysin-mediated cell migration and spreading in vitro. In vivo, TIMP-1 deficiency enhanced airway re-epithelialization after naphthalene injury. Furthermore, TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in airway epithelial cells adjacent to the wound edge. Our data demonstrate that TIMP-1 interacts with matrix metalloproteinases and regulates matrilysin activity during airway epithelial repair. Furthermore, we speculate that TIMP-1 overexpression restricts airway re-epithelialization by inhibiting matrilysin activity, contributing to a stereotypic injury response that promotes airway fibrosis via bronchiole airway epithelial damage and obliteration.

  13. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Moderates Airway Re-Epithelialization by Regulating Matrilysin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peter; McGuire, John K.; Hackman, Robert C.; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Black, Roy A.; Poindexter, Kurt; Yan, Wei; Liu, Phillip; Chen, Ann J.; Parks, William C.; Madtes, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is the histopathological finding in chronic lung allograft rejection. Mounting evidence suggests that epithelial damage drives the development of airway fibrosis in OB. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression increases in lung allografts and is associated with the onset of allograft rejection. Furthermore, in a mouse model of OB, airway obliteration is reduced in TIMP-1-deficient mice. Matrilysin (matrix metallproteinase-7) is essential for airway epithelial repair and is required for the re-epithelialization of airway wounds by facilitating cell migration; therefore, the goal of this study was to determine whether TIMP-1 inhibits re-epithelialization through matrilysin. We found that TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in the epithelium of human lungs with OB and both co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated in wounded primary airway epithelial cultures. TIMP-1-deficient cultures migrated faster, and epithelial cells spread to a greater extent compared with wild-type cultures. TIMP-1 also inhibited matrilysin-mediated cell migration and spreading in vitro. In vivo, TIMP-1 deficiency enhanced airway re-epithelialization after naphthalene injury. Furthermore, TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in airway epithelial cells adjacent to the wound edge. Our data demonstrate that TIMP-1 interacts with matrix metalloproteinases and regulates matrilysin activity during airway epithelial repair. Furthermore, we speculate that TIMP-1 overexpression restricts airway re-epithelialization by inhibiting matrilysin activity, contributing to a stereotypic injury response that promotes airway fibrosis via bronchiole airway epithelial damage and obliteration. PMID:18385523

  14. Time course of isotonic shortening and the underlying contraction mechanism in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Syyong, Harley T; Raqeeb, Abdul; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2011-09-01

    Although the structure of the contractile unit in smooth muscle is poorly understood, some of the mechanical properties of the muscle suggest that a sliding-filament mechanism, similar to that in striated muscle, is also operative in smooth muscle. To test the applicability of this mechanism to smooth muscle function, we have constructed a mathematical model based on a hypothetical structure of the smooth muscle contractile unit: a side-polar myosin filament sandwiched by actin filaments, each attached to the equivalent of a Z disk. Model prediction of isotonic shortening as a function of time was compared with data from experiments using ovine tracheal smooth muscle. After equilibration and establishment of in situ length, the muscle was stimulated with ACh (100 μM) until force reached a plateau. The muscle was then allowed to shorten isotonically against various loads. From the experimental records, length-force and force-velocity relationships were obtained. Integration of the hyperbolic force-velocity relationship and the linear length-force relationship yielded an exponential function that approximated the time course of isotonic shortening generated by the modeled sliding-filament mechanism. However, to obtain an accurate fit, it was necessary to incorporate a viscoelastic element in series with the sliding-filament mechanism. The results suggest that a large portion of the shortening is due to filament sliding associated with muscle activation and that a small portion is due to continued deformation associated with an element that shows viscoelastic or power-law creep after a step change in force.

  15. Development and characterization of a 3D multicell microtissue culture model of airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Nishat; Cole, Darren J.; Walker, Matthew J.; Legant, Wesley R.; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher S.; Favreau, John T.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Cowley, Elizabeth A.; Maksym, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cellular and molecular biology is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on flat 2D substrates. However, cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures, and it is well established in other cell types that altering substrate geometry exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall, and highlights a need for more physiologically relevant models of ASM function. We utilized a tissue engineering platform known as microfabricated tissue gauges to develop a 3D culture model of ASM featuring arrays of ∼0.4 mm long, ∼350 cell “microtissues” capable of simultaneous contractile force measurement and cell-level microscopy. ASM-only microtissues generated baseline tension, exhibited strong cellular organization, and developed actin stress fibers, but lost structural integrity and dissociated from the cantilevers within 3 days. Addition of 3T3-fibroblasts dramatically improved survival times without affecting tension development or morphology. ASM-3T3 microtissues contracted similarly to ex vivo ASM, exhibiting reproducible responses to a range of contractile and relaxant agents. Compared with 2D cultures, microtissues demonstrated identical responses to acetylcholine and KCl, but not histamine, forskolin, or cytochalasin D, suggesting that contractility is regulated by substrate geometry. Microtissues represent a novel model for studying ASM, incorporating a physiological 3D structure, realistic mechanical environment, coculture of multiple cells types, and comparable contractile properties to existing models. This new model allows for rapid screening of biochemical and mechanical factors to provide insight into ASM dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23125251

  16. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  17. Perturbed equilibria of myosin binding in airway smooth muscle: bond-length distributions, mechanics, and ATP metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mijailovich, S M; Butler, J P; Fredberg, J J

    2000-01-01

    We carried out a detailed mathematical analysis of the effects of length fluctuations on the dynamically evolving cross-bridge distributions, simulating those that occur in airway smooth muscle during breathing. We used the latch regulation scheme of Hai and Murphy (Am. J. Physiol. Cell Physiol. 255:C86-C94, 1988) integrated with Huxley's sliding filament theory of muscle contraction. This analysis showed that imposed length fluctuations decrease the mean number of attached bridges, depress muscle force and stiffness, and increase force-length hysteresis. At frequencies >0.1 Hz, the bond-length distribution of slowly cycling latch bridges changed little over the stretch cycle and contributed almost elastically to muscle force, but the rapidly cycling cross-bridge distribution changed substantially and dominated the hysteresis. By contrast, at frequencies <0.033 Hz this behavior was reversed: the rapid cycling cross-bridge distribution changed little, effectively functioning as a constant force generator, while the latch bridge bond distribution changed substantially and dominated the stiffness and hysteresis. The analysis showed the dissociation of force/length hysteresis and cross-bridge cycling rates when strain amplitude exceeds 3%; that is, there is only a weak coupling between net external mechanical work and the ATP consumption required for cycling cross-bridges during the oscillatory steady state. Although these results are specific to airway smooth muscle, the approach generalizes to other smooth muscles subjected to cyclic length fluctuations. PMID:11053139

  18. The Expression of NOX4 in Smooth Muscles of Small Airway Correlates with the Disease Severity of COPD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is a hallmark in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in COPD pathogenesis. In the present study, the expression of NOX4 and its correlation with the ASM hypertrophy/hyperplasia, clinical pulmonary functions, and the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the ASM of COPD small airways were investigated by semiquantitative morphological and/or immunohistochemistry staining methods. The results showed that an elevated expression of NOX4 and TGF-β, along with an increased volume of ASM mass, was found in the ASM of small airways in COPD patients. The abundance of NOX4 protein in the ASM was increased with disease severity and inversely correlated with the pulmonary functions in COPD patients. In addition, the expression of NOX4 and ASM marker α-SMA was colocalized, and the increased NOX4 expression was found to accompany an upregulated expression of TGF-β in the ASM of small airways of COPD lung. These results indicate that NOX4 may be a key regulator in ASM remodeling of small airway, in part through a mechanism interacting with TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of COPD, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27656649

  19. Exploiting the relationship between birefringence and force to measure airway smooth muscle contraction with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to observe airway dynamics is fundamental to forming a complete understanding of pulmonary diseases such as asthma. We have previously demonstrated that Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used to observe structural changes in the airway during bronchoconstriction, but standard OCT lacks the contrast to discriminate airway smooth muscle (ASM) bands- ASM being responsible for generating the force that drives airway constriction- from the surrounding tissue. Since ASM in general exhibits a greater degree of birefringence than the surrounding tissue, a potential solution to this problem lies in the implementation of polarization sensitivity (PS) to the OCT system. By modifying the OCT system so that it is sensitive to the birefringence of tissue under inspection, we can visualize the ASM with much greater clarity and definition. In this presentation we show that the force of contraction can be indirectly measured by an associated increase in the birefringence signal of the ASM. We validate this approach by attaching segments of swine trachea to an isometric force transducer and stimulating contraction, while simultaneously measuring the exerted force and imaging the segment with PS-OCT. We then show how our results may be used to extrapolate the force of contraction of closed airways in absence of additional measurement devices. We apply this technique to assess ASM contractility volumetrically and in vivo, in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers.

  20. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID

  1. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  2. Prenatal Exposure to Respiratory Syncytial Virus Alters Postnatal Immunity and Airway Smooth Muscle Contractility during Early-Life Reinfections

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Terri J.; Agrawal, Vandana; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Rezaee, Fariba; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Maternal viral infections can have pathological effects on the developing fetus which last long after birth. Recently, maternal-fetal transmission of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was shown to cause postnatal airway hyperreactivity (AHR) during primary early-life reinfection; however, the influence of prenatal exposure to RSV on offspring airway immunity and smooth muscle contractility during recurrent postnatal reinfections remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine whether maternal RSV infection impairs specific aspects of cell-mediated offspring immunity during early-life reinfections and the mechanisms leading to AHR. Red fluorescent protein-expressing recombinant RSV (rrRSV) was inoculated into pregnant rat dams at midterm, followed by primary and secondary postnatal rrRSV inoculations of their offspring at early-life time points. Pups and weanlings were tested for specific lower airway leukocyte populations by flow cytometry; serum cytokine/chemokine concentrations by multiplex ELISA and neurotrophins concentrations by standard ELISA; and ex vivo lower airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction by physiological tissue bath. Pups born to RSV-infected mothers displayed elevated total CD3+ T cells largely lacking CD4+ and CD8+ surface expression after both primary and secondary postnatal rrRSV infection. Cytokine/chemokine analyses revealed reduced IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12, IL-17A, IL-18, and TNF-α, as well as elevated nerve growth factor (NGF) expression. Prenatal exposure to RSV also increased ASM reactivity and contractility during early-life rrRSV infection compared to non-exposed controls. We conclude that maternal RSV infection can predispose offspring to postnatal lower airways dysfunction by altering immunity development, NGF signaling, and ASM contraction during early-life RSV reinfections. PMID:28178290

  3. Exogenous S100A8 protein inhibits PDGF-induced migration of airway smooth muscle cells in a RAGE-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Dong; Wei, Ying; Wang, Yu; Yin, Lei-Miao; Park, Gyoung-Hee; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2016-03-25

    S100A8 is an important member of the S100 protein family, which is involved in intracellular and extracellular regulatory activities. We previously reported that the S100A8 protein was differentially expressed in the asthmatic respiratory tracts. To understand the potential role of S100A8 in asthma, we investigated the effect of recombinant S100A8 protein on the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism by using multiple methods, such as impedance-based xCELLigence migration assay, transwell migration assays and wound-healing assays. We found that exogenous S100A8 protein significantly inhibited PDGF-induced ASMC migration. Furthermore, the migration inhibition effect of S100A8 was blocked by neutralizing antibody against the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), a potential receptor for the S100A8 protein. These findings provide direct evidence that exogenous S100A8 protein inhibits the PDGF-induced migration of ASMCs through the membrane receptor RAGE. Our study highlights a novel role of S100A8 as a potential means of counteracting airway remodeling in chronic airway diseases.

  4. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2−), both absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicated formation of a new metabolite with features expected for the nitrated drug. The new metabolites showed an absorption maximum at 410 nm and pKa of 6.6 of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In addition to nitrosalbutamol (m/z 285.14), a salbutamol-derived nitrophenol, formed by elimination of the formaldehyde group, was detected (m/z 255.13) by mass spectrometry. It is noteworthy that the latter metabolite was detected in exhaled breath condensates of asthma patients receiving salbutamol but not in unexposed control subjects, indicating the potential for β2-agonist nitration to occur in the inflamed airway in vivo. Salbutamol nitration was inhibited in vitro by ascorbate, thiocyanate, and the pharmacological agents methimazole and dapsone. The efficacy of inhibition depended on the nitrating system, with the lactoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− being the most affected. Functionally, nitrated salbutamol showed decreased affinity for β2-adrenergic receptors and impaired cAMP synthesis in airway smooth muscle cells compared with the native drug. These results suggest that under inflammatory conditions associated with asthma, phenolic β2-agonists may be subject to peroxidase-catalyzed nitration that could potentially diminish their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20974700

  5. Relaxation of soman-induced contracture of airway smooth muscle in vitro. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Moore, D.H.; Adler, M.

    1992-12-31

    A possible role for beta-adrenergic agonists in the management of bronchoconstriction resulting from exposure to anticholinesterase compounds was investigated in vitro in canine tracheal smooth muscle. Norepinephrine, salbutamol and isoproterenol produced partial relaxation of soman-induced contractures. However, the relaxation induced was not sustained; muscle tensions returned to pretreatment levels within minutes despite the continued presence of beta-agonists. Increasing cAMP levels with the non beta-agonist bronchodilators such as thoophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or forskolin, a specific stimulator of adenylate cyclase, resulted in more complete and longer lasting relaxation, suggesting that beta-adrenoceptor desensitization may contribute to the failure by beta-agonists to produce sustained relaxation. Nerve agents, Soman, Toxicity, Airway smooth muscle, In vitro, Physiology, Effects.

  6. Airway smooth muscle relaxant effects of the cocaine pyrolysis product, methylecgonidine.

    PubMed

    el-Fawal, H A; Wood, R W

    1995-03-01

    Methylecgonidine (anhydroecgonine methylester; MEG) is produced when cocaine base ("crack") is heated. Since crack smoking can produce significant airway toxicity and the role of MEG in this toxicity is unknown, we determined the effects of MEG on guinea pig isolated tracheal rings. Trachea do not contract in response to MEG; rather, MEG (10(-9) to 10(-3) M) dose-dependently relaxed tissue precontracted with 2 x 10(-3) M acetylcholine (ACh). MEG (10(-9) to 10(-6) M) reduced the magnitude of contractions induced by ACh, carbachol, histamine and KCl in a nonsurmountable manner; the maximal response to these agents was not restored after repeated washing. MEG did not affect contractions induced by BaCl2. 4-Diphenyl acetoxymethyl piperidine methiodide (4-DAMP; 10(-7) M), in the presence or absence of MEG (10(-7) M), shifted the dose-effect curve for ACh 30-fold to the right. After washing, sensitivity to ACh was fully recovered in tissues exposed to 4-DAMP alone, but was still reduced to 50% of control in tissues exposed to 4-DAMP and MEG. The effects of MEG were unlike those of cocaine which, at 10(-7) to 10(-5) M, increased the magnitude of contractions induced by ACh (10(-9) to 2 x 10(-3) M); MEG (10(-7) M) abolished this increase. The mechanism by which MEG relaxes tracheal smooth muscle has not been established, but it is likely to be independent of direct interaction with sites that mediate the effects of the bronchoconstrictor agents used in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Involvement of cysteinyl leukotrienes in airway smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis after repeated allergen exposure in sensitized Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Michael; Walsh, David A; Huang, Tung-Jung; Barnes, Peter J; Leonard, Thomas B; Hay, Douglas W P; Chung, K Fan

    1999-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle thickening is a characteristic feature of airway wall remodelling in chronic asthma. We have investigated the role of the leukotrienes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and epithelial cell DNA synthesis and ASM thickening following repeated allergen exposure in Brown Norway rats sensitized to ovalbumin. There was a 3 fold increase in ASM cell DNA synthesis, as measured by percentage bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, in repeatedly ovalbumin-exposed (4.1%, 3.6–4.6; mean, 95% c.i.) compared to chronically saline-exposed rats (1.3%, 0.6–2.1; P<0.001). Treatment with a 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor (SB 210661, 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) and a specific cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT1) receptor antagonist, pranlukast (SB 205312, 30 mg kg−1, p.o.), both attenuated ASM cell DNA synthesis. Treatment with a specific leukotriene B4 (BLT) receptor antagonist (SB 201146, 15 mg kg−1, p.o.) had no effect. There was also a significant, 2 fold increase in the number of epithelial cells incorporating BrdU per unit length of basement membrane after repeated allergen exposure. This response was not inhibited by treatment with SB 210661, pranlukast or SB 201146. A significant increase in ASM thickness was identified following repeated allergen exposure and this response was attenuated significantly by SB 210661, pranlukast and SB 201146. Rats exposed to chronic allergen exhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine and had significant eosinophil recruitment into the lungs. Treatment with SB 210661, pranlukast or SB 201146 significantly attenuated eosinophil recruitment into the lungs, whilst having no significant effect on airway hyperresponsiveness. These data indicate that the cysteinyl leukotrienes are important mediators in allergen-induced ASM cell DNA synthesis in rats, while both LTB4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes contribute to ASM thickening and eosinophil recruitment following repeated allergen exposure. PMID:10455261

  8. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway.

  9. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  10. YAP is up-regulated in the bronchial airway smooth muscle of the chronic asthma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Jing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by leukocytic infiltration and tissue remodeling with structural changes including subepithelial fibrosis and ASM cells proliferation. The Hippo pathway is a key regulatory point involved in cell proliferation, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cell differentiation. In order to disclose the relation between asthma and the Hippo pathway, expression of the Yes-associated protein (YAP), a key gene in the Hippo pathway, in the bronchial smooth muscle of chronic asthma model (CAM) was studied. 40 mice were randomly divided into control (wide type) and experimental group to construct CAM using chicken ovalbumin (OVA). Pathological changes of the lung tissues were observed in the CAM mice compared with the control using HE staining method. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect if YAP protein is expressed in the lung tissues. The pathological changes of the CAM group showed that a large number of inflammatory cells infiltration including mainly lymphocytes and a small amount of eosinophilic, with the presence of certain airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, was observed in comparison with the control. IHC results showed that the YAP protein was significantly increased compared with the control groups (P < 0.01). This result was further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay which detected the up-regulation of the YAP gene (P < 0.01) and Western blot. In conclusion, the YAP protein was significantly expressed in the bronchial airway tissues of the CAM mice, and could be used as an indicator for asthma. PMID:26617833

  11. Arginine Vasopressin Alters Both Spontaneous and Phase-Locked Synaptic Inputs to Airway Vagal Preganglionic Neuron via Activation of V1a Receptor: Insights into Stress-Related Airway Vagal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xianxia; Chen, Xingxin; Guo, Yuhong; He, Ding; Chen, Yonghua; Xia, Chunmei; Wang, Jijiang

    2017-01-01

    The airway vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus (eNA) play a major role in the vagal control of tracheobronchial smooth muscle tone and maintenance of airway resistance. The eNA receives vasopressinergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the key node for the genesis of psychological stress. Since airway vagal excitation is reportedly to be associated with the psychological stress-induced/exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatics, arginine vasopressin (AVP) might be involved in stress-related airway vagal excitation. However, this possibility has not been validated. This study aimed to test whether and how AVP regulates AVPNs. In rhythmically active medullary slices of newborn rats, retrogradely labeled AVPNs were identified as inspiratory-activated and inspiratory-inhibited AVPNs (IA- and II-AVPNs) using patch-clamp techniques according to their inspiratory-related firing behavior and synaptic activities. The results show that under current clamp, AVP depolarized both IA- and II-AVPNs, and significantly increased their spontaneous firing rate. Under voltage clamp, AVP elicited a slow inward current, and significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in both types of AVPNs. In addition, AVP significantly enhanced the phase-locked excitatory inspiratory inward current in inspiratory-activated airway vagal preganglionic neurons (IA-AVPNs), but significantly suppressed the phase-locked inhibitory inspiratory outward current in II-AVPNs. In both types AVPNs, AVP significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of pharmacologically isolated spontaneous GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). All of the AVP-induced effects were prevented by SR49059, an antagonist of V1a receptors, but unaffected by SSR149415, an antagonist of V1b receptors. AVP did not cause significant changes in the miniature excitatory

  12. Characterising the mechanism of airway smooth muscle β2 adrenoceptor desensitization by rhinovirus infected bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Van Ly, David; Faiz, Alen; Jenkins, Christine; Crossett, Ben; Black, Judith L; McParland, Brent; Burgess, Janette K; Oliver, Brian G G

    2013-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) infections account for approximately two thirds of all virus-induced asthma exacerbations and often result in an impaired response to β2 agonist therapy. Using an in vitro model of RV infection, we investigated the mechanisms underlying RV-induced β2 adrenoceptor desensitization in primary human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). RV infection of primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) for 24 hours produced conditioned medium that caused β2 adrenoceptor desensitization on ASMCs without an effect on ASMCs viability. Less than 3 kDa size fractionation together with trypsin digestion of RV-induced conditioned medium did not prevent β2 adrenoceptor desensitization, suggesting it could potentially be mediated by a small peptide or lipid. RV infection of BECs, ASMCs and fibroblasts produced prostaglandins, of which PGE2, PGF2α and PGI2 had the ability to cause β2 adrenoceptor desensitization on ASMCs. RV-induced conditioned medium from HBECs depleted of PGE2 did not prevent ASMC β2 adrenoceptor desensitization; however this medium induced PGE2 from ASMCs, suggesting that autocrine prostaglandin production may be responsible. Using inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and prostaglandin receptor antagonists, we found that β2 adrenoceptor desensitization was mediated through ASMC derived COX-2 induced prostaglandins. Since ASMC prostaglandin production is unlikely to be caused by RV-induced epithelial derived proteins or lipids we next investigated activation of toll-like receptors (TLR) by viral RNA. The combination of TLR agonists poly I:C and imiquimod induced PGE2 and β2 adrenoceptor desensitization on ASMC as did the RNA extracted from RV-induced conditioned medium. Viral RNA but not epithelial RNA caused β2 adrenoceptor desensitization confirming that viral RNA and not endogenous human RNA was responsible. It was deduced that the mechanism by which β2 adrenoceptor desensitization occurs was by pattern recognition receptor activation of COX-2

  13. Characterising the Mechanism of Airway Smooth Muscle β2 Adrenoceptor Desensitization by Rhinovirus Infected Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Ly, David; Faiz, Alen; Jenkins, Christine; Crossett, Ben; Black, Judith L.; McParland, Brent; Burgess, Janette K.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2013-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) infections account for approximately two thirds of all virus-induced asthma exacerbations and often result in an impaired response to β2 agonist therapy. Using an in vitro model of RV infection, we investigated the mechanisms underlying RV-induced β2 adrenoceptor desensitization in primary human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). RV infection of primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) for 24 hours produced conditioned medium that caused β2 adrenoceptor desensitization on ASMCs without an effect on ASMCs viability. Less than 3 kDa size fractionation together with trypsin digestion of RV-induced conditioned medium did not prevent β2 adrenoceptor desensitization, suggesting it could potentially be mediated by a small peptide or lipid. RV infection of BECs, ASMCs and fibroblasts produced prostaglandins, of which PGE2, PGF2α and PGI2 had the ability to cause β2 adrenoceptor desensitization on ASMCs. RV-induced conditioned medium from HBECs depleted of PGE2 did not prevent ASMC β2 adrenoceptor desensitization; however this medium induced PGE2 from ASMCs, suggesting that autocrine prostaglandin production may be responsible. Using inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and prostaglandin receptor antagonists, we found that β2 adrenoceptor desensitization was mediated through ASMC derived COX-2 induced prostaglandins. Since ASMC prostaglandin production is unlikely to be caused by RV-induced epithelial derived proteins or lipids we next investigated activation of toll-like receptors (TLR) by viral RNA. The combination of TLR agonists poly I:C and imiquimod induced PGE2 and β2 adrenoceptor desensitization on ASMC as did the RNA extracted from RV-induced conditioned medium. Viral RNA but not epithelial RNA caused β2 adrenoceptor desensitization confirming that viral RNA and not endogenous human RNA was responsible. It was deduced that the mechanism by which β2 adrenoceptor desensitization occurs was by pattern recognition receptor activation of COX-2

  14. Application of histamine or serotonin to the hypoglossal nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity across the wake-sleep cycle.

    PubMed

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Sakai, Kazuya; Gormand, Frédéric; Petitjean, Thierry; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Parrot, Sandrine; Guidon, Gérard; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The decrease in genioglossus (GG) muscle activity during sleep, especially rapid eye movement (REM) or paradoxical sleep, can lead to airway occlusion and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The hypoglossal nucleus innervating the GG muscle is under the control of serotonergic, noradrenergic and histaminergic neurons that cease firing during paradoxical sleep. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect on GG muscle activity during different wake-sleep states of the microdialysis application of serotonin, histamine (HA) or noradrenaline (NE) to the hypoglossal nucleus in freely moving cats. Six adult cats were implanted with electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram and neck electromyogram electrodes to record wake-sleep states and with GG muscle and diaphragm electrodes to record respiratory muscle activity. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the hypoglossal nucleus for monoamine application. Changes in GG muscle activity were assessed by power spectrum analysis. In the baseline conditions, tonic GG muscle activity decreased progressively and significantly from wakefulness to slow-wave sleep and even further during slow-wave sleep with ponto-geniculo-occipital waves and paradoxical sleep. Application of serotonin or HA significantly increased GG muscle activity during the wake-sleep states when compared with controls. By contrast, NE had no excitatory effect. Our results indicate that both serotonin and HA have a potent excitatory action on GG muscle activity, suggesting multiple aminergic control of upper airway muscle activity during the wake-sleep cycle. These data might help in the development of pharmacological approaches for the treatment of OSA.

  15. Bisulfite and sulfite as derivatives of sulfur dioxide alters biomechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijing; Lin, Feng; Li, Jianming; Liao, Qingfeng; Liu, Enmei; Jiang, Xuemei; Deng, Linhong

    2014-02-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a common air pollutant that triggers asthmatic symptoms, but its toxicological mechanisms are not fully understood. Specifically, it is unclear how SO2 in vivo affects airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells of which the mechanics is known to ultimately mediate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) - a hallmark feature of asthma. To this end, we investigated the effects of bisulfite/sulfite (1:3 M/M in neutral fluid to simulate the in vivo derivatives of inhaled SO2 in the airways), on the viability, migration, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells cultured in vitro. The results showed that bisulfite/sulfite consistently increased viability, migration, F-actin intensity and stiffness of ASM cells in similar fashion as concentration increasing from 10(-4) to 10(-1) mmol/L. However, bisulfite/sulfite increased the ASM cell contractility induced by KCl only at the concentration between 10(-4) and 10(-3) mmol/L (p < 0.05), while having no consistent effect on that induced by histamine. At the concentration of 10(0) mmol/L, bisulfite/sulfite became acutely toxic to the ASM cells. Taken together, the data suggest that SO2 derivatives at low levels in vivo may directly increase the mass, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells, which may help understand the mechanism in which specific air pollutants contribute in vivo to the pathogenesis of asthma.

  16. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  17. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  18. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  19. Pre-treatment with α-hederin increases β-adrenoceptor mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Anne; Gosens, Reinoud; Meurs, Herman; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-01-15

    Preparations of ivy leaves dry extract with secretolytic and bronchiolytic efficacy are widely used for the treatment of acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases. The mechanism by which ivy preparations improve lung functions is not fully understood. Here, we tested the influence of the three main saponins of ivy, α-hederin, hederacoside C and hederagenin, on the contraction and relaxation behaviour of isolated bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips by isometric tension measurements. None of the tested compounds altered histamine or methacholine-induced contraction of the smooth muscle strips. In contrast, the isoprenaline-induced relaxation of 100μM methacholine precontracted muscle strips was significantly enhanced when pre-treated with 1μM of α-hederin for 18h. The pre-treatment with hederacoside C or hederagenin had no effect on isoprenaline-induced relaxation. For the first time the bronchiolytic effect of α-hederin was demonstrated by isometric tension measurements using bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. α-Hederin increases isoprenaline-induced relaxation indirectly, probably by inhibiting heterologous desensitization induced by high concentrations of muscarinic ligands like methacholine.

  20. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  1. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  2. Acetylcholine and tachykinins involvement in the caffeine-induced biphasic change in intracellular Ca2+ in bovine airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Montaño, Luis M; Carbajal, Verónica; Arreola, José L; Barajas-López, Carlos; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Vargas, Mario H

    2003-01-01

    Caffeine has been widely used as a pharmacological tool to evaluate Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in isolated smooth muscle cells. However, in nervous tissue this drug also causes neurotransmitters release, which might cause additional effects when smooth muscle strips are evaluated. To assess this last possibility, simultaneous measurements of contraction and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (using Fura–2/AM) were carried out in bovine airway smooth muscle strips during caffeine stimulation. A first stimulation (S1, n=11) with caffeine (10 mM) induced a biphasic change in cytosolic Ca2+, which consisted of a transient Ca2+ peak (254±40 nM, X±SEM) followed by a plateau (92±13 nM), and a transient contraction (204.72±31.56 mg tension mg tissue−1). A second caffeine stimulation (S2) produced a similar response but these parameters had a different magnitude. The S2/S1 ratios for these parameters were 0.69±0.02, 0.83±0.06 and 1.01±0.03, respectively. Addition of ω-conotoxin GVIA (1 μM) and tetrodotoxin (3.1 μM) before S2 significantly diminished these S2/S1 ratios (0.26±0.05, 0.26±0.09 and 0.64±0.11, respectively, n=5, P<0.05), implicating the neurotransmitters release involvement in the response to caffeine. A similar effect (P<0.01) was observed with atropine (1 μM, n=4), the fragment 4–11 of substance P (SP) (an SP receptor antagonist, 10 μM, n=5), and with both substances (n=4). We discarded a direct effect of ω-conotoxin GVIA (1 μM) plus tetrodotoxin (3.1 μM) or of atropine (1 μM) plus SP fragment 4–11 on smooth muscle cells because they did not modify caffeine responses in isolated tracheal myocytes. We confirmed by HPLC that caffeine increased the release of acetylcholine (from 0.43±0.19 to 2.07±0.56 nM mg tissue−1, P<0.02) in bovine airway smooth muscle strips. Detection of substance P by ELISA was not statistically different after caffeine stimulation (geometric means before and after caffeine, 0.69 vs. 1.97 pg ml−1

  3. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  4. Transneuronal tracing of neural pathways influencing both diaphragm and genioglossal muscle activity in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Shintani, T; Anker, A R; Billig, I; Card, J P; Yates, B J

    2003-10-01

    In prior experiments that employed the transneuronal transport of isogenic recombinants of pseudorabies virus (PRV), we demonstrated that neurons located ventrally in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) of the ferret provide collateralized projections to both diaphragm and abdominal muscle motoneurons as well as to multiple abdominal muscle motoneuron pools. The goal of the present study was to determine whether single MRF neurons also furnish inputs to diaphragm motoneurons and those innervating an airway muscle with inspiratory-related activity: the tongue protruder genioglossus. For this purpose, PRV recombinants expressing unique reporters (beta-galactosidase or enhanced green fluorescent protein) were injected into either the diaphragm or the genioglossal muscle. The virus injections produced transneuronal infection of overlapping populations of MRF neurons. A small proportion of these neurons (<15%) was infected by both PRV recombinants, which indicated that they provide collateralized inputs to genioglossal and diaphragm motoneurons. These findings show that, whereas some MRF neurons simultaneously influence the activity of upper airway and respiratory pump muscles, other cells in this brain stem region independently contribute to diaphragm and genioglossal muscle contraction regulation.

  5. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwen; Cruz, Tina; Irion, Uwe; Moussian, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them) are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila. PMID:26621831

  6. Effects of hypercapnia and inspiratory flow-resistive loading on respiratory activity in chronic airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Altose, M D; McCauley, W C; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The respiratory responses to hypercapnia alone and to hypercapnia and flow-resistive loading during inspiration were studied in normal individuals and in eucapnic and hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction. Responses were assessed in terms of minute ventilation and occlusion pressure (mouth pressure during airway occlusion 100 ms after the onset of inspiration). Ventilatory responses to CO2 (deltaV/deltaPCO2) were distinctly subnormal in both groups of patients with airways obstruction. The two groups of patients, however, showed different occlusion pressure responses to CO2 (deltaP100/deltaPCO2): deltaP100/deltaPCO2 was normal in the eucapnic patients but subnormal in the hypercapnic patients. Flow-resistive loading during inspiration reduced deltaV/deltaPCO2 both in normal subjects and in patients with airways obstruction. The occlusion pressure response to CO2 increased in normal subjects during flow-resistive loading but remained unchanged in both groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. These results indicate that while chemosensitivity as determined by deltaP100/deltaPCO2 is impaired only in hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction, an acute increase in flow resistance elicits a subnormal increase in respiratory efferent activity in both eucapnic and hypercapnic patients. PMID:838862

  7. Apigenin inhibits TGF-β1-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Hua; Lu, Bin; Wu, Hong-Ke; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the proliferation and migration of ASM cells (ASMCs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in asthma. Previous studies reported that apigenin can inhibit airway remodeling in a mouse asthma model. However, its effects on the proliferation and migration of ASMCs in asthma remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of our present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on ASMC proliferation and migration, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. We found that apigenin inhibited transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced ASMC proliferation. The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by apigenin. It also suppressed TGF-β1-induced ASMCs migration. Furthermore, apigenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad 2 and Smad 3 phosphorylation in ASMCs. Taken together, these results suggested that apigenin inhibited the proliferation and migration of TGF-β1-stimulated ASMCs by inhibiting Smad signaling pathway. These data might provide useful information for treating asthma and show that apigenin has potential for attenuating airway remodeling.

  8. Adenylate cyclase, cyclic AMP and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 in airway smooth muscle: modulation by protein kinase C and growth serum.

    PubMed Central

    Moughal, N; Stevens, P A; Kong, D; Pyne, S; Pyne, N J

    1995-01-01

    Bradykinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulate adenylate cyclase activity in serum-depleted cultured airway smooth muscle via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. The probable target is the type II adenylate cyclase, which can integrate coincident signals from both PKC and Gs. Therefore, activation of Gs (by cholera-toxin pre-treatment) amplified the bradykinin-stimulated cyclic AMP signal and concurrently attenuated the partial activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2) by bradykinin. We have previously demonstrated that, in order to induce full activation of ERK-2 with bradykinin, it is necessary to obliterate PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP formation. We concluded that the cyclic AMP signal limits the magnitude of ERK-2 activation [Pyne, Moughal, Stevens, Tolan and Pyne (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 611-616]. The present study indicates that the bradykinin-stimulated ERK-2 pathway is entirely cyclic AMP-sensitive, and suggests that coincident signal detection by adenylate cyclase may be an important physiological route for the modulation of early mitogenic signalling. Furthermore, the direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity enables bradykinin to induce DNA synthesis, indicating that the PKC-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase limits entry of cells into the cell cycle. These studies suggest that the mitogenicity of an agonist may be governed, in part, by its ability to stimulate an inhibitory cyclic AMP signal pathway in the cell. The activation of adenylate cyclase by PKC appears to be downstream of phospholipase D. However, in cells that were maintained in growth serum (i.e. were not growth-arrested), bradykinin was unable to elicit a PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP response. The lesion in the signal-response coupling was not at the level of either the receptor or phospholipase D, which remain functionally operative and suggests modification occurs at either PKC or adenylate cyclase itself. These studies are discussed with

  9. Muscle activities during asymmetric trunk angular accelerations.

    PubMed

    Marras, W S; Mirka, G A

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize trunk muscle and intra-abdominal pressure behavior during extensions of the trunk when angular trunk acceleration levels and trunk twist were varied during lifting exertions. Since force is related to acceleration, it was believed that changes in trunk acceleration would cause activity changes in the muscles and abdominal cavity pressurization mechanics that load the spine during manual materials handling tasks. The electromyographic activity of 10 trunk muscles and intra-abdominal pressure were studied in 39 subjects as they moved their trunks under high, medium, and low constant angular acceleration conditions. The results indicated that almost all the muscles were affected by acceleration and asymmetry. Muscle activities of up to 50% of maximum were observed even though a minimal amount of torque was being produced by the back. Coactivation of muscles was also apparent. Muscles located at the greatest distances from the spine, such as the latissimus dorsi and oblique groups, increased their activities the most as trunk acceleration increased. Muscles located farthest from the spine also played an important role as the trunk became more asymmetric. Intra-abdominal pressure changed minimally over the test conditions. The nature of these responses and their impact on spine loading are discussed.

  10. Microgravity effects on 'postural' muscle activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neuromuscular activation patterns associated with movements made in microgravity can contribute to muscular atrophy. Using electromyography (EMG) to monitor 'postural' muscles, it was found that free floating arm flexions made in microgravity were not always preceded by neuromuscular activation patterns normally observed during movements made in unit gravity. Additionally, manipulation of foot sensory input during microgravity arm flexion impacted upon anticipatory postural muscle activation.

  11. Contribution of SRF, Elk-1, and myocardin to airway smooth muscle remodeling in heaves, an asthma-like disease of horses.

    PubMed

    Chevigny, Mylène; Guérin-Montpetit, Karine; Vargas, Amandine; Lefebvre-Lavoie, Josiane; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Myocyte hyperplasia and hypertrophy contribute to the increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM) in asthma. Serum-response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates myocyte differentiation in vitro in vascular and intestinal smooth muscles. When SRF is associated with phosphorylated (p)Elk-1, it promotes ASM proliferation while binding to myocardin (MYOCD) leading to the expression of contractile elements in these tissues. The objective of this study was therefore to characterize the expression of SRF, pElk-1, and MYOCD in ASM cells from central and peripheral airways in heaves, a spontaneously occurring asthma-like disease of horses, and in controls. Six horses with heaves and five aged-matched controls kept in the same environment were studied. Nuclear protein expression of SRF, pElk-1, and MYOCD was evaluated in peripheral airways and endobronchial biopsies obtained during disease remission and after 1 and 30 days of naturally occurring antigenic exposure using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques. Nuclear expression of SRF (P = 0.03, remission vs. 30 days) and MYOCD (P = 0.05, controls vs. heaves at 30 days) increased in the peripheral airways of horses with heaves during disease exacerbation, while MYOCD (P = 0.04, remission vs. 30 days) decreased in the central airways of control horses. No changes were observed in the expression of pElk-1 protein in either tissue. In conclusion, SRF and its cofactor MYOCD likely contribute to the hypertrophy of peripheral ASM observed in equine asthmatic airways, while the remodeling of the central airways is more static or involves different transcription factors.

  12. MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS DURING SUSPENSION TRAINING EXERCISES

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sean; Ruffin, Elise; Brewer, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Background Suspension training (ST) has been utilized over exercises performed on a stable surface to train multiple muscle groups simultaneously to increase muscle activation and joint stability. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether ST augments muscle activation compared to similar exercises performed on a stable surface. Study Design Cross-sectional study Methods Twenty-five healthy adults (male: 16; women: 9; BMI: 23.50 ± 2.48 kg/m2) had 16 pre-amplified wireless surface EMG electrodes placed bilaterally on: the pectoralis major (PM), middle deltoid (MD), serratus anterior (SA), obliques (OB), rectus abdominis (RA), gluteus maximus (GM), erector spinae (ES), and middle trapezius/rhomboids (MT). Each participant performed reference isometric exercises (Sorensen test, push-up, sit-up, and inverted row) to establish a baseline muscle contraction. Muscle activation was assessed during the following exercises: ST bridge, ST push-up, ST inverted row, ST plank, floor bridge, floor push-up, floor row, and floor plank. The root mean square (RMS) of each side for every muscle was averaged for data analysis. Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) for each exercise with post-hoc comparisons were performed to compare muscle activation between each ST exercise and its stable surface counterpart. Results MANOVAs for all exercise comparisons showed statistically significant greater muscle activation in at least one muscle group during the ST condition. Post-hoc analyses revealed a statistically significant increase in muscle activation for the following muscles during the plank: OB (p = 0.021); Push-up: PM (p = 0.002), RA (p<0.0001), OB (p = 0.019), MT (p<0.0001), and ES (p = 0.006); Row: MD (p = 0.016), RA (p = 0.059), and OB (p = 0.027); and Bridge: RA (p = 0.013) and ES (p<0.0001). Conclusions Performing ST exercises increases muscle activation of selected muscles when compared to exercises performed on a stable surface. Level of

  13. Effects of age on muscarinic agonist-induced contraction an IP accumulation in airway smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Wills-Karp, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of age on carbachol-stimulated force development and ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production was studied in tracheal rings from guinea pigs aged 1 month and 25 months of age. The pD{sub 2} for the contractile response to carbachol was significantly reduced in tracheal tissues from old animals as compared to that of the young tissues, respectively. In contrast, inositol phosphate formation was not altered with increasing age when stimulated by carbachol or NaF, a direct activator of G proteins. Carbachol-induced inositol phosphate accumulation was inhibited by treatment with 1{mu}g/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that IP1 accumulation is coupled to a pertussis-toxin-sensitive protein. The pD{sub 2} values for contraction were significantly different from the pD{sub 2} values for IP1 accumulation, in both young and old tissues, respectively. These data suggest that IP1 accumulation is not responsible for the decreased contractile ability in tracheal smooth muscle during aging.

  14. Ionic mechanisms underlying electrical slow waves in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Janssen, L J; Hague, C; Nana, R

    1998-09-01

    In canine bronchial smooth muscle (BSM), spasmogens evoke oscillations in membrane potential ("slow waves"). The depolarizing phase of the slow waves is mediated by voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels; we examined the roles played by Cl- and K+ currents and Na+-K+-ATPase activity in mediating the repolarizing phase. Slow waves were evoked using tetraethylammonium (25 mM) in the presence or absence of niflumic acid (100 microM; Cl- channel blocker) or ouabain (10 microM; block Na+-K+-ATPase) or after elevating external K+ concentration ([K+]) to 36 mM (to block K+ currents); curve fitting was performed to quantitate the rates of rise/fall and frequency under these conditions. Slow waves were markedly slowed, and eventually abolished, by niflumic acid but were unaffected by ouabain or high [K+]. Electrically evoked slow waves were also blocked in similar fashion by niflumic acid. We conclude that the repolarization phase is mediated by Ca2+-dependent Cl- currents. This information, together with our earlier finding that the depolarizing phase is due to voltage-dependent Ca2+ current, suggests that slow waves in canine BSM involve alternating opening and closing of Ca2+ and Cl- channels.

  15. Upregulation and activation of eosinophil integrins in blood and airway after segmental lung antigen challenge1

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Mats W.; Kelly, Elizabeth A. B.; Busse, William W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that there are clinically relevant differences in eosinophil integrin expression and activation in patients with asthma. To evaluate this, surface densities and activation states of integrins on eosinophils in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of 19 asthmatic subjects were studied before and 48 h after segmental Ag challenge. At 48 h, there was increased expression of αD and the N29 epitope of activated β1 integrins on blood eosinophils and of αM, β2, and the mAb24 epitope of activated β2 integrins on airway eosinophils. Changes correlated with the late-phase fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after whole-lung inhalation of the Ag that was subsequently used in segmental challenge and were greater in subjects defined as dual responders. Increased surface densities of αM and β2 and activation of β2 on airway eosinophils correlated with the concentration of IL-5 in BAL fluid. Activation of β1 and β2 on airway eosinophils correlated with eosinophil percentage in BAL. Thus, eosinophils respond to an allergic stimulus by activation of integrins in a sequence that likely promotes eosinophilic inflammation of the airway. Before challenge, β1 and β2 integrins of circulating eosinophils are in low-activation conformations, and αDβ2 surface expression is low. After Ag challenge, circulating eosinophils adopt a phenotype with activated β1 integrins and upregulated αDβ2, changes that are predicted to facilitate eosinophil arrest on VCAM-1 in bronchial vessels. Finally, eosinophils present in IL-5-rich airway fluid have a hyperadhesive phenotype associated with increased surface expression of αMβ2 and activation of β2 integrins. PMID:18490765

  16. Effects of a two-year inhalation exposure of rats to coal dust and/or diesel exhaust on tension responses of isolated airway smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Fedan, J.S.; Frazer, D.G.; Moorman, W.J.; Attfield, M.D.; Franczak, M.S.; Kosten, C.J.; Cahill, J.F.; Lewis, T.R.; Green, F.H.

    1985-04-01

    This study was performed to determine whether chronic inhalation exposure of rats to levels of coal dust (CD) and/or diesel exhaust (DE) similar to those experienced by underground miners affects the pharmacologic characteristics of the animal's airway smooth muscle. Animals were exposed for 2 yr to CD alone, DE alone, or CD and DE (CD + DE) in combination. Concentration-response relationships for tension changes induced with acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, potassium chloride, and isoproterenol were assessed in vitro on isolated preparations of rat airway smooth muscle (trachealis). Compared with control animals, the maximal contractile responses to acetylcholine of tissues from CD-, DE-, and CD + DE-exposed animals were significantly increased; the effects of CD and DE exposure were additive. The CD + DE exposure, but not the individual treatments, resulted in a significant increase in the maximal relaxation response elicited by isoproterenol; this interaction may have resulted from the addition of, or the synergism between, the nonsignificant effects of CD and DE alone. No treatment altered the sensitivity (EC50 values) of the muscles to the agonists used. The results indicate that chronic exposure to CD, DE, and CD + DE produces differential modifications in the behavior of rat airway smooth muscle. These findings may have some bearing on humans exposed to these substances.

  17. Heterogeneity of muscle activity during sedentary behavior.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Arto J; Laukkanen, Arto; Tikkanen, Olli; Finni, Taija

    2016-11-01

    Replacing sitting by standing has been hypothesized to reduce the health risks of sitting, based on the assumption that muscles are passive during sitting and active during standing. Interventions have been more effective in overweight (OW) than in normal weight (NW) individuals, but subjects' muscle activities have not been quantified. This study compared quadriceps and hamstring muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity between 57 NW (body mass index (BMI) 22.5 ± 1.5 kg/m(2), female n = 36) and 27 OW (BMI 28.4 ± 2.9 kg/m(2), female n = 8) subjects during non-fatiguing standing (15 s, EMGstanding) and sitting (30 min). EMG amplitude was normalized to EMG measured during maximal isometric knee extension and flexion (% EMGMVC), and sitting muscle inactivity and bursts were determined using 4 thresholds (60% or 90% EMGstanding and 1% or 2% EMGMVC). Comparisons were adjusted for sex, age, knee extension strength, and the individual threshold. Standing EMG amplitude was 36% higher in OW (1.9% ± 1.5% EMGMVC) than in NW (1.4% ± 1.4% EMGMVC, P < 0.05) subjects. During sitting, muscles were inactive 89.8% ± 12.7% of the measurement time with 12.7 ± 14.2 bursts/min across all thresholds. On average, 6% more activity was recorded in NW than in OW individuals for 3 of the 4 thresholds (P < 0.05 for 60% or 90% EMGstanding and 1% EMGMVC). In conclusion, the OW group had higher muscle activity amplitude during standing but more muscle inactivity during sitting for 3/4 of the thresholds tested. Interventions should test whether the observed heterogeneity in muscle activity affects the potential to gain cardiometabolic benefits from replacing sitting with standing.

  18. DUOX1 mediates persistent epithelial EGFR activation, mucous cell metaplasia, and airway remodeling during allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Heppner, David E; Danyal, Karamatullah; Ather, Jennifer L; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W; Irvin, Charles G; Poynter, Matthew E; Lundblad, Lennart K; Dixon, Anne E; Geiszt, Miklos; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-11-03

    Chronic inflammation with mucous metaplasia and airway remodeling are hallmarks of allergic asthma, and these outcomes have been associated with enhanced expression and activation of EGFR signaling. Here, we demonstrate enhanced expression of EGFR ligands such as amphiregulin as well as constitutive EGFR activation in cultured nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic subjects compared with nonasthmatic controls and in lung tissues of mice during house dust mite-induced (HDM-induced) allergic inflammation. EGFR activation was associated with cysteine oxidation within EGFR and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src, and both amphiregulin production and oxidative EGFR activation were diminished by pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of the epithelial NADPH oxidase dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1). DUOX1 deficiency also attenuated several EGFR-dependent features of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation, including neutrophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production (IL-33, IL-13), mucous metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and central airway resistance. Moreover, targeted inhibition of airway DUOX1 in mice with previously established HDM-induced allergic inflammation, by intratracheal administration of DUOX1-targeted siRNA or pharmacological NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reversed most of these outcomes. Our findings indicate an important function for DUOX1 in allergic inflammation related to persistent EGFR activation and suggest that DUOX1 targeting may represent an attractive strategy in asthma management.

  19. DUOX1 mediates persistent epithelial EGFR activation, mucous cell metaplasia, and airway remodeling during allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Heppner, David E.; Danyal, Karamatullah; Ather, Jennifer L.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.; Irvin, Charles G.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Lundblad, Lennart K.; Dixon, Anne E.; Geiszt, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation with mucous metaplasia and airway remodeling are hallmarks of allergic asthma, and these outcomes have been associated with enhanced expression and activation of EGFR signaling. Here, we demonstrate enhanced expression of EGFR ligands such as amphiregulin as well as constitutive EGFR activation in cultured nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic subjects compared with nonasthmatic controls and in lung tissues of mice during house dust mite–induced (HDM-induced) allergic inflammation. EGFR activation was associated with cysteine oxidation within EGFR and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src, and both amphiregulin production and oxidative EGFR activation were diminished by pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of the epithelial NADPH oxidase dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1). DUOX1 deficiency also attenuated several EGFR-dependent features of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation, including neutrophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production (IL-33, IL-13), mucous metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and central airway resistance. Moreover, targeted inhibition of airway DUOX1 in mice with previously established HDM-induced allergic inflammation, by intratracheal administration of DUOX1-targeted siRNA or pharmacological NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reversed most of these outcomes. Our findings indicate an important function for DUOX1 in allergic inflammation related to persistent EGFR activation and suggest that DUOX1 targeting may represent an attractive strategy in asthma management. PMID:27812543

  20. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  1. H2S relaxes isolated human airway smooth muscle cells via the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert; DeSantiago, Breann; Lee, Danielle Y; Yang, Guangdong; Kim, Jae Yeon; Foster, D Brian; Chan-Li, Yee; Horton, Maureen R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Wang, Rui; An, Steven S

    2014-03-28

    Here we explored the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on biophysical properties of the primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM)-the end effector of acute airway narrowing in asthma. Using magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC), we measured dynamic changes in the stiffness of isolated ASM, at the single-cell level, in response to varying doses of GYY4137 (1-10mM). GYY4137 slowly released appreciable levels of H2S in the range of 10-275 μM, and H2S released was long lived. In isolated human ASM cells, GYY4137 acutely decreased stiffness (i.e. an indicator of the single-cell relaxation) in a dose-dependent fashion, and stiffness decreases were sustained in culture for 24h. Human ASM cells showed protein expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE; a H2S synthesizing enzyme) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The KATP channel opener pinacidil effectively relaxed isolated ASM cells. In addition, pinacidil-induced ASM relaxation was completely inhibited by the treatment of cells with the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide. Glibenclamide also markedly attenuated GYY4137-mediated relaxation of isolated human ASM cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that H2S causes the relaxation of human ASM and implicate as well the role for sarcolemmal KATP channels. Finally, given that ASM cells express intrinsic enzymatic machinery of generating H2S, we suggest thereby this class of gasotransmitter can be further exploited for potential therapy against obstructive lung disease.

  2. BET Bromodomains Regulate Transforming Growth Factor-β-induced Proliferation and Cytokine Release in Asthmatic Airway Smooth Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark M.; Durham, Andrew L.; Austin, Philip J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass is increased in asthma, and ASM cells from patients with asthma are hyperproliferative and release more IL-6 and CXCL8. The BET (bromo- and extra-terminal) family of proteins (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4) govern the assembly of histone acetylation-dependent chromatin complexes. We have examined whether they modulate proliferation and cytokine expression in asthmatic ASM cells by studying the effect of BET bromodomain mimics JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762. ASM cells from healthy individuals and nonsevere and severe asthmatics were pretreated with JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 prior to stimulation with FCS and TGF-β. Proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation. IL-6 and CXCL8 release was measured by ELISA, and mRNA expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. ChIP using a specific anti-Brd4 antibody and PCR primers directed against the transcriptional start site of IL-6 and CXCL8 gene promoters was performed. Neither JQ1/SGCBD01 nor I-BET762 had any effect on ASM cell viability. JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 inhibited FCS+TGF-β-induced ASM cell proliferation and IL-6 and CXCL8 release in healthy individuals (≥ 30 nm) and in nonsevere and severe asthma patients (≥100 nm), with the latter requiring higher concentrations of these mimics. JQ1/SGCBD01 reduced Brd4 binding to IL8 and IL6 promoters induced by FCS+TGF-β. Mimics of BET bromodomains inhibit aberrant ASM cell proliferation and inflammation with lesser efficiency in those from asthmatic patients. They may be effective in reducing airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:25697361

  3. Muscle spindle and fusimotor activity in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Peter H; Taylor, Anthony; Durbaba, Rade

    2015-08-01

    Mammals may exhibit different forms of locomotion even within a species. A particular form of locomotion (e.g. walk, run, bound) appears to be selected by supraspinal commands, but the precise pattern, i.e. phasing of limbs and muscles, is generated within the spinal cord by so-called central pattern generators. Peripheral sense organs, particularly the muscle spindle, play a crucial role in modulating the central pattern generator output. In turn, the feedback from muscle spindles is itself modulated by static and dynamic fusimotor (gamma) neurons. The activity of muscle spindle afferents and fusimotor neurons during locomotion in the cat is reviewed here. There is evidence for some alpha-gamma co-activation during locomotion involving static gamma motoneurons. However, both static and dynamic gamma motoneurons show patterns of modulation that are distinct from alpha motoneuron activity. It has been proposed that static gamma activity may drive muscle spindle secondary endings to signal the intended movement to the central nervous system. Dynamic gamma motoneuron drive appears to prime muscle spindle primary endings to signal transitions in phase of the locomotor cycle. These findings come largely from reduced animal preparations (decerebrate) and require confirmation in freely moving intact animals.

  4. PLUNC Is a Novel Airway Surfactant Protein with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    PubMed Central

    Penterman, Jon; Mizrachi, Dario; Singh, Pradeep K.; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Ramaswamy, S.; McCray, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Background The PLUNC (“Palate, lung, nasal epithelium clone”) protein is an abundant secretory product of epithelia present throughout the conducting airways of humans and other mammals, which is evolutionarily related to the lipid transfer/lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LT/LBP) family. Two members of this family - the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) and the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) - are innate immune molecules with recognized roles in sensing and responding to Gram negative bacteria, leading many to propose that PLUNC may play a host defense role in the human airways. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on its marked hydrophobicity, we hypothesized that PLUNC may be an airway surfactant. We found that purified recombinant human PLUNC greatly enhanced the ability of aqueous solutions to spread on a hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, we discovered that PLUNC significantly reduced surface tension at the air-liquid interface in aqueous solutions, indicating novel and biologically relevant surfactant properties. Of note, surface tensions achieved by adding PLUNC to solutions are very similar to measurements of the surface tension in tracheobronchial secretions from humans and animal models. Because surfactants of microbial origin can disperse matrix-encased bacterial clusters known as biofilms [1], we hypothesized that PLUNC may also have anti-biofilm activity. We found that, at a physiologically relevant concentration, PLUNC inhibited biofilm formation by the airway pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an in vitro model. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that the PLUNC protein contributes to the surfactant properties of airway secretions, and that this activity may interfere with biofilm formation by an airway pathogen. PMID:20161732

  5. Stereoselectivity of tradinterol's inhibition on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells induced by acetylcholine through suppressing Ca(2+) signalling.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Wen, H; Zhao, C; Lan, Y; Pan, L; Zhang, C; Cheng, M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the inhibition of tradinterol (SPFF) against acetylcholine (ACh)-induced proliferation is mediated by Ca(2+) signaling in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and whether stereoselectivity of the drug exists. Guinea pig ASMCs were primarily prepared with the method described and treated with ACh combined to SPFF isomers for 24 or 48 hours, respectively. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the proliferation of the guinea pig ASMCs. Ca(2+) fluorescent intensity in the guinea pig ASMCs, expressed with percentage increase in fluorescence when the intensity was determined with varioskan flash or shown with percentage increase in Geo Mean (GM) measured with flow cytometry, was recorded. Images of the intensity were obtained with fluorescent microscope. 2-APB, an (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor) IP3R blocker, and NiCl2, a store-operated channel (SOC) inhibitor, were used to investigate the mechanism of SPFF isomers regulating intracellular Ca(2+) via IP3R on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and/or SOC on plasma membrane. (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF, treated for 48 hours, showed significant inhibition against ACh-induced proliferation. The Ca(2+) elevation induced by ACh was concentration-dependently suppressed by SPFF isomers. (-)SPFF is the most effective but the potency of (±)SPFF is less than that of the former and stronger than that of (+)SPFF based on the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value. No significant additive effect was observed when (-)SPFF/(±)SPFF was used alone and combined with NiCl2/2-APB. As far as (+)SPFF is concerned, no similar phenomenon was observed. (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF but (+)SPFF showed significant inhibition against the percentage increase in fluorescence induced by CaCl2. It is likely that the influence of IP2RSOC-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in ASMCs helps (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF contribute to the suppression of ASMCs

  6. IL13 activates autophagy to regulate secretion in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, John D; Alevy, Yael; Malvin, Nicole P; Patel, Khushbu K; Gunsten, Sean P; Holtzman, Michael J; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine modulation of autophagy is increasingly recognized in disease pathogenesis, and current concepts suggest that type 1 cytokines activate autophagy, whereas type 2 cytokines are inhibitory. However, this paradigm derives primarily from studies of immune cells and is poorly characterized in tissue cells, including sentinel epithelial cells that regulate the immune response. In particular, the type 2 cytokine IL13 (interleukin 13) drives the formation of airway goblet cells that secrete excess mucus as a characteristic feature of airway disease, but whether this process is influenced by autophagy was undefined. Here we use a mouse model of airway disease in which IL33 (interleukin 33) stimulation leads to IL13-dependent formation of airway goblet cells as tracked by levels of mucin MUC5AC (mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel forming), and we show that these cells manifest a block in mucus secretion in autophagy gene Atg16l1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control mice. Similarly, primary-culture human tracheal epithelial cells treated with IL13 to stimulate mucus formation also exhibit a block in MUC5AC secretion in cells depleted of autophagy gene ATG5 (autophagy-related 5) or ATG14 (autophagy-related 14) compared to nondepleted control cells. Our findings indicate that autophagy is essential for airway mucus secretion in a type 2, IL13-dependent immune disease process and thereby provide a novel therapeutic strategy for attenuating airway obstruction in hypersecretory inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis lung disease. Taken together, these observations suggest that the regulation of autophagy by Th2 cytokines is cell-context dependent.

  7. Dual p38/JNK mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors prevent ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Verhein, Kirsten C; Salituro, Francesco G; Ledeboer, Mark W; Fryer, Allison D; Jacoby, David B

    2013-01-01

    Ozone exposure causes airway hyperreactivity and increases hospitalizations resulting from pulmonary complications. Ozone reacts with the epithelial lining fluid and airway epithelium to produce reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, which then activate cell signaling pathways, including the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Both p38 and c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) are MAPK family members that are activated by cellular stress and inflammation. To test the contribution of both p38 and JNK MAPK to ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity, guinea pigs were pretreated with dual p38 and JNK MAPK inhibitors (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 60 minutes before exposure to 2 ppm ozone or filtered air for 4 hours. One day later airway reactivity was measured in anesthetized animals. Ozone caused airway hyperreactivity one day post-exposure, and blocking p38 and JNK MAPK completely prevented ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity. Blocking p38 and JNK MAPK also suppressed parasympathetic nerve activity in air exposed animals, suggesting p38 and JNK MAPK contribute to acetylcholine release by airway parasympathetic nerves. Ozone inhibited neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors and blocking both p38 and JNK prevented M2 receptor dysfunction. Neutrophil influx into bronchoalveolar lavage was not affected by MAPK inhibitors. Thus p38 and JNK MAPK mediate ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity through multiple mechanisms including prevention of neuronal M2 receptor dysfunction.

  8. Adenylyl cyclase 2 selectively couples to E prostanoid type 2 receptors, whereas adenylyl cyclase 3 is not receptor-regulated in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Adris, Piyatilake; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2012-08-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists stimulate AC activity and cAMP production. We have previously shown in a number of cell types that AC6 selectively couples to βAR and these proteins are coexpressed in lipid rafts. We overexpressed AC2, AC3, and AC6 in mouse bronchial smooth muscle cells (mBSMCs) and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells by using recombinant adenoviruses and assessed their localization and regulation by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AC3 and AC6 were expressed primarily in caveolin-rich fractions, whereas AC2 expression was excluded from these domains. AC6 expression enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol but did not increase responses to butaprost, reflecting the colocalization of AC6 with β(2)AR but not E prostanoid type 2 receptor (EP(2)R) in lipid raft fractions. AC2 expression enhanced butaprost-stimulated cAMP production but had no effect on the β(2)AR-mediated response. AC3 did not couple to any GPCR tested. Forskolin-induced arborization of mBSMCs was assessed as a functional readout of cAMP signaling. Arborization was enhanced by overexpression of AC6 and AC3, but AC2 had no effect. GPCR-stimulated arborization mirrored the selective coupling observed for cAMP production. With the addition of the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram AC2 accelerated forskolin-stimulated arborization. Thus, AC2 selectively couples to EP(2)R, but signals from this complex are limited by PDE4 activity. AC3 does not seem to couple to GPCR in either mBSMCs or HEK-293 cells, so it probably exists in a distinct signaling domain in these cells.

  9. Glucocorticoid Receptor ChIP-seq Identifies PLCD1 as a KLF15 Target that Represses Airway Smooth Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Kadiyala, Vineela; Danhorn, Thomas; Panettieri, Reynold A; Phang, Tzu L; Gerber, Anthony N

    2017-04-04

    Glucocorticoids exert important therapeutic effects on airway smooth muscle (ASM), yet few direct targets of glucocorticoid signaling in ASM have been definitively identified. Here, we show that the transcription factor, KLF15, is directly induced by glucocorticoids in primary human ASM and that KLF15 represses ASM hypertrophy. We integrated transcriptome data from KLF15 overexpression with genome-wide analysis of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) occupancy (i.e. ChIP-seq) to identify PLCD1 as both a KLF15-regulated gene and a novel repressor of ASM hypertrophy. Our ChIP-seq data also allowed us to establish numerous direct transcriptional targets of GR in ASM. Genes with inducible GR occupancy and putative anti-inflammatory properties included IRS2, APPL2, RAMP1 and MFGE8. Surprisingly, we also observed GR occupancy in the absence of supplemental ligand, including robust GR binding peaks within the IL11 and LIF loci. Detection of antibody-GR complexes at these areas was abrogated by dexamethasone treatment in association with reduced RNAPII occupancy, suggesting that non-canonical pathways contribute to cytokine repression by glucocorticoids in ASM. Through defining GR interactions with chromatin on a genome-wide basis in ASM, our data also provide an important resource for future studies of GR in this therapeutically relevant cell type.

  10. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  11. The proprioceptive reflex control of the intercostal muscles during their voluntary activation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. Newsom; Sears, T. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. A quantitative study has been made of the reflex effects of sudden changes in mechanical load on contracting human intercostal muscles during willed breathing movements involving the chest wall. Averaging techniques were applied to recordings of electromyogram (EMG) and lung volume, and to other parameters of breathing. 2. Load changes were effected for brief periods (10-150 msec) at any predetermined lung volume by sudden connexion of the airway to a pressure source variable between ± 80 cm H2O so that respiratory movement could be either assisted or opposed. In some experiments airway resistance was suddenly reduced by porting from a high to a low resistance external airway. 3. Contracting inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles showed a `silent period' with unloading which is attributed to the sudden withdrawal from intercostal motoneurones of monosynaptic excitation of muscle spindle origin. 4. For both inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles the typical immediate effect of an increase in load was an inhibitory response (IR) with a latency of about 22 msec followed by an excitatory response (ER) with a latency of 50-60 msec. 5. It was established using brief duration stimuli (< 40 msec) that the IR depended on mechanical events associated with the onset of stimulation, whereas stimuli greater than 40 msec in duration were required to evoke the ER. 6. For constant expiratory flow rate and a constant load, the ER of expiratory intercostal muscles increased as lung volume decreased within the limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool as residual volume was approached. 7. The ER to a constant load increased directly with the expiratory flow rate at which the load applied, also within limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool. 8. For a given load, the ER during phonation was greater than that occurring at a similar expiratory flow rate without phonation when the resistance of the phonating larynx was mimicked by an

  12. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  13. Toll-like Receptor 7 Rapidly Relaxes Human Airways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Proskocil, Becky J.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.; Kaufman, Elad H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 detect respiratory virus single-stranded RNA and trigger an innate immune response. We recently described rapid TLR7-mediated bronchodilation in guinea pigs. Objectives: To characterize TLR7 expression and TLR7-induced airway relaxation in humans and in eosinophilic airway inflammation in guinea pigs. To evaluate the relaxant effects of other TLRs. Methods: Human airway smooth muscle strips were contracted with methacholine in vitro, and responses to TLR7 and TLR8 agonists were assessed. TLR7-mediated nitric oxide production was measured using a fluorescent indicator, and TLR7 expression was characterized using immunofluorescence. TLR7 signaling was also evaluated in ovalbumin-challenged guinea pigs. Measurements and Main Results: The TLR7 agonist imiquimod (R837) caused rapid dose-dependent relaxation of methacholine-contracted human airways in vitro. This was blocked by the TLR7 antagonist IRS661 and by inhibiting nitric oxide production but not by inhibiting prostaglandin production. TLR7 activation markedly increased fluorescence of a nitric oxide detector. TLR7 was expressed on airway nerves, but not airway smooth muscle, implicating airway nerves as the source of TLR7-induced nitric oxide production. TLR7-mediated relaxation persisted in inflamed guinea pigs airways in vivo. The TLR8 agonists polyuridylic acid and polyadenylic acid also relaxed human airways, and this was not blocked by the TLR7 antagonist or by blocking nitric oxide or prostaglandin production. No other TLRs relaxed the airways. Conclusions: TLR7 is expressed on airway nerves and mediates relaxation of human and animal airways through nitric oxide production. TLR7-mediated bronchodilation may be a new therapeutic strategy in asthma. PMID:23924358

  14. Neck Muscle Activation Levels During Frontal Impacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    right and left upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid . Amplitude and frequency components of the signals were evaluated to determine the amount of...Gx acceleration levels. The trapezius produced more force than the sternocleidomastoid . Activity of both muscle groups was synchronized, by their...dynamic environment. The role of upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) during long-duration head and neck loading situations has been

  15. Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1a Contributes to Airway Hyperreactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reznikov, Leah R.; Meyerholz, David K.; Adam, Ryan J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Jaffer, Omar; Michalski, Andrew S.; Powers, Linda S.; Price, Margaret P.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons innervating the airways contribute to airway hyperreactivity (AHR), a hallmark feature of asthma. Several observations suggested that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), neuronal cation channels activated by protons, might contribute to AHR. For example, ASICs are found in vagal sensory neurons that innervate airways, and asthmatic airways can become acidic. Moreover, airway acidification activates ASIC currents and depolarizes neurons innervating airways. We found ASIC1a protein in vagal ganglia neurons, but not airway epithelium or smooth muscle. We induced AHR by sensitizing mice to ovalbumin and found that ASIC1a-/- mice failed to exhibit AHR despite a robust inflammatory response. Loss of ASIC1a also decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of substance P, a sensory neuropeptide secreted from vagal sensory neurons that contributes to AHR. These findings suggest that ASIC1a is an important mediator of AHR and raise the possibility that inhibiting ASIC channels might be beneficial in asthma. PMID:27820848

  16. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

  17. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. PMID:26504295

  18. Sesamin attenuates allergic airway inflammation through the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangchang; Piao, Hongmei; Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Zhewu; Zhao, Liguang; Yan, Guanghai

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the role of sesamin, the most abundant lignan in sesame seed oil, on the regulation of allergic airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. A BALB/c mouse model with allergic asthma was used to evaluate the effects of sesamin on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine protein expression in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to examine histological changes. Moreover, western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of proteins in tissues. Prior to administering sesamin, the mice developed the following pathophysiological features of asthma: An increase in the number of inflammatory cells, increased levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, decreased levels of interferon-γ in BAL fluids and lung tissues, increased immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the serum and an increased activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Following treatment with sesamin, the mice had evidently reduced peribronchiolar inflammation and airway inflammatory cell recruitment, inhibited production of several cytokines in BAL fluids and lung tissues, and decreased IgE levels. Following inhalation of ovalbumin, the administration of sesamin also inhibited the activation of NF-κB. In addition, sesamin administration reduced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The present study demonstrates that sesamin decreases the activation of NF-κB in order to attenuate allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma, possibly via the regulation of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. These observations provide an important molecular mechanism for the potential use of sesamin in preventing and/or treating asthma, as well as other airway inflammatory disorders.

  19. Sesamin attenuates allergic airway inflammation through the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangchang; Piao, Hongmei; Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Zhewu; Zhao, Liguang; Yan, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the role of sesamin, the most abundant lignan in sesame seed oil, on the regulation of allergic airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. A BALB/c mouse model with allergic asthma was used to evaluate the effects of sesamin on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine protein expression in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to examine histological changes. Moreover, western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of proteins in tissues. Prior to administering sesamin, the mice developed the following pathophysiological features of asthma: An increase in the number of inflammatory cells, increased levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, decreased levels of interferon-γ in BAL fluids and lung tissues, increased immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the serum and an increased activation of NF-κB in lung tissues. Following treatment with sesamin, the mice had evidently reduced peribronchiolar inflammation and airway inflammatory cell recruitment, inhibited production of several cytokines in BAL fluids and lung tissues, and decreased IgE levels. Following inhalation of ovalbumin, the administration of sesamin also inhibited the activation of NF-κB. In addition, sesamin administration reduced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The present study demonstrates that sesamin decreases the activation of NF-κB in order to attenuate allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma, possibly via the regulation of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. These observations provide an important molecular mechanism for the potential use of sesamin in preventing and/or treating asthma, as well as other airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:28105144

  20. Muscle Activation Patterns During Different Squat Techniques.

    PubMed

    Slater, Lindsay V; Hart, Joseph M

    2017-03-01

    Slater, LV, and Hart, JM. Muscle activation patterns during different squat techniques. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 667-676, 2017-Bilateral squats are frequently used exercises in sport performance programs. Lower extremity muscle activation may change based on knee alignment during the performance of the exercise. The purpose of this study was to compare lower extremity muscle activation patterns during different squat techniques. Twenty-eight healthy, uninjured subjects (19 women, 9 men, 21.5 ± 3 years, 170 ± 8.4 cm, 65.7 ± 11.8 kg) volunteered. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and the gastrocnemius of the dominant leg. Participants completed 5 squats while purposefully displacing the knee anteriorly (AP malaligned), 5 squats while purposefully displacing the knee medially (ML malaligned) and 5 squats with control alignment (control). Normalized EMG data (MVIC) were reduced to 100 points and represented as percentage of squat cycle with 50% representing peak knee flexion and 0 and 99% representing fully extended. Vastus lateralis, medialis, and rectus femoris activity decreased in the medio-lateral (ML) malaligned squat compared with the control squat. In the antero-posterior (AP) malaligned squat, the vastus lateralis, medialis, and rectus femoris activity decreased during initial descent and final ascent; however, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris activation increased during initial ascent compared with the control squat. The biceps femoris and gastrocnemius displayed increased activation during both malaligned squats compared with the control squat. In conclusion, participants had altered muscle activation patterns during squats with intentional frontal and sagittal malalignment as demonstrated by changes in quadriceps, biceps femoris, and gastrocnemius activation during the squat cycle.

  1. Spiperone, identified through compound screening, activates calcium-dependent chloride secretion in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lihua; MacDonald, Kelvin; Schwiebert, Erik M.; Zeitlin, Pamela L.; Guggino, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene producing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR functions as a Cl− channel. Its dysfunction limits Cl− secretion and enhances Na+ absorption, leading to viscous mucus in the airway. Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are coexpressed with CFTR in the airway surface epithelia. Increases in cytosolic Ca2+ activate the epithelial CaCCs, which provides an alternative Cl− secretory pathway in CF. We developed a screening assay and screened a library for compounds that could enhance cytoplasmic Ca2+, activate the CaCC, and increase Cl− secretion. We found that spiperone, a known antipsychotic drug, is a potent intracellular Ca2+ enhancer and demonstrated that it stimulates intracellular Ca2+, not by acting in its well-known role as an antagonist of serotonin 5-HT2 or dopamine D2 receptors, but through a protein tyrosine kinase-coupled phospholipase C-dependent pathway. Spiperone activates CaCCs, which stimulates Cl− secretion in polarized human non-CF and CF airway epithelial cell monolayers in vitro and in CFTR-knockout mice in vivo. In conclusion, we have identified spiperone as a new therapeutic platform for correction of defective Cl− secretion in CF via a pathway independent of CFTR. PMID:18987251

  2. Thyroarytenoid muscle activity during hypocapnic central apneas in awake nonsedated lambs.

    PubMed

    Kianicka, I; Leroux, J F; Praud, J P

    1994-03-01

    In this study, we examined whether the glottis is open or closed during central apnea and the effect of arterial PO2 (PaO2) on this control. We hyperventilated nine 11- to 30-day-old awake nonsedated lambs via a tracheostomy for 1 min to induce central apnea. Four gas mixtures (8, 15, 21, and 30% O2) were used. At the end of the hyperventilation period, the lambs were allowed to breathe spontaneously through intact upper airways. Using a pneumotachograph attached to a face mask, we measured airflow, and we continuously recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of the thyroarytenoid (TA), the main glottic adductor muscle. We also studied the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA, laryngeal adductor), the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA, laryngeal abductor), the cricothyroid muscle (CT), and the diaphragm. We found that hyperventilation consistently induced hypocapnic central apnea in all nine lambs in hyperoxic conditions [30% inspiratory fraction of O2 (FIO2)], in eight of nine lambs in normoxia or mild hypoxia (15 and 21% FIO2), and in four of seven lambs in hypoxia (8% FIO2). During baseline room air breathing, there was no glottic adductor muscle expiratory EMG activity or expiratory airflow braking. Continuous TA EMG activity began early during hyperventilation and continued throughout the central apnea, regardless of PaO2. The first subsequent breathing efforts were marked by expiratory flow braking and expiratory activity of the TA. The LCA and the TA demonstrated the same EMG activity pattern.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  4. Lower extremity muscle activation during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brian M; Stodden, David F; Nixon, Megan K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation levels of select lower extremity muscles during the pitching motion. Bilateral surface electromyography data on 5 lower extremity muscles (biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius) were collected on 11 highly skilled baseball pitchers and compared with individual maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) data. The pitching motion was divided into 4 distinct phases: phase 1, initiation of pitching motion to maximum stride leg knee height; phase 2, maximum stride leg knee height to stride foot contact (SFC); phase 3, SFC to ball release; and phase 4, ball release to 0.5 seconds after ball release (follow-through). Results indicated that trail leg musculature elicited moderate to high activity levels during phases 2 and 3 (38-172% of MVIC). Muscle activity levels of the stride leg were moderate to high during phases 2-4 (23-170% of MVIC). These data indicate a high demand for lower extremity strength and endurance. Specifically, coaches should incorporate unilateral and bilateral lower extremity exercises for strength improvement or maintenance and to facilitate dynamic stabilization of the lower extremities during the pitching motion.

  5. Antibody to very late activation antigen 4 prevents interleukin-5-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophil infiltration in the airways of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kraneveld, A D; van Ark, I; Van Der Linde, H J; Fattah, D; Nijkamp, F P; Van Oosterhout, A J

    1997-08-01

    This study examines the effect of monoclonal antibody to very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4) on IL5-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and eosinophil accumulation into guinea pig airways. IL5 has been shown to be important in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophil accumulation in the guinea pig. Eosinophils, unlike neutrophils, express VLA-4 which mediates the adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells. Thus VLA-4 seems to be an important adhesion molecule in the infiltration of eosinophils from the vasculature into the airway tissue. In addition, it has been shown that IL5 activates VLA-4 on eosinophils to facilitate their adhesion. In the present study, IL5 (1 microg, twice on one day) or vehicle were administered intranasally. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) to VLA-4 (HP1/2) or the isotype-matched control mAb (1E6) were injected 1 hour before each IL5 or vehicle treatment at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. The next day in vivo bronchial reactivity, eosinophil number in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity in cell-free BAL fluid were determined. IL5 induces an increase in bronchial reactivity to histamine, which is associated with an accumulation of eosinophils into BAL fluid (control: 12 (5 to 42) x 10(5) cells and IL5: 69 (11 to 99) x 10(5) cells, p < 0.05) and an increase of 35% +/- 14% in EPO activity in cell-free BAL fluid. Intravenous administration of anti-VLA-4 mAb, but not of the control antibody, completely inhibits the bronchial hyperresponsiveness as well as the airway eosinophilia found after intraairway application of IL5. HP1/2 also suppresses the IL5-induced increase in EPO activity in cell-free BAL fluid. In conclusion, for the development of IL5-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig, the VLA-4-dependent infiltration and activation of eosinophils in the bronchial tissue seems to be essential.

  6. A regulatory role for cAMP in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase-mediated DNA synthesis in platelet-derived-growth-factor-stimulated bovine airway smooth-muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, P H; Belham, C M; al-Hafidh, J; Chilvers, E R; Peacock, A J; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    In bovine airway smooth-muscle cells platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and endothelin (Et-1) stimulate sustained and comparable activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) but display very different mitogenic efficacies, with PDGF inducing 50 times more DNA synthesis than Et-1. To examine additional signalling pathways which may be involved in this response, we investigated the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns 3-kinase)/p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70s6k) in mediating PDGF- and Et-1-induced mitogenesis, and whether inhibition of this pathway may underly the ability of cAMP to inhibit cell proliferation. PDGF stimulated an increase in PtdIns 3-kinase activity and a sustained 15-fold increase in p70s6k activity that was abolished by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Et-1, however, stimulated only a 2-fold increase in p70s6k activity that was rapamycin-sensitive but wortmannin-insensitive. DNA synthesis stimulated by PDGF (50-fold) and Et-1 (2-fold) followed a similar pattern of inhibition. Pretreatment with phorbol ester did not affect p70s6k activation in response to PDGF. Raising intracellular cAMP levels using forskolin, however, resulted in a marked time-dependent inhibition of p70s6k activity, a decrease in the tyrosine phosphorylation of the PtdIns 3-kinase p85 subunit and reduced PtdIns 3-kinase activity. Forskolin also inhibited PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. These results suggest that PtdIns 3-kinase-dependent activation of p70s6k may determine mitogenic efficacy of agonists that generate comparable MAP kinase signals. Negative regulation of PtdIns 3-kinase by cAMP may play an important role in the inhibition of airway smooth-muscle cell proliferation. PMID:8836145

  7. α-Galactosylceramide-induced airway eosinophilia is mediated through the activation of NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Tzu-Chun; Jen, Hsiao-Yu; Yu, Alice L; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-04-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells bridge innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in the expansion of Ag-specific B and T cell responses. α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), the most studied glycolipid that activates iNKT cells, has been proposed to be an effective adjuvant against infections and tumors. We found that the activation of iNKT cells by intranasal injection of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilia in naive mice. Eosinophils, which mediate tissue damage and dysfunction by secreting mediators, play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how eosinophils are recruited to the lung by α-GalCer. Our results demonstrated that α-GalCer-induced eosinophil inflammation was mediated through iNKT cells. These cells secreted IL-5 to recruit eosinophils directly to the lung and/or secreted IL-4 and IL-13 to recruit eosinophils indirectly by inducing lung epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblast to secrete the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin. In addition, in the OVA-alum murine model of allergic asthma, α-GalCer administration in OVA-immunized mice also increased airway eosinophilia after challenge. Given our findings, intranasal administration of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilic inflammation in both naive and allergic mice. Hence, it remains to be determined whether the activation of iNKT cells would be applicable in therapeutics for human diseases.

  8. Regulation of Heparan Sulfate and Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis by 4-Fluoro-glucosamine in Murine Airway Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Julie; Wang, Aimin; Mukhopadhyay, Durba; Lauer, Mark; Midura, Ronald J.; Sackstein, Robert; Hascall, Vincent C.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the pathological changes in proteoglycans has driven the need to study and design novel chemical tools to control proteoglycan synthesis. Accordingly, we tested the fluorinated analogue of glucosamine (4-fluoro-N-acetyl-glucosamine (4-F-GlcNAc)) on the synthesis of heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) by murine airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in the presence of radiolabeled metabolic precursors. Secreted and cell-associated CS and HS were assessed for changes in size by Superose 6 chromatography. Treatment of ASM cells with 4-F-GlcNAc (100 μm) reduced the quantity (by 64.1–76.6%) and decreased the size of HS/CS glycosaminoglycans associated with the cell layer (Kav shifted from 0.30 to 0.45). The quantity of CS secreted into the medium decreased by 65.7–73.0%, and the size showed a Kav shift from 0.30 to 0.50. Treatment of ASM cells with 45 μm and 179 μm 4-F-GlcNAc in the presence of a stimulator of CS synthesis, 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-xyloside, reduced the amount of the xyloside-CS chains by 65.4 and 87.0%, respectively. The size of xyloside-CS chains synthesized in the presence of 4-F-GlcNAc were only slightly larger than those with xyloside treatment alone (Kav of 0.55 compared with that of 0.6). The effects of 4-F-GlcNAc to inhibit CS synthesis were not observed with equimolar concentrations of glucosamine. We propose that 4-F-GlcNAc inhibits CS synthesis by inhibiting 4-epimerization of UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-GalNAc, thereby depleting one of the substrates required, whereas HS elongation is inhibited by truncation when the nonreducing terminus of the growing chain is capped with 4-F-GlcNAc. PMID:19346253

  9. Noncanonical NF-κB mediates the Suppressive Effect of Neutrophil Elastase on IL-8/CXCL8 by Inducing NKRF in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shu-Chuan; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Feng, Po-Hao; Liu, Wen-Te; Chen, Kuan-Yuan; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Chan, Yao-Fei; Kuo, Lu-Wei; Lee, Kang-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) suppresses IL-8/CXCL8 in human airway smooth muscle cells (hASM) while stimulating its production in respiratory epithelial cells. This differential effect is mediated by the selective induction of NKRF and dysregulation in chronic inflammatory diseases. We hypothesized that the differential activation of NF-κB subunits confer the opposite effect of NKRF on IL-8/CXCL8 in primary hASM and A549 cells stimulated with NE. The events occurring at the promoters of NKRF and IL-8/CXCL8 were observed by ChIP assays, and the functional role of RelB was confirmed by knockdown and overexpression. Although p65 was stimulated in both cell types, RelB was only activated in NE-treated hASM, as confirmed by NF-κB DNA binding ELISA, Western blotting and confocal microscopy. Knockdown of RelB abolished the induction of NKRF and converted the suppression of IL-8/CXCL8 to stimulation. The forced expression of RelB induced NKRF production in hASM and A549 cells. NE activated the NIK/IKK1/RelB non-canonical NF-κB pathway in hASM but not in A549. The nuclear-translocated RelB was recruited to the NKRF promoter around the putative κB site, accompanied by p52 and RNA polymerase II. In conclusion, NFRF is a novel RelB-response gene, and NE is a stimulator of the non-canonical RelB/NF-κB pathway in hASM. PMID:28322300

  10. Patterns of muscle activity for digital coarticulation

    PubMed Central

    Winges, Sara A.; Furuya, Shinichi; Faber, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Although piano playing is a highly skilled task, basic features of motor pattern generation may be shared across tasks involving fine movements, such as handling coins, fingering food, or using a touch screen. The scripted and sequential nature of piano playing offered the opportunity to quantify the neuromuscular basis of coarticulation, i.e., the manner in which the muscle activation for one sequential element is altered to facilitate production of the preceding and subsequent elements. Ten pianists were asked to play selected pieces with the right hand at a uniform tempo. Key-press times were recorded along with the electromyographic (EMG) activity from seven channels: thumb flexor and abductor muscles, a flexor for each finger, and the four-finger extensor muscle. For the thumb and index finger, principal components of EMG waveforms revealed highly consistent variations in the shape of the flexor bursts, depending on the type of sequence in which a particular central key press was embedded. For all digits, the duration of the central EMG burst scaled, along with slight variations across subjects in the duration of the interkeystroke intervals. Even within a narrow time frame (about 100 ms) centered on the central EMG burst, the exact balance of EMG amplitudes across multiple muscles depended on the nature of the preceding and subsequent key presses. This fails to support the idea of fixed burst patterns executed in sequential phases and instead provides evidence for neuromuscular coarticulation throughout the time course of a hand movement sequence. PMID:23596338

  11. Role of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in Ca2+ entry of bovine airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Barajas-López, Carlos; Montaño, Luis M

    2003-10-01

    Depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores induces the opening of an unknown Ca(2+ )entry pathway to the cell. We measured the intracellular free-Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) at different sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in fura-2-loaded smooth muscle cells isolated from bovine tracheas. The absence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium generated a time-dependent decrement in [Ca(2+)]i which was proportional to the reduction in the SR-Ca(2+) content. This SR-Ca(2+) level was indirectly determined by measuring the amount of Ca(2+) released by caffeine. Ca(2+) restoration at different times after Ca(2+)-free incubation (2, 4, 6 and 10 min) induced an increment of [Ca(2+)]i. This increase in [Ca(2+)]i was considered as Ca(2+) entry to the cell. The rate of this entry was slow (~0.3 nM/s) when SR-Ca(2+) content was higher than 50% (2 and 4 min in Ca(2+)-free medium), and significantly ( p<0.01) accelerated (>1.0 nM/s) when SR-Ca(2+) content was lower than 50% (6 and 10 min in Ca(2+)-free medium). Thapsigargin significantly induced a higher rate of this Ca(2+) entry ( p<0.01). Variations in Ca(2+) influx after SR-Ca(2+) depletion were estimated more directly by a Mn(2+) quench approach. Ca(2+) restoration to the medium 4 min after Ca(2+) removal did not modify the Mn(2+) influx. However, when Ca(2+) was added after 10 min in Ca(2+)-free medium, an increment of Mn(2+) influx was observed, corroborating an increase in Ca(2+) entry. The fast Ca(2+) influx was Ni(2+) sensitive but was not affected by other known capacitative Ca(2+) entry blockers such as La(3+), Mg(2+), SKF 96365 and 2-APB. It was also not affected by the blockage of L-type Ca2(+) channels with methoxyverapamil or by the sustained K(+)-induced depolarisation. The slow Ca(2+) influx was only sensitive to SKF 96365. In conclusion, our results indicate that in bovine airway smooth muscle cells Ca(2+) influx after SR-Ca(2+) depletion has two rates: A) The slow Ca(2+) influx, which occurred in cells

  12. Decreased S100A9 Expression Promoted Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Stimulating ROS Generation and Inhibiting p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Han, Xiao-Jie; Duan, Ting-Ting; Xu, Yu-Dong; Ulloa, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Asthma is a disease with a core abnormality in airway smooth muscle function, and the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) plays a pivotal role in asthma airway remodeling. Our previous study showed that S100A9 (S100 calcium-binding protein A9; 400 and 800 ng/mL) significantly inhibited rat ASMCs proliferation at 48 h, and 50–800 ng/mL S100A9 (50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 ng/mL) also induced a lasting effect by significantly inhibiting rat ASMCs proliferation at 72 h in a dose-dependent manner. However, the intracellular effects of S100A9 on ASMCs proliferation remain unknown. Methods. Rat ASMCs with stable S100A9 knockdown were generated using short hairpin RNA. The effects of decreased S100A9 expression on cellular proliferation, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and p38 MAPK pathway protein expression were examined. Results. Decreased intracellular S100A9 expression significantly promoted platelet-derived growth factor-induced rat ASMCs proliferation and increased ROS production. The antioxidative agent N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited rat ASMCs proliferation. Western blot results showed that the decreased intracellular S100A9 expression significantly inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Conclusion. Decreased S100A9 expression promoted rat ASMCs proliferation by stimulating ROS generation and inhibiting p38 MAPK. Our study may provide novel insights into the regulation of asthma airway remodeling. PMID:28050155

  13. A highly potent agonist to protease-activated receptor-2 reveals apical activation of the airway epithelium resulting in Ca2+-regulated ion conductance

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Daines, Michael O.; Price, Theodore J.; Vagner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The airway epithelium provides a barrier that separates inhaled air and its various particulates from the underlying tissues. It provides key physiological functions in both sensing the environment and initiating appropriate innate immune defenses to protect the lung. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is expressed both apically and basolaterally throughout the airway epithelium. One consequence of basolateral PAR2 activation is the rapid, Ca2+-dependent ion flux that favors secretion in the normally absorptive airway epithelium. However, roles for apically expressed PAR2 activation have not been demonstrated, in part due to the lack of specific, high-potency PAR2 ligands. In the present study, we used the newly developed PAR2 ligand 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 in combination with well-differentiated, primary cultured airway epithelial cells from wild-type and PAR2−/− mice to examine the physiological role of PAR2 in the conducting airway after apical activation. Using digital imaging microscopy of intracellular Ca2+ concentration changes, we verified ligand potency on PAR2 in primary cultured airway cells. Examination of airway epithelial tissue in an Ussing chamber showed that apical activation of PAR2 by 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 resulted in a transient decrease in transepithelial resistance that was due to increased apical ion efflux. We determined pharmacologically that this increase in ion conductance was through Ca2+-activated Cl− and large-conductance K+ channels that were blocked with a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel inhibitor and clotrimazole, respectively. Stimulation of Cl− efflux via PAR2 activation at the airway epithelial surface can increase airway surface liquid that would aid in clearing the airway of noxious inhaled agents. PMID:25143347

  14. Effects of 12 Months Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sympathetic Activity Related Brainstem Function and Structure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Luke A.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; Lundblad, Linda C.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 OSA subjects before and after 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. We found that following 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment, resting MSNA levels were significantly reduced in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related brainstem activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons, and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MSNA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function. PMID:27013952

  15. Lipoxin A4 Stimulates Calcium-Activated Chloride Currents and Increases Airway Surface Liquid Height in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Mazen; Costello, Richard W.; McNally, Paul; Chiron, Raphaël; Harvey, Brian J.; Urbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl− secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA4 is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA4 are reported to be decreased in the airways of patients with CF. We have previously shown that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LXA4 produced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+. We have investigated, the effect of LXA4 on Cl− secretion and the functional consequences on ASL generation in bronchial epithelial cells obtained from CF and non-CF patient biopsies and in bronchial epithelial cell lines. We found that LXA4 stimulated a rapid intracellular Ca2+ increase in all of the different CF bronchial epithelial cells tested. In non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia, LXA4 stimulated whole-cell Cl− currents which were inhibited by NPPB (calcium-activated Cl− channel inhibitor), BAPTA-AM (chelator of intracellular Ca2+) but not by CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor). We found, using confocal imaging, that LXA4 increased the ASL height in non-CF and in CF airway bronchial epithelia. The LXA4 effect on ASL height was sensitive to bumetanide, an inhibitor of transepithelial Cl− secretion. The LXA4 stimulation of intracellular Ca2+, whole-cell Cl− currents, conductances and ASL height were inhibited by Boc-2, a specific antagonist of the ALX/FPR2 receptor. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence for a novel role of LXA4 in the stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ signalling leading to Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion and enhanced ASL height in non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia. PMID:22662206

  16. Neural Control of the Upper Airway: Respiratory and State-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kubin, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Upper airway muscles subserve many essential for survival orofacial behaviors, including their important role as accessory respiratory muscles. In the face of certain predisposition of craniofacial anatomy, both tonic and phasic inspiratory activation of upper airway muscles is necessary to protect the upper airway against collapse. This protective action is adequate during wakefulness, but fails during sleep which results in recurrent episodes of hypopneas and apneas, a condition known as the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA). Although OSA is almost exclusively a human disorder, animal models help unveil the basic principles governing the impact of sleep on breathing and upper airway muscle activity. This article discusses the neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neurophysiology of the different neuronal systems whose activity changes with sleep-wake states, such as the noradrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, orexinergic, histaminergic, GABAergic and glycinergic, and their impact on central respiratory neurons and upper airway motoneurons. Observations of the interactions between sleep-wake states and upper airway muscles in healthy humans and OSA patients are related to findings from animal models with normal upper airway, and various animal models of OSA, including the chronic-intermittent hypoxia model. Using a framework of upper airway motoneurons being under concurrent influence of central respiratory, reflex and state-dependent inputs, different neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides are considered as either causing a sleep-dependent withdrawal of excitation from motoneurons or mediating an active, sleep-related inhibition of motoneurons. Information about the neurochemistry of state-dependent control of upper airway muscles accumulated to date reveals fundamental principles and may help understand and treat OSA. PMID:27783860

  17. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-08

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle.

  18. Activation and intermuscular coherence of distal arm muscles during proximal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wook; Landers, Katlin; Harris-Love, Michelle L

    2014-03-01

    In the human upper extremity (UE), unintended effects of proximal muscle activation on muscles controlling the hand could be an important aspect of motor control due to the necessary coordination of distal and proximal segments during functional activities. This study aimed to elucidate the effects of concurrent activation of elbow muscles on the coordination between hand muscles performing a grip task. Eleven healthy subjects performed precision grip tasks while a constant extension or flexion moment was applied to their elbow joints, inducing a sustained submaximal contraction of elbow muscles to counter the applied torque. Activation of four hand muscles was measured during each task condition using surface electromyography (EMG). When concurrent activation of elbow muscles was induced, significant changes in the activation levels of the hand muscles were observed, with greater effects on the extrinsic finger extensor (23.2 % increase under 30 % elbow extensor activation; p = 0.003) than extrinsic finger flexor (14.2 % increase under 30 % elbow flexor activation; p = 0.130). Elbow muscle activation also induced involuntary changes in the intrinsic thumb flexor activation (44.6 % increase under 30 % elbow extensor activation; p = 0.005). EMG-EMG coherence analyses revealed that elbow muscle activation significantly reduced intermuscular coherence between distal muscle pairs, with its greatest effects on coherence in the β-band (13-25 Hz) (average of 17 % decrease under 30 % elbow flexor activation). The results of this study provide evidence for involuntary, muscle-specific interactions between distal and proximal UE muscles, which may contribute to UE motor performance in health and disease.

  19. Regional and species differences in glyburide-sensitive K+ channels in airway smooth muscles as estimated from actions of KC 128 and levcromakalim.

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, K; Yoshida, S; Imagawa, J; Nabata, H; Kuriyama, H

    1994-01-01

    1. The purpose of the present experiments was to elucidate the differences in actions of two K+ channel openers, KC 128 and levcromakalim, on the carbachol-induced contraction, membrane potential and 86Rb+ efflux of the dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscles. Furthermore, we compared the effects of these agents on guinea-pig and human airway smooth muscles. 2. In the dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle tissues, levcromakalim induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of the carbachol-induced contraction. The IC50 values were 0.35 microM (pIC50: 6.46 +/- 0.10, n = 9) and 0.55 microM (pIC50: 6.26 +/- 0.07, n = 5), respectively. KC 128 relaxed bronchial smooth muscles precontracted by carbachol with an IC50 value of 0.19 microM (pIC50: 6.73 +/- 0.10, n = 7). However, KC 128 had almost no effect on the contraction evoked by carbachol in the trachea (IC50 > 10 microM). The relaxations induced by levcromakalim and KC 128 were antagonized by glyburide (0.03-1 microM) but not by charybdotoxin (100 nM). 3. Levcromakalim (1 microM) hyperpolarized the membrane of both dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle cells, whereas KC 128 (1 microM) hyperpolarized the membrane of bronchial but not of tracheal smooth muscle cells. 4. Levcromakalim (10 microM) increased 86Rb+ efflux rate from both tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle tissues but KC 128 (10 microM) increased 86Rb+ efflux rate only from bronchial and not tracheal smooth muscle tissues. Glyburide (1 microM) prevented the hyperpolarization and the 86Rb+ efflux induced by these agents at the same concentration as observed for mechanical responses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858882

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway.

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  2. Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel-3.1 blocker TRAM-34 attenuates airway remodeling and eosinophilia in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Ozier, Annaig; Carvalho, Gabrielle; Ilina, Olga; Ousova, Olga; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre; Begueret, Hugues; Wulff, Heike; Marthan, Roger; Bradding, Peter; Berger, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Key features of asthma include bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), eosinophilic airway inflammation, and bronchial remodeling, characterized by subepithelial collagen deposition, airway fibrosis, and increased bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) mass. The calcium-activated K(+) channel K(Ca)3.1 is expressed by many cells implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, and is involved in both inflammatory and remodeling responses in a number of tissues. The specific K(Ca)3.1 blocker 5-[(2-chlorophenyl)(diphenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34) attenuates BSM cell proliferation, and both mast cell and fibrocyte recruitment in vitro. We aimed to examine the effects of K(Ca)3.1 blockade on BSM remodeling, airway inflammation, and BHR in a murine model of chronic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) on Days 0 and 14, and then challenged with intranasal OVA during Days 14-75. OVA-sensitized/challenged mice received TRAM-34 (120 mg/kg/day, subcutaneous) from Days -7 to 75 (combined treatment), Days -7 to 20 (preventive treatment), or Days 21 to 75 (curative treatment). Untreated mice received daily injections of vehicle (n = 8 per group). Bronchial remodeling was assessed by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Inflammation was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage and flow cytometry. We also determined BHR in both conscious and anesthetized mice via plethysmography. We demonstrated that curative treatment with TRAM-34 abolishes BSM remodeling and subbasement collagen deposition, and attenuates airway eosinophilia. Although curative treatment alone did not significantly reduce BHR, the combined treatment attenuated nonspecific BHR to methacholine. This study indicates that K(Ca)3.1 blockade could provide a new therapeutic strategy in asthma.

  3. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  4. Calcium uptake and bioelectrical activity of denervated and myotonic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Radu, H.; Gödri, I.; Albu, E.; Radu, A.; Robu, R.

    1970-01-01

    Calcium uptake on muscle microsomal fraction has been investigated in connection with bioelectrical activity in some muscle diseases. The findings showed a significant increase of calcium uptake in denervated muscle, which exhibited spontaneous bioelectrical activity (fibrillations). In myotonias, a low calcium uptake was peculiar to Steinert's disease but not to myotonia congenita. In other muscle diseases, such as progressive muscular dystrophy (Duchenne's type) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth's disease, the ability of muscle microsomal fraction to bind calcium was not changed. Starting with the key role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, the implications of calcium uptake disturbances in muscle electrogenesis are discussed. Images PMID:5431720

  5. GTP-Binding Proteins Inhibit cAMP Activation of Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Kizer, Neil; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    1992-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized, in part, by defective regulation of Cl^- secretion by airway epithelial cells. In CF, cAMP does not activate Cl^- channels in the apical membrane of airway epithelial cells. We report here whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrating that pertussis toxin, which uncouples heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) from their receptors, and guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate, which prevents G proteins from interacting with their effectors, increase Cl^- currents and restore cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells isolated from CF patients. In contrast, the G protein activators guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate and AlF^-_4 reduce Cl^- currents and inhibit cAMP from activating Cl^- currents in normal airway epithelial cells. In CF cells treated with pertussis toxin or guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate and in normal cells, cAMP activates a Cl^- conductance that has properties similar to CF transmembrane-conductance regulator Cl^- channels. We conclude that heterotrimeric G proteins inhibit cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells and that modulation of the inhibitory G protein signaling pathway may have the therapeutic potential for improving cAMP-activated Cl^- secretion in CF.

  6. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  7. Ozone activates airway nerves via the selective stimulation of TRPA1 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E; Undem, Bradley J

    2010-02-01

    Inhalation of ozone is a major health risk in industrialized nations. Ozone can impair lung function and induce respiratory symptoms through sensory neural-mediated pathways, yet the specific interaction of ozone with airway sensory nerves has yet to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate, using a vagally innervated ex vivo tracheal-lung mouse preparation, that ozone selectively and directly evokes action potential discharge in a subset of nociceptive bronchopulmonary nerves, namely slow conducting C-fibres. Sensitivity to ozone correlated with the transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 agonist, cinnamaldehyde, with ozone having no effect on cinnamaldehyde-insensitive fibres. C-fibre responses to ozone were abolished by ruthenium red (TRP inhibitor). Ozone also stimulated a subset of nociceptive sensory neurones isolated from vagal ganglia of wild-type mice, but failed to activate neurones isolated from transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) knockout mice. Ozone activated HEK293 cells transfected with TRPA1, but failed to activate non-transfected HEK293 or HEK293 transfected with the capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel. Thus, ozone is not an indiscriminate neuronal activator, but rather it potently and selectively activates a subset of airway C-fibres by directly stimulating TRPA1.

  8. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment.

  9. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  10. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225-230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine.

  11. ACTIVE STATE OF MUSCLE IN IODOACETATE RIGOR

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, George E.; Sandow, Alexander

    1959-01-01

    Frog sartorius muscles, equilibrated to 2 x 10-4 M iodoacetic acid-Ringer's solution and activated by a series of twitches or a long tetanus, perform a rigor response consisting in general of a contractile change which plateaus and is then automatically reversed. Isotonic rigor shortening obeys a force-velocity relation which, with certain differences in value of the constants, accords with Hill's equation for this relation. Changes in rigidity during either isotonic or isometric rigor response show that the capacity of the rigor muscle to bear a load increases more abruptly than the corresponding onset of the ordinarily recorded response, briefly plateaus, and then decays. A quick release of about 1 mm. applied at any instant of isometric rigor output causes the tension to drop instantaneously to zero and then redevelop, the rate of redevelopment varying as does the intensity of the load-bearing capacity. These results demonstrate that rigor mechanical responses result from interaction of a passive, undamped series elastic component, and a contractile component with active state properties like those of normal contraction. Adenosinetriphosphate is known to break down in association with development of the rigor active state. This is discussed in relation to the apparent absence of ATP splitting in normal activation of the contractile component. PMID:13654738

  12. Stochastic modelling of muscle recruitment during activity

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Saulo; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki; Viceconti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Muscle forces can be selected from a space of muscle recruitment strategies that produce stable motion and variable muscle and joint forces. However, current optimization methods provide only a single muscle recruitment strategy. We modelled the spectrum of muscle recruitment strategies while walking. The equilibrium equations at the joints, muscle constraints, static optimization solutions and 15-channel electromyography (EMG) recordings for seven walking cycles were taken from earlier studies. The spectrum of muscle forces was calculated using Bayesian statistics and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, whereas EMG-driven muscle forces were calculated using EMG-driven modelling. We calculated the differences between the spectrum and EMG-driven muscle force for 1–15 input EMGs, and we identified the muscle strategy that best matched the recorded EMG pattern. The best-fit strategy, static optimization solution and EMG-driven force data were compared using correlation analysis. Possible and plausible muscle forces were defined as within physiological boundaries and within EMG boundaries. Possible muscle and joint forces were calculated by constraining the muscle forces between zero and the peak muscle force. Plausible muscle forces were constrained within six selected EMG boundaries. The spectrum to EMG-driven force difference increased from 40 to 108 N for 1–15 EMG inputs. The best-fit muscle strategy better described the EMG-driven pattern (R2 = 0.94; RMSE = 19 N) than the static optimization solution (R2 = 0.38; RMSE = 61 N). Possible forces for 27 of 34 muscles varied between zero and the peak muscle force, inducing a peak hip force of 11.3 body-weights. Plausible muscle forces closely matched the selected EMG patterns; no effect of the EMG constraint was observed on the remaining muscle force ranges. The model can be used to study alternative muscle recruitment strategies in both physiological and pathophysiological neuromotor conditions. PMID:25844155

  13. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  14. Electrically and Hybrid-Induced Muscle Activations: Effects of Muscle Size and Fiber Type

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Kelly; Faghri, Pouran D.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES) frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz) on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and vastus lateralis (VL)) was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years) participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1) compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) force, and 2) compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz) induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG. PMID:27990244

  15. High altitude simulation, substance P and airway rapidly adapting receptor activity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, R; Yasir, A; Vashisht, A; Kulshreshtha, R; Singh, S B; Ravi, K

    2011-09-15

    To investigate whether there is a change in airway rapidly adapting receptor (RAR) activity during high altitude exposure, rabbits were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure, 429 mm Hg). With 12 h exposure, when there was pulmonary congestion, an increase in basal RAR activity was observed. With 36 h exposure, when there was alveolar edema, there was a further increase in basal RAR activity. In these backgrounds, there was an increase in the sensitivity of the RARs to substance P (SP). To assess whether there was an increase in lung SP level, neutral endopeptidase activity was determined which showed a decrease in low barometric pressure exposed groups. It is concluded that along with the SP released, pulmonary congestion and edema produced, respectively by different durations of low barometric pressure exposure cause a progressive increase in RAR activity which may account for the respiratory symptoms reported in climbers who are unacclimatized.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated homoserine lactone C12 rapidly activates apoptosis in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fu, Zhu; Patanwala, Maria; Hum, Lauren; Lopez-Guzman, Mirielle; Illek, Beate; Kong, Weidong; Lynch, Susan V; Machen, Terry E

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) forms biofilms in lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, a process regulated by quorum-sensing molecules including N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (C12). C12 (10-100 µM) rapidly triggered events commonly associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in JME (CF ΔF508CFTR, nasal surface) epithelial cells: depolarization of mitochondrial (mito) membrane potential (Δψ(mito)) and release of cytochrome C (cytoC) from mitos into cytosol and activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9. C12 also had novel effects on the endoplasmic reticulum (release of both Ca(2+) and ER-targeted GFP and oxidized contents into the cytosol). Effects began within 5 min and were complete in 1-2 h. C12 caused similar activation of caspases and release of cytoC from mitos in Calu-3 (wtCFTR, bronchial gland) cells, showing that C12-triggered responses occurred similarly in different airway epithelial types. C12 had nearly identical effects on three key aspects of the apoptosis response (caspase 3/7, depolarization of Δψ(mito) and reduction of redox potential in the ER) in JME and CFTR-corrected JME cells (adenoviral expression), showing that CFTR was likely not an important regulator of C12-triggered apoptosis in airway epithelia. Exposure of airway cultures to biofilms from PAO1wt caused depolarization of Δψ(mito) and increases in Ca(cyto) like 10-50 µM C12. In contrast, biofilms from PAO1ΔlasI (C12 deficient) had no effect, suggesting that C12 from P. aeruginosa biofilms may contribute to accumulation of apoptotic cells that cannot be cleared from CF lungs. A model to explain the effects of C12 is proposed.

  17. Muscle motion and EMG activity in vibration treatment.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Antonio; La Gatta, Antonio; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study is to highlight the relationship between muscle motion, generated by whole body vibration, and the correspondent electromyographic (EMG) activity and to suggest a new method to customize the stimulation frequency. Simultaneous recordings of EMG and tri-axial accelerations of quadriceps rectus femoris from fifteen subjects undergoing vibration treatments were collected. Vibrations were delivered via a sinusoidal oscillating platform at different frequencies (10-45 Hz). Muscle motion was estimated by processing the accelerometer data. Large EMG motion artifacts were removed using sharp notch filters centred at the vibration frequency and its superior harmonics. EMG-RMS values were computed and analyzed before and after artifact suppression to assess muscular activity. Muscles acceleration amplitude increased with frequency. Muscle displacements revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour of the muscle. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject. Moreover, RMS of artifact-free EMG was found well correlated (R(2)=0.82) to the actual muscle displacement, while the maximum of the EMG response was found related to the mechanical resonance frequency of muscle. Results showed that maximum muscular activity was found in correspondence to the mechanical resonance of the muscle itself. Assuming the hypothesis that muscle activation is proportional to muscle displacement, treatment optimization (i.e. to choose the best stimulation frequency) could be obtained by simply monitoring local acceleration (resonance), leading to a more effective muscle stimulation. Motion artifact produced an overestimation of muscle activity, therefore its removal was essential.

  18. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tlili, Mounira; Rouatbi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Vaudry, David; Wurtz, Olivier; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2015-01-01

    The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h) for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM) for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC) and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α) in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders. PMID:26199679

  19. Graded Activation in Frog Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Costantin, L. L.; Taylor, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    The membrane potential of frog single muscle fibers in solutions containing tetrodotoxin was controlled with a two-electrode voltage clamp. Local contractions elicited by 100-ms square steps of depolarization were observed microscopically and recorded on cinefilm. The absence of myofibrillar folding with shortening to striation spacings below 1.95 µm served as a criterion for activation of the entire fiber cross section. With depolarizing steps of increasing magnitude, shortening occurred first in the most superficial myofibrils and spread inward to involve axial myofibrils as the depolarization was increased. In contractions in which the entire fiber cross section shortened actively, both the extent of shortening and the velocity of shortening at a given striation spacing could be graded by varying the magnitude of the depolarization step. The results provide evidence that the degree of activation of individual myofibrils can be graded with membrane depolarization. PMID:4540418

  20. Mean individual muscle activities and ratios of total muscle activities in a selective muscle strengthening experiment: the effects of lower limb muscle activity based on mediolateral slope angles during a one-leg stance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide basic data for research on selective muscle strengthening by identifying mean muscle activities and calculating muscle ratios for use in developing strengthening methods. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one healthy volunteers were included in this study. Muscle activity was measured during a one-leg stance under 6 conditions of slope angle: 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°. The data used in the analysis were root mean square and % total muscle activity values. [Results] There were significant differences in the root mean square of the gluteus medius, the hamstring, and the medial gastrocnemius muscles. There were significant differences in % total muscle activity of the medial gastrocnemius. [Conclusion] Future studies aimed at developing selective muscle strengthening methods are likely to yield more effective results by using muscle activity ratios based on electromyography data. PMID:27799690

  1. The GABAA agonist muscimol attenuates induced airway constriction in guinea pigs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Neil R; Gallos, George; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W

    2009-04-01

    GABA(A) channels are ubiquitously expressed on neuronal cells and act via an inward chloride current to hyperpolarize the cell membrane of mature neurons. Expression and function of GABA(A) channels on airway smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated in vitro. Airway smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization contributes to relaxation. We hypothesized that muscimol, a selective GABA(A) agonist, could act on endogenous GABA(A) channels expressed on airway smooth muscle to attenuate induced increases in airway pressures in anesthetized guinea pigs in vivo. In an effort to localize muscimol's effect to GABA(A) channels expressed on airway smooth muscle, we pretreated guinea pigs with a selective GABA(A) antagonist (gabazine) or eliminated lung neural control from central parasympathetic, sympathetic, and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) nerves before muscimol treatment. Pretreatment with intravenous muscimol alone attenuated intravenous histamine-, intravenous acetylcholine-, or vagal nerve-stimulated increases in peak pulmonary inflation pressure. Pretreatment with the GABA(A) antagonist gabazine blocked muscimol's effect. After the elimination of neural input to airway tone by central parasympathetic nerves, peripheral sympathetic nerves, and NANC nerves, intravenous muscimol retained its ability to block intravenous acetylcholine-induced increases in peak pulmonary inflation pressures. These findings demonstrate that the GABA(A) agonist muscimol acting specifically via GABA(A) channel activation attenuates airway constriction independently of neural contributions. These findings suggest that therapeutics directed at the airway smooth muscle GABA(A) channel may be a novel therapy for airway constriction following airway irritation and possibly more broadly in diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  2. Functional contribution of mandibular advancement to awake upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Tsuiki, Satoru; Ryan, C Frank; Lowe, Alan A; Inoue, Yuichi

    2007-12-01

    In the narrowed upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a neuromuscular compensatory mechanism augments the activity of the upper airway dilator muscles in defense of upper airway patency, particularly during inspiration. We hypothesized that mechanical enlargement of the upper airway by a mandibular advancement oral appliance would permit a reduction in this neuromuscular compensation during wakefulness. To test this hypothesis, we focused on changes in the cross-sectional (CS) area of the upper airway before and after emplacement of a ventrally titrated oral appliance in 12 awake OSA patients. The CS areas at the end of tidal expiration (CS area-EET) and at the nadir of intraluminal pressure during inspiration (CS area-IN) were obtained using videoendoscopy. The median apnea-hypopnea index decreased with mandibular advancement. Before mandibular advancement, there was no difference between CS area-EET and CS area-IN in the velopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. This indicates that upper airway dilator muscle activity increased during inspiration to counteract the intraluminal negative pressure of the upper airway. After mandibular advancement, CS area-EET increased in the velopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx, but CS area-IN was unchanged at any level and was less than CS area-EET in the velopharynx and oropharynx. These findings suggest that mandibular advancement enlarges the upper airway and may reduce upper airway dilator muscle activity during inspiration. We conclude that oral appliances act to return the upper airway towards a normal configuration and pattern of muscle function in OSA patients.

  3. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy Drew, Kirstin R.; Sanders, Lori K.; Culumber, Zachary W.; Zribi, Olena; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2009-06-17

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers.

  4. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, K.R.Purdy; Sanders, L.K.; Culumber, Z.W.; Zribi, O.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-05-21

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers.

  5. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  6. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  7. Viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of airway smooth muscle tissue: roles of mechanical force and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoru; Majumdar, Arnab; Kume, Hiroaki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Naruse, Keiji; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Suki, Béla

    2006-06-01

    The viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle tissues were investigated by measuring the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli using pseudorandom small-amplitude length oscillations between 0.12 and 3.5 Hz superimposed on static strains of either 10 or 20% of initial length. The G" and G' spectra were interpreted using a linear viscoelastic model incorporating damping (G) and stiffness (H), respectively. Both G and H were elevated following an increase in strain from 10 to 20%. There was no change in harmonic distortion (K(d)), an index of dynamic nonlinearity, between 10 and 20% strains. Application of methacholine at 10% strain significantly increased G and H while it decreased K(d). Cytochalasin D, isoproterenol, and HA-1077, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly decreased both G and H but increased K(d). Following cytochalasin D, G, H, and K(d) were all elevated when mean strain increased from 10 to 20%. There were no changes in hysteresivity, G/H, under any condition. We conclude that not all aspects of the viscoelastic properties of tracheal smooth muscle strips are similar to those previously observed in cultured cells. We attribute these differences to the contribution of the extracellular matrix. Additionally, using a network model, we show that the dynamic nonlinear behavior, which has not been observed in cell culture, is associated with the state of the contractile stress and may derive from active polymerization within the cytoskeleton.

  8. Does chronic physical activity level modify the airway inflammatory response to an acute bout of exercise in the postprandial period?

    PubMed

    Kurti, Stephanie P; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Chapes, Stephen K; Teeman, Colby S; Cull, Brooke J; Emerson, Sam R; Levitt, Morton H; Smith, Joshua R; Harms, Craig A

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that a single high-fat meal (HFM) leads to increased airway inflammation. However, exercise is a natural anti-inflammatory and may modify postprandial airway inflammation. The postprandial airway inflammatory response is likely to be modified by chronic physical activity (PA) level. This study investigated whether chronic PA modifies the airway inflammatory response to an acute bout of exercise in the postprandial period in both insufficiently active and active subjects. Thirty-nine nonasthmatic subjects (20 active, 13 males/7 females) who exceeded PA guidelines (≥150 min moderate-vigorous PA/week) and 19 insufficiently active (6 males/13 females) underwent an incremental treadmill test to exhaustion to determine peak oxygen uptake. Subjects were then randomized to a condition (COND), either remaining sedentary (CON) or exercising (EX) post-HFM. Exercise was performed at the heart rate corresponding to 60% peak oxygen uptake on a treadmill for 1 h post-HFM (63% fat, 10 kcal/kg body weight). Blood lipids and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO: marker of airway inflammation) were measured at baseline and 2 h and 4 h post-HFM. Sputum differential cell counts were performed at baseline and 4 h post-HFM. The mean eNO response for all groups increased at 2 h post-HFM (∼6%) and returned to baseline by 4 h (p = 0.03). There was a time × COND interaction (p = 0.04), where EX had a greater eNO response at 4 h compared with CON. Sputum neutrophils increased at 4 h post-HFM (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that airway inflammation occurs after an HFM when exercise is performed in the postprandial period, regardless of habitual activity level.

  9. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  10. An experimental study on the impacts of inspiratory and expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Du, Juan; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-01-01

    In spite of intensive investigations, the role of spontaneous breathing (SB) activity in ARDS has not been well defined yet and little has been known about the different contribution of inspiratory or expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS. In present study, oleic acid-induced beagle dogs’ ARDS models were employed and ventilated with the same level of mean airway pressure. Respiratory mechanics, lung volume, gas exchange and inflammatory cytokines were measured during mechanical ventilation, and lung injury was determined histologically. As a result, for the comparable ventilator setting, preserved inspiratory muscles activity groups resulted in higher end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and oxygenation index. In addition, less lung damage scores and lower levels of system inflammatory cytokines were revealed after 8 h of ventilation. In comparison, preserved expiratory muscles activity groups resulted in lower EELV and oxygenation index. Moreover, higher lung injury scores and inflammatory cytokines levels were observed after 8 h of ventilation. Our findings suggest that the activity of inspiratory muscles has beneficial effects, whereas that of expiratory muscles exerts adverse effects during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model. Therefore, for mechanically ventilated patients with ARDS, the demands for deep sedation or paralysis might be replaced by the strategy of expiratory muscles paralysis through epidural anesthesia. PMID:28230150

  11. An experimental study on the impacts of inspiratory and expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Du, Juan; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-02-23

    In spite of intensive investigations, the role of spontaneous breathing (SB) activity in ARDS has not been well defined yet and little has been known about the different contribution of inspiratory or expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS. In present study, oleic acid-induced beagle dogs' ARDS models were employed and ventilated with the same level of mean airway pressure. Respiratory mechanics, lung volume, gas exchange and inflammatory cytokines were measured during mechanical ventilation, and lung injury was determined histologically. As a result, for the comparable ventilator setting, preserved inspiratory muscles activity groups resulted in higher end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and oxygenation index. In addition, less lung damage scores and lower levels of system inflammatory cytokines were revealed after 8 h of ventilation. In comparison, preserved expiratory muscles activity groups resulted in lower EELV and oxygenation index. Moreover, higher lung injury scores and inflammatory cytokines levels were observed after 8 h of ventilation. Our findings suggest that the activity of inspiratory muscles has beneficial effects, whereas that of expiratory muscles exerts adverse effects during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model. Therefore, for mechanically ventilated patients with ARDS, the demands for deep sedation or paralysis might be replaced by the strategy of expiratory muscles paralysis through epidural anesthesia.

  12. ABDOMINAL MUSCLE ACTIVATION INCREASES LUMBAR SPINAL STABILITY: ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTIONS OF DIFFERENT MUSCLE GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.F.; Gardner-Morse, Mack G.; Henry, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Antagonistic activation of abdominal muscles and raised intra-abdominal pressure are associated with both spinal unloading and spinal stabilization. Rehabilitation regimens have been proposed to improve spinal stability via selective recruitment of certain trunk muscle groups. This biomechanical study used an analytical model to address whether lumbar spinal stability is increased by selective activation of abdominal muscles. Methods The biomechanical model included anatomically realistic three-layers of curved abdominal musculature connected by fascia, rectus abdominis and 77 symmetrical pairs of dorsal muscles. The muscle activations were calculated with the model loaded with either flexion, extension, lateral bending or axial rotation moments up to 60 Nm, along with intra-abdominal pressure up to 5 or 10 kPa (37.5 or 75 mm Hg) and partial bodyweight. After solving for muscle forces, a buckling analysis quantified spinal stability. Subsequently, different patterns of muscle activation were studied by forcing activation of selected abdominal muscles to at least 10% or 20% of maximum. Findings The spinal stability increased by an average factor of 1.8 with doubling of intra-abdominal pressure. Forced activation of obliques or transversus abdominis muscles to at least 10% of maximum increased stability slightly for efforts other than flexion, but forcing at least 20% activation generally did not produce further increase in stability. Forced activation of rectus abdominis did not increase stability. Interpretation Based on predictions from an analytical spinal buckling model, the degree of stability was not substantially influenced by selective forcing of muscle activation. This casts doubt on the supposed mechanism of action of specific abdominal muscle exercise regimens that have been proposed for low back pain rehabilitation. PMID:21571410

  13. Respiratory muscle activity and patient–ventilator asynchrony during different settings of noninvasive ventilation in stable hypercapnic COPD: does high inspiratory pressure lead to respiratory muscle unloading?

    PubMed Central

    Duiverman, Marieke L; Huberts, Anouk S; van Eykern, Leo A; Bladder, Gerrie; Wijkstra, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction High-intensity noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to improve outcomes in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. However, there is insufficient knowledge about whether with this more controlled ventilatory mode optimal respiratory muscle unloading is provided without an increase in patient–ventilator asynchrony (PVA). Patients and methods Ten chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients on home mechanical ventilation were included. Four different ventilatory settings were investigated in each patient in random order, each for 15 min, varying the inspiratory positive airway pressure and backup breathing frequency. With surface electromyography (EMG), activities of the intercostal muscles, diaphragm, and scalene muscles were determined. Furthermore, pressure tracings were derived simultaneously in order to assess PVA. Results Compared to spontaneous breathing, the most pronounced decrease in EMG activity was achieved with the high-pressure settings. Adding a high breathing frequency did reduce EMG activity per breath, while the decrease in EMG activity over 1 min was comparable with the high-pressure, low-frequency setting. With high backup breathing frequencies less breaths were pressure supported (25% vs 97%). PVAs occurred more frequently with the low-frequency settings (P=0.017). Conclusion High-intensity NIV might provide optimal unloading of respiratory muscles, without undue increases in PVA. PMID:28138234

  14. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in CVC at the bretylium treated sites. The succeeding bout of isometric exercise in hyperthermia significantly reduced CVC at both untreated (pre-exercise: 59.0 +/- 4.8, exercise: 47.3 +/- 4.0, PEI: 50.1 +/- 4.1% of maximum; both P < 0.05) and bretylium treated sites (pre-exercise: 61.4 +/- 7.3, exercise: 50.6 +/- 5.1, PEI: 53.9 +/- 6.0% of maximum, both P < 0.05). At both sites, CVC during PEI was lower than during the pre-exercise period (P < 0.05). Sweat rate rose significantly during both bouts of isometric exercise and remained elevated during PEI. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the reduction in CVC during isometric exercise in hyperthermia, including the inhibition of the active vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle

  15. Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 Strain Activates TNFR1 Signaling in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Umadevi Sajjan, S.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Forstner, Janet F.; LiPuma, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important pulmonary pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Infection is often associated with severe pulmonary inflammation and some patients develop a fatal necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis (‘cepacia syndrome’). The mechanisms by which this species causes severe pulmonary inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that B. cenocepacia BC7, a potentially virulent representative of the epidemic ET12 lineage binds to tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1) and activates TNFR1-related signaling pathway similar to TNF-α, a natural ligand for TNFR1. This interaction participates in stimulating a robust IL-8 production from CF airway epithelial cells. In contrast, BC45, a relatively less virulent ET12 representative, and ATCC 25416, an environmental B. cepacia strain do not bind to TNFR1 and stimulate only minimal IL-8 production from CF cells. Further, TNFR1 expression is increased in CF airway epithelial cells compared to non-CF cells. We also show that B. cenocepacia ET12 strain colocaizes with TNFR1 in vitro and in the lungs of CF patient who died due to infection with B. cenocepacia, ET12 strain. Together, these results suggest that interaction of B. cenocepacia, ET12 strain with TNFR1 may contribute to robust inflammatory responses elicited by this organism. PMID:17697131

  16. Zinc sulfate inhibited inflammation of Der p2-induced airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing ERK1/2 and NF-κB phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chia-Ju; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2013-06-01

    Inflammation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is believed to be important in causing airway hyperresponsiveness. However, zinc has been reported to be implicated in many kinds of cell inflammation. Little is known about the effect of zinc treatment on Der p2 (group II Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-induced inflammation from ASMCs. This study investigated effects and mechanisms of zinc in Der p2-treated ASMCs. Der p2-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with various concentrations of zinc sulfate (ZnSO₄) 6 μM, 12 μM, 24 μM, and 96 μM. The proteins and mRNAs of cytokines in ASMCs were examined by ELISA and real-time PCR. Intracellular zinc was stained with Zinquin fluorescence. The cell signaling protein expression was detected by Western blot. Der p2 was used to induce interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production of ASMCs. However, we found that 24 μM ZnSO₄ reduced these inflammatory mediators production of Der p2-treated primary ASMCs. Der p2-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) phosphorylation were suppressed by supplementation of 24 μM ZnSO₄. Zinc is an anti-inflammatory agent that reduces inflammation of Der p2-treated ASMCs through the suppression of the ERK and NF-κB pathway. The results may be helpful for the development of effective treatments.

  17. Trunk Muscle Activities During Abdominal Bracing: Comparison Among Muscles and Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Takahashi, Takumi; Takai, Yohei; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank) and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench) exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG) activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax). The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60%) than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%). The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Key Points Trunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing was examined with regard to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Abdominal bracing preferentially activates internal oblique muscles even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Abdominal bracing should be

  18. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  19. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  20. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  1. Activation of eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells by ozonolysis products of membrane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Leikauf, G D; Zhao, Q; Zhou, S; Santrock, J

    1995-09-01

    Inhaled ozone can react with a variety of cellular macromolecules within the lung. Recent analyses of the chemistry of ozone reactions with unsaturated fatty acids, which are present in all membranes and in mucus in the airways, indicate that ozonolysis yields one aldehyde and one hydroxyhydroperoxide molecule for each molecule of ozone. The hydroxyhydroperoxide molecule is unstable in aqueous environments, and subsequently yields a second aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide. The structure of common unsaturated fatty acids is such that attack by ozone at the carbon-carbon double bonds will yield 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and hydroxyhydroperoxide. This study examines the effects of ozonolysis products on eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells. Eicosanoid biosynthesis is important in a wide array of pathophysiological responses in the airway, and the release of eicosanoids by the epithelial barrier is likely to be significant in diseases induced by environmental factors. Previously, we demonstrated that ozone can increase eicosanoid synthesis from airway epithelial cells exposed in vitro. Human exposures to concentrations of ozone below the current National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm, not to be exceeded for more than one hour once per year) also resulted in increased eicosanoids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To determine whether ozonolysis products could activate eicosanoid release, we exposed human airway epithelial cells to 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon aldehydes, hydroxyhydroperoxides, and hydrogen peroxide. We measured (1) eicosanoid metabolism using high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassays, and (2) the effects of the aldehydes, hydroxyhydroperoxides, and hydrogen peroxide on cell lysis. Eicosanoid release increased after exposure to aldehyde; release induced by 9-carbon (nonanal) aldehyde was greater than that induced by the 6-carbon (hexanal) or 3-carbon (propanal) aldehydes

  2. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  3. Regionalizing muscle activity causes changes to the magnitude and direction of the force from whole muscles-a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Rahemi, Hadi; Nigam, Nilima; Wakeling, James M

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can contain neuromuscular compartments that are spatially distinct regions that can receive relatively independent levels of activation. This study tested how the magnitude and direction of the force developed by a whole muscle would change when the muscle activity was regionalized within the muscle. A 3D finite element model of a muscle with its bounding aponeurosis was developed for the lateral gastrocnemius, and isometric contractions were simulated for a series of conditions with either a uniform activation pattern, or regionally distinct activation patterns: in all cases the mean activation from all fibers within the muscle reached 10%. The models showed emergent features of the fiber geometry that matched physiological characteristics: with fibers shortening, rotating to greater pennation, adopting curved trajectories in 3D and changes in the thickness and width of the muscle belly. Simulations were repeated for muscle with compliant, normal and stiff aponeurosis and the aponeurosis stiffness affected the changes to the fiber geometry and the resultant muscle force. Changing the regionalization of the activity resulted to changes in the magnitude, direction and center of the force vector from the whole muscle. Regionalizing the muscle activity resulted in greater muscle force than the simulation with uniform activity across the muscle belly. The study shows how the force from a muscle depends on the complex interactions between the muscle fibers and connective tissues and the region of muscle that is active.

  4. Muscle activation patterns when passively stretching spastic lower limb muscles of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8 ± 3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I-IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental position

  5. a Dynamical Model of Muscle Activation, Fatigue and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing Z.; Yue, Guang H.; Brown, Robert W.

    2001-04-01

    A dynamical model on muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery was developed to provide a theoretical framework for explaining the force produced by muscle(s) during the process of getting activated and fatigued. By simplifying the fatigue effect and the recovery effect as two phenomenological parameters (F, R), we developed a set of dynamical equations to describe the behavior of muscle(s) as a group of motor units under an external drive, e.g., voluntary brain effort. This model provides a macroscopic view for understanding the biophysical mechanisms of voluntary drive, fatigue effect, and recovery in stimulating, limiting and modulating the force output from muscle(s). Agreement between the experimental data and the predicted forces is excellent. This model may also generate new possibilities in clinical and engineering applications. The parameters introduced by this model can serve as good indicators of physical conditions, and may be useful for quantitative diagnosis of certain diseases related to muscles, especially symptoms of fatigue. Inference from the model can clarify a long-debating question regarding the maximal possibility of muscle force production. It can also be used as guideline for simulating real muscle in muscle engineering or design of human-mimic robot.

  6. Neck muscle activity in skydivers during parachute opening shock.

    PubMed

    Lo Martire, R; Gladh, K; Westman, A; Lindholm, P; Nilsson, J; Äng, B O

    2016-03-01

    This observational study investigated skydiver neck muscle activity during parachute opening shock (POS), as epidemiological data recently suggested neck pain in skydivers to be related to POS. Twenty experienced skydivers performed two terminal velocity skydives each. Surface electromyography quantified muscle activity bilaterally from the anterior neck, the upper and lower posterior neck, and the upper shoulders; and two triaxial accelerometers sampled deceleration. Muscle activity was normalized as the percentage of reference maximum voluntary electrical activity (% MVE); and temporal muscle activity onset was related to POS onset. Our results showed that neck muscle activity during POS reached mean magnitudes of 53-104% MVE, often exceeding reference activity in the lower posterior neck and upper shoulders. All investigated muscle areas' mean temporal onsets occurred <50 ms after POS onset (9-34 ms latencies), which is consistent with anticipatory motor control. The high muscle activity observed supports that the neck is under substantial strain during POS, while temporal muscle activation suggests anticipatory motor control to be a strategy used by skydivers to protect the cervical spine from POS. This study's findings contribute to understanding the high rates of POS-related neck pain, and further support the need for evaluation of neck pain preventative strategies.

  7. Comparison between muscle activation measured by electromyography and muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography for effective muscle assessment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk; Kim, Suhn-Yeop; Oh, Duck-Won; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, Ji-Whan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the intrarater reliability and validity of muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography (US) and muscle activity via electromyography (EMG) during manual muscle testing (MMT) of the external oblique (EO) and lumbar multifidus (MF) muscles. The study subjects were 30 healthy individuals who underwent MMT at different grades. EMG was used to measure the muscle activity in terms of ratio to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and root mean square (RMS) metrics. US was used to measure the raw muscle thickness, the ratio of muscle thickness at MVC, and the ratio of muscle thickness at rest. One examiner performed measurements on each subject in 3 trials. The intrarater reliabilities of the % MVC RMS and raw RMS metrics for EMG and the % MVC thickness metrics for US were excellent (ICC=0.81-0.98). There was a significant difference between all the grades measured using the % MVC thickness metric (p<0.01). Further, this % MVC thickness metric of US showed a significantly higher correlation with the EMG measurement methods than with the others (r=0.51-0.61). Our findings suggest that the % MVC thickness determined by US was the most sensitive of all methods for assessing the MMT grade.

  8. Independent Active Contraction of Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscle (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, whereas all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. Mechanical independence between both types of compartments has been demonstrated during passive tensile loading. We examined coupling between EOM compartments during active, ex vivo contraction. Methods. Fresh bovine EOMs were removed, and one compartment of each was coated with hydrophobic petrolatum. Contraction of the uncoated compartment was induced by immersion in a solution of 50 mM CaCl2 at 38°C labeled with sodium fluorescein dye, whereas tensions in both compartments were monitored by strain gauges. Control experiments omitted petrolatum so that the entire EOM contracted. After physiological experiments, EOMs were sectioned transversely to demonstrate specificity of CaCl2 permeation by yellow fluorescence dye excited by blue light. Results. In control experiments without petrolatum, both transverse and GL and OL compartments contracted similarly. Selective compartmental omission of petrolatum caused markedly independent compartmental contraction whether measured at the GL or the OL insertions or for transverse compartments at the scleral insertion. Although some CaCl2 spread occurred, mean (±SD) tension in the coated compartments averaged only 10.5 ± 3.3% and 6.0 ± 1.5% in GL/OL and transverse compartments, respectively relative to uncoated compartments. Fluorescein penetration confirmed selective CaCl2 permeation. Conclusions. These data confirm passive tensile findings of mechanical independence of EOM compartments and extend results to active contraction. EOMs behave actively as if composed of mechanically independent parallel fiber bundles having different insertional targets, consistent with the active pulley and transverse compartmental hypotheses. PMID:25503460

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 regulates TGF-β1 production in airway epithelia and asthmatic airway remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qin, X.-J.; Zhang, G.-S.; Zhang, X.; Qiu, Z.-W.; Wang, P.-L.; Li, Y.-W.; Li, W.; Xie, Q.-M.; Ke, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J.; Shen, H.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 produced in airway epithelia has been suggested as a contributor to the airway remodeling observed in asthma patients. The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 is a demonstrable modulator of TGF-β1 production and thus a potential regulator of airway remodeling. Objectives To define the signal event by which SHP2 regulates asthmatic responses in airway epithelial cells by using a mouse model of experimental OVA-induced airway remodeling. Methods The airways of Shp2flox/flox mice were infected with recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing a Cre recombinase–green fluorescence protein (GFP) fusion protein as part of allergen provocation studies using mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and repeatedly challenged with OVA. Several endpoint pathologies were assessed, including airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), lung inflammatory score, peribronchial collagen deposition, and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) hyperplasia. In vitro studies using airway epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were used to investigate the role of SHP2 in the regulation of pulmonary remodeling events, including the expression of collagen, α-SMA, and TGF-β1. Results Chronic OVA challenges in wild-type mice resulted in airway remodeling and lung dysfunction (e.g., increased inflammatory scores, collagen deposition (fibrosis), smooth muscle hyperplasia, and a significant increase in AHR). These endpoint pathology metrics were each significantly attenuated by conditional shp2 gene knockdown in airway epithelia. In vitro studies using BEAS-2B cells also demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1 production by these cells correlated with the extent of shp2 gene expression. Conclusions SHP2 activities in airway epithelial cells appear to modulate TGF-β1 production and, in turn, regulate allergic airway remodeling following allergen provocation. Clinical Implications Our findings identify SHP2 as a previously underappreciated contributor to the airway remodeling and lung

  10. Synaptic activity and connective tissue remodeling in denervated frog muscle

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Denervation of skeletal muscle results in dramatic remodeling of the cellular and molecular composition of the muscle connective tissue. This remodeling is concentrated in muscle near neuromuscular junctions and involves the accumulation of interstitial cells and several extracellular matrix molecules. Given the role of extracellular matrix in neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, we predict that this remodeling of the junctional connective tissue directly influences the regeneration of the neuromuscular junction. As one step toward understanding the role of this denervation-induced remodeling in synapse formation, we have begun to look for the signals that are involved in initiating the junctional accumulations of interstitial cells and matrix molecules. Here, the role of muscle inactivity as a signal was examined. The distributions of interstitial cells, fibronectin, and tenascin were determined in muscles inactivated by presynaptic blockade of muscle activity with tetrodotoxin. We found that blockade of muscle activity for up to 4 wk produced neither the junctional accumulation of interstitial cells nor the junctional concentrations of tenascin and fibronectin normally present in denervated frog muscle. In contrast, the muscle inactivity induced the extrajunctional appearance of two synapse-specific molecules, the acetylcholine receptor and a muscle fiber antigen, mAb 3B6. These results demonstrate that the remodeling of the junctional connective tissue in response to nerve injury is a unique response of muscle to denervation in that it is initiated by a mechanism that is independent of muscle activity. Thus connective tissue remodeling in denervated skeletal muscle may be induced by signals released from or associated with the nerve other than the evoked release of neurotransmitter. PMID:7525607

  11. Muscle contractile activity regulates Sirt3 protein expression in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Fumi; Kawasaki, Emi; Sakai, Atsushi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2010-08-01

    Sirt3, a member of the sirtuin family, is known to control cellular mitochondrial function. Furthermore, because sirtuins require NAD for their deacetylase activity, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the intracellular NAD biosynthetic pathway, influences their activity. We examined the effects of exercise training and normal postural contractile activity on Sirt3 and Nampt protein expression in rat skeletal muscles. Male rats were trained by treadmill running at 20 m/min, 60 min/day, 7 days/wk for 4 wk. This treadmill training program increased the Sirt3 protein expression in the soleus and plantaris muscles by 49% and 41%, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, a 4-wk voluntary wheel-running program also induced 66% and 95% increases in Sirt3 protein in the plantaris and triceps muscles of rats, respectively (P < 0.05). Treadmill-running and voluntary running training induced no significant changes in Nampt protein expression in skeletal muscles. In resting rats, the soleus muscle, which is recruited during normal postural activity, possessed the greatest expression levels of the Sirt3 and Nampt proteins, followed by the plantaris and triceps muscles. Furthermore, the Sirt3, but not Nampt, protein level was reduced in the soleus muscles from immobilized hindlimbs compared with that shown in the contralateral control muscle. These results demonstrated that 1) Sirt3 protein expression is upregulated by exercise training in skeletal muscles and 2) local postural contractile activity plays an important role in maintaining a high level of Sirt3 protein expression in postural muscle.

  12. Electrical activation of artificial muscles containing polyacrylonitrile gel fibers.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, H B; Gebhart, N; Kim, K J; Shahinpoor, M

    2000-01-01

    Gel fibers made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are known to elongate and contract when immersed in caustic and acidic solutions, respectively. The amount of contraction for these pH-activated fibers is 50% or greater, and the strength of these fibers is shown to be comparable to that of human muscle. Despite these attributes, the need of strong acids and bases for actuation has limited the use of PAN gel fibers as linear actuators or artificial muscles. Increasing the conductivity by depositing platinum on the fibers or combining the fibers with graphite fibers has allowed for electrical activation of artificial muscles containing gel fibers when placed in an electrochemical cell. The electrolysis of water in such a cell produces hydrogen ions at an artificial muscle anode, thus locally decreasing the pH and causing the muscle to contract. Reversing the electric field allows the PAN muscle to elongate. A greater than 40% contraction in artificial muscle length in less than 10 min is observed when it is placed as an electrode in a 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution and connected to a 10 V power supply. These results indicate potential in developing electrically activated PAN muscles and linear actuators, which would be much more applicable than chemically activated muscles.

  13. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, Karyne N.; Green, David J.; Taylor, Andrea B.; Begun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.; McFarlin, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual’s past behaviour. PMID:25467113

  14. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology.

    PubMed

    Rabey, Karyne N; Green, David J; Taylor, Andrea B; Begun, David R; Richmond, Brian G; McFarlin, Shannon C

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual's past behaviour.

  15. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition.

  16. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  17. Osteopontin That Is Elevated in the Airways during COPD Impairs the Antibacterial Activity of Common Innate Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gela, Anele; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mori, Michiko; Keenan, Paul; Mörgelin, Matthias; Erjefält, Jonas S; Herwald, Heiko; Egesten, Arne; Kasetty, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the respiratory tract contribute to exacerbations and disease progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is also an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease in COPD. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood but include impaired mucociliary clearance and structural remodeling of the airways. In addition, antimicrobial proteins that are constitutively expressed or induced during inflammatory conditions are an important part of the airway innate host defense. In the present study, we show that osteopontin (OPN), a multifunctional glycoprotein that is highly upregulated in the airways of COPD patients co-localizes with several antimicrobial proteins expressed in the airways. In vitro, OPN bound lactoferrin, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), midkine, human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) but showed low or no affinity for lysozyme and LL-37. Binding of OPN impaired the antibacterial activity against the important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OPN reduced lysozyme-induced killing of S. pneumoniae, a finding that could be explained by binding of OPN to the bacterial surface, thereby shielding the bacteria. A fragment of OPN generated by elastase of P. aeruginosa retained some inhibitory effect. Some antimicrobial proteins have additional functions. However, the muramidase-activity of lysozyme and the protease inhibitory function of SLPI were not affected by OPN. Taken together, OPN can contribute to the impairment of innate host defense by interfering with the function of antimicrobial proteins, thus increasing the vulnerability to acquire infections during COPD.

  18. Osteopontin That Is Elevated in the Airways during COPD Impairs the Antibacterial Activity of Common Innate Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Michiko; Keenan, Paul; Mörgelin, Matthias; Erjefält, Jonas S.; Herwald, Heiko; Egesten, Arne; Kasetty, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the respiratory tract contribute to exacerbations and disease progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is also an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease in COPD. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood but include impaired mucociliary clearance and structural remodeling of the airways. In addition, antimicrobial proteins that are constitutively expressed or induced during inflammatory conditions are an important part of the airway innate host defense. In the present study, we show that osteopontin (OPN), a multifunctional glycoprotein that is highly upregulated in the airways of COPD patients co-localizes with several antimicrobial proteins expressed in the airways. In vitro, OPN bound lactoferrin, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), midkine, human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) but showed low or no affinity for lysozyme and LL-37. Binding of OPN impaired the antibacterial activity against the important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OPN reduced lysozyme-induced killing of S. pneumoniae, a finding that could be explained by binding of OPN to the bacterial surface, thereby shielding the bacteria. A fragment of OPN generated by elastase of P. aeruginosa retained some inhibitory effect. Some antimicrobial proteins have additional functions. However, the muramidase-activity of lysozyme and the protease inhibitory function of SLPI were not affected by OPN. Taken together, OPN can contribute to the impairment of innate host defense by interfering with the function of antimicrobial proteins, thus increasing the vulnerability to acquire infections during COPD. PMID:26731746

  19. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  20. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats.

  1. A three-dimensional muscle activity imaging technique for assessing pelvic muscle function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Dan; Timm, Gerald W.

    2010-11-01

    A novel multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG)-based three-dimensional muscle activity imaging (MAI) technique has been developed by combining the bioelectrical source reconstruction approach and subject-specific finite element modeling approach. Internal muscle activities are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the intra-vaginal surface EMG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. The MAI technique was employed to minimally invasively reconstruct electrical activity in the pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter from multi-channel intra-vaginal surface EMG recordings. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the present MAI technique. With appropriate numerical modeling and inverse estimation techniques, we have demonstrated the capability of the MAI technique to accurately reconstruct internal muscle activities from surface EMG recordings. This MAI technique combined with traditional EMG signal analysis techniques is being used to study etiologic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence in women by correlating functional status of muscles characterized from the intra-vaginal surface EMG measurements with the specific pelvic muscle groups that generated these signals. The developed MAI technique described herein holds promise for eliminating the need to place needle electrodes into muscles to obtain accurate EMG recordings in some clinical applications.

  2. ACTIVATION OF CASPASE-3 IN THE SKELETAL MUSCLE DURING HEMODIALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Michel A; Battah, Shadi I; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ferrando, Arny; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Dwivedi, Rama; Ma, Thomas A; Moseley, Pope; Raj, Dominic SC

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscle atrophy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may be due to the activation of apoptotic and proteolytic pathways. Objective We hypothesized that activation of caspase-3 in the skeletal muscle mediates apoptosis and proteolysis during hemodialysis (HD). Materials and Methods Eight ESRD patients were studied before (pre-HD) and during HD and the finding were compared with those from six healthy volunteers. Protein kinetics was determined by primed constant infusion of L-(ring 13C6) Phenylalanine. Results Caspase-3 activity in the skeletal muscle was higher in ESRD patients pre-HD than in controls (24966.0±4023.9 vs. 15293.3±2120.0 units, p<0.01) and increased further during HD (end-HD) (37666.6±4208.3 units) (p<0.001). 14 kDa actin fragments generated by caspase-3 mediated cleavage of actinomyosin was higher in the skeletal muscle pre-HD (68%) and during HD (164%) compared to controls. The abundance of ubiquitinized carboxy-terminal actin fragment was also significantly increased during HD. Skeletal muscle biopsies obtained at the end of HD exhibited augmented apoptosis, which was higher than that observed in pre-HD and control samples (p<0.001). IL-6 content in the soluble fraction of the muscle skeletal muscle was increased significantly during HD. Protein kinetic studies showed that catabolism was higher in ESRD patients during HD compared to pre-HD and control subjects. Muscle protein catabolism was positively associated with caspase-3 activity and skeletal muscle IL-6 content. Conclusion Muscle atrophy in ESRD may be due to IL-6 induced activation of caspase-3 resulting in apoptosis as well as muscle proteolysis during HD. PMID:20636378

  3. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  4. Effect of Expiratory Resistive Loading in Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Orbicularis Oris Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshimi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of expiratory resistive loading on orbicularis oris muscle activity. [Subjects] Subjects were 23 healthy individuals (11 males, mean age 25.5±4.3 years; 12 females, mean age 25.0±3.0 years). [Methods] Surface electromyography was performed to measure the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during maximum lip closure and resistive loading at different expiratory pressures. Measurement was performed at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 100% of maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) for all subjects. The t-test was used to compare muscle activity between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP, and analysis of variance followed by multiple comparisons was used to compare the muscle activities observed at different expiratory pressures. [Results] No significant difference in muscle activity was observed between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP. Analysis of variance with multiple comparisons revealed significant differences among the different expiratory pressures. [Conclusion] Orbicularis oris muscle activity increased with increasing expiratory resistive loading. PMID:24648644

  5. Role of chloride channels in bradykinin-induced guinea pig airway vagal C-fibre activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Goo; Macglashan, Donald W; Undem, Bradley J

    2005-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an ionic current carried by chloride ions contributes to bradykinin (BK)-induced membrane depolarization and activation of vagal afferent C-fibres. In an ex vivo innervated trachea/bronchus preparation, BK (1 microM) consistently produced action potential discharge in vagal afferent C-fibres with receptive fields in the trachea or main stem bronchus. The Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (CLCA) inhibitor, niflumic acid (NFA, 100 microM), significantly reduced BK-induced action potential discharge to 21 +/- 7% of the control BK response. NFA did not inhibit capsaicin-induced or citric-acid-induced action potential discharge in tracheal C-fibres. The inhibitory effect of NFA was mimicked by another CLCA inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB, 100 microM). NFA also inhibited the BK-induced inward current in gramicidin-perforated whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of capsaicin-sensitive jugular ganglion neurones retrogradely labelled from the airways. NFA did not inhibit the BK-induced increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The TRPV1 inhibitor, iodo-resiniferatoxin (1 microM), also partially inhibited BK-induced action potential discharge, and the combination of iodo-resiniferatoxin and NFA virtually abolished the BK-induced action potential discharge. We concluded that in vagal afferent C-fibres, BK evokes membrane depolarization and action potential discharge through the additive effects of TRPV1 and Cl- channel activation.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide inhalation ameliorates allergen induced airway hypereactivity by modulating mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Bertolino, Antonio; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Terlizzi, Michela; Matteis, Maria; Calderone, Vincenzo; Mattera, Valentina; Martelli, Alma; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Pinto, Aldo; D'Agostino, Bruno; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide represents an important gaseous transmitter in the mammalian respiratory system. In the present study, we have evaluated the role of mast cells in hydrogen sulfide-induced effects on airways in a mouse model of asthma. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin and received aerosol of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS; 100 ppm) starting at day 7 after ovalbumin challenge. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide abrogated ovalbumin-induced bronchial hypereactivity as well as the increase in lung resistance. Concomitantly, hydrogen sulfide prevented mast cell activity as well as FGF-2 and IL-13 upregulation. Conversely, pulmonary inflammation and the increase in plasmatic IgE levels were not affected by hydrogen sulfide. A lack of hydrogen sulfide effects in mast cell deficient mice occurred. Primary fibroblasts harvested from ovalbumin-sensitized mice showed an increased proliferation rate that was inhibited by hydrogen sulfide aerosol. Furthermore, ovalbumin-induced transdifferentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was reversed. Finally, hydrogen sulfide did abrogate in vitro the degranulation of the mast cell-like RBL-2H3 cell line. Similarly to the in vivo experiments the inhibitory effect was present only when the cells were activated by antigen exposure. In conclusion, inhaled hydrogen sulfide improves lung function and inhibits bronchial hyper-reactivity by modulating mast cells and in turn fibroblast activation.

  7. Cockroach protease allergen induces allergic airway inflammation via epithelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sagar L.; Agrawal, Komal; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Protease allergens are known to enhance allergic inflammation but their exact role in initiation of allergic reactions at mucosal surfaces still remains elusive. This study was aimed at deciphering the role of serine protease activity of Per a 10, a major cockroach allergen in initiation of allergic inflammation at mucosal surfaces. We demonstrate that Per a 10 increases epithelial permeability by disruption of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, and enhances the migration of Monocyte derived dendritic cell precursors towards epithelial layer as exhibited by trans-well studies. Per a 10 exposure also leads to secretion of IL-33, TSLP and intracellular Ca2+ dependent increase in ATP levels. Further, in vivo experiments revealed that Per a 10 administration in mice elevated allergic inflammatory parameters along with high levels of IL-33, TSLP, IL-1α and uric acid in the mice lungs. We next demonstrated that Per a 10 cleaves CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified B cells and CD25 (IL-2 receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified T cells in an activity dependent manner, which might favour Th2 responses. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 plays a significant role in initiation of allergic airway inflammation at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:28198394

  8. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2005-08-15

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops approximately 1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 +/- 3% (mean +/- s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 +/- 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 +/- 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1-2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1-4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 +/- 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation

  9. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  10. Timing of Cortico-Muscle Transmission During Active Movement.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Gustaf M; Luchies, Carl W; Cheney, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have reported large disparities between short cortico-muscle conduction latencies and long recorded delays between cortical firing and evoked muscle activity. Using methods such as spike- and stimulus-triggered averaging of electromyographic (EMG) activity, previous studies have shown that the time delay between corticomotoneuronal (CM) cell firing and onset of facilitation of forelimb muscle activity ranges from 6.7 to 9.8 ms, depending on the muscle group tested. In contrast, numerous studies have reported delays of 60-122 ms between cortical cell firing onset and either EMG or movement onset during motor tasks. To further investigate this disparity, we simulated rapid active movement by applying frequency-modulated stimulus trains to M1 cortical sites in a rhesus macaque performing a movement task. This yielded corresponding EMG modulations, the latency of which could be measured relative to the stimulus modulations. The overall mean delay from stimulus frequency modulation to EMG modulation was 11.5 ± 5.6 ms, matching closely the conduction time through the cortico-muscle pathway (12.6 ± 2.0 ms) derived from poststimulus facilitation peaks computed at the same sites. We conclude that, during active movement, the delay between modulated M1 cortical output and its impact on muscle activity approaches the physical cortico-muscle conduction time.

  11. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  12. Regulation of myostatin activity and muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; McPherron, A C

    2001-07-31

    Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-beta family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To identify possible myostatin inhibitors that may have applications for promoting muscle growth, we investigated the regulation of myostatin signaling. Myostatin protein purified from mammalian cells consisted of a noncovalently held complex of the N-terminal propeptide and a disulfide-linked dimer of C-terminal fragments. The purified C-terminal myostatin dimer was capable of binding the activin type II receptors, Act RIIB and, to a lesser extent, Act RIIA. Binding of myostatin to Act RIIB could be inhibited by the activin-binding protein follistatin and, at higher concentrations, by the myostatin propeptide. To determine the functional significance of these interactions in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing high levels of the propeptide, follistatin, or a dominant-negative form of Act RIIB by using a skeletal muscle-specific promoter. Independent transgenic mouse lines for each construct exhibited dramatic increases in muscle mass comparable to those seen in myostatin knockout mice. Our findings suggest that the propeptide, follistatin, or other molecules that block signaling through this pathway may be useful agents for enhancing muscle growth for both human therapeutic and agricultural applications.

  13. Saturated muscle activation contributes to compensatory reaching strategies following stroke

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Patrick H; Eng, Janice J; Hodgson, Antony J

    2012-01-01

    The control and execution of movement could potentially be altered by the presence of stroke-induced weakness if muscles are incapable of generating sufficient power. The purpose of this study was to identify compensatory strategies during a forward (sagittal) reaching task for twenty persons with chronic stroke and ten healthy age-matched controls. We hypothesized that the paretic anterior deltoid would be maximally activated (i.e., saturated) during a reaching task and that task completion would require activation of additional muscles, resulting in compensatory movements out of the sagittal plane. For reaching movements by control subjects, joint motion remained largely in the sagittal plane and hand trajectories were smooth and direct. Movement characteristics of the non-paretic arm of stroke subjects were similar to control subjects except for small increases in the abduction angle and the percentage that anterior deltoid was activated. In contrast, reaching movements of the paretic arm of stroke subjects were characterized by increased activation of all muscles, especially the lateral deltoid, in addition to the anterior deltoid, with resulting shoulder abduction power and segmented and indirect hand motion. For the paretic arm of stroke subjects, muscle and kinetic compensations increased with impairment severity and weaker muscles were used at a higher percentage of their available muscle activity. These results suggest that the inability to generate sufficient force with the typical agonists involved during a forward reaching task may necessitate compensatory muscle recruitment strategies to complete the task. PMID:16014786

  14. Saturated muscle activation contributes to compensatory reaching strategies after stroke.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Patrick H; Eng, Janice J; Hodgson, Antony J

    2005-11-01

    The control and execution of movement could potentially be altered by the presence of stroke-induced weakness if muscles are incapable of generating sufficient power. The purpose of this study was to identify compensatory strategies during a forward (sagittal) reaching task for 20 persons with chronic stroke and 10 healthy age-matched controls. We hypothesized that the paretic anterior deltoid would be maximally activated (i.e., saturated) during a reaching task and that task completion would require activation of additional muscles, resulting in compensatory movements out of the sagittal plane. For reaching movements by control subjects, joint motion remained largely in the sagittal plane and hand trajectories were smooth and direct. Movement characteristics of the nonparetic arm of stroke subjects were similar to control subjects except for small increases in the abduction angle and the percentage that anterior deltoid was activated. In contrast, reaching movements of the paretic arm of stroke subjects were characterized by increased activation of all muscles, especially the lateral deltoid, in addition to the anterior deltoid, with resulting shoulder abduction power and segmented and indirect hand motion. For the paretic arm of stroke subjects, muscle and kinetic compensations increased with impairment severity and weaker muscles were used at a higher percentage of their available muscle activity. These results suggest that the inability to generate sufficient force with the typical agonists involved during a forward reaching task may necessitate compensatory muscle recruitment strategies to complete the task.

  15. Particulate matter (PM₁₀) induces metalloprotease activity and invasion in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Chirino, Yolanda I; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Osornio-Vargas, Álvaro Román; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Rosas, Irma; García-Cuellar, Claudia María

    2015-09-17

    Airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) is a risk factor for the development of lung diseases and cancer. The aim of this work was to identify alterations in airway epithelial (A549) cells induced by PM10 that could explain how subtoxic exposure (10 μg/cm(2)) promotes a more aggressive in vitro phenotype. Our results showed that cells exposed to PM10 from an industrial zone (IZ) and an urban commercial zone (CZ) induced an increase in protease activity and invasiveness; however, the cell mechanism is different, as only PM10 from CZ up-regulated the activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and disrupted E-cadherin/β-catenin expression after 48 h of exposure. These in vitro findings are relevant in terms of the mechanism action of PM10 in lung epithelial cells, which could be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of some human illness associated with highly polluted cities.

  16. Dung biomass smoke activates inflammatory signaling pathways in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Claire E; Duffney, Parker F; Gelein, Robert; Thatcher, Thomas H; Elder, Alison; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    Animal dung is a biomass fuel burned by vulnerable populations who cannot afford cleaner sources of energy, such as wood and gas, for cooking and heating their homes. Exposure to biomass smoke is the leading environmental risk for mortality, with over 4,000,000 deaths each year worldwide attributed to indoor air pollution from biomass smoke. Biomass smoke inhalation is epidemiologically associated with pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and respiratory infections, especially in low and middle-income countries. Yet, few studies have examined the mechanisms of dung biomass smoke-induced inflammatory responses in human lung cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dung biomass smoke causes inflammatory responses in human lung cells through signaling pathways involved in acute and chronic lung inflammation. Primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were exposed to dung smoke at the air-liquid interface using a newly developed, automated, and reproducible dung biomass smoke generation system. The examination of inflammatory signaling showed that dung biomass smoke increased the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in SAECs through activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. We propose that the inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed to dung biomass smoke contribute to the development of respiratory diseases.

  17. Influence of playing wind instruments on activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Gotouda, A; Yamaguchi, T; Okada, K; Matsuki, T; Gotouda, S; Inoue, N

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of change in sound tone of playing wind instruments on activity of jaw-closing muscles and the effect of sustained playing for a long time on fatigue of jaw-closing muscles. Electromyograms (EMG) of 19 brass instrument players and 14 woodwind instrument players were measured while playing instruments in tuning tone and high tone and under other conditions. Nine brass instrument players and nine woodwind instrument players played instruments for 90 min. Before and after the exercise, power spectral analyses of EMG from masseter muscles at 50% of maximum voluntary clenching level were performed and mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Root mean square (RMS) of EMG in masseter and temporal muscles while playing were slightly larger than those at rest but extremely small in comparison with those during maximum clenching. Root mean square in orbicularis oris and digastric muscles were relatively large when playing instruments. In the brass instrument group, RMS in high tone was significantly higher than that in tuning tone in all muscles examined. In the woodwind instrument group, RMS in high tone was not significantly higher than that in tuning tone in those muscles. Mean power frequency was not decreased after sustained playing in both instrument groups. These findings indicate that contractive load to jaw-closing muscles when playing a wind instrument in both medium and high tone is very small and playing an instrument for a long time does not obviously induce fatigue of jaw-closing muscles.

  18. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.

  19. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  20. MicroRNA-146a and microRNA-146b expression and anti-inflammatory function in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Comer, Brian S; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Kogut, Paul C; Halayko, Andrew J; Solway, Julian; Gerthoffer, William T

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-146a and miR-146b are negative regulators of inflammatory gene expression in lung fibroblasts, epithelial cells, monocytes, and endothelial cells. The abundance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and IL-1β is negatively regulated by the miR-146 family, suggesting miR-146a and/or miR-146b might modulate inflammatory mediator expression in airway smooth muscle thereby contributing to pathogenesis of asthma. To test this idea we compared miR-146a and miR-146b expression in human airway smooth muscle cells (hASMCs) from nonasthmatic and asthmatic subjects treated with cytomix (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFNγ) and examined the miRNAs' effects on COX-2 and IL-1β expression. We found that cytomix treatment elevated miR-146a and miR-146b abundance. Induction with cytomix was greater than induction with individual cytokines, and asthmatic cells exhibited higher levels of miR-146a expression following cytomix treatment than nonasthmatic cells. Transfection of miR-146a or miR-146b mimics reduced COX-2 and IL-1β expression. A miR-146a inhibitor increased COX-2 and IL-1β expression, but a miR-146b inhibitor was ineffective. Repression of COX-2 and IL-1β expression by miR-146a correlated with reduced abundance of the RNA-binding protein human antigen R. These results demonstrate that miR-146a and miR-146b expression is inducible in hASMCs by proinflammatory cytokines and that miR-146a expression is greater in asthmatic cells. Both miR-146a and miR-146b can negatively regulate COX-2 and IL-1β expression at pharmacological levels, but loss-of-function studies showed that only miR-146a is an endogenous negative regulator in hASMCs. The results suggest miR-146 mimics may be an attractive candidate for further preclinical studies as an anti-inflammatory treatment of asthma.

  1. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for showing the electrical activity in nerve and muscle including action potentials, refractory period of a nerve, and fatigue. Presents instructions for constructing an amplifier, electronic stimulator, and force transducer. (GS)

  2. Effect of craniocervical posture on abdominal muscle activities

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jung Gil; Won, Shin Ji; Gak, Hwangbo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the craniocervical posture on abdominal muscle activities in hook-lying position. [Subjects] This study recruited 12 healthy young adults. [Methods] Each subject was asked to adopt a supine position with the hip and knee flexed at 60°. Surface electromyographic signals of transversus abdominis/internal oblique, rectus abdominis, and external oblique in different craniocervical postures (extension, neutral, and flexion) were compared. [Results] The transversus abdominis and rectus abdominis showed increased muscle activities in craniocervical flexion compared to craniocervical extension and neutral position. Greater muscle activities of the external oblique were seen in craniocervical flexion than in craniocervical extension. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion was found to be effective to increase the abdominal muscle activities. Consideration of craniocervical posture is recommended when performing trunk stabilization exercises. PMID:27065558

  3. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  4. Active tension adaptation at a shortened arterial muscle length: inhibition by cytochalasin-D.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Melissa L; Speich, John E; Miner, Amy S; Ratz, Paul H

    2011-04-01

    Unlike the static length-tension curve of striated muscle, airway and urinary bladder smooth muscles display a dynamic length-tension curve. Much less is known about the plasticity of the length-tension curve of vascular smooth muscle. The present study demonstrates that there were significant increases of ∼15% in the phasic phase and ∼10% in the tonic phase of a third KCl-induced contraction of a rabbit femoral artery ring relative to the first contraction after a 20% decrease in length from an optimal muscle length (L(0)) to 0.8-fold L(0). Typically, three repeated contractions were necessary for full length adaptation to occur. The tonic phase of a third KCl-induced contraction was increased by ∼50% after the release of tissues from 1.25-fold to 0.75-fold L(o). The mechanism for this phenomenon did not appear to lie in thick filament regulation because there was no increase in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation to support the increase in tension nor was length adaptation abolished when Ca(2+) entry was limited by nifedipine and when Rho kinase (ROCK) was blocked by H-1152. However, length adaptation of both the phasic and tonic phases was abolished when actin polymerization was inhibited through blockade of the plus end of actin by cytochalasin-D. Interestingly, inhibition of actin polymerization when G-actin monomers were sequestered by latrunculin-B increased the phasic phase and had no effect on the tonic phase of contraction during length adaptation. These data suggest that for a given level of cytosolic free Ca(2+), active tension in the femoral artery can be sensitized not only by regulation of MLC phosphatase via ROCK and protein kinase C, as has been reported by others, but also by a nonmyosin regulatory mechanism involving actin polymerization. Dysregulation of this form of active tension modulation may provide insight into alterations of large artery stiffness in hypertension.

  5. Effects of muscle activation on shear between human soleus and gastrocnemius muscles.

    PubMed

    Finni, T; Cronin, N J; Mayfield, D; Lichtwark, G A; Cresswell, A G

    2017-01-01

    Lateral connections between muscles provide pathways for myofascial force transmission. To elucidate whether these pathways have functional roles in vivo, we examined whether activation could alter the shear between the soleus (SOL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles. We hypothesized that selective activation of LG would decrease the stretch-induced shear between LG and SOL. Eleven volunteers underwent a series of knee joint manipulations where plantar flexion force, LG, and SOL muscle fascicle lengths and relative displacement of aponeuroses between the muscles were obtained. Data during a passive full range of motion were recorded, followed by 20° knee extension stretches in both passive conditions and with selective electrical stimulation of LG. During active stretch, plantar flexion force was 22% greater (P < 0.05) and relative displacement of aponeuroses was smaller than during passive stretch (P < 0.05). Soleus fascicle length changes did not differ between passive and active stretches but LG fascicles stretched less in the active than passive condition when the stretch began at angles of 70° and 90° of knee flexion (P < 0.05). The activity-induced decrease in the relative displacement of SOL and LG suggests stronger (stiffer) connectivity between the two muscles, at least at flexed knee joint angles, which may serve to facilitate myofascial force transmission.

  6. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength. PMID:24963862

  7. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  8. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  9. Differential Activation of Airway Eosinophils Induces IL-13 Mediated Allergic Th2 Pulmonary Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, EA; Doyle, AD; Colbert, DC; Zellner, KR; Protheroe, CA; LeSuer, WE; Lee, NA.; Lee, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are hallmark cells of allergic Th2 respiratory inflammation. However, the relative importance of eosinophil activation and the induction of effector functions such as the expression of IL-13 to allergic Th2 pulmonary disease remain to be defined. Methods Wild type or cytokine deficient (IL-13−/− or IL-4−/−) eosinophils treated with cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-33) were adoptively transferred into eosinophil-deficient recipient mice subjected to allergen provocation using established models of respiratory inflammation. Allergen-induced pulmonary changes were assessed. Results In contrast to the transfer of untreated blood eosinophils to the lungs of recipient eosinophildeficient mice, which induced no immune/inflammatory changes either in the lung or lung draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), pretreatment of blood eosinophils with GM-CSF prior to transfer elicited trafficking of these eosinophils to LDLNs. In turn, these LDLN eosinophils elicited the accumulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells to these same LDLNs without inducing pulmonary inflammation. However, exposure of eosinophils to GM-CSF, IL-4 and IL-33 prior to transfer induced not only immune events in the LDLN, but also allergen-mediated increases in airway Th2 cytokine/chemokine levels, the subsequent accumulation of CD4+ T cells as well as alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, and the induction of pulmonary histopathologies. Significantly, this allergic respiratory inflammation was dependent on eosinophil-derived IL-13 whereas IL-4 expression by eosinophils had no significant role. Conclusion The data demonstrate the differential activation of eosinophils as a function of cytokine exposure and suggest that eosinophil-specific IL-13 expression by activated cells is a necessary component of the subsequent allergic Th2 pulmonary pathologies. PMID:26009788

  10. Activated nuclear factor kappa B and airway inflammation after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert A; Burke, Ann S; Jacob, Sam; Oliveras, Gloria; Murakami, Kazunori; Shimoda, Katsumi; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Lillian D; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study, we have shown a rapid inflammatory cell influx across the glandular epithelium and strong proinflammatory cytokine expression at 4 hours after inhalation injury. Studies have demonstrated a significant role of nuclear factor kappa B in proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription. This study examines the acute airway inflammatory response and immunohistochemical detection of p65, a marker of nuclear factor kappa B activation, in sheep after smoke inhalation and burn injury. Pulmonary tissue from uninjured sheep and sheep at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after inhalation and burn injury was included in the study. Following immunostaining for p65 and myeloperoxidase, the cell types and the percentage of bronchial submucosal gland cells staining for p65 and the extent of myeloperoxidase stained neutrophils in the bronchial submucosa were determined. Results indicate absence of detection of P65 before 12 hours after injury. At 12 hours after injury, strong perinuclear staining for p65 was evident in bronchial gland epithelial cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Bronchial submucosal gland cells showed a significant increase in the percentage of cells stained for p65 compared with uninjured animals and earlier times after injury, P < .05. At 24 and 48 hours after injury, p65 expression was evident in the bronchiolar epithelium, Type II pneumocytes, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Quantitation of the neutrophil influx into the bronchial submucosa showed a significant increase compared with uninjured tissue at 24 and 48 hours after injury, P < .05. In conclusion, immunohistochemical detection of activated p65 preceded the overall inflammatory response measured in the lamina propria. However, detection of p65 did not correlate with a recent study showing rapid emigration of neutrophils at 4 hours postinjury. Together, these results suggest that p65 immunostaining may identify cells that are activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines after

  11. Matriptase Proteolytically Activates Influenza Virus and Promotes Multicycle Replication in the Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Alexandre; Gravel, Émilie; Cloutier, Alexandre; Marois, Isabelle; Colombo, Éloïc; Désilets, Antoine; Verreault, Catherine; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses do not encode any proteases and must rely on host proteases for the proteolytic activation of their surface hemagglutinin proteins in order to fuse with the infected host cells. Recent progress in the understanding of human proteases responsible for influenza virus hemagglutinin activation has led to the identification of members of the type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 and human airway trypsin-like protease; however, none has proved to be the sole enzyme responsible for hemagglutinin cleavage. In this study, we identify and characterize matriptase as an influenza virus-activating protease capable of supporting multicycle viral replication in the human respiratory epithelium. Using confocal microscopy, we found matriptase to colocalize with hemagglutinin at the apical surface of human epithelial cells and within endosomes, and we showed that the soluble form of the protease was able to specifically cleave hemagglutinins from H1 virus, but not from H2 and H3 viruses, in a broad pH range. We showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of matriptase in human bronchial epithelial cells significantly blocked influenza virus replication in these cells. Lastly, we provide a selective, slow, tight-binding inhibitor of matriptase that significantly reduces viral replication (by 1.5 log) of H1N1 influenza virus, including the 2009 pandemic virus. Our study establishes a three-pronged model for the action of matriptase: activation of incoming viruses in the extracellular space in its shed form, upon viral attachment or exit in its membrane-bound and/or shed forms at the apical surface of epithelial cells, and within endosomes by its membrane-bound form where viral fusion takes place. PMID:23365447

  12. Matriptase proteolytically activates influenza virus and promotes multicycle replication in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Alexandre; Gravel, Émilie; Cloutier, Alexandre; Marois, Isabelle; Colombo, Éloïc; Désilets, Antoine; Verreault, Catherine; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Éric; Richter, Martin V

    2013-04-01

    Influenza viruses do not encode any proteases and must rely on host proteases for the proteolytic activation of their surface hemagglutinin proteins in order to fuse with the infected host cells. Recent progress in the understanding of human proteases responsible for influenza virus hemagglutinin activation has led to the identification of members of the type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 and human airway trypsin-like protease; however, none has proved to be the sole enzyme responsible for hemagglutinin cleavage. In this study, we identify and characterize matriptase as an influenza virus-activating protease capable of supporting multicycle viral replication in the human respiratory epithelium. Using confocal microscopy, we found matriptase to colocalize with hemagglutinin at the apical surface of human epithelial cells and within endosomes, and we showed that the soluble form of the protease was able to specifically cleave hemagglutinins from H1 virus, but not from H2 and H3 viruses, in a broad pH range. We showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of matriptase in human bronchial epithelial cells significantly blocked influenza virus replication in these cells. Lastly, we provide a selective, slow, tight-binding inhibitor of matriptase that significantly reduces viral replication (by 1.5 log) of H1N1 influenza virus, including the 2009 pandemic virus. Our study establishes a three-pronged model for the action of matriptase: activation of incoming viruses in the extracellular space in its shed form, upon viral attachment or exit in its membrane-bound and/or shed forms at the apical surface of epithelial cells, and within endosomes by its membrane-bound form where viral fusion takes place.

  13. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during posthandgrip muscle ischemia in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, J.; Wilson, T. E.; Shibasaki, M.; Hodges, N. A.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    To identify whether muscle metaboreceptor stimulation alters baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA, beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure (Finapres), and electrocardiogram were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the supine position. Subjects performed 2 min of isometric handgrip exercise at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2.5 min of posthandgrip muscle ischemia. During muscle ischemia, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P < 0.001) during posthandgrip muscle ischemia (-201.9 +/- 20.4 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-142.7 +/- 17.3 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)). No significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. However, both curves shifted during postexercise ischemia to accommodate the elevation in blood pressure and MSNA that occurs with this condition. These data suggest that the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated by muscle metaboreceptor stimulation, whereas the sensitivity of baroreflex of modulate heart rate is unchanged during posthandgrip muscle ischemia.

  14. ARSENITE ACTIVATES KB-DEPENDENT IL-8 GENE EXPRESSION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIM IN THE ABSENCE OF NUCLEAR TRANSLOCATION OF NF-KB

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airway epithelial cells respond to certain environmental stresses by mounting a proinflammatory response, which is characterized by enhanced synthesis and release of the neutrophil chemotactic and activating factor interleukin-8 (IL-8). IL-8 expression is regulated at the transcr...

  15. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Jensen, Bente Rona; Diederichsen, Louise

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between-group differences in shoulder MVC were observed. The present data suggest that shoulder sensory-motor control is only mildly impaired in subjects with SIS who are able to continue with upper body physical activity in spite of shoulder pain. Thus, physical activity should be continued by patients with SIS, if possible, to avoid the loss in neural and muscle functions associated with inactivity.

  16. Muscle torque preservation and physical activity in individuals with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Janice J.; Lomaglio, Melanie J.; MacIntyre, Donna L.

    2011-01-01

    Background A greater percent loss of concentric versus eccentric muscle torque (i.e., relative eccentric muscle torque preservation) has been reported in the paretic limb of individuals with stroke and has been attributed to hypertonia and/or co-contractions. Stroke provides a unique condition for examining mechanisms underlying eccentric muscle preservation because both limbs experience similar amounts of general physical activity, but the paretic side is impaired directly by the brain lesion. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine 1) whether eccentric preservation also exists in the nonparetic limb and 2) the relationship of eccentric or concentric torque preservation with physical activity in stroke. We hypothesized that the nonparetic muscles would demonstrate eccentric muscle preservation, which would suggest that non-neural mechanisms may also contribute to its relative preservation. Methods Eighteen stroke and 18 healthy control subjects (age and sex matched) completed a physical activity questionnaire. Maximum voluntary concentric and eccentric joint torques of the ankle, knee and hip flexors and extensors were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/s for the paretic and nonparetic muscles. Relative concentric and eccentric peak torque preservation were expressed as a percentage of control subject torque. Results Relative eccentric torque was higher (more preserved) than relative concentric torque for paretic, as well as nonparetic muscles. Physical activity correlated with paretic (r=0.640, p=0.001) and nonparetic concentric torque preservation (r=0.508, p=0.009), but not with eccentric torque preservation for either leg. Conclusions The relative preservation of eccentric torque in the nonparetic muscles suggest a role of non-neural mechanisms and could also explain the preservation observed in other chronic health conditions. Loss of concentric, but not eccentric muscle torque was related to physical inactivity in stroke. PMID

  17. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae outer membrane protein A is required to prevent the activation of airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    March, Catalina; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Llobet, Enrique; Tomás, Anna; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2011-03-25

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is a class of proteins highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae family and throughout evolution. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a capsulated gram-negative pathogen. It is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by a lack of an early inflammatory response. Data from our laboratory indicate that K. pneumoniae CPS helps to suppress the host inflammatory response. However, it is unknown whether K. pneumoniae employs additional factors to modulate host inflammatory responses. Here, we report that K. pneumoniae OmpA is important for immune evasion in vitro and in vivo. Infection of A549 and normal human bronchial cells with 52OmpA2, an ompA mutant, increased the levels of IL-8. 52145-Δwca(K2)ompA, which does not express CPS and ompA, induced the highest levels of IL-8. Both mutants could be complemented. In vivo, 52OmpA2 induced higher levels of tnfα, kc, and il6 than the wild type. ompA mutants activated NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of p38, p44/42, and JNK MAPKs and IL-8 induction was via NF-κB-dependent and p38- and p44/42-dependent pathways. 52OmpA2 engaged TLR2 and -4 to activate NF-κB, whereas 52145-Δwca(K2)ompA activated not only TLR2 and TLR4 but also NOD1. Finally, we demonstrate that the ompA mutant is attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. The results of this study indicate that K. pneumoniae OmpA contributes to attenuate airway cell responses. This may facilitate pathogen survival in the hostile environment of the lung.

  19. The relationship between human skeletal muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase activity and muscle aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Love, Lorenzo K; LeBlanc, Paul J; Inglis, J Greig; Bradley, Nicolette S; Choptiany, Jon; Heigenhauser, George J F; Peters, Sandra J

    2011-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for regulating the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA for use in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PDH is regulated through phosphorylation and inactivation by PDH kinase (PDK) and dephosphorylation and activation by PDH phosphatase (PDP). The effect of endurance training on PDK in humans has been investigated; however, to date no study has examined the effect of endurance training on PDP in humans. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in PDP activity and PDP1 protein content in human skeletal muscle across a range of muscle aerobic capacities. This association is important as higher PDP activity and protein content will allow for increased activation of PDH, and carbohydrate oxidation. The main findings of this study were that 1) PDP activity (r(2) = 0.399, P = 0.001) and PDP1 protein expression (r(2) = 0.153, P = 0.039) were positively correlated with citrate synthase (CS) activity as a marker for muscle aerobic capacity; 2) E1α (r(2) = 0.310, P = 0.002) and PDK2 protein (r(2) = 0.229, P =0.012) are positively correlated with muscle CS activity; and 3) although it is the most abundant isoform, PDP1 protein content only explained ∼ 18% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.184, P = 0.033). In addition, PDP1 in combination with E1α explained ∼ 38% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.383, P = 0.005), suggesting that there may be alternative regulatory mechanisms of this enzyme other than protein content. These data suggest that with higher muscle aerobic capacity (CS activity) there is a greater capacity for carbohydrate oxidation (E1α), in concert with higher potential for PDH activation (PDP activity).

  20. End-inspiratory airway occlusion: a method to assess the pressure developed by inspiratory muscles in patients with acute lung injury undergoing pressure support.

    PubMed

    Foti, G; Cereda, M; Banfi, G; Pelosi, P; Fumagalli, R; Pesenti, A

    1997-10-01

    We evaluated the end-inspiratory occlusion maneuver as a means to estimate the inspiratory effort during pressure support ventilation (PS). In nine nonobstructed acute lung injury (ALI) patients, we applied four levels of PS (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H2O) to modify the inspiratory effort. End inspiratory occlusions (2 to 3 s) were performed at the end of each experimental period by pushing the inspiratory hold button of the ventilator (Servo 900 C; Siemens, Berlin, Germany). We took the difference between the end-inspiratory occlusion plateau pressure and the airway pressure before the occlusion (PEEP + PS) as an estimate of the inspiratory effort and called it PMI (Pmusc,index). From the esophageal pressure tracing we obtained a reference measurement of the pressure developed by the inspiratory muscles at end inspiration (Pmusc,ei) and of the pressure-time product per breath (PTP/b) and per minute (PTP/min). In each patient, PMI was correlated with Pmusc,ei (p < 0.01) and PTP/b (p < 0.01). A PMI threshold of 6 cm H2O detected PTP/min < 125 cm H2O s/min with a sensitivity of 0.89 and a specificity of 0.89. We conclude that PMI is a good estimate of the pressure developed by the inspiratory muscles in ALI patients and may be used to titrate PS level. The major advantage of PMI is that it can be obtained from the ventilator display without any additional equipment.

  1. Muscle Activity During Unilateral vs. Bilateral Battle Rope Exercises.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Martin, Fernando; Colado, Juan C; Benítez, Josep C; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-10-01

    High training intensity is important for efficient strength gains. Although battle rope training is metabolically demanding, no studies have quantified intensity of muscle activity during this type of training. This study analyzes muscle activity during unilateral alternating waves vs. bilateral waves of battle rope training. Twenty-one volunteers participated in a repeated-measures study on 2 different occasions. Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from the anterior deltoid (AD), external oblique (OBLIQ), lumbar erector spinae (LUMB), and gluteus medius (GM) during bilateral waves and unilateral waves and were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Results showed that muscle activity ranged from 51%MVIC to 73%MVIC for AD, OBLIQ, and LUMB, whereas GM muscle activity was only 14-18%MVIC. OBLIQ activation was significantly greater (20%MVIC; p = 0.02) with the unilateral waves compared with the bilateral waves, whereas LUMB signal was significantly higher (16%MVIC; p = 0.001) with the bilateral waves compared with the unilateral waves. In conclusion, both wave movements can be used to provide moderate to high levels of muscle activity in the AD, OBLIQ, and LUMB. Fitness practitioners aiming for higher OBLIQ activity should perform unilateral waves, whereas the bilateral variation of the movement can be used for higher LUMB activity.

  2. Muscle activity and inactivity periods during normal daily life.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Olli; Haakana, Piia; Pesola, Arto J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Rantalainen, Timo; Havu, Marko; Pullinen, Teemu; Finni, Taija

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that not only the lack of physical activity, but also prolonged times of sedentary behaviour where major locomotor muscles are inactive, significantly increase the risk of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to provide details of quadriceps and hamstring muscle inactivity and activity during normal daily life of ordinary people. Eighty-four volunteers (44 females, 40 males, 44.1±17.3 years, 172.3±6.1 cm, 70.1±10.2 kg) were measured during normal daily life using shorts measuring muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity (recording time 11.3±2.0 hours). EMG was normalized to isometric MVC (EMG(MVC)) during knee flexion and extension, and inactivity threshold of each muscle group was defined as 90% of EMG activity during standing (2.5±1.7% of EMG(MVC)). During normal daily life the average EMG amplitude was 4.0±2.6% and average activity burst amplitude was 5.8±3.4% of EMG(MVC) (mean duration of 1.4±1.4 s) which is below the EMG level required for walking (5 km/h corresponding to EMG level of about 10% of EMG(MVC)). Using the proposed individual inactivity threshold, thigh muscles were inactive 67.5±11.9% of the total recording time and the longest inactivity periods lasted for 13.9±7.3 min (2.5-38.3 min). Women had more activity bursts and spent more time at intensities above 40% EMG(MVC) than men (p<0.05). In conclusion, during normal daily life the locomotor muscles are inactive about 7.5 hours, and only a small fraction of muscle's maximal voluntary activation capacity is used averaging only 4% of the maximal recruitment of the thigh muscles. Some daily non-exercise activities such as stair climbing produce much higher muscle activity levels than brisk walking, and replacing sitting by standing can considerably increase cumulative daily muscle activity.

  3. Fractionation of muscle activity in rapid responses to startling cues

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Lauren R.

    2017-01-01

    Movements in response to acoustically startling cues have shorter reaction times than those following less intense sounds; this is known as the StartReact effect. The neural underpinnings for StartReact are unclear. One possibility is that startling cues preferentially invoke the reticulospinal tract to convey motor commands to spinal motoneurons. Reticulospinal outputs are highly divergent, controlling large groups of muscles in synergistic patterns. By contrast the dominant pathway in primate voluntary movement is the corticospinal tract, which can access small groups of muscles selectively. We therefore hypothesized that StartReact responses would be less fractionated than standard voluntary reactions. Electromyogram recordings were made from 15 muscles in 10 healthy human subjects as they carried out 32 varied movements with the right forelimb in response to startling and nonstartling auditory cues. Movements were chosen to elicit a wide range of muscle activations. Multidimensional muscle activity patterns were calculated at delays from 0 to 100 ms after the onset of muscle activity and subjected to principal component analysis to assess fractionation. In all cases, a similar proportion of the total variance could be explained by a reduced number of principal components for the startling and the nonstartling cue. Muscle activity patterns for a given task were very similar in response to startling and nonstartling cues. This suggests that movements produced in the StartReact paradigm rely on similar contributions from different descending pathways as those following voluntary responses to nonstartling cues. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrate that the ability to activate muscles selectively is preserved during the very rapid reactions produced following a startling cue. This suggests that the contributions from different descending pathways are comparable between these rapid reactions and more typical voluntary movements. PMID:28003416

  4. Effects of Physical Activity and Inactivity on Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanis, Gregory C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the mechanisms by which physical activity and inactivity modify muscle fatigue. It is well known that acute or chronic increases in physical activity result in structural, metabolic, hormonal, neural, and molecular adaptations that increase the level of force or power that can be sustained by a muscle. These adaptations depend on the type, intensity, and volume of the exercise stimulus, but recent studies have highlighted the role of high intensity, short-duration exercise as a time-efficient method to achieve both anaerobic and aerobic/endurance type adaptations. The factors that determine the fatigue profile of a muscle during intense exercise include muscle fiber composition, neuromuscular characteristics, high energy metabolite stores, buffering capacity, ionic regulation, capillarization, and mitochondrial density. Muscle fiber-type transformation during exercise training is usually toward the intermediate type IIA at the expense of both type I and IIx myosin heavy-chain isoforms. High-intensity training results in increases of both glycolytic and oxidative enzymes, muscle capillarization, improved phosphocreatine resynthesis and regulation of K+, H+, and lactate ions. Decreases of the habitual activity level due to injury or sedentary lifestyle result in partial or even compete reversal of the adaptations due to previous training, manifested by reductions in fiber cross-sectional area, decreased oxidative capacity, and capillarization. Complete immobilization due to injury results in markedly decreased force output and fatigue resistance. Muscle unloading reduces electromyographic activity and causes muscle atrophy and significant decreases in capillarization and oxidative enzymes activity. The last part of the review discusses the beneficial effects of intermittent high-intensity exercise training in patients with different health conditions to demonstrate the powerful effect of exercise on health and well being. PMID

  5. [Thermoregulatory activity of the intercostal muscles under a hypercapnic load].

    PubMed

    Burachevskaia, L E

    1983-02-01

    In experiments on anesthetized cats, the reactions elicited by CO2 inhalation were studied in single motor units of the intercostal muscles activated during shivering. The excitation of the bulbar respiratory center during shivering was found to modify the activity of the respiratory and tonic motor units. Most of the respiratory motor units in a hypercapnic state increased the mean firing rate by 1.5/sec. The tonic motor units both diminished the mean firing rate and changed the pattern of activity: they began to produce bursts of spikes synchronous with the respiratory rhythm. The problems of supraspinal regulation of activity of the intercostal muscles motoneuron pool are discussed.

  6. Toluene diisocyanate exposure induces airway inflammation of bronchial epithelial cells via the activation of transient receptor potential melastatin 8

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo-Hee; Jang, Young-Sook; Jang, Seung-Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Ye, Young-Min; Park, Hae-Sim

    2017-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is the most important cause of occupational asthma (OA), and various pathogenic mechanisms have been suggested. Of these mechanisms, neurogenic inflammation is an important inducer of airway inflammation. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is a well-established cold-sensing cation channel that is expressed in both neuronal cells and bronchial epithelial cells. A recent genome-wide association study of TDI-exposed workers found a significant association between the phenotype of TDI-induced OA and the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10803666, which has been mapped to the TRPM8 gene. We hypothesized that TRPM8 located in airway epithelial cells may be involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of TDI-induced OA and investigated its role. Bronchial epithelial cells were treated with TDI in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression levels of TRPM8 mRNA and protein were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. TDI-induced morphological changes in the cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry. Alterations in the transcripts of inflammatory cytokines were examined in accordance with TRPM8 activation by TDI. TRPM8 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels was enhanced by TDI in airway epithelial cells. TRPM8 activation by TDI led to significant increases in the mRNA of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, IL-25 and IL-33. The increased expression of the cytokine genes by TDI was partly attenuated after treatment with a TRPM8 antagonist. TDI exposure induces increased expression of TRPM8 mRNA in airway epithelial cells coupled with enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting a novel role of TRPM8 in the pathogenesis of TDI-induced OA. PMID:28255167

  7. Bile acids stimulate chloride secretion through CFTR and calcium-activated Cl- channels in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Siobhán M; Mroz, Magdalena S; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J; Harvey, Brian J

    2014-09-01

    Bile acids resulting from the aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate are often present in the lower airways of people with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory distress diseases. Surprisingly, there is little or no information on the modulation of airway epithelial ion transport by bile acids. The secretory effect of a variety of conjugated and unconjugated secondary bile acids was investigated in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells grown under an air-liquid interface and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic transepithelial ion transport was measured as short-circuit current (Isc). The taurine-conjugated secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), was found to be the most potent modulator of basal ion transport. Acute treatment (5 min) of Calu-3 cells with TDCA (25 μM) on the basolateral side caused a stimulation of Isc, and removal of extracellular Cl(-) abolished this response. TDCA produced an increase in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-dependent current that was abolished by pretreatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172. TDCA treatment also increased Cl(-) secretion through calcium-activated chloride (CaCC) channels and increased the Na(+)/K(+) pump current. Acute treatment with TDCA resulted in a rapid cellular influx of Ca(2+) and increased cAMP levels in Calu-3 cells. Bile acid receptor-selective activation with INT-777 revealed TGR5 localized at the basolateral membrane as the receptor involved in TDCA-induced Cl(-) secretion. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that low concentrations of bile acids can modulate Cl(-) secretion in airway epithelial cells, and this effect is dependent on both the duration and sidedness of exposure to the bile acid.

  8. Proteinase activated receptor-2-mediated dual oxidase-2 up-regulation is involved in enhanced airway reactivity and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Alharbi, Naif O; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Tyagi, Manoj; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M

    2015-07-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) express a variety of receptors, which sense danger signals from various aeroallergens/pathogens being inhaled constantly. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is one such receptor and is activated by cockroach allergens, which have intrinsic serine proteinase activity. Recently, dual oxidases (DUOX), especially DUOX-2, have been shown to be involved in airway inflammation in response to Toll-like receptor activation. However, the association between PAR-2 and DUOX-2 has not been explored in airways of allergic mice. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of DUOX-2/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling in airway reactivity and inflammation after PAR-2 activation. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with intact cockroach allergen extract (CE) in the presence of aluminium hydroxide followed by intranasal challenge with CE. Mice were then assessed for airway reactivity, inflammation, oxidative stress (DUOX-2, ROS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitrite, nitrotyrosine and protein carbonyls) and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3). Challenge with CE led to up-regulation of DUOX-2 and ROS in AECs with concomitant increases in airway reactivity/inflammation and parameters of oxidative stress, and apoptosis. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by intranasal administration of ENMD-1068, a small molecule antagonist of PAR-2 in allergic mice. Administration of diphenyliodonium to allergic mice also led to improvement of allergic airway responses via inhibition of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway; however, these effects were less pronounced than PAR-2 antagonism. The current study suggests that PAR-2 activation leads to up-regulation of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway in AECs, which is involved in regulation of airway reactivity and inflammation via oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  9. Muscle RANK is a key regulator of Ca2+ storage, SERCA activity, and function of fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Dumont, Nicolas A; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Fajardo, Val A; Gamu, Daniel; Kake-Guena, Sandrine-Aurélie; David, Rares Ovidiu; Bouchard, Patrice; Lavergne, Éliane; Penninger, Josef M; Pape, Paul C; Tupling, A Russell; Frenette, Jérôme

    2016-04-15

    Receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and bone remodeling. Here we show that RANK is also expressed in fully differentiated myotubes and skeletal muscle. Muscle RANK deletion has inotropic effects in denervated, but not in sham, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles preventing the loss of maximum specific force while promoting muscle atrophy, fatigability, and increased proportion of fast-twitch fibers. In denervated EDL muscles, RANK deletion markedly increased stromal interaction molecule 1 content, a Ca(2+)sensor, and altered activity of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) modulating Ca(2+)storage. Muscle RANK deletion had no significant effects on the sham or denervated slow-twitch soleus muscles. These data identify a novel role for RANK as a key regulator of Ca(2+)storage and SERCA activity, ultimately affecting denervated skeletal muscle function.

  10. [Bioelectric activity of paravertebral muscles in experimental scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, G I; Popov, S V

    1976-12-01

    The paper is concerned with a study of the bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles in 2 groups of rabbits with differently expressed degrees of experimental scoliosis and in a control group of intact animals. The results demonstrated an asymmetry in the tonic bioelectric activity in the paravertebral muscles in scoliosis, unlike the reactions of the control group of animals. The character of asymmetry depends upon the degree of deformation: in cases of moderately expressed scoliosis there is a prevalence of the tonic bioelectric activity on the level of the basic arc of distortion on the side of the concavity; in severely expressed scoliosis the tonic bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles on the concave side appears to be less than on the convex side. An asymmetry of the tonic activity takes place on the level of compensatory arcs as well. The authors come to the conclusion on the pathogenetical role of the muscular dysbalance in the genesis of scoliotic deformation.

  11. Reflex influences on muscle spindle activity in relaxed human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Gandevia, S C; Miller, S; Aniss, A M; Burke, D

    1986-07-01

    The study was designed to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from the foot reflexly activate gamma-motoneurons innervating relaxed muscles of the leg. In 15 experiments multiunit recordings were made from 21 nerve fascicles innervating triceps surae or tibialis anterior. In a further nine experiments the activity of 19 identified single muscle spindle afferents was recorded, 13 from triceps surae, 5 from tibialis anterior, and 1 from extensor digitorum longus. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 Hz) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity, twice sensory threshold) and the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity, 1.1 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). In addition, a tap on the appropriate tendon at varying times after the stimuli was used to assess the dynamic responsiveness of the afferents under study. The conditioning electrical stimuli did not change the discharge of single spindle afferents. Recordings of rectified and averaged multiunit activity also revealed no change in the overall level of background neural activity following the electrical stimuli. The afferent responses to tendon taps did not differ significantly whether or not they were preceded by stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves. These results suggest that low-threshold afferents from the foot do not produce significant activation of fusimotor neurons in relaxed leg muscles, at least as judged by their ability to alter the discharge of muscle spindle afferents. As there may be no effective background activity in fusimotor neurons innervating relaxed human muscles, it is possible that these inputs from the foot could influence the fusimotor system during voluntary contractions when the fusimotor neurons have been brought to firing threshold. In one subject trains of stimuli were delivered to the posterior tibial nerve at painful levels (30 times motor threshold). They produced an acceleration of the

  12. Association between Laryngeal Airway Aperture and the Discharge Rates of Genioglossus Motor Units

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Amy; Watson, Peter J.; Bailey, E. Fiona

    2017-01-01

    We know very little about how muscles and motor units in one region of the upper airway are impacted by adjustments in an adjacent airway region. In this case, the focus is on regulation of the expiratory airstream by the larynx and how changes in laryngeal aperture impact muscle motor unit activities downstream in the pharynx. We selected sound production as a framework for study as it requires (i) sustained expiratory airflow, (ii) laryngeal airway regulation for production of whisper and voice, and (iii) pharyngeal airway regulation for production of different vowel sounds. We used these features as the means of manipulating expiratory airflow, pharyngeal, and laryngeal airway opening to compare the effect of each on the activation of genioglossus (GG) muscle motor units in the pharynx. We show that some GG muscle motor units (a) discharge stably on expiration associated with production of vowel sounds, (b) are exquisitely sensitive to subtle alterations in laryngeal airflow, and (c) discharge at higher firing rates in high flow vs. low flow conditions even when producing the same vowel sound. Our results reveal subtle changes in GG motor unit discharge rates that correlate with changes imposed at the larynx, and which may contribute to the regulation of the expiratory airstream. PMID:28179887

  13. Characterizing differential post-stroke corticomotor drive to the dorsi- and plantarflexor muscles during resting and volitional muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jacqueline Ann; Zarzycki, Ryan; Morton, Susanne M; Kesar, Trisha M; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2017-01-11

    Imbalance of corticomotor excitability between the paretic and nonparetic limbs has been associated with the extent of upper extremity motor recovery post-stroke, is greatly influenced by specific testing conditions such as the presence or absence of volitional muscle activation, and may vary across muscle groups. However, despite its clinical importance, post-stroke corticomotor drive to lower extremity muscles has not been thoroughly investigated. Additionally, while conventional gait rehabilitation strategies for stroke survivors focus on paretic limb foot drop and dorsiflexion impairments, most contemporary literature has indicated that paretic limb propulsion and plantarflexion impairments are the most significant limiters to post-stroke walking function. The purpose of this study was to compare corticomotor excitability of the dorsi- and plantarflexor muscles during resting and active conditions in individuals with good and poor post-stroke walking recovery and in neurologically-intact controls. We found that plantarflexor muscles showed reduced corticomotor symmetry between paretic and nonparetic limbs compared to dorsiflexor muscles in individuals with poor post-stroke walking recovery during active muscle contraction but not during rest. Reduced plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry during active muscle contraction was a result of reduced corticomotor drive to the paretic muscles and enhanced corticomotor drive to the nonparetic muscles when compared to the neurologically-intact controls. These results demonstrate that atypical corticomotor drive exists in both the paretic and nonparetic lower limbs and implicate greater severity of corticomotor impairments to plantarflexor versus dorsiflexor muscles during muscle activation in stroke survivors with poor walking recovery.

  14. Treatment of disorders characterized by reversible airway obstruction in childhood: are anti-cholinergic agents the answer?

    PubMed

    Quizon, Annabelle; Colin, Andrew A; Pelosi, Umberto; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2012-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in the airways activates postjunctional muscarinic receptors present on smooth muscle, submucosal glands and blood vessels. This triggers bronchoconstriction, muscle hypertrophy, mucus secretion, and vasodilatation, respectively. The release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in lungs is induced by a variety of stimuli and downregulated by the inhibitory activity of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors via a feedback mechanism. Increased parasympathetic nerve activity occurs in a variety of airway diseases in childhood, including viral-induced wheeze and asthma. Common to these conditions are reversible airway obstruction, mucus hypersecretion, vasodilation and enhanced vascular permeability. In animal models of airway hyperreactivity similar findings of increased acetylcholine release resulting in enhanced supply of this neurotransmitter to the postjunctional smooth muscles, submucosal glands and airway vessels, were demonstrated. While the number and function of postjunctional muscarinic receptors in the airways are unchanged in such airway disorders, inhibitory activity on the parasympathetic nerves appears to be impaired. Specifically, M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction has been demonstrated in models of bronchial hyperreactivity induced by a variety of triggers, including viruses, atmospheric pollutants and allergens. The mechanisms leading to impairment of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptor function and their putative relevance to the pathogenesis and the treatment of airway disease in childhood are described. Finally, the available data on the activity of ipratropium bromide, a short-acting anticholinergic drug, in the most common pediatric airway disease are reported and the possible therapeutic efficacy of tiotropium bromide, a more recently introduced long-acting, selective anticholinergic compound, is discussed.

  15. Skeletal Muscle Activity and the Fate of Myonuclei

    PubMed Central

    Turtikova, O.V.; Nemirovskaya, T.L.; Grigoriev, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Adult skeletal muscle fiber is a symplast multinuclear structure developed in ontogenesis by the fusion of the myoblasts (muscle progenitor cells). The nuclei of a muscle fiber (myonuclei) are those located at the periphery of fiber in the space between myofibrils and sarcolemma. In theory, a mass change in skeletal muscle during exercise or unloading may be associated with the altered myonuclear number, ratio of the transcription, and translation and proteolysis rates. Here we review the literature data related to the phenomenology and hypothetical mechanisms of the myonuclear number alterations during enhanced or reduced muscle contractile activity. In many cases (during severe muscle and systemic diseases and gravitational unloading), muscle atrophy is accompanied by a reduction in the amount of myonuclei. Such reduction is usually explained by the development of myonuclear apoptosis. A myonuclear number increase may be provided only by the satellite cell nuclei incorporation via cell fusion with the adjacent myofiber. It is believed that it is these cells which supply fiber with additional nuclei, providing postnatal growth, work hypertrophy, and repair processes. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms controlling satellite cell proliferation during exercise, functional unloading, and passive stretch. PMID:22649641

  16. Nerve–muscle activation by rotating permanent magnet configurations

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Graham M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The standard method of magnetic nerve activation using pulses of high current in coils has drawbacks of high cost, high electrical power (of order 1 kW), and limited repetition rate without liquid cooling.Here we report a new technique for nerve activation using high speed rotation of permanent magnet configurations, generating a sustained sinusoidal electric field using very low power (of order 10 W).A high ratio of the electric field gradient divided by frequency is shown to be the key indicator for nerve activation at high frequencies.Activation of the cane toad sciatic nerve and attached gastrocnemius muscle was observed at frequencies as low as 180 Hz for activation of the muscle directly and 230 Hz for curved nerves, but probably not in straight sections of nerve.These results, employing the first prototype device, suggest the opportunity for a new class of small low‐cost magnetic nerve and/or muscle stimulators. Abstract Conventional pulsed current systems for magnetic neurostimulation are large and expensive and have limited repetition rate because of overheating. Here we report a new technique for nerve activation, namely high‐speed rotation of a configuration of permanent magnets. Analytical solutions of the cable equation are derived for the oscillating electric field generated, which has amplitude proportional to the rotation speed. The prototype device built comprised a configuration of two cylindrical magnets with antiparallel magnetisations, made to rotate by interaction between the magnets’ own magnetic field and three‐phase currents in coils mounted on one side of the device. The electric field in a rectangular bath placed on top of the device was both numerically evaluated and measured. The ratio of the electric field gradient on frequency was approximately 1 V m−2 Hz−1 near the device. An exploratory series of physiological tests was conducted on the sciatic nerve and attached gastrocnemius muscle of the cane toad

  17. Muscle Activity Adaptations to Spinal Tissue Creep in the Presence of Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Nougarou, François

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to identify adaptations in muscle activity distribution to spinal tissue creep in presence of muscle fatigue. Methods Twenty-three healthy participants performed a fatigue task before and after 30 minutes of passive spinal tissue deformation in flexion. Right and left erector spinae activity was recorded using large-arrays surface electromyography (EMG). To characterize muscle activity distribution, dispersion was used. During the fatigue task, EMG amplitude root mean square (RMS), median frequency and dispersion in x- and y-axis were compared before and after spinal creep. Results Important fatigue-related changes in EMG median frequency were observed during muscle fatigue. Median frequency values showed a significant main creep effect, with lower median frequency values on the left side under the creep condition (p≤0.0001). A significant main creep effect on RMS values was also observed as RMS values were higher after creep deformation on the right side (p = 0.014); a similar tendency, although not significant, was observed on the left side (p = 0.06). A significant creep effects for x-axis dispersion values was observed, with higher dispersion values following the deformation protocol on the left side (p≤0.001). Regarding y-axis dispersion values, a significant creep x fatigue interaction effect was observed on the left side (p = 0.016); a similar tendency, although not significant, was observed on the right side (p = 0.08). Conclusion Combined muscle fatigue and creep deformation of spinal tissues led to changes in muscle activity amplitude, frequency domain and distribution. PMID:26866911

  18. The effect of muscle length on force depression after active shortening in soleus muscle of mice.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Isometric muscle force after active shortening is reduced [force depression (FD)]. The mechanism is incompletely understood but work delivered during shortening has been suggested to be the main determinant of FD. However, whether muscle length affects the sensitivity of FD to work is unknown, although this information might add to the understanding of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is to investigate the length dependence of the FD/work ratio (Q). Therefore, isometric force production (ISO) of 10 incubated mouse soleus muscles was compared to isometric force after 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mm shortening (IAS) at different end lengths ranging from L(0) - 3 to L(0) + 1.8 mm in steps of 0.6 mm. FD was calculated as the force difference between an ISO and IAS contraction at the same activation time (6 s) and end length. We confirm the strong relation between FD and work at L(0) (R² = 0.92) and found that FD is length dependent with a maximum of 8.8 ± 0.3% at L(0) + 1.2 mm for 0.6 mm shortening amplitude. Q was only constant for short muscle lengths (<85% L(0)) but increased exponentially with increasing muscle length. The observed length dependence of Q indicates that FD is not only determined by work produced during shortening but also by a length-dependent factor, possibly actin compliance, which should be incorporated in any mechanism explaining FD.

  19. DIESEL EXHAUST ACTIVATES REDOX-SENSITIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND KINASES IN HUMAN AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major component of airborne particulate matter. In previous studies we have described the acute inflammatory response of the human airway to inhaled DE. This was characterized by neutrophil, mast cell, and lymphocyte infiltration into the bronchial mucosa...

  20. Glucocorticoid Insensitivity in Virally Infected Airway Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Transforming Growth Factor-β Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Asmaa; Keenan, Christine R.; Langenbach, Shenna Y.; Li, Meina; Londrigan, Sarah L.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Stewart, Alastair G.

    2017-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are commonly associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinovirus (RV) and influenza A virus (IAV) infection. The ensuing airway inflammation is resistant to the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids (GCs). Viral infection elicits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activity, a growth factor we have previously shown to impair GC action in human airway epithelial cells through the activation of activin-like kinase 5 (ALK5), the type 1 receptor of TGF-β. In the current study, we examine the contribution of TGF-β activity to the GC-resistance caused by viral infection. We demonstrate that viral infection of human bronchial epithelial cells with RSV, RV or IAV impairs GC anti-inflammatory action. Poly(I:C), a synthetic analog of double-stranded RNA, also impairs GC activity. Both viral infection and poly(I:C) increase TGF-β expression and activity. Importantly, the GC impairment was attenuated by the selective ALK5 (TGFβRI) inhibitor, SB431542 and prevented by the therapeutic agent, tranilast, which reduced TGF-β activity associated with viral infection. This study shows for the first time that viral-induced glucocorticoid-insensitivity is partially mediated by activation of endogenous TGF-β. PMID:28046097

  1. The Relationship Between Activity Pattern and Muscle Adaptation in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Jonathan C

    2015-10-01

    Muscle is highly plastic in terms of size (maximum force), speed, maximum power, and endurance. Well-controlled studies in animals have shown that the adult skeletal muscle fiber has a remarkable ability to modify its gene expression so that with long-term substantial changes in the daily activity pattern the contractile phenotype can be modified across the whole spectrum of fiber type found in control muscle. The contractile phenotype in this context includes the isoform content of myosin and therefore the maximum velocity of shortening, the mitochondrial content and therefore the specific force and aerobic capacity (endurance), and the calcium handling proteins and therefore the speed of activation and relaxation. With voluntary exercise in human subjects, similar responses are observed, although the degree of transformation is restricted by the practical limitations of exercise dosing to changes in mitochondrial activity and muscle size rather than the more profound changes in contractile protein isoform that can be induced with artificial activation over a substantial proportion of the day.

  2. BRAF activates PAX3 to control muscle precursor cell migration during forelimb muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeyoung; Watanabe, Shuichi; Hoelper, Soraya; Krüger, Marcus; Kostin, Sawa; Pöling, Jochen; Kubin, Thomas; Braun, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells is a key step during limb muscle development and depends on the activity of PAX3 and MET. Here, we demonstrate that BRAF serves a crucial function in formation of limb skeletal muscles during mouse embryogenesis downstream of MET and acts as a potent inducer of myoblast cell migration. We found that a fraction of BRAF accumulates in the nucleus after activation and endosomal transport to a perinuclear position. Mass spectrometry based screening for potential interaction partners revealed that BRAF interacts and phosphorylates PAX3. Mutation of BRAF dependent phosphorylation sites in PAX3 impaired the ability of PAX3 to promote migration of C2C12 myoblasts indicating that BRAF directly activates PAX3. Since PAX3 stimulates transcription of the Met gene we propose that MET signaling via BRAF fuels a positive feedback loop, which maintains high levels of PAX3 and MET activity required for limb muscle precursor cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18351.001 PMID:27906130

  3. Muscle triacylglycerol and hormone-sensitive lipase activity in untrained and trained human muscles.

    PubMed

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Biba, Taus O; Galbo, Henrik; Gaster, Michael; Donsmark, Morten

    2006-07-01

    During exercise, triacylglycerol (TG) is recruited in skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that both muscle hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and TG recruitment would be higher in trained than in untrained subjects in response to prolonged exercise. Healthy male subjects (26 +/- 1 years, body moss index 23.3 +/- 0.5 kg m(-2)), either untrained (N = 8, VO(2max) 3.8 +/- 0.2 l min(-1)) or trained (N = 8, VO(2max) 5.1 +/- 0.1 l min(-1)), were studied. Before and after 3-h exercise (58 +/- 1% VO(2max)), a biopsy was taken. Muscle citrate synthase (32 +/- 2 vs. 47 +/- 6 mumol g(-1) min(-1) d.w.) and beta-hydroxy-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (38 +/- 3 vs. 52 +/- 5 mumol g(-1) min(-1) d.w.) activities were lower in untrained than in trained subjects (p < 0.05). Throughout the exercise, fat oxidation was higher in trained than in untrained subjects (p < 0.05). Muscle HSL activity was similar at rest (0.72 +/- 0.08 and 0.74 +/- 0.03 mU mg(-1) protein) and after exercise (0.71 +/- 0.1 and 0.68 +/- 0.03 mU mg(-1) protein) in untrained and trained subjects. At rest, the chemically determined muscle TG content (37 +/- 8 and 26 +/- 5 mmol g(-1) d.w.) was similar (p > 0.05), and after exercise it was unchanged in untrained and lower (p < 0.05) in trained subjects (41 +/- 9 and 10 +/- 2 mmol g((1) d.w.). Determined histochemically, TG was decreased (p < 0.05) after exercise in type I and II fibres. Depletion of TG was not different between fibre types in untrained, but tended to be higher (p = 0.07) in type I compared with type II fibres in trained muscles. In conclusion, HSL activity is similar in untrained and trained skeletal muscles both before and after prolonged exercise. However, the tendency to higher muscle TG recruitment during exercise in the trained subjects suggests a difference in the regulation of HSL or other lipases during exercise in trained compared with untrained subjects.

  4. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5–10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (−8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15–30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  5. Grip force and muscle activity differences due to glove type.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Kimberly; Splittstoesser, Riley; Maronitis, Anthony; Marras, William S

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different types and sizes of gloves on external grip force and muscle activity. Twenty-one male and seven female volunteers served as subjects. Each subject performed two maximum voluntary grip contractions while wearing each of the 10 glove types. Results indicated significant differences in the effects of different glove types on the peak force, ratio of peak force to normalized flexor muscle EMG activity, and the ratio of peak force to coactivity.

  6. Prior history of FDI muscle contraction: different effect on MEP amplitude and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Talis, V L; Kazennikov, O V; Castellote, J M; Grishin, A A; Ioffe, M E

    2014-03-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation of left motor cortex were assessed in ten healthy subjects during maintenance of a fixed FDI contraction level. Subjects maintained an integrated EMG (IEMG) level with visual feedback and reproduced this level by memory afterwards in the following tasks: stationary FDI muscle contraction at the level of 40 ± 5 % of its maximum voluntary contraction (MVC; 40 % task), at the level of 20 ± 5 % MVC (20 % task), and also when 20 % MVC was preceded by either no contraction (0-20 task), by stronger muscle contraction (40-20 task) or by no contraction with a previous strong contraction (40-0-20 task). The results show that the IEMG level was within the prescribed limits when 20 and 40 % stationary tasks were executed with and without visual feedback. In 0-20, 40-20, and 40-0-20 tasks, 20 % IEMG level was precisely controlled in the presence of visual feedback, but without visual feedback the IEMG and force during 20 % IEMG maintenance were significantly higher in the 40-0-20 task than those in 0-20 and 40-20 tasks. That is, without visual feedback, there were significant variations in muscle activity due to different prehistory of contraction. In stationary tasks, MEP amplitudes in 40 % task were higher than in 20 % task. MEPs did not differ significantly during maintenance of the 20 % level in tasks with different prehistory of muscle contraction with and without visual feedback. Thus, in spite of variations in muscle background activity due to different prehistory of contraction MEPs did not vary significantly. This dissociation suggests that the voluntary maintenance of IEMG level is determined not only by cortical mechanisms, as reflected by corticospinal excitability, but also by lower levels of CNS, where afferent signals and influences from other brain structures and spinal cord are convergent.

  7. LncRNAs BCYRN1 promoted the proliferation and migration of rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma via upregulating the expression of transient receptor potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Luo-Xian; Tian, Cui-Jie; Tang, Xue-Yi; Zhao, Li-Min; Guo, Ya-Li; Cheng, Dong-Jun; Chen, Xian-Liang; Ma, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhuo-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in several biological processes through regulating the expression of protein. However, the function of lncRNA BCYRN1 in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) has not been reported. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into control and asthma groups and the ovalbumin (OVA) model was constructed. The expression of BCYRN1 and transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) were detected in the ASMCs separated from these rats. Then 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-1) assay, Roche real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) DP assay and Transwell cell migration assay were performed to detect the effect of BCYRN1 on the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs. RNA pull-down assays and RNA immunoprecipitation assay were used to identify and verify the binding between BCYRN1 and TRPC1. Inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance were measured in OVA challenged rats with BCYRN1 knockdown. Results: We foundthe high expression of BCYRN1 and TRPC1 in asthma groups and ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. Overexpression of BCYRN1 greatly promoted the proliferation and migration of ASMCs. In addition,TRPC1 overexpression reversed the function of si-BCYRN1 indecreasing the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. BCYRN1 could up-regulate the protein level of TRPC1 through increasing the stability of TRPC1. Finally, we found that BCYRN1 knockdown reduced the inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance in OVA challenged rats. Conclusion: Our study indicated that BCYRN1 promotedthe proliferation and migration of rat ASMCs in asthma via upregulating the expression of TRPC1. PMID:27648131

  8. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  9. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  10. The effect of muscle activation on neck response.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Karin; Halldin, Peter; Leijonhufvud, Ingrid

    2005-03-01

    Prevention of neck injuries due to complex loading, such as occurs in traffic accidents, requires knowledge of neck injury mechanisms and tolerances. The influence of muscle activation on outcome of the injuries is not clearly understood. Numerical simulations of neck injury accidents can contribute to increase the understanding of injury tolerances. The finite element (FE) method is suitable because it gives data on stress and strain of individual tissues that can be used to predict injuries based on tissue level criteria. The aim of this study was to improve and validate an anatomically detailed FE model of the human cervical spine by implement neck musculature with passive and active material properties. Further, the effect of activation time and force on the stresses and strains in the cervical tissues were studied for dynamic loading due to frontal and lateral impacts. The FE model used includes the seven cervical vertebrae, the spinal ligaments, the facet joints with cartilage, the intervertebral disc, the skull base connected to a rigid head, and a spring element representation of the neck musculature. The passive muscle properties were defined with bilinear force-deformation curves and the active properties were defined using a material model based on the Hill equation. The FE model's responses were compared to volunteer experiments for frontal and lateral impacts of 15 and 7 g. Then, the active muscle properties where varied to study their effect on the motion of the skull, the stress level of the cortical and trabecular bone, and the strain of the ligaments. The FE model had a good correlation to the experimental motion corridors when the muscles activation was implemented. For the frontal impact a suitable peak muscle force was 40 N/cm2 whereas 20 N/cm2 was appropriate for the side impact. The stress levels in the cortical and trabecular bone were influenced by the point forces introduced by the muscle spring elements; therefore a more detailed model of

  11. Respiratory muscle strength in the physically active elderly.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, Eleanor M; Angov, Nadia; Garber, Carol; McCool, F Dennis

    2007-12-01

    Advancing age is associated with a decline in the strength of the skeletal muscles, including those of respiration. Respiratory muscles can be strengthened with nonrespiratory activities. We therefore hypothesized that regular exercise in the elderly would attenuate this age-related decline in respiratory muscle strength. Twenty-four healthy subjects older than 65 years were recruited (11 males and 13 females). A comprehensive physical activity survey was administered, and subjects were categorized as active (n = 12) or inactive (n = 12). Each subject underwent testing of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PI(max) and PE(max)). Diaphragmatic thickness (tdi) was measured via two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound. There were no significant differences between the active and inactive groups with respect to age (75 vs. 73 years) or body weight (69.1vs. 69.9 kg). There were more women (9) than men (3) in the inactive group. Diaphragm thickness was greater in the active group (0.31 +/- 0.06 cm vs. 0.25 +/- 0.04 cm; p = 0.011). PE(max) and PI(max) were also greater in the active group (130 +/- 44 cm H(2)O vs. 80 +/- 24 cm H(2)O; p = 0.002; and 99 +/- 32 cm H(2)O vs. 75 +/- 14 cm H(2)O; p = 0.03). There was a positive association between PI(max )and tdi (r = 0.43, p = 0.03). Regular exercise was positively associated with diaphragm muscle thickness in this cohort. As PE(max) was higher in the active group, we postulate that recruitment of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles during nonrespiratory activities may be the source of this training effect.

  12. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  13. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  14. Airflow synchronous with oscillatory acceleration reflects involuntary respiratory muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard E; Lee, Hsueh-Tze; Loring, Stephen H

    2004-06-25

    To explore mechanisms causing involuntary airflow synchronous with oscillatory axial whole body acceleration (oscillatory axial acceleration, OAA) such as that during locomotion, we monitored airflow, acceleration, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the rib cage and abdominal muscles in standing subjects undergoing OAA at 3, 6, and 9 Hz at accelerations of 0.1-0.95 g. Subjects relaxed or performed static respiratory maneuvers at constant lung volume with glottis open. Oscillatory airflows (0.01-3.01 s(-1)) synchronous with OAA were not consistent with expectations for a passive respiratory system, and were larger during active respiratory efforts than during relaxation. Peak inspiratory airflow usually preceded peak upward acceleration by 90-180 degrees. In 80% of runs with respiratory muscles voluntarily activated or relaxed, EMGs showed activity synchronous with OAA. Changes in periodic muscle activity coincided with changes in oscillatory airflow. We conclude that periodic muscle activity, probably a reflex response to body wall deformation during OAA, strongly influences the involuntary airflow synchronous with OAA.

  15. Variability and reliability of muscle activity measurements during chewing.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A; Weiser, A; Hugger, S; Kordass, B; Hugger, A; Wanke, E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test masseter muscle activity and its variability and reliability in terms of repeatable measurements in fully dentate and healthy volunteers during habitual chewing and deliberate unilateral chewing. Three sessions were performed on three consecutive days, each time recording kinematic data and masseter muscle EMG activities through a series of defined jaw exercises, including maximum voluntary contraction, habitual chewing, and left and right unilateral chewing. Asymmetry index (AI) and deliberate chewing index (DCI) scores were used to evaluate the activities of the left and right masseter muscles, which were separately recorded during each of these chewing exercises. DCI scores were side-specific, including two sets of values for left and right unilateral chewing. Reproducibility testing of the values obtained for all parameters revealed good to excellent reproducibility of masseter muscle activity under standardized recording conditions across the consecutive study sessions, with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) ranging from 0.68 to 0.93. Different individuals were found to utilize different strategies of bilateral masseter activation during both habitual chewing and deliberate unilateral chewing.

  16. Task-dependent effects evoked by foot muscle afferents on leg muscle activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, M; Rubino, V; Schieppati, M

    1996-08-01

    The effect of low intensity electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve (PTN) at the ankle on the active triceps surae (TS) muscles was studied in normal subjects, both in a prone position and while standing. PTN stimulation regularly evoked the H-reflex in the flexor digitorum brevis and, in the prone position, a short-latency facilitatory effect in the soleus muscle. During standing, the facilitatory effect was preceded by a clear-cut reduction in electromyograph (EMG) activity. The inhibition-facilitation sequence was evoked in the gastrocnemii under both conditions, on average, though individual differences were present. An EMG modulation similar to that observed under standing conditions was present also in the prone position when subjects pressed the sole of the foot against the wall. Stimulation of sural or digital nerves did not evoke similar effects. It is concluded that foot muscle afferents establish oligosynaptic connections transmitting mixed effects to the TS motoneuronal pool, and that contact with the sole of the foot plays an enabling role for the inhibitory pathway directed to the soleus muscle.

  17. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, T. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration. PMID:24304861

  18. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nichols, T Richard

    2014-03-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration.

  19. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids accelerate airway repair by activating FFA4 in club cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Park, Soo-Jin; Kang, Saeromi; Koh, Jung-Min; Sato, Koichi; Chung, Hae Young; Okajima, Fumikazu; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-03-17

    A GPCR named FFA4 (also known as GPR120) was found to act as a GPCR for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Its expression has been reported in lung epithelial club cells. The authors investigated whether supplementation of the omega-3 fatty acids benefits lung health. Omacor® (7.75 mg kg-1), clinically prescribed preparation of omega-3 fatty acids and FFA4-knockout mice were utilized in a naphthalene-induced mouse model of acute airway injury (one injection of 30 mg kg-1, i.p.). Naphthalene injection induced complete destruction of bronchiolar epithelial cells within a day. Appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cells was observed after 21 days in control mice. It was found, however, that supplementation of omacor accelerated the recovery. The appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cells was observed between 7 and 14 days after naphthalene injury in omacor-treated mice. In isolated club cells, omega-3 fatty acids were found to stimulate cell proliferation and migration but to inhibit cell differentiation. Using pharmacological tools and FFA4-knockout mice, FFA4 was found to be responsible for omega-3 fatty acids-induced proliferation in vitro in club cells. Furthermore, accelerated recovery from naphthalene-induced airway injury in omacor-treated mice was not observed in FFA4-knockout mice in vivo. Present findings indicate that omega-3 fatty acids-induced proliferation of bronchiole epithelial cells through FFA4 is responsible for omacor-induced accelerated recovery from airway injury. Therefore, intermittent administration of omacor needs to be tested for acute airway injury, because omega-3 fatty acids stimulate proliferation but inhibits differentiation of club cells.

  20. Tirasemtiv amplifies skeletal muscle response to nerve activation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Richard; Saikali, Khalil G; Chou, Willis; Russell, Alan J; Chen, Michael M; Vijayakumar, Vipin; Stoltz, Randall R; Baudry, Stephane; Enoka, Roger M; Morgans, David J; Wolff, Andrew A; Malik, Fady I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we tested the hypothesis that tirasemtiv, a selective fast skeletal muscle troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium, could amplify the response of muscle to neuromuscular input in humans. Methods: Healthy men received tirasemtiv and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, 4-period, crossover design. The deep fibular nerve was stimulated transcutaneously to activate the tibialis anterior muscle and produce dorsiflexion of the foot. The force–frequency relationship of tibialis anterior dorsiflexion was assessed after dosing. Results: Tirasemtiv increased force produced by the tibialis anterior in a dose-, concentration-, and frequency-dependent manner with the largest increases [up to 24.5% (SE 3.1), P < 0.0001] produced at subtetanic nerve stimulation frequencies (10 Hz). Conclusions: The data confirm that tirasemtiv amplifies the response of skeletal muscle to nerve input in humans. This outcome provides support for further studies of tirasemtiv as a potential therapy in conditions marked by diminished neuromuscular input. Muscle Nerve 50: 925–931, 2014 PMID:24634285

  1. A dynamical model of muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing Z; Brown, Robert W; Yue, Guang H

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical model is presented as a framework for muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery. By describing the effects of muscle fatigue and recovery in terms of two phenomenological parameters (F, R), we develop a set of dynamical equations to describe the behavior of muscles as a group of motor units activated by voluntary effort. This model provides a macroscopic view for understanding biophysical mechanisms of voluntary drive, fatigue effect, and recovery in stimulating, limiting, and modulating the force output from muscles. The model is investigated under the condition in which brain effort is assumed to be constant. Experimental validation of the model is performed by fitting force data measured from healthy human subjects during a 3-min sustained maximal voluntary handgrip contraction. The experimental results confirm a theoretical inference from the model regarding the possibility of maximal muscle force production, and suggest that only 97% of the true maximal force can be reached under maximal voluntary effort, assuming that all motor units can be recruited voluntarily. The effects of different motor unit types, time-dependent brain effort, sources of artifacts, and other factors that could affect the model are discussed. The applications of the model are also discussed. PMID:11964225

  2. [Latest standards of muscle injury prophylactic activities, treatment and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Jaroszewski, Jacek; Bakowski, Paweł; Tabiszewski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Muscle injury represents the highest proportion of sport-linked contusions. Experimental and clinical studies aim at increasingly detailed recognition of muscle physiology and pathophysiology. It would allow to set up functional standards and permit to minimize risk of contusions associated with sport activities. In cases of such contusions it would restrict its sequele and would abbreviate the duration of treatment. In the study elements of prophylaxis, treatment and rehabilitation of injured muscles will be discussed, based on current scientific results. Review study includes data from studies investigating prophylactic activities, types of teratment and the effects of different rehabilitation strategy. Latest standards from First European Congress of Football Medicine, Munich 2004, were also taken into account. The prophylactic activities should focus on education attempting to popularize the knowledge of the role of warm-up activities which precede proper physical effort, muscle stretching and activities augmenting muscle strength. The treatment of muscle injury is related to the extent of their damage. First actions should be focused on the RICE principle (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation). In case of torn tissues, local injections of anesthetics, anti-inflammatory agents and regeneration-promoting agents used to be applied. Application of NSAIDs and anti-thrombotic prophylaxis is sound but due to their side effects it is recommended as frequently as it is counterindicated by physicians. A threshold in the therapy, not always noted by therapeutists, involves rapid mobilization of the injured tissue. This involves mobility exercises starting at 3-5 days post-trauma, with no load at the beginning, but starting at days 4 to 6 asssociated with appropriate loading. The recently conducted studies aim at stimulation of rapid muscle regeneration, inhibition of scar formation in the site of injury and elimination of already existing scars. The latter seems most

  3. Assessing voluntary muscle activation with the twitch interpolation technique.

    PubMed

    Shield, Anthony; Zhou, Shi

    2004-01-01

    The twitch interpolation technique is commonly employed to assess the completeness of skeletal muscle activation during voluntary contractions. Early applications of twitch interpolation suggested that healthy human subjects could fully activate most of the skeletal muscles to which the technique had been applied. More recently, however, highly sensitive twitch interpolation has revealed that even healthy adults routinely fail to fully activate a number of skeletal muscles despite apparently maximal effort. Unfortunately, some disagreement exists as to how the results of twitch interpolation should be employed to quantify voluntary activation. The negative linear relationship between evoked twitch force and voluntary force that has been observed by some researchers implies that voluntary activation can be quantified by scaling a single interpolated twitch to a control twitch evoked in relaxed muscle. Observations of non-linear evoked-voluntary force relationships have lead to the suggestion that the single interpolated twitch ratio can not accurately estimate voluntary activation. Instead, it has been proposed that muscle activation is better determined by extrapolating the relationship between evoked and voluntary force to provide an estimate of true maximum force. However, criticism of the single interpolated twitch ratio typically fails to take into account the reasons for the non-linearity of the evoked-voluntary force relationship. When these reasons are examined, it appears that most are even more challenging to the validity of extrapolation than they are to the linear equation. Furthermore, several factors that contribute to the observed non-linearity can be minimised or even eliminated with appropriate experimental technique. The detection of small activation deficits requires high resolution measurement of force and careful consideration of numerous experimental details such as the site of stimulation, stimulation intensity and the number of interpolated

  4. Orofacial Muscle Activity of Children Who Stutter: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ellen M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This preliminary investigation of stuttering development and maturation of speech motor processes recorded the electromyographic activity of the orofacial muscles of nine children who stuttered. Results suggest that the emergence of tremor-like instabilities in the speech motor processes of stuttering children may coincide with aspects of general…

  5. Nutritional strategies of physically active subjects with muscle dysmorphia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify dietary strategies for physically active individuals with muscle dysmorphia based on a systematic literature review. Method References were included if the study population consisted of adults over 18 years old who were physically active in fitness centers. We identified reports through an electronic search ofScielo, Lilacs and Medline using the following keywords: muscle dysmorphia, vigorexia, distorted body image, and exercise. We found eight articles in Scielo, 17 in Medline and 12 in Lilacs. Among the total number of 37 articles, only 17 were eligible for inclusion in this review. Results The results indicated that the feeding strategies used by physically active individuals with muscle dysmorphia did not include planning or the supervision of a nutritionist. Diet included high protein and low fat foods and the ingestion of dietary and ergogenic supplements to reduce weight. Conclusion Physically active subjects with muscle dysmorphia could benefit from the help of nutritional professionals to evaluate energy estimation, guide the diet and its distribution in macronutrient and consider the principle of nutrition to functional recovery of the digestive process, promote liver detoxification, balance and guide to organic adequate intake of supplemental nutrients and other substances. PMID:23706013

  6. Mapping Muscles Activation to Force Perception during Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Simone; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It has been largely proved that while judging a force humans mainly rely on the motor commands produced to interact with that force (i.e., sense of effort). Despite of a large bulk of previous investigations interested in understanding the contributions of the descending and ascending signals in force perception, very few attempts have been made to link a measure of neural output (i.e., EMG) to the psychophysical performance. Indeed, the amount of correlation between EMG activity and perceptual decisions can be interpreted as an estimate of the contribution of central signals involved in the sensation of force. In this study we investigated this correlation by measuring the muscular activity of eight arm muscles while participants performed a quasi-isometric force detection task. Here we showed a method to quantitatively describe muscular activity (“muscle-metric function”) that was directly comparable to the description of the participants' psychophysical decisions about the stimulus force. We observed that under our experimental conditions, muscle-metric absolute thresholds and the shape of the muscle-metric curves were closely related to those provided by the psychophysics. In fact a global measure of the muscles considered was able to predict approximately 60% of the perceptual decisions total variance. Moreover the inter-subjects differences in psychophysical sensitivity showed high correlation with both participants' muscles sensitivity and participants' joint torques. Overall, our findings gave insights into both the role played by the corticospinal motor commands while performing a force detection task and the influence of the gravitational muscular torque on the estimation of vertical forces. PMID:27032087

  7. Changes in Quadriceps Muscle Activity During Sustained Recreational Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich; Seifert, John G.; Wakeling, James M.

    2011-01-01

    During a day of skiing thousands of repeated contractions take place. Previous research on prolonged recreational alpine skiing show that physiological changes occur and hence some level of fatigue is inevitable. In the present paper the effect of prolonged skiing on the recruitment and coordination of the muscle activity was investigated. Six subjects performed 24 standardized runs. Muscle activity during the first two (PREskiing) and the last two (POSTskiing) runs was measured from the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) using EMG and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF on outside leg. A significant pronounced outside leg loading occurred during POSTskiing and the timing of muscle activity peaks occurred more towards turn completion. Specific EMG frequency changes were observed at certain time points throughout the time windows and not over the whole double turn. It is suggested that general muscular fatigue, where additional specific muscle fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers did not occur. The EMG frequency decrease and intensity changes for RF and VL are caused by altered timing (coordination) within the turn towards a most likely more uncontrolled skiing technique. Hence, these data provide evidence to suggest recreational skiers alter their skiing technique before a potential change in muscle fiber recruitment occurs. Key points The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF. General muscular fatigue, where additional specific fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers, did not occur. A modified skiing style towards a less functional and hence more uncontrolled skiing technique seems to be a key

  8. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P < 0.001). After a 2-min knee flexor maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P < 0.01). After the contralateral (left) MVC (experiment 3; n = 8), mean voluntary activation of the right leg was similar with or without ischemia (92 ± 6% vs. 93 ± 4%; P = 0.65). After fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents.

  9. The magnetic field of gastrointestinal smooth muscle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Alan; Ladipo, Jk; Richards, William; Wikswo, John

    1997-11-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract controls the absorption and transport of ingested materials. Its function is determined largely by the electrical activity of the smooth muscle that lines the GI tract. GI electrical activity consists of an omnipresent slowly oscillating wave known as the basic electrical rhythm (BER) that modulates a higher-frequency spiking activity associated with muscle contraction. The BER has been shown to be a reliable indicator of intestinal viability, and thus, recording of smooth muscle activity may have clinical value. The BER is difficult to measure with cutaneous electrodes because layers of low-conductivity fat between the GI tract and the abdominal surface attenuate the potential. On the other hand, the magnetic field associated with GI electrical activity is mostly unaffected by intervening fat layers. We recorded the magnetic fields from GI activity in 12 volunteers using a multichannel Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Characteristics typical of gastric and intestinal BER were apparent in the data. Channels near the epigastrium recorded gastric BER, and channels in intestinal areas recorded small bowel BER. These results suggest that a single multichannel SQUID magnetometer is able to measure gastrointestinal electrical activity from multiple locations around the abdomen simultaneously.

  10. Factors modifying the frequency of spontaneous activity in gastric muscle.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Kito, Y; Hashitani, H; Nakamura, E

    2006-11-01

    The cellular mechanisms that determine the frequency of spontaneous activity were investigated in gastric smooth muscles isolated from the guinea-pig. Intact antral muscle generated slow waves periodically; the interval between slow waves was decreased exponentially by depolarization of the membrane to reach a steady interval value of about 7 s. Isolated circular muscle bundles produced slow potentials spontaneously or were evoked by depolarizing current stimuli. Evoked slow potentials appeared in an all-or-none fashion, with a refractory period of approximately 2-3 s. Low concentrations of chemicals that modify intracellular signalling revealed that the refractory period was causally related to the activity of protein kinase C (PKC). Activation of PKC increased and inhibition of PKC activity decreased the frequency of slow potentials. Chemicals that inhibit mitochondrial functions reduced the frequency of slow waves. Inhibition of internal Ca(2+)-store activity decreased the amplitude, but not the frequency of slow potentials, suggesting that the amplitude is causally related to Ca(2+) release from the internal store. The results suggest that changes in [Ca(2+)](i) caused by the activity of mitochondria may play a key role in determining the frequency of spontaneous activity in gastric pacemaker cells.

  11. Genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity improves muscle function in aging.

    PubMed

    Umanskaya, Alisa; Santulli, Gaetano; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C; Reiken, Steven R; Marks, Andrew R

    2014-10-21

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is a leading cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 or greater. Here we tested the effects of increased mitochondrial antioxidant activity on age-dependent skeletal muscle dysfunction using transgenic mice with targeted overexpression of the human catalase gene to mitochondria (MCat mice). Aged MCat mice exhibited improved voluntary exercise, increased skeletal muscle specific force and tetanic Ca(2+) transients, decreased intracellular Ca(2+) leak and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load compared with age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Furthermore, ryanodine receptor 1 (the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channel required for skeletal muscle contraction; RyR1) from aged MCat mice was less oxidized, depleted of the channel stabilizing subunit, calstabin1, and displayed increased single channel open probability (Po). Overall, these data indicate a direct role for mitochondrial free radicals in promoting the pathological intracellular Ca(2+) leak that underlies age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle function. This study harbors implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, including mitochondria-targeted antioxidants for treatment of mitochondrial myopathies and other healthspan-limiting disorders.

  12. Ion channel activity in lobster skeletal muscle membrane.

    PubMed

    Worden, M K; Rahamimoff, R; Kravitz, E A

    1993-09-01

    Ion channel activity in the sarcolemmal membrane of muscle fibers is critical for regulating the excitability, and therefore the contractility, of muscle. To begin the characterization of the biophysical properties of the sarcolemmal membrane of lobster exoskeletal muscle fibers, recordings were made from excised patches of membrane from enzymatically induced muscle fiber blebs. Blebs formed as evaginations of the muscle sarcolemmal membrane and were sufficiently free of extracellular debris to allow the formation of gigaohm seals. Under simple experimental conditions using bi-ionic symmetrical recording solutions and maintained holding potentials, a variety of single channel types with conductances in the range 32-380 pS were detected. Two of these ion channel species are described in detail, both are cation channels selective for potassium. They can be distinguished from each other on the basis of their single-channel conductance and gating properties. The results suggest that current flows through a large number of ion channels that open spontaneously in bleb membranes in the absence of exogenous metabolites or hormones.

  13. Non-crossbridge stiffness in active muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Barbara; Nocella, Marta; Bagni, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Stretching of an activated skeletal muscle induces a transient tension increase followed by a period during which the tension remains elevated well above the isometric level at an almost constant value. This excess of tension in response to stretching has been called 'static tension' and attributed to an increase in fibre stiffness above the resting value, named 'static stiffness'. This observation was originally made, by our group, in frog intact muscle fibres and has been confirmed more recently, by us, in mammalian intact fibres. Following stimulation, fibre stiffness starts to increase during the latent period well before crossbridge force generation and it is present throughout the whole contraction in both single twitches and tetani. Static stiffness is dependent on sarcomere length in a different way from crossbridge force and is independent of stretching amplitude and velocity. Static stiffness follows a time course which is distinct from that of active force and very similar to the myoplasmic calcium concentration time course. We therefore hypothesize that static stiffness is due to a calcium-dependent stiffening of a non-crossbridge sarcomere structure, such as the titin filament. According to this hypothesis, titin, in addition to its well-recognized role in determining the muscle passive tension, could have a role during muscle activity.

  14. Neck and shoulder muscle activity of orthodontists in natural environments.

    PubMed

    McNee, C; Kieser, J K; Antoun, J S; Bennani, H; Gallo, L M; Farella, M

    2013-06-01

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are common among dentists and possibly caused by prolonged static load. The aim of this study was to assess the contraction pattern of neck and shoulder muscles of orthodontists in natural environments. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of right sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles were recorded by means of portable recorders in eight orthodontists during working conditions, and both active and resting non-working conditions. Recordings were analysed in terms of contraction episode (CE) count, amplitude, and duration. The sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles contracted about 40-70times per hour in the natural environment. Their EMG activity pattern mainly consisted of short-lasting, low-amplitude CEs. The counts and amplitude of sternocleidomastoid CEs did not differ across vocational and non-vocational conditions. The number and amplitude of trapezius CEs were slightly but significantly higher during the vocational condition. There were highly significant (p<0.001) differences in duration of CEs across conditions, with two to threefold increase in the average duration of trapezius muscle contractions found in the vocational setting. During orthodontic work, operators commonly hold muscular contractions for significantly longer periods than are encountered in non-vocational settings. This behaviour may be associated causally with the increases seen in WMSDs through proposed pathophysiological mechanisms occurring at the motor unit level. Our findings may also be valid for other occupations characterised by seated static postures with precision hand and wrist movements.

  15. Afferent contribution to locomotor muscle activity during unconstrained overground human walking: an analysis of triceps surae muscle fascicles.

    PubMed

    af Klint, R; Cronin, N J; Ishikawa, M; Sinkjaer, T; Grey, M J

    2010-03-01

    Plantar flexor series elasticity can be used to dissociate muscle-fascicle and muscle-tendon behavior and thus afferent feedback during human walking. We used electromyography (EMG) and high-speed ultrasonography concomitantly to monitor muscle activity and muscle fascicle behavior in 19 healthy volunteers as they walked across a platform. On random trials, the platform was dropped (8 cm, 0.9 g acceleration) or held at a small inclination (up to +/-3 degrees in the parasagittal plane) with respect to level ground. Dropping the platform in the mid and late phases of stance produced a depression in the soleus muscle activity with an onset latency of about 50 ms. The reduction in ground reaction force also unloaded the plantar flexor muscles. The soleus muscle fascicles shortened with a minimum delay of 14 ms. Small variations in platform inclination produced significant changes in triceps surae muscle activity; EMG increased when stepping on an inclined surface and decreased when stepping on a declined surface. This sensory modulation of the locomotor output was concomitant with changes in triceps surae muscle fascicle and gastrocnemius tendon length. Assuming that afferent activity correlates to these mechanical changes, our results indicate that within-step sensory feedback from the plantar flexor muscles automatically adjusts muscle activity to compensate for small ground irregularities. The delayed onset of muscle fascicle movement after dropping the platform indicates that at least the initial part of the soleus depression is more likely mediated by a decrease in force feedback than length-sensitive feedback, indicating that force feedback contributes to the locomotor activity in human walking.

  16. Chrysin alleviates allergic inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Jiang, Mingzi; Zhang, Yunshi; Liu, Xing; Du, Qiang; Feng, Ganzhu

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder and progresses mainly due to airway remodeling. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess multiple biologic activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-proliferation. The present study aimed to investigate whether chrysin could relieve allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma and the mechanism involved. The female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) successfully developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation and remodeling. The experimental data showed that chrysin could alleviate OVA-induced AHR. Chrysin could also reduce OVA-induced increases in the number of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, interleukin (IL) -4, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total IgE in serum. The decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) level in BALF was also upregulated by chrysin. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) around bronchioles were suppressed by chrysin. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) could be decreased by chrysin, which are associated with airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. These results indicate the promising therapeutic effect of chrysin on chronic asthma, especially the progression of airway remodeling.

  17. Does chronic physical activity level modify the airway inflammatory response to an acute bout of exercise in the post-prandial period?

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Stephanie P.; Rosenkranz, Sara K.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Teeman, Colby S.; Cull, Brooke J.; Emerson, Sam R.; Levitt, Morton H.; Smith, Joshua R.; Harms, Craig A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that a single high-fat meal (HFM) leads to increased airway inflammation. However exercise is a natural anti-inflammatory and may modify post-prandial airway inflammation. The post-prandial airway inflammatory response is likely to be modified by chronic physical activity (PA) level. Purpose To investigate whether chronic PA modifies the airway inflammatory response to an acute bout of exercise in the post-prandial period in both insufficiently active and active subjects. Methods Thirty-nine non-asthmatic subjects (twenty active (ACT), 13M/7F) who exceeded PA guidelines (≥150 min moderate-vigorous PA/week) and (nineteen insufficiently active (IN), 6M/13F) underwent an incremental treadmill test to exhaustion to determine VO2peak. Subjects were then randomized to a condition (COND), either remaining sedentary (CON) or exercising (EX) post-HFM. Exercise was performed at the heart rate corresponding to 60% VO2peak on a treadmill one-hour post-HFM (63% fat, 10kcal/kgbw). Blood lipids and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO: marker of airway inflammation) were measured at baseline, 2 h and 4 h post-HFM. Sputum differential cell counts were performed at baseline and 4 h post-HFM. Results The mean eNO response for all groups increased at 2 h post-HFM (∼6%) and returned to baseline by 4 h (p=0.03). There was a time*COND interaction (p=0.04), where EX had a greater eNO response at 4 hours compared to CON. Sputum neutrophils increased at 4 hours post-HFM (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that airway inflammation occurs after a HFM when exercise is performed in the postprandial period, regardless of habitual activity level. PMID:28121185

  18. Variation in masticatory muscle activity during subsequent, submaximal clenching efforts.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Huddleston Slater, J J R

    2002-06-01

    In previous studies to the relative contribution of the jaw closing muscles to the maintenance of submaximal clenching levels, a considerable variation in the electromyography (EMG) activities of these muscles during subsequent efforts was found. In this study, it was examined to what extent this variation could be explained by coincidental variations in mandibular positioning. From seven healthy individuals, a total of 90 EMG sweeps was recorded: three conditions (intercuspal position and two types of stabilization appliances) x three clenching levels (10, 30 and 50% of maximum voluntary contraction level) x 10 repetitions. Mandibular position was monitored with a six degrees of freedom opto-electronic jaw movement recording system. Variations in mandibular positioning during subsequent, submaximal clenching efforts explained up to 25% of the variance in the indices that quantify the relative contribution of the jaw closing muscles to the total clenching effort (P=0.000; ANOVA). Only a weak dependency of positioning upon clenching condition was found whereas during higher clenching levels, the positioning effect tended to be smaller than during lower levels. In conclusion small, coincidental variations in mandibular positioning during subsequent clenching efforts partly explain the variance in EMG activity of jaw closing muscles, especially at lower clenching levels.

  19. The effects of finger extension on shoulder muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-Woo; Shin, Ju-Yong; Kim, Youn-Joung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to examine the effects of the extension of the fingers (distal upper limb) on the activity of the shoulder muscles (proximal upper limb). [Subjects and Methods] This study involved 14 healthy male adults with no musculoskeletal disorder or pain related to the shoulders and hands. The subjects in a sitting posture abducted the angle of the shoulder joints at 60° and had their palms in the front direction. Electromyography (EMG) was comparatively analyzed to look at the activities of the infraspinatus (IS) and rhomboid major (RM) when the fingers were extended and relaxed. [Results] The activity of the IS was statistically significantly higher when the fingers were extended than when they were relaxed. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, finger extension is considered to affect the muscles for connected shoulder joint stability. PMID:26504277

  20. Satellite cell activity in muscle regeneration after contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Pholpramool, Chumpol; Kitiyanant, Yindee; Yimlamai, Tossaporn

    2010-11-01

    1. The role of satellite cells in muscle growth during development is well documented, but the involvement of these cells in muscle repair after contusion is less well known. In the present study, we investigated the time-course of satellite cell activity (from 3h to 7days) after contusion of rat gastrocnemius muscle using specific molecular markers for immunofluorescence and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 2. Inflammation of the injured muscle occurred within 6h, followed by disintegration of the damaged myofibres within 12h. Newly formed myofibres appeared by Day 7. 3. The number of MyoD-positive nuclei (activated satellite cells) in the injured muscle was significantly increased by 6h, reaching a maximum by 12h after contusion. However, the number of MyoD-positive nuclei decreased towards control levels by Day 7. Changes in the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labelled nuclei (proliferating satellite cells) paralleled the changes seen in the number of MyoD-positive nuclei. Conversely, expression of myogenin protein was not apparent until Day 3 and increased further by Day 7. Colabelling of MyoD and myogenin was seen in only a few cells. 4. The time-course of MyoD mRNA expression corresponded with MyoD protein expression. However, there were two peaks in myogenin mRNA expression: 6h and Day 7 after contusion. The second peak coincided with upregulation of myostatin mRNA levels. 5. The results of the present study suggest that contusion activates a homogeneous population of satellite cells to proliferate within 3days, followed by differentiation to form new myofibres. The latter may be regulated, in part, by myostatin.

  1. Systematic review of core muscle activity during physical fitness exercises.

    PubMed

    Martuscello, Jason M; Nuzzo, James L; Ashley, Candi D; Campbell, Bill I; Orriola, John J; Mayer, John M

    2013-06-01

    A consensus has not been reached among strength and conditioning specialists regarding what physical fitness exercises are most effective to stimulate activity of the core muscles. Thus, the purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 3 core muscles (lumbar multifidus, transverse abdominis, quadratus lumborum) during physical fitness exercises in healthy adults. CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTdiscus, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant articles using a search strategy designed by the investigators. Seventeen studies enrolling 252 participants met the review's inclusion/exclusion criteria. Physical fitness exercises were partitioned into 5 major types: traditional core, core stability, ball/device, free weight, and noncore free weight. Strength of evidence was assessed and summarized for comparisons among exercise types. The major findings of this review with moderate levels of evidence indicate that lumbar multifidus EMG activity is greater during free weight exercises compared with ball/device exercises and is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. Transverse abdominis EMG activity is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. No studies were uncovered for quadratus lumborum EMG activity during physical fitness exercises. The available evidence suggests that strength and conditioning specialists should focus on implementing multijoint free weight exercises, rather than core-specific exercises, to adequately train the core muscles in their athletes and clients.

  2. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent.

  3. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  4. Preparation of the patient and the airway for awake intubation

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Venkateswaran

    2011-01-01

    Awake intubation is usually performed electively in the presence of a difficult airway. A detailed airway examination is time-consuming and often not feasible in an emergency. A simple 1-2-3 rule for airway examination allows one to identify potential airway difficulty within a minute. A more detailed airway examination can give a better idea about the exact nature of difficulty and the course of action to be taken to overcome it. When faced with an anticipated difficult airway, the anaesthesiologist needs to consider securing the airway in an awake state without the use of anaesthetic agents or muscle relaxants. As this can be highly discomforting to the patient, time and effort must be spent to prepare such patients both psychologically and pharmacologically for awake intubation. Psychological preparation is best initiated by an anaesthesiologist who explains the procedure in simple language. Sedative medications can be titrated to achieve patient comfort without compromising airway patency. Additional pharmacological preparation includes anaesthetising the airway through topical application of local anaesthetics and appropriate nerve blocks. When faced with a difficult airway, one should call for the difficult airway cart as well as for help from colleagues who have interest and expertise in airway management. Preoxygenation and monitoring during awake intubation is important. Anxious patients with a difficult airway may need to be intubated under general anaesthesia without muscle relaxants. Proper psychological and pharmacological preparation of the patient by an empathetic anaesthesiologist can go a long way in making awake intubation acceptable for all concerned. PMID:22174458

  5. Analysis of muscle activity during active pelvic tilting in sagittal plane

    PubMed Central

    TAKAKI, Sho; KANEOKA, Koji; OKUBO, Yu; OTSUKA, Satoru; TATSUMURA, Masaki; SHIINA, Itsuo; MIYAKAWA, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic tilting is performed to improve lumbopelvic flexibility or retrain the motor control of local muscles. However, few studies investigated the activity of local muscles during pelvic tilting. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting. Method: Twelve healthy males (age, 22.6 ± 1.4 years) participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the bilateral lumbar multifidus (MF) and transversus abdominis (TrA). Surface electrodes were used to record activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis, external oblique, and erector spinae (ES), and the unilateral right latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, semitendinosus, and rectus femoris muscles. The electromyographic activities during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting in a standing position were recorded and expressed as a percentage of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) for each muscle. Results: The activities of the bilateral MF (right: 23.9 ± 15.9 %MVC, left: 23.9 ± 15.1 %MVC) and right ES (19.0 ± 13.3 %MVC) were significantly greater than those of the other muscles during anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the left TrA (14.8 ± 16.4 %MVC) was significantly greater than that of the other muscles during posterior pelvic tilting. Conclusions: The results suggested that the MF and ES are related to anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the TrA, which was classified as a local muscle, was greater during posterior pelvic tilting. This study indicated that local muscles such as the MF and TrA may be related to pelvic tilting. PMID:28289581

  6. Muscle shortening velocity depends on tissue inertia and level of activation during submaximal contractions.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephanie A; Wakeling, James M

    2016-06-01

    In order to perform external work, muscles must do additional internal work to deform their tissue, and in particular, to overcome the inertia due to their internal mass. However, the contribution of the internal mass within a muscle to the mechanical output of that muscle has only rarely been studied. Here, we use a dynamic, multi-element Hill-type muscle model to examine the effects of the inertial mass within muscle on its contractile performance. We find that the maximum strain-rate of muscle is slower for lower activations and larger muscle sizes. As muscle size increases, the ability of the muscle to overcome its inertial load will decrease, as muscle tension is proportional to cross-sectional area and inertial load is proportional to mass. Thus, muscles that are larger in size will have a higher inertial cost to contraction. Similarly, when muscle size and inertial load are held constant, decreasing muscle activation will increase inertial cost to contraction by reducing muscle tension. These results show that inertial loads within muscle contribute to a slowing of muscle contractile velocities (strain-rates), particularly at the submaximal activations that are typical during animal locomotion.

  7. Myomaker: A membrane activator of myoblast fusion and muscle formation

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; O’Rourke, Jason R.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fusion of myoblasts is essential for the formation of multi-nucleated muscle fibers. However, the identity of myogenic proteins that directly govern this fusion process has remained elusive. Here, we discovered a muscle-specific membrane protein, named Myomaker, that controls myoblast fusion. Myomaker is expressed on the cell surface of myoblasts during fusion and is down-regulated thereafter. Over-expression of Myomaker in myoblasts dramatically enhances fusion and genetic disruption of Myomaker in mice causes perinatal death due to an absence of multi-nucleated muscle fibers. Remarkably, forced expression of Myomaker in fibroblasts promotes fusion with myoblasts, demonstrating the direct participation of this protein in the fusion process. Pharmacologic perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton abolishes the activity of Myomaker, consistent with prior studies implicating actin dynamics in myoblast fusion. These findings reveal a long-sought myogenic fusion protein both necessary and sufficient for mammalian myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of muscle formation. PMID:23868259

  8. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  9. Interplay between body stabilisation and quadriceps muscle activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2017-03-22

    The study aimed to distinguish the effect of stabilisation and muscle activation on quadriceps maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) torque generation. Nine subjects performed (a) an MVC with restrained leg and pelvis (Typical MVC), (b) a Typical MVC with handgrip (Handgrip MVC), (c) an MVC focusing on contracting the knee extensors only (Isolated knee extension MVC), and (d) an MVC with unrestrained leg and pelvis (Unrestrained MVC). Torque and activation capacity between conditions were compared with repeated measures ANOVA and dependent t-tests. EMG (from eleven remote muscles) was compared using Friedman's and Wilcoxon. Typical MVC (277.2±49.6Nm) and Handgrip MVC (261.0±55.4Nm) were higher than Isolated knee extension MVC (210.2±48.3Nm, p<0.05) and Unrestrained MVC (195.2±49.7Nm, p<0.05) torque. Typical MVC (83.1±15.9%) activation was higher than Isolated knee extension MVC (68.9±24.3%, p<0.05), and both Typical MVC and Handgrip MVC (81.8±17.4%) were higher than Unrestrained MVC (64.9±16.2%, p<0.05). Only flexor carpi radialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii and external oblique muscles showed EMG differences, with Isolated knee extension MVC consistently lower than Typical MVC or Handgrip MVC. Stabilisation of the involved segments is the prime concern allowing fuller activation of the muscle, reinforcing the need for close attention to stabilisation during dynamometry-based knee joint functional assessment.

  10. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  11. The muscle activity of trout exposed to unsteady flow.

    PubMed

    Klein, Adrian; Bleckmann, Horst

    2017-02-23

    In running water trout seek out special regions for station holding. Trout exposed to flow fluctuations caused by a cylinder hold station immediately upstream of the cylinder (bow wake region), adjacent to the cylinder (entraining region) or downstream of the cylinder (Kármán gait). In addition it was shown that the activity of the axial red swimming muscles is reduced during Kármán gaiting. Up to now only the two-dimensional (horizontal) extensions of the above regions have been examined. We determined both, the horizontal and vertical extension of the Kármán gait, entraining and bow wake region by continuously recording the position (spatial resolution 1 cm(3)) of trout for 3 h. In addition we continuously recorded the trunk muscle activity. The Kármán gate region had the smallest vertical extension (13 cm, water level 28-29 cm, length of the submerged cylinder 27 cm), followed by the entraining (21 cm) and bow wake region (25 cm). A fourth so far unknown region used for station holding was immediately below a stationary surface wave which, at flow velocities ≥36 cm s(- 1), developed slightly downstream of the cylinder. While in any of the above regions the activity of the axial swimming muscles was significantly reduced.

  12. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P < 0.05) as was force (40.3 ± 12.8% vs. 57.1 ± 13.8% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Likewise, after a 2-min AP MVC, elbow flexion voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (88.3 ± 7.5% vs. 93.6 ± 3.9%; P < 0.05) as was torque (80.2 ± 4.6% vs. 86.6 ± 1.0% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Pain during ischemia was reported as Moderate to Very Strong. Postfatigue firing of group III/IV muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  13. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types a rat model of critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Benjamin T.; Confides, Amy L.; Rich, Mark M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40–60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and −8 activities, but not caspase-9 and −12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, −27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types. PMID:25740800

  14. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types in a rat model of critical illness myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Benjamin T; Confides, Amy L; Rich, Mark M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-06-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40-60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and -8 activities, but not caspase-9 and -12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, -27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types.

  15. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by mucA mutations result in activation of TLR2 in addition to TLR5 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Trevor; Lafayette, Shantelle; Nguyen, Dao; Rousseau, Simon

    2012-11-09

    The presence of the mucoid phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a marker of poor survival in cystic fibrosis. As CF lung disease results from chronic infection leading to airway inflammation, we determined whether the switch to a mucoid phenotype by P. aeruginosa has an impact on the inflammatory response of airway epithelial cells. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to non-mucoid and mucoid P. aeruginosa-derived material leads to p38α MAPK activation, a key protein kinase involved in transmitting inflammatory signals. However, while the non-mucoid strain PAO1 activates p38α MAPK pathway solely via TLR5, the mucoid strain PACF508 activates p38α MAPK via both TLR5 and TLR2. Inactivation of mucA (the gene responsible for the mucoid phenotype) in PAO1 leads to p38α MAPK activation by both TLR2 and TLR5, as observed in the clinical mucoid isolate PACF508. Therefore, the switch to mucoid phenotype may contribute to more inflammation via TLR2 activation in addition to TLR5. Our findings highlight an important and under recognized role for TLR2 in the response of airway epithelial cells to infection.

  16. The assessment methods of laryngeal muscle activity in muscle tension dysphonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Seyyedeh Maryam; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Izadi, Farzad; Talebian Moghadam, Saeed

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this paper is to review the methods used for the assessment of muscular tension dysphonia (MTD). The MTD is a functional voice disorder associated with abnormal laryngeal muscle activity. Various assessment methods are available in the literature to evaluate the laryngeal hyperfunction. The case history, laryngoscopy, and palpation are clinical methods for the assessment of patients with MTD. Radiography and surface electromyography (EMG) are objective methods to provide physiological information about MTD. Recent studies show that surface EMG can be an effective tool for assessing muscular tension in MTD.

  17. A Role for Nitric Oxide in Muscle Repair: Nitric Oxide–mediated Activation of Muscle Satellite Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Judy E.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle satellite cells are quiescent precursors interposed between myofibers and a sheath of external lamina. Although their activation and recruitment to cycle enable muscle repair and adaptation, the activation signal is not known. Evidence is presented that nitric oxide (NO) mediates satellite cell activation, including morphological hypertrophy and decreased adhesion in the fiber-lamina complex. Activation in vivo occurred within 1 min after injury. Cell isolation and histology showed that pharmacological inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity prevented the immediate injury-induced myogenic cell release and delayed the hypertrophy of satellite cells in that muscle. Transient activation of satellite cells in contralateral muscles 10 min later suggested that a circulating factor may interact with NO-mediated signaling. Interestingly, satellite cell activation in muscles of mdx dystrophic mice and NOS-I knockout mice quantitatively resembled NOS-inhibited release of normal cells, in agreement with reports of displaced and reduced NOS expression in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle and the complete loss of NOS-I expression in knockout mice. Brief NOS inhibition in normal and mdx mice during injury produced subtle alterations in subsequent repair, including apoptosis in myotube nuclei and myotube formation inside laminar sheaths. Longer NOS inhibition delayed and restricted the extent of repair and resulted in fiber branching. A model proposes the hypothesis that NO release mediates satellite cell activation, possibly via shear-induced rapid increases in NOS activity that produce “NO transients.” PMID:10793157

  18. IL-25 promotes Th2 immunity responses in airway inflammation of asthmatic mice via activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hongjia, Li; Caiqing, Zhang; Degan, Lu; Fen, Liu; Chao, Wang; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Allergic asthma occurs as a consequence of inappropriate immunologic inflammation to allergens and characterized by Th2 adaptive immune response. Recent studies indicated that interleukin (IL)-25, a member of the IL-17 cytokine family, had been implicated in inducing Th2 cell-dependent inflammation in airway epithelium and IL-25-deficient mice exhibit impaired Th2 immunity responses; however, how these cytokines influence innate immune responses remains poorly understood. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge to induce the murine asthmatic model and confirmed by histological analysis of lung tissues and serum levels of total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-E. The expression of IL-25 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and the dendritic cells (DCs) activation was detected by levels of CD80 and CD86 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by flow cytometry. The mice sensitized and challenged with OVA showed high expression of IL-25 in both mRNA and protein levels in lungs. We detected the expression of CD80 and CD86 in BALF was also increased. A tight correlation between IL-25 mRNA and other Th2 cells producing cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BALF was identified. Furthermore, when the asthmatic mice were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, the inflammatory cells infiltration and the inflammatory cytokines secretion were significantly decreased. In this study, we show that IL-25 promoted the accumulation of co-stimulatory molecules of CD80 and CD86 on DCs and then induced the differentiation of prime naive CD4(+) T cells to become proinflammatory Th2 cells and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in OVA-induced airway inflammation. The ability of IL-25 to promote the activation and differentiation of DCs population was identified as a link between the IL-17 cytokine family and the innate immune response and suggested a previously unrecognized innate immune pathway that promotes Th2

  19. TAK1 regulates NF-{Kappa}B and AP-1 activation in airway epithelial cells following RSV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Nilay; Liu Tianshuang; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2011-09-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory diseases in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and AP-1. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to activation of these two transcription factors in response to RSV infection. Our results show that IKK{beta} plays a key role in viral-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, while JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription, as demonstrated by using kinase inactive proteins and chemical inhibitors of the two kinases. Inhibition of TAK1 activation, by overexpression of kinase inactive TAK1 or using cells lacking TAK1 expression, significantly reduced RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity, as well as NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, identifying TAK1 as an important upstream signaling molecule regulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 activation. - Highlights: > IKK{beta} is a major kinase involved in RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. > JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription in RSV infection. > TAK1 is a critical upstream signaling molecule for both pathways in infected cells.

  20. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity during ventilatory chemostimulation in piglets.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; O'Day, T L; Brozanski, B S; Guthrie, R D

    1990-04-01

    We examined abdominal muscle minute electromyographic (EMG) activity (peak moving time average EMG x respiratory rate) during eupnea, hyperoxic hypercapnia (8% CO2-40% O2-balance N2), and hypoxia (13% O2) in 12 anesthetized (0.5% halothane) newborn piglets. In addition, we assessed the role of vagal afferent pathways in the abdominal muscles' response to ventilatory chemostimulation by examining abdominal EMG activity (EMGab) before and after bilateral cervical vagotomy in five animals. Phasic expiratory EMGab was observed in 11 of 12 piglets during eupnea. Hypercapnia was associated with a sustained augmentation of minute EMGab (444 +/- 208% control). In contrast, hypoxia consistently augmented (1 min, 193 +/- 33% control) then diminished (5 min, 126 +/- 39% control) minute EMGab. Vagotomy resulted in a decline in peak moving time average EMGab by approximately one-half (48 +/- 18% control); the abdominal muscles' response to ventilatory chemostimulation, however, was qualitatively unchanged. We conclude that 1) expiration during eupnea in anesthetized newborn piglets is associated with phasic EMGab; 2) both hypercapnia and hypoxia augment minute EMGab; however, only hypercapnia is associated with sustained augmentation; and 3) although vagal afferents have a role in modulating the base-line level of EMGab, other extravagal mechanisms appear to determine the pattern of EMGab in response to ventilatory chemostimulation.

  1. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; De Winter, Josine M; Buck, Danielle; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Labeit, Siegfried; Ottenheijm, Coen A; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT) and nebulin deficient (NEB KO) mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse) or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM) patients with NEB mutations) causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold) at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM), CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr) (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch). CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr) at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL) dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm) and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength.

  2. An active learning mammalian skeletal muscle lab demonstrating contractile and kinetic properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Head, S I; Arber, M B

    2013-12-01

    The fact that humans possess fast- and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of ∼50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic properties of fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. This laboratory illustrates the major differences in contractile properties and fatigue profiles exhibited by the two muscle types. Students compare and contrast twitch kinetics, fused tetanus characteristics, force-frequency relationships, and fatigue properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Examples of results collected by students during class are used to illustrate the type of data collected and analysis performed. During the laboratory, students are encouraged to connect factual information from their skeletal muscle lectures to their laboratory findings. This enables student learning in an active fashion; in particular, the isolated muscle preparation demonstrates that much of what makes muscle fast or slow is myogenic and not the product of the nervous or circulatory systems. This has far-reaching implications for motor control and exercise behavior and therefore is a crucial element in exercise science, with its focus on power and endurance sport activities. To measure student satisfaction with this active learning technique, a questionnaire was administered after the laboratory; 96% of the comments were positive in their support of active versus passive learning strategies.

  3. The Activity of Surface Electromyographic Signal of Selected Muscles during Classic Rehabilitation Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jinzhuang; Sun, Jinli; Gao, Junmin; Wang, Hongrui; Yang, Xincai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Prone bridge, unilateral bridge, supine bridge, and bird-dog are classic rehabilitation exercises, which have been advocated as effective ways to improve core stability among healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of seven selected muscles during rehabilitation exercises through the signal of surface electromyographic. Approaches. We measured the surface electromyographic signals of four lower limb muscles, two abdominal muscles, and one back muscle during rehabilitation exercises of 30 healthy students and then analyzed its activity level using the median frequency method. Results. Different levels of muscle activity during the four rehabilitation exercises were observed. The prone bridge and unilateral bridge caused the greatest muscle fatigue; however, the supine bridge generated the lowest muscle activity. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between left and right body side muscles in the median frequency slope during the four rehabilitation exercises of seven muscles. Conclusions. The prone bridge can affect the low back and lower limb muscles of most people. The unilateral bridge was found to stimulate muscles much more active than the supine bridge. The bird-dog does not cause much fatigue to muscles but can make most selected muscles active. PMID:27195151

  4. The Activity of Surface Electromyographic Signal of Selected Muscles during Classic Rehabilitation Exercise.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jinzhuang; Sun, Jinli; Gao, Junmin; Wang, Hongrui; Yang, Xincai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Prone bridge, unilateral bridge, supine bridge, and bird-dog are classic rehabilitation exercises, which have been advocated as effective ways to improve core stability among healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of seven selected muscles during rehabilitation exercises through the signal of surface electromyographic. Approaches. We measured the surface electromyographic signals of four lower limb muscles, two abdominal muscles, and one back muscle during rehabilitation exercises of 30 healthy students and then analyzed its activity level using the median frequency method. Results. Different levels of muscle activity during the four rehabilitation exercises were observed. The prone bridge and unilateral bridge caused the greatest muscle fatigue; however, the supine bridge g