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Sample records for airway muscle dysfunction

  1. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C.; Pabelick, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  2. Airway smooth muscle dysfunction precedes teratogenic congenital diaphragmatic hernia and may contribute to hypoplastic lung morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, Neil C; Connell, Marilyn G; Fernig, David G; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor V; Losty, Paul D; Jesudason, Edwin C

    2006-11-01

    Fetal intervention aims to improve lung growth and survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Airway smooth muscle (ASM) is important in lung development: ASM progenitors produce a key growth factor for lung morphogenesis (fibroblast growth factor 10); ASM contractility is also coupled to growth. ASM hyperreactivity occurs in postnatal CDH and may exacerbate barotrauma via impaired lung compliance. We hypothesize that ASM hyperreactivity and its sequelae are based on an early developmental lesion of ASM activity in hypoplastic lung. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 100 mg nitrofen on Day 9.5 of pregnancy to induce lung hypoplasia in offspring (controls had vehicle alone). Normal and hypoplastic lung primordia were cultured from Day 13.5 of gestation at 37 degrees C in 5% CO(2) and loaded at 54 or 78 h with Ca(2+)-sensitive indicators: Fluo-4 for confocal imaging and Indo-1 or Fura-2 for photometric measurements of [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoplastic lung features spontaneous propagating ASM Ca(2+) transients with reduced frequency, increased amplitude, and significantly prolonged plateau duration, relative to control lung. Nonetheless, hypoplastic lung exhibits normal requirement for extracellular calcium entry and intracellular calcium release in initiation and regulation of ASM Ca(2+) waves. Early ASM dysfunction in lung hypoplasia is apparent as specific anomalies of Ca(2+) transients that indicate a problem with plasmalemmal ion channels/action potential generation. Elucidation of such an ASM lesion may allow pharmacologic amelioration not only of ASM hyperreactivity and its sequelae, but also of hypoplastic lung growth itself. PMID:16728706

  3. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  4. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  5. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  6. CXCL8 histone H3 acetylation is dysfunctional in airway smooth muscle in asthma: regulation by BET

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Rachel L.; Patel, Jamie K.; John, Alison E.; Tatler, Amanda L.; Mazengarb, Lisa; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation and remodeling and CXCL8 is a CXC chemokine that drives steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. We have shown that airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells isolated from asthmatic individuals secrete more CXCL8 than cells from nonasthmatic individuals. Here we investigated chromatin modifications at the CXCL8 promoter in ASM cells from nonasthmatic and asthmatic donors to further understand how CXCL8 is dysregulated in asthma. ASM cells from asthmatic donors had increased histone H3 acetylation, specifically histone H3K18 acetylation, and increased binding of histone acetyltransferase p300 compared with nonasthmatic donors but no differences in CXCL8 DNA methylation. The acetylation reader proteins Brd3 and Brd4 were bound to the CXCL8 promoter and Brd inhibitors inhibited CXCL8 secretion from ASM cells by disrupting Brd4 and RNA polymerase II binding to the CXCL8 promoter. Our results show a novel dysregulation of CXCL8 transcriptional regulation in asthma characterized by a promoter complex that is abnormal in ASM cells isolated from asthmatic donors and can be modulated by Brd inhibitors. Brd inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy for steroid-resistant inflammation. PMID:25713319

  7. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  8. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  9. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Tabar, A I; Alvarez, M J; Acero, S; Olaguíbel, J M; García, B E; Quirce, S

    1998-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is a type of asthma that develops in subjects without prior pulmonary disease, following single or multiple exposure to high levels of nonimmunogenic irritants. The main difference from classic occupational asthma is the absence of a latency period. Non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness is characteristic of the disease and usually persists after cessation of exposure. We report the cases of two subjects in whom RADS developed after occupational exposure to irritants. PMID:9615307

  10. Genetic differences in airway smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Jo, Taisuke

    2008-01-01

    The genetic basis for airway smooth muscle properties is poorly explored. Contraction and relaxation are altered in asthmatic airway smooth muscle, but the basis for the alterations and the role that muscle-specific susceptibility genes may play is largely unexplored. Alterations in the beta-adrenergic receptor, signaling pathways affecting inositol phosphate metabolism, adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase activity, and contractile proteins such as the myosin heavy chain are all suggested by experimental model systems. Significant changes in proliferative and secretory capacities of asthmatic smooth muscle are also demonstrated, but their genetic basis also requires elucidation. Certain asthma-related genes such as ADAM33, although potentially important for smooth muscle function, have been incompletely explored. PMID:18094088

  11. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. PMID:27274324

  12. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. PMID:27274324

  13. Origins of increased airway smooth muscle mass in asthma.

    PubMed

    Berair, Rachid; Saunders, Ruth; Brightling, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by both chronic inflammation and airway remodeling. Remodeling--the structural changes seen in asthmatic airways--is pivotal in the pathogenesis of the disease. Although significant advances have been made recently in understanding the different aspects of airway remodeling, the exact biology governing these changes remains poorly understood. There is broad agreement that, in asthma, increased airway smooth muscle mass, in part due to smooth muscle hyperplasia, is a very significant component of airway remodeling. However, significant debate persists on the origins of these airway smooth muscle cells. In this review article we will explore the natural history of airway remodeling in asthma and we will discuss the possible contribution of progenitors, stem cells and epithelial cells in mesenchymal cell changes, namely airway smooth muscle hyperplasia seen in the asthmatic airways. PMID:23742314

  14. Effects of tracheal airway occlusion on hyoid muscle length and upper airway volume.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E; Haxhiu, M A; Cherniack, N S

    1989-12-01

    Complex relationships exist among electromyograms (EMGs) of the upper airway muscles, respective changes in muscle length, and upper airway volume. To test the effects of preventing lung inflation on these relationships, recordings were made of EMGs and length changes of the geniohyoid (GH) and sternohyoid (SH) muscles as well as of tidal changes in upper airway volume in eight anesthetized cats. During resting breathing, tracheal airway occlusion tended to increase the inspiratory lengthening of GH and SH. In response to progressive hypercapnia, the GH eventually shortened during inspiration in all animals; the extent of muscle shortening was minimally augmented by airway occlusion despite substantial increases in EMGs. SH lengthened during inspiration in six of eight animals under hypercapnic conditions, and in these cats lengthening was greater during airway occlusion even though EMGs increased. Despite the above effects on SH and GH length, upper airway tidal volume was increased significantly by tracheal occlusion under hypercapnic conditions. These data suggest that the thoracic and upper airway muscle reflex effects of preventing lung inflation during inspiration act antagonistically on hyoid muscle length, but, because of the mechanical arrangement of the hyoid muscles relative to the airway and thorax, they act agonistically to augment tidal changes in upper airway volume. The augmentation of upper airway tidal volume may occur in part as a result of the effects of thoracic movements being passively transmitted through the hyoid muscles. PMID:2606835

  15. Measuring and imaging small airways dysfunction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways causing typical symptoms, and the diagnosis is supported by evidence of airflow obstruction which is variable, reversible or inducible. However, standard assessment of lung function with spirometry does not measure dysfunction in small airways which are < 2 mm in diameter towards the periphery of the lung. These airways make only a small contribution to airway resistance under normal circumstances. Nevertheless, there is mounting evidence that pathology and dysfunction in these small airways are implicated in the pathogenesis and natural history of asthma. Using forced oscillation and the multibreath nitrogen washout techniques, uneven ventilation (ventilation heterogeneity) due to small airways dysfunction has been shown to be an important marker of asthma disease activity, even in the absence of abnormalities in standard spirometric measurements. Recent advances in imaging research, particularly with hyperpolarised gas magnetic resonance imaging, have also given insights into the significance and dynamic nature of ventilation heterogeneity in asthma. The challenge is to integrate these new physiological and imaging insights to further our understanding of asthma and facilitate potential new treatments. PMID:24260727

  16. Clinical characteristics of adult asthma associated with small airway dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kjellberg, S; Houltz, B K; Zetterström, O; Robinson, P D; Gustafsson, Per M

    2016-08-01

    Suboptimal asthma control is common despite modern asthma therapy. The degree of peripheral airway involvement remains unclear and poor medication delivery to these regions might be a contributing reason for this failure in obtaining adequate symptom control. A cohort of 196 adults (median (range) age 44 (18-61) years, 109 females, 54 ex-smokers, six current smokers) with physician-diagnosed asthma were recruited from primary care. Subjects were characterized clinically by interviews, questionnaires, skin prick tests (SPT) and blood eosinophil counts. Lung function was assessed by spirometry, impulse oscillometry (IOS) and nitrogen multiple breath washout (N2 MBW). IOS assessed peripheral airway resistance (FDR, frequency dependence of resistance). N2 MBW assessed global ventilation inhomogeneity (LCI, lung clearance index), specific indices of peripheral airway function (Scond × VT and Sacin × VT; VT, tidal volume), and inter-regional inhomogeneity (specific ventilation ratio). Never-smoking healthy cohorts of 158 and 400 adult subjects provided local reference values for IOS and N2 MBW variables, respectively. Peripheral airway dysfunction was detected in 31% (FDR or specific ventilation ratio) to 47% (Scond x VT) of subjects. Risk factors for peripheral airway dysfunction were identified. Among subjects with low FEV1 and either positive smoking history and/or blood eosinophilia (>4.0%), 63% had abnormality across all peripheral airway outcomes, whilst only one subject was completely normal. Abnormal peripheral airway function was present in a large proportion of adult asthmatics at baseline. Reduced FEV1, a positive smoking history, and/or blood eosinophilia identified "a small airway asthma subtype" that might benefit from peripheral airway targeted therapy. PMID:27492518

  17. Techniques of assessing small airways dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, William; Usmani, Omar S.

    2014-01-01

    The small airways are defined as those less than 2 mm in diameter. They are a major site of pathology in many lung diseases, not least chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The small airways are frequently involved early in the course of these diseases, with significant pathology demonstrable often before the onset of symptoms or changes in spirometry and imaging. Despite their importance, they have proven relatively difficult to study. This is in part due to their relative inaccessibility to biopsy and their small size which makes their imaging difficult. Traditional lung function tests may only become abnormal once there is a significant burden of disease within them. This has led to the term ‘the quiet zone’ of the lung. In recent years, more specialised tests have been developed which may detect these changes earlier, perhaps offering the possibility of earlier diagnosis and intervention. These tests are now moving from the realms of clinical research laboratories into routine clinical practice and are increasingly useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of respiratory diseases. This article gives an overview of small airways physiology and some of the routine and more advanced tests of airway function. PMID:26557240

  18. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction. PMID:25583659

  19. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome following metal fume fever.

    PubMed

    Dube, Daniel; Puruckherr, Michael; Byrd, Ryland P; Roy, Thomas M

    2002-06-01

    Metal fume fever (MFF) is an acute response to the inhalation of heavy metals used in industry. The patient typically experiences symptoms of cough, fever, chills, malaise, and myalgia that are self-limited and of short duration. Wheezing may occur and pulmonary function may be acutely impaired with a decrease in lung volumes and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. Nevertheless, respiratory function quickly returns to normal, and persistent pulmonary insufficiency is unusual. Irritant-induced asthma is a non-immunogenic form of airway injury that may be associated with industrial inhalation exposure. In this situation, the direct toxic effect on the airways causes persistent airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity. The two conditions are considered distinct entities, but we report a previously healthy worker who had classic MFF and was left with irritant-induced asthma or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). PMID:12056129

  20. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  1. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome caused by bromochlorodifluoromethane from fire extinguishers.

    PubMed

    Matrat, M; Laurence, M F; Iwatsubo, Y; Hubert, C; Joly, N; Legrand-Cattan, K; L'Huillier, J P; Villemain, C; Pairon, J C

    2004-08-01

    Although the neurological and cardiovascular effects of Freons have been extensively described, the respiratory effects have been less well documented. We report four cases of occupational asthma following accidental exposure to bromochlorodifluoromethane (Halon 1211) due to release of the contents of a fire extinguisher. All subjects developed an irritative reaction of the upper airways and lower respiratory symptoms immediately after exposure. Non-specific bronchial hyperreactivity was present for at least two months in all subjects and was still present more than two years after exposure in one case. The diagnosis of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome can be adopted in at least three of these four cases. PMID:15258280

  2. How the airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis reacts in proinflammatory conditions: implications for airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, Sarah; Martin, James G

    2013-04-01

    Among patients with cystic fibrosis there is a high prevalence (40-70%) of asthma signs and symptoms such as cough and wheezing and airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled histamine or methacholine. Whether these abnormal airway responses are due to a primary deficiency in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or are secondary to the inflammatory environment in the cystic fibrosis lungs is not clear. A role for the CFTR in smooth muscle function is emerging, and alterations in contractile signalling have been reported in CFTR-deficient airway smooth muscle. Persistent bacterial infection, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, stimulates interleukin-8 release from the airway epithelium, resulting in neutrophilic inflammation. Increased neutrophilia and skewing of CFTR-deficient T-helper cells to type 2 helper T cells creates an inflammatory environment characterised by high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-8, and interleukin-13, which might all contribute to increased contractility of airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis. An emerging role of interleukin-17, which is raised in patients with cystic fibrosis, in airway smooth muscle proliferation and hyper-responsiveness is apparent. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the altered smooth muscle physiology in patients with cystic fibrosis might provide insight into airway dysfunction in this disease. PMID:24429094

  3. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome following exposure to a fluorocarbon.

    PubMed

    de la Hoz, R E

    1999-05-01

    This report describes the case of a 43-yr-old male who developed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome after exposure to a high level of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br, Halon 1301), a fluorocarbon widely used in automatic fire extinguishing systems. The patient was a previously healthy, nonatopic male, who developed wheezing and intermittent and reversible obstructive ventilatory impairment starting immediately after a large accidental nonfire-related release of CF3Br in a confined space. PMID:10414425

  4. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  5. Bronchospasm and its biophysical basis in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Airways hyperresponsiveness is a cardinal feature of asthma but remains unexplained. In asthma, the airway smooth muscle cell is the key end-effector of bronchospasm and acute airway narrowing, but in just the past five years our understanding of the relationship of responsiveness to muscle biophysics has dramatically changed. It has become well established, for example, that muscle length is equilibrated dynamically rather than statically, and that non-classical features of muscle biophysics come to the forefront, including unanticipated interactions between the muscle and its time-varying load, as well as the ability of the muscle cell to adapt rapidly to changes in its dynamic microenvironment. These newly discovered phenomena have been described empirically, but a mechanistic basis to explain them is only beginning to emerge. PMID:15084229

  6. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  7. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME. PMID:26998359

  8. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME. PMID:26998359

  9. Evidence of hypoxic tolerance in weak upper airway muscle from young mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Burns, David P; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterised by deficiency in the protein dystrophin. The respiratory system is weakened and patients suffer from sleep disordered breathing and hypoventilation culminating in periods of hypoxaemia. We examined the effects of an acute (6h) hypoxic stress on sternohyoid muscle function (representative pharyngeal dilator). 8 week old male, wild-type (WT; C57BL/10ScSnJ; n=18) and mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J; n=16) mice were exposed to sustained hypoxia (FIO2=0.10) or normoxia. Muscle functional properties were examined ex vivo. Additional WT (n=5) and mdx (n=5) sternohyoid muscle was exposed to an anoxic challenge. Sternohyoid dysfunction was observed in mdx mice with significant reductions in force and power. Following exposure to the acute in vivo hypoxic stress, WT sternohyoid muscle showed evidence of functional impairment (reduced force, work and power). Conversely, mdx sternohyoid showed an apparent tolerance to the acute hypoxic stress. This tolerance was not maintained for mdx following a severe hypoxic stress. A dysfunctional upper airway muscle phenotype is present at 8 weeks of age in the mdx mouse, which may have implications for the control of airway patency in DMD. Hypoxic tolerance in mdx respiratory muscle is suggestive of adaptation to chronic hypoxia, which could be present due to respiratory morbidity. We speculate a role for hypoxia in mdx respiratory muscle morbidity. PMID:26691169

  10. Airway smooth muscle responsiveness from dogs with airway hyperresponsiveness after O/sub 3/ inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.L.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Pashley, M.; Serio, R.; Jury, J.; Lane, C.G.; Daniel, E.E.

    1988-07-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs after inhalation of O3 in dogs. The purpose of this study was to examine the responsiveness of trachealis smooth muscle in vitro to electrical field stimulation, exogenous acetylcholine, and potassium chloride from dogs with airway hyperresponsiveness after inhaled O3 in vivo and to compare this with the responsiveness of trachealis muscle from control dogs. In addition, excitatory junction potentials were measured with the use of single and double sucrose gap techniques in both groups of dogs to determine whether inhaled O3 affects the release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in trachealis muscle. Airway hyperresponsiveness developed in all dogs after inhaled O3 (3 ppm for 30 min). The acetylcholine provocative concentration decreased from 4.11 mg/ml before O3 inhalation to 0.66 mg/ml after O3 (P less than 0.0001). The acetylcholine provocative concentration increased slightly after control inhalation of dry room air. Airway smooth muscle showed increased responses to both electrical field stimulation and exogenous acetylcholine but not to potassium chloride in preparations from dogs with airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo. The increased response to electrical field stimulation was not associated with a change in excitatory junctional potentials. These results suggest that a postjunctional alteration in trachealis muscle function occurs after inhaled O3 in dogs, which may account for airway hyperresponsiveness after O3 in vivo.

  11. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  12. Can Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) be iatrogenic?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, David J

    2011-08-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is an asthma-like illness that develops after a single high-level exposure to a pulmonary irritant. Two different cases are reviewed, in which the exposure circumstances were not sufficient to result in adverse health effects yet resulted in persistent respiratory symptoms and a clinical diagnosis of RADS. Potential explanations for an erroneous diagnosis of RADS included an incomplete exposure assessment, medication adverse effects that can contribute to respiratory symptoms, and alternative explanations for respiratory symptoms or test findings. In particular, the empirical use of bronchodilator medications without a clear indication appeared to contribute to continued respiratory symptoms. Without a clear understanding of the patient's exposure, a RADS diagnosis should be carefully considered. The possibility of an iatrogenic sequence of events in which medication adverse effects facilitate respiratory symptoms and a mistaken RADS diagnosis should be considered, particularly in patients who have a poorly defined exposure history. PMID:21457622

  13. Critical role of actin-associated proteins in smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dale D

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling, which are largely attributed to increased airway smooth muscle contractility and cell proliferation. It is known that both chemical and mechanical stimulation regulates smooth muscle contraction. Recent studies suggest that contractile activation and mechanical stretch induce actin cytoskeletal remodeling in smooth muscle. However, the mechanisms that control actin cytoskeletal reorganization are not completely elucidated. This review summarizes our current understanding regarding how actin-associated proteins may regulate remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton in airway smooth muscle. In particular, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) plays a critical role in regulating airway smooth muscle contraction and cell proliferation in vitro, and airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in vivo. These studies indicate that Abl may be a novel target for the development of new therapy to treat asthma. PMID:26517982

  14. Epithelial modulation of preterm airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Panitch, H B; Wolfson, M R; Shaffer, T H

    1993-03-01

    To determine if epithelium from immature airways can modulate the responsiveness of smooth muscle, we studied paired trachealis muscle strips from preterm sheep. The epithelium was removed from one strip and left undisturbed in the other. Concentration-effect (CE) curves to acetylcholine (ACh), KCl, and isoproterenol were obtained. To evaluate maturational effects, responses to ACh and isoproterenol were studied in trachealis strips from adult airways. Maximal stress (Po) to ACh increased after epithelium removal in preterm (P < 0.05) but not adult strips. Epithelium removal caused a leftward shift of the ACh CE curves in both preterm and adult strips (P < 0.001) and a decrease in the dose required to achieve a one-half maximal response (ED50) in both preterm (P < 0.005) and adult strips (P < 0.05). The magnitude of the change in Po as well as in the ED50 for ACh between preterms and adults was similar. Epithelium removal did not alter either the Po or the CE curves of preterm strips stimulated by KCl. Response to isoproterenol in precontracted strips was enhanced in the presence of an intact epithelium in both groups (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that preterm airway epithelium is able to modulate the responsiveness of smooth muscle. Additionally, the magnitude of the effect is unchanged with maturation. We speculate that damage of airway epithelium from mechanical ventilation may contribute to the increased incidence of airway hyperreactivity observed in preterm infants. PMID:8482688

  15. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  16. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  17. The Three A's in Asthma - Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Keglowich, L F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  18. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  19. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  20. Emergence of airway smooth muscle functions related to structural malleability

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    The function of a complex system such as a smooth muscle cell is the result of the active interaction among molecules and molecular aggregates. Emergent macroscopic manifestations of these molecular interactions, such as the length-force relationship and its associated length adaptation, are well documented, but the molecular constituents and organization that give rise to these emergent muscle behaviors remain largely unknown. In this minireview, we describe emergent properties of airway smooth muscle that seem to have originated from inherent fragility of the cellular structures, which has been increasingly recognized as a unique and important smooth muscle attribute. We also describe molecular interactions (based on direct and indirect evidence) that may confer malleability on fragile structural elements that in turn may allow the muscle to adapt to large and frequent changes in cell dimensions. Understanding how smooth muscle works may hinge on how well we can relate molecular events to its emergent macroscopic functions. PMID:21127211

  1. MicroRNA regulation of airway smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sun, Maoyun; Lu, Quan

    2016-06-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) controls airway narrowing and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. MicroRNAs are small yet powerful gene tuners that regulate diverse cellular processes. Recent studies have demonstrated the versatile role of microRNAs in regulating multiple ASM phenotypes that are critically involved in asthma pathogenesis. These ASM phenotypes include proliferation, cell size, chemokine secretion, and contractility. Here we review microRNA-mediated regulation of ASM functions and discuss the potential of microRNAs as a novel class of therapeutic targets to improve ASM function for asthma therapy. PMID:26812790

  2. Angiogenesis is induced by airway smooth muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Lin, Richard Z; Vaday, Gayle G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2007-10-01

    Angiogenesis is an important feature of airway remodeling in both chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airways in those conditions are exposed to excessive mechanical strain during periods of acute exacerbations. We recently reported that mechanical strain of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) led to an increase in their proliferation and migration. Sustained growth in airway smooth muscle in vivo requires an increase in the nutritional supply to these muscles, hence angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical strain of HASM produces factors promoting angiogenic events in the surrounding vascular endothelial cells. Our results show: 1) a significant increase in human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) proliferation, migration, and tube formation following incubation in conditioned media (CM) from HASM cells exposed to mechanical strain; 2) mechanical strain of HASM cells induced VEGF expression and release; 3) VEGF neutralizing antibodies inhibited the proliferation, migration, and tube formations of HMVEC-L induced by the strained airway smooth muscle CM; 4) mechanical strain of HASM induced a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA and protein, a transcription factor required for VEGF gene transcription; and 5) mechanical strain of HASM induced HIF-1alpha/VEGF through dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ERK pathways. In conclusion, exposing HASM cells to mechanical strain induces signal transduction pathway through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK pathways that lead to an increase in HIF-1alpha, a transcription factor required for VEGF expression. VEGF release by mechanical strain of HASM may contribute to the angiogenesis seen with repeated exacerbation of asthma and COPD. PMID:17693481

  3. High glucose induces dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier through down-regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Xia, Li

    2016-03-01

    The airway epithelium is a barrier to the inhaled antigens and pathogens. Connexin 43 (Cx43) has been found to play critical role in maintaining the function of airway epithelial barrier and be involved in the pathogenesis of the diabetic retinal vasculature, diabetes nephropathy and diabetes skin. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that the down-regulation of Cx43 induced by HG alters the expression of tight junctions (zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and contributes to dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier, and Cx43 plays a critical role in the process in human airway epithelial cells (16 HBE). We show that high glucose (HG) decreased the expression of ZO-1 and occludin, disassociated interaction between Cx43 and tight junctions, and then increased airway epithelial transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and permeability by down-regulation of Cx43 in human airway epithelial cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for Cx43 in regulating HG-induced dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary infection related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for the dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26902399

  4. The Pivotal Role of Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ozier, Annaïg; Allard, Benoit; Bara, Imane; Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Trian, Thomas; Marthan, Roger; Berger, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by the association of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodelling. The aim of the present article is to review the pivotal role of airway smooth muscle (ASM) in the pathophysiology of asthma. ASM is the main effector of AHR. The mechanisms of AHR in asthma may involve a larger release of contractile mediators and/or a lower release of relaxant mediators, an improved ASM cell excitation/contraction coupling, and/or an alteration in the contraction/load coupling. Beyond its contractile function, ASM is also involved in bronchial inflammation and remodelling. Whereas ASM is a target of the inflammatory process, it can also display proinflammatory and immunomodulatory functions, through its synthetic properties and the expression of a wide range of cell surface molecules. ASM remodelling represents a key feature of asthmatic bronchial remodelling. ASM also plays a role in promoting complementary airway structural alterations, in particular by its synthetic function. PMID:22220184

  5. Increase in passive stiffness at reduced airway smooth muscle length: potential impact on airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Ynuk; Solomon, Dennis; Chin, Leslie Y M; Lian, Kevin; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-03-01

    The amplitude of strain in airway smooth muscle (ASM) produced by oscillatory perturbations such as tidal breathing or deep inspiration (DI) influences the force loss in the muscle and is therefore a key determinant of the bronchoprotective and bronchodilatory effects of these breathing maneuvers. The stiffness of unstimulated ASM (passive stiffness) directly influences the amplitude of strain. The nature of the passive stiffness is, however, not clear. In this study, we measured the passive stiffness of ovine ASM at different muscle lengths (relative to in situ length, which was used as a reference length, L(ref)) and states of adaptation to gain insights into the origin of this muscle property. The results showed that the passive stiffness was relatively independent of muscle length, possessing a constant plateau value over a length range from 0.62 to 1.25 L(ref). Following a halving of ASM length, passive stiffness decreased substantially (by 71%) but redeveloped over time ( approximately 30 min) at the shorter length to reach 65% of the stiffness value at L(ref), provided that the muscle was stimulated to contract at least once over a approximately 30-min period. The redevelopment and maintenance of passive stiffness were dependent on the presence of Ca(2+) but unaffected by latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin filament polymerization. The maintenance of passive stiffness was also not affected by blocking myosin cross-bridge cycling using a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor or by blocking the Rho-Rho kinase (RhoK) pathway using a RhoK inhibitor. Our results suggest that the passive stiffness of ASM is labile and capable of redevelopment following length reduction. Redevelopment and maintenance of passive stiffness following muscle shortening could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness by attenuating the airway wall strain induced by tidal breathing and DI. PMID:20008114

  6. Airway smooth muscle growth from the perspective of animal models.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Ramos-Barbón, David

    2003-09-16

    Airway smooth muscle maintains airway tone and may assist in adjusting ventilation distribution within the normal lung. Alterations in the properties or the quantity of ASM are likely responsible for some instances of airways hyperresponsiveness to bronchoconstrictive stimuli that is a characteristic of diseases such as asthma. Morphometric studies have shown an increase in the mass of ASM in human asthmatic airways. Animal models have been developed that confirm that ASM can be induced to grow by allergic sensitization and challenge. Growth is in large part by hyperplasia as measured by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine as a marker of the S-phase of the cell cycle. T cells, in particular CD4+ cells, may participate in the stimulation of growth of ASM by allergen challenge. The growth factors responsible for the increase in ASM are as yet unidentified but two mediators associated with allergic airway responses, cysteinyl leukotrienes and endothelin, have been implicated using specific receptor antagonists. The links between T cells and the biochemical mediators of growth have not been established. PMID:14516730

  7. Does the length dependency of airway smooth muscle force contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Pascoe, Chris D; Couture, Christian; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-11-01

    Airway wall remodeling and lung hyperinflation are two typical features of asthma that may alter the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) by affecting its operating length. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to describe in detail the "length dependency of ASM force" in response to different spasmogens; and 2) to predict, based on morphological data and a computational model, the consequence of this length dependency of ASM force on airway responsiveness in asthmatic subjects who have both remodeled airway walls and hyperinflated lungs. Ovine tracheal ASM strips and human bronchial rings were isolated and stimulated to contract in response to increasing concentrations of spasmogens at three different lengths. Ovine tracheal strips were more sensitive and generated greater force at longer lengths in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and K(+). Equipotent concentrations of ACh were approximately a log less for ASM stretched by 30% and approximately a log more for ASM shortened by 30%. Similar results were observed in human bronchi in response to methacholine. Morphometric and computational analyses predicted that the ASM of asthmatic subjects may be elongated by 6.6-10.4% (depending on airway generation) due to remodeling and/or hyperinflation, which could increase ACh-induced force by 1.8-117.8% (depending on ASM length and ACh concentration) and enhance the increased resistance to airflow by 0.4-4,432.8%. In conclusion, elongation of ASM imposed by airway wall remodeling and/or hyperinflation may allow ASM to operate at a longer length and to consequently generate more force and respond to lower concentration of spasmogens. This phenomenon could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:23970527

  8. Histochemical properties of upper airway muscles: comparison of dilator and nondilator muscles.

    PubMed

    Bracher, A; Coleman, R; Schnall, R; Oliven, A

    1997-05-01

    The upper airway dilator muscles (UADMs) represent a subgroup of muscles in the pharyngeal area which, in addition to their roles in mastication, vocalization, etc., also have an important respiratory function. Failure of these muscles to maintain upper airway patency during sleep is important in the development of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. In the present study, we evaluated the histochemical properties of the UADMs and compared them to those of neighbouring muscles without respiratory functions, and to the diaphragm, to determine whether the UADMs are specifically adapted to their respiratory role. Our results, both in dogs and rats, indicate that the dilator and nondilator upper airway muscles are similar and differ from the diaphragm. In rats, there were significantly less type I fibres (<12% as compared to 42% for the diaphragm) and more type IIb fibres (39-67% as compared to 27% for the diaphragm). A similar pattern was seen in dogs: type I fibres <38% as compared to 46% for the diaphragm, and type IIb fibres, 29-35% as compared to 10% for the diaphragm. These findings suggest that the upper airway dilator muscles are not specifically designed for their respiratory role. They may fail in the presence of increased loads, often encountered in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, unless appropriate adaptive structural changes take place. PMID:9163636

  9. Airway compliance and dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in length adaptation between intact airways and smooth muscle strips.

    PubMed

    Dowie, Jackson; Ansell, Thomas K; Noble, Peter B; Donovan, Graham M

    2016-01-01

    Length adaptation is a phenomenon observed in airway smooth muscle (ASM) wherein over time there is a shift in the length-tension curve. There is potential for length adaptation to play an important role in airway constriction and airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma. Recent results by Ansell et al., 2015 (JAP 2014 10.1152/japplphysiol.00724.2014) have cast doubt on this role by testing for length adaptation using an intact airway preparation, rather than strips of ASM. Using this technique they found no evidence for length adaptation in intact airways. Here we attempt to resolve this apparent discrepancy by constructing a minimal mathematical model of the intact airway, including ASM which follows the classic length-tension curve and undergoes length adaptation. This allows us to show that (1) no evidence of length adaptation should be expected in large, cartilaginous, intact airways; (2) even in highly compliant peripheral airways, or at more compliant regions of the pressure-volume curve of large airways, the effect of length adaptation would be modest and at best marginally detectable in intact airways; (3) the key parameters which control the appearance of length adaptation in intact airways are airway compliance and the relaxation timescale. The results of this mathematical simulation suggest that length adaptation observed at the level of the isolated ASM may not clearly manifest in the normal intact airway. PMID:26376002

  10. Permanent respiratory impairment and upper airway symptoms despite clinical improvement in patients with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S L; Cordasco, E M; Guidotti, T L

    2001-04-10

    We previously reported clinical findings for 19 patients who developed symptomatic airways hyperactivity following an acute exposure to an inhaled irritant and who were given the diagnosis of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). We now report on nine of these patients who have been followed for a mean of 9 years, allowing assessment of function, symptoms, and comorbidity beyond the early phase of acute airway injury and inflammation. None of the patients have resolved their airway hyper-responsiveness and symptoms completely, although only in one subject, who had a premorbid history of asthma, has the condition progressed. A common feature has been sinusitis and other upper-airway symptoms. We conclude that in this group of patients, RADS presented in a consistent pattern regardless of the cause of airway injury, resolved only partially, even in subjects without a premorbid history of respiratory disease, and was associated with significant secondary morbidity, especially affecting the upper airway. This pattern was evident regardless of smoking status or age at time of exposure. We conclude that for these subjects, RADS was a distinct entity with a consistent natural history that conferred permanent impairment, but did generally improve somewhat over time. PMID:11327398

  11. Impact of obstructive apnea syndrome on upper airway respiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Eva

    2005-07-28

    This article reviews studies of upper airway muscles in humans, with emphasis on muscle fiber structural and electrophysiological changes observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The concept of OSAS as a progressive disease is discussed and also possible causes. These include local nervous lesions in the upper airway, both motor and sensory. Previous muscle biopsy studies have given evidence for motor neuron lesions such as, e.g., the phenomenon of type grouping in histological sections. New data obtained with concentric needle EMG recordings from the palatopharyngeus muscles are also presented. In 10/12 OSAS patients there were typical findings indicating motor neuropathy (reduced EMG activity at maximal voluntary effort, long and polyphasic motor-unit potentials and, in two cases, spontaneous denervation activity), whereas such findings were only present in 3/15 patients with habitual snoring. This supports the hypothesis that progression from habitual snoring to the clinical disease of OSAS could be attributed to peripheral neurogenic lesions. PMID:16054444

  12. Bitter tasting compounds dilate airways by inhibiting airway smooth muscle calcium oscillations and calcium sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiahui; Sanderson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose While selective, bitter tasting, TAS2R agonists can relax agonist-contracted airway smooth muscle (ASM), their mechanism of action is unclear. However, ASM contraction is regulated by Ca2+ signalling and Ca2+ sensitivity. We have therefore investigated how the TAS2R10 agonists chloroquine, quinine and denotonium regulate contractile agonist-induced Ca2+ signalling and sensitivity. Experimental Approach Airways in mouse lung slices were contracted with either methacholine (MCh) or 5HT and bronchodilation assessed using phase-contrast microscopy. Ca2+ signalling was measured with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of ASM cells loaded with Oregon Green, a Ca2+-sensitive indicator (with or without caged-IP3). Effects on Ca2+ sensitivity were assessed on lung slices treated with caffeine and ryanodine to permeabilize ASM cells to Ca2+. Key Results The TAS2R10 agonists dilated airways constricted by either MCh or 5HT, accompanied by inhibition of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations. However, in non-contracted airways, TAS2R10 agonists, at concentrations that maximally dilated constricted airways, did not evoke Ca2+ signals in ASM cells. Ca2+ increases mediated by the photolysis of caged-IP3 were also attenuated by chloroquine, quinine and denotonium. In Ca2+-permeabilized ASM cells, the TAS2R10 agonists dilated MCh- and 5HT-constricted airways. Conclusions and Implications TAS2R10 agonists reversed bronchoconstriction by inhibiting agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations while simultaneously reducing the Ca2+ sensitivity of ASM cells. Reduction of Ca2+ oscillations may be due to inhibition of Ca2+ release through IP3 receptors. Further characterization of bronchodilatory TAS2R agonists may lead to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive conditions. PMID:24117140

  13. Mechanisms of BDNF regulation in asthmatic airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin produced by airway smooth muscle (ASM), enhances inflammation effects on airway contractility, supporting the idea that locally produced growth factors influence airway diseases such as asthma. We endeavored to dissect intrinsic mechanisms regulating endogenous, as well as inflammation (TNF-α)-induced BDNF secretion in ASM of nonasthmatic vs. asthmatic humans. We focused on specific Ca(2+) regulation- and inflammation-related signaling cascades and quantified BDNF secretion. We find that TNF-α enhances BDNF release by ASM cells, via several mechanisms relevant to asthma, including transient receptor potential channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 (but not TRPC1), ERK 1/2, PI3K, PLC, and PKC cascades, Rho kinase, and transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Basal BDNF expression and secretion are elevated in asthmatic ASM and increase further with TNF-α exposure, involving many of these regulatory mechanisms. We conclude that airway BDNF secretion is regulated at multiple levels, providing a basis for autocrine effects of BDNF under conditions of inflammation and disease, with potential downstream influences on contractility and remodeling. PMID:27317689

  14. Effect of gender on rat upper airway muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Cantillon, D; Bradford, A

    1998-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea arises due to upper airway (UA) collapse which is normally counteracted by contraction of UA muscles such as the sternohyoids and geniohyoids. The disorder has a marked male predominance but the effect of gender on UA muscle contractile properties is unknown and these properties have not been compared for the sternohyoid and geniohyoid muscles in the same species. Isometric contractile characteristics were determined using strips of sternohyoid and geniohyoid muscle from male and female rats in Krebs solution at 30 degrees C. For both muscles, there were no differences between male and female contractile kinetics, twitch or tetanic tension, tension-length or tension-frequency relationship or endurance. In both males and females, sternohyoid twitch and tetanic tension was greater than geniohyoid. Sternohyoid endurance was less than geniohyoid but contractile kinetics, tension-length and tension-frequency relationships were similar. Therefore, gender does not affect UA muscle contractile properties and sternohyoid tension is greater and endurance less than that of the geniohyoid. PMID:9832233

  15. Airway smooth muscle and bronchospasm: fluctuating, fluidizing, freezing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Trepat, Xavier; Nguyen, Trang T. B.; Lenormand, Guillaume; Oliver, Madavi; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    We review here four recent findings that have altered in a fundamental way our understanding of airways smooth muscle (ASM), its dynamic responses to physiological loading, and their dominant mechanical role in bronchospasm. These findings highlight ASM remodeling processes that are innately out-of-equilibrium and dynamic, and bring to the forefront a striking intersection between topics in condensed matter physics and ASM cytoskeletal biology. By doing so, they place in a new light the role of enhanced ASM mass in airway hyper-responsiveness as well as in the failure of a deep inspiration to relax the asthmatic airway. These findings have established that (i) ASM length is equilibrated dynamically, not statically; (ii) ASM dynamics closely resemble physical features exhibited by so-called soft glassy materials; (iii) static force-length relationships fail to describe dynamically contracted ASM states; (iv) stretch fluidizes the ASM cytoskeleton. Taken together, these observations suggest that at the origin of the bronchodilatory effect of a deep inspiration, and its failure in asthma, may lie glassy dynamics of the ASM cell. PMID:18514592

  16. IL-6 trans-signaling increases expression of airways disease genes in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mac B; Deshpande, Deepak A; Chou, Jeffery; Cui, Wei; Smith, Shelly; Langefeld, Carl; Hastie, Annette T; Bleecker, Eugene R; Hawkins, Gregory A

    2015-07-15

    Genetic data suggest that IL-6 trans-signaling may have a pathogenic role in the lung; however, the effects of IL-6 trans-signaling on lung effector cells have not been investigated. In this study, human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells were treated with IL-6 (classical) or IL-6+sIL6R (trans-signaling) for 24 h and gene expression was measured by RNAseq. Intracellular signaling and transcription factor activation were assessed by Western blotting and luciferase assay, respectively. The functional effect of IL-6 trans-signaling was determined by proliferation assay. IL-6 trans-signaling had no effect on phosphoinositide-3 kinase and Erk MAP kinase pathways in HASM cells. Both classical and IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM involves activation of Stat3. However, the kinetics of Stat3 phosphorylation by IL-6 trans-signaling was different than classical IL-6 signaling. This was further reflected in the differential gene expression profile by IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM cells. Under IL-6 trans-signaling conditions 36 genes were upregulated, including PLA2G2A, IL13RA1, MUC1, and SOD2. Four genes, including CCL11, were downregulated at least twofold. The expression of 112 genes was divergent between IL-6 classical and trans-signaling, including the genes HILPDA, NNMT, DAB2, MUC1, WWC1, and VEGFA. Pathway analysis revealed that IL-6 trans-signaling induced expression of genes involved in regulation of airway remodeling, immune response, hypoxia, and glucose metabolism. Treatment of HASM cells with IL-6+sIL6R induced proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting a role for IL-6 trans-signaling in asthma pathogenesis. These novel findings demonstrate differential effect of IL-6 trans-signaling on airway cells and identify IL-6 trans-signaling as a potential modifier of airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26001777

  17. Kinematic MRI study of upper-airway biomechanics using electrical muscle stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennick, Michael J.; Margulies, Susan S.; Ford, John C.; Gefter, Warren B.; Pack, Allan I.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a new and powerful method to study the movement and function of upper airway muscles. Our method is to use direct electrical stimulation of individual upper airway muscles, while performing state of the art high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have adapted a paralyzed isolated UA cat model so that positive or negative static pressure in the UA can be controlled at specific levels while electrical muscle stimulation is applied during MRI. With these techniques we can assess the effect of muscle stimulation on airway cross-sectional area compliance and soft tissue motion. We are reporting the preliminary results and MRI techniques which have enabled us to examine changes in airway dimensions which result form electrical stimulation of specific upper airway dilator muscles. The results of this study will be relevant to the development of new clinical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea by providing new information as to exactly how upper airway muscles function to dilate the upper airway and the strength of stimulation required to prevent the airway obstruction when overall muscle tone may not be sufficient to maintain regular breathing.

  18. Small Airways Dysfunction in Asthma: Evaluation and Management to Improve Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The small airways have been neglected for many years, but interest in the topic has been rekindled with recent advances in measurement techniques to assess this region and also the ability to deliver therapeutics to the distal airways. Current levels of disease control in asthmatic patients remain poor and there are several contributory factors including; poor treatment compliance, heterogeneity of asthma phenotypes and associated comorbidities. However, the proposition that we may not be targeting all the inflammation that is present throughout the whole respiratory tree may also be an important factor. Indeed decades ago, pathologists and physiologists clearly identified the importance of small airways dysfunction in asthmatic patients. With improved inhaler technology to deliver drug to target the whole respiratory tree and more sensitive measures to assess the distal airways, we should certainly give greater consideration to treating the small airway region when seeing our asthmatic patients in clinic. The aim of this review is to address the relevance of small airways dysfunction in the daily clinical management of patients with asthma. In particular the role of small particle aerosols in the management of patients with asthma will be explored. PMID:25228994

  19. Can reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) transform into occupational asthma due to "sensitisation" to isocyanates?

    PubMed

    Leroyer, C; Perfetti, L; Cartier, A; Malo, J L

    1998-02-01

    The case history is described of a worker who presented with a history suggestive of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome which occurred after an acute high level inhalation of diphenylmethane diisocyanate. Further exposure at work, at a time when concentrations of isocyanates were no longer "irritant", suggested occupational asthma; this diagnosis was confirmed by a specific inhalation challenge test. PMID:9624303

  20. Chronic sustained hypoxia-induced redox remodeling causes contractile dysfunction in mouse sternohyoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; Sheehan, David; Soares, Renata; Varela Coelho, Ana; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sustained hypoxia (CH) induces structural and functional adaptations in respiratory muscles of animal models, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. This study explores the putative role of CH-induced redox remodeling in a translational mouse model, with a focus on the sternohyoid-a representative upper airway dilator muscle involved in the control of pharyngeal airway caliber. We hypothesized that exposure to CH induces redox disturbance in mouse sternohyoid muscle in a time-dependent manner affecting metabolic capacity and contractile performance. C57Bl6/J mice were exposed to normoxia or normobaric CH (FiO2 = 0.1) for 1, 3, or 6 weeks. A second cohort of animals was exposed to CH for 6 weeks with and without antioxidant supplementation (tempol or N-acetyl cysteine in the drinking water). Following CH exposure, we performed 2D redox proteomics with mass spectrometry, metabolic enzyme activity assays, and cell-signaling assays. Additionally, we assessed isotonic contractile and endurance properties ex vivo. Temporal changes in protein oxidation and glycolytic enzyme activities were observed. Redox modulation of sternohyoid muscle proteins key to contraction, metabolism and cellular homeostasis was identified. There was no change in redox-sensitive proteasome activity or HIF-1α content, but CH decreased phospho-JNK content independent of antioxidant supplementation. CH was detrimental to sternohyoid force- and power-generating capacity and this was prevented by chronic antioxidant supplementation. We conclude that CH causes upper airway dilator muscle dysfunction due to redox modulation of proteins key to function and homeostasis. Such changes could serve to further disrupt respiratory homeostasis in diseases characterized by CH such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Antioxidants may have potential use as an adjunctive therapy in hypoxic respiratory disease. PMID:25941492

  1. Chronic sustained hypoxia-induced redox remodeling causes contractile dysfunction in mouse sternohyoid muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Philip; Sheehan, David; Soares, Renata; Varela Coelho, Ana; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sustained hypoxia (CH) induces structural and functional adaptations in respiratory muscles of animal models, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. This study explores the putative role of CH-induced redox remodeling in a translational mouse model, with a focus on the sternohyoid—a representative upper airway dilator muscle involved in the control of pharyngeal airway caliber. We hypothesized that exposure to CH induces redox disturbance in mouse sternohyoid muscle in a time-dependent manner affecting metabolic capacity and contractile performance. C57Bl6/J mice were exposed to normoxia or normobaric CH (FiO2 = 0.1) for 1, 3, or 6 weeks. A second cohort of animals was exposed to CH for 6 weeks with and without antioxidant supplementation (tempol or N-acetyl cysteine in the drinking water). Following CH exposure, we performed 2D redox proteomics with mass spectrometry, metabolic enzyme activity assays, and cell-signaling assays. Additionally, we assessed isotonic contractile and endurance properties ex vivo. Temporal changes in protein oxidation and glycolytic enzyme activities were observed. Redox modulation of sternohyoid muscle proteins key to contraction, metabolism and cellular homeostasis was identified. There was no change in redox-sensitive proteasome activity or HIF-1α content, but CH decreased phospho-JNK content independent of antioxidant supplementation. CH was detrimental to sternohyoid force- and power-generating capacity and this was prevented by chronic antioxidant supplementation. We conclude that CH causes upper airway dilator muscle dysfunction due to redox modulation of proteins key to function and homeostasis. Such changes could serve to further disrupt respiratory homeostasis in diseases characterized by CH such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Antioxidants may have potential use as an adjunctive therapy in hypoxic respiratory disease. PMID:25941492

  2. Contribution of air pollution to COPD and small airway dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Berend, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Although in many Western countries levels of ambient air pollution have been improving with the setting of upper limits and better urban planning, air pollution in developing countries and particularly those with rapid industrialization has become a major global problem. Together with increased motor vehicle ownership and traffic congestion, there is a growing issue with airborne particles of respirable size. These particles are thought responsible for respiratory and cardiovascular effects and have also been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. The pathologic effects in the lung are mediated via inflammatory pathways and involve oxidative stress similar to cigarette smoking. These effects are seen in the peripheral airways where the smaller particle fractions are deposited and lead to airway remodelling. However, emphysema and loss of bronchioles seen with cigarette smoking have not been described with ambient air pollution, and there are few studies specifically looking at peripheral airway function. Definitive evidence of air pollution causing COPD is lacking and a different study design is required to link air pollution and COPD. PMID:26412571

  3. Functional effects of KCNQ K+ channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Evseev, Alexey I.; Semenov, Iurii; Archer, Crystal R.; Medina, Jorge L.; Dube, Peter H.; Shapiro, Mark S.; Brenner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    KCNQ (Kv7) channels underlie a voltage-gated K+ current best known for control of neuronal excitability, and its inhibition by Gq/11-coupled, muscarinic signaling. Studies have indicated expression of KCNQ channels in airway smooth muscle (ASM), a tissue that is predominantly regulated by muscarinic receptor signaling. Therefore, we investigated the function of KCNQ channels in rodent ASM and their interplay with Gq/11-coupled M3 muscarinic receptors. Perforated-patch clamp of dissociated ASM cells detected a K+ current inhibited by the KCNQ antagonist, XE991, and augmented by the specific agonist, flupirtine. KCNQ channels begin to activate at voltages near resting potentials for ASM cells, and indeed XE991 depolarized resting membrane potentials. Muscarinic receptor activation inhibited KCNQ current weakly (~20%) at concentrations half-maximal for contractions. Thus, we were surprised to see that KCNQ had no affect on membrane voltage or muscle contractility following muscarinic activation. Further, M3 receptor-specific antagonist J104129 fumarate alone did not reveal KCNQ effects on muscarinic evoked depolarization or contractility. However, a role for KCNQ channels was revealed when BK-K+ channel activities are reduced. While KCNQ channels do control resting potentials, they appear to play a redundant role with BK calcium-activated K+ channels during ASM muscarinic signaling. In contrast to effect of antagonist, we observe that KCNQ agonist flupirtine caused a significant hyperpolarization and reduced contraction in vitro irrespective of muscarinic activation. Using non-invasive whole animal plethysmography, the clinically approved KCNQ agonist retigabine caused a transient reduction in indexes of airway resistance in both wild type and BK β1 knockout (KO) mice treated with the muscarinic agonist. These findings indicate that KCNQ channels can be recruited via agonists to oppose muscarinic evoked contractions and may be of therapeutic value as bronchodilators

  4. Functional effects of KCNQ K(+) channels in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Evseev, Alexey I; Semenov, Iurii; Archer, Crystal R; Medina, Jorge L; Dube, Peter H; Shapiro, Mark S; Brenner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    KCNQ (Kv7) channels underlie a voltage-gated K(+) current best known for control of neuronal excitability, and its inhibition by Gq/11-coupled, muscarinic signaling. Studies have indicated expression of KCNQ channels in airway smooth muscle (ASM), a tissue that is predominantly regulated by muscarinic receptor signaling. Therefore, we investigated the function of KCNQ channels in rodent ASM and their interplay with Gq/11-coupled M3 muscarinic receptors. Perforated-patch clamp of dissociated ASM cells detected a K(+) current inhibited by the KCNQ antagonist, XE991, and augmented by the specific agonist, flupirtine. KCNQ channels begin to activate at voltages near resting potentials for ASM cells, and indeed XE991 depolarized resting membrane potentials. Muscarinic receptor activation inhibited KCNQ current weakly (~20%) at concentrations half-maximal for contractions. Thus, we were surprised to see that KCNQ had no affect on membrane voltage or muscle contractility following muscarinic activation. Further, M3 receptor-specific antagonist J104129 fumarate alone did not reveal KCNQ effects on muscarinic evoked depolarization or contractility. However, a role for KCNQ channels was revealed when BK-K(+) channel activities are reduced. While KCNQ channels do control resting potentials, they appear to play a redundant role with BK calcium-activated K(+) channels during ASM muscarinic signaling. In contrast to effect of antagonist, we observe that KCNQ agonist flupirtine caused a significant hyperpolarization and reduced contraction in vitro irrespective of muscarinic activation. Using non-invasive whole animal plethysmography, the clinically approved KCNQ agonist retigabine caused a transient reduction in indexes of airway resistance in both wild type and BK β1 knockout (KO) mice treated with the muscarinic agonist. These findings indicate that KCNQ channels can be recruited via agonists to oppose muscarinic evoked contractions and may be of therapeutic value as

  5. Persistent reactive airway dysfunction syndrome after exposure to toluene diisocyanate.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, J C; Nelsen, K G; Fischbein, A

    1990-01-01

    Two police officers developed asthma like illness after a single but prolonged exposure to toluene diisocyanate (TDI) by being in the immediate vicinity of a tank car that had overturned on a highway. One officer experienced upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms with chest tightness about 4.5 hours after initial exposure. Shortness of breath, cough, and wheezing were noted the following day. The other experienced symptoms immediately on exposure, developed shortness of breath 20 minutes later, and presented with wheezing four hours after that. Follow up examinations over seven years showed persistence of respiratory symptoms and continuation of airway hyperreactivity requiring treatment. PMID:2159772

  6. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  7. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics. PMID:25663674

  8. Effect of inflammatory mediators on airway nerves and muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, E.E.; O'Byrne, P. )

    1991-03-01

    The neuromuscular mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness have been reviewed on the basis of studies of the changes induced by ozone inhalation in dogs. In vivo, there is increased, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness based on studies of the response to inhaled acetylcholine or histamine. The underlying inflammatory mechanism involves release of LTB4 and/or other chemotactic agents from epithelial or lumenal cells, ingress of macrophages, neutrophils, and platelets from the blood vessels between the muscle and epithelium, and migration of mast cells into the epithelium. The hyperresponsiveness seems to depend upon the influx of neutrophils and actions of thromboxane A2 released from the neutrophils. In vitro, there is increased responsiveness to field stimulation of cholinergic nerves and to acetylcholine (not to KCI) in tracheal strips. These effects can be mimicked by a thromboxane A2 analog (U44619). In the sucrose gap, the TxA2 analog does not affect the excitatory junction potential, but in low concentration it increases and prolongs a series of fading membrane oscillations closely related to the contractions. We consider these oscillations to reflect ongoing release and/or action of acetylcholine. In high concentrations the analog causes a small depolarization and a tonic contraction, but it does not enhance the sensitivity to acetylcholine. TxA2 may be acting either presynaptically or postsynaptically or both to produce these effects; however, changes in release of an epithelial-derived relaxing factor do not seem to be involved. We conclude that TxA2 actions probably underlie hyperresponsiveness developed in vivo and in vitro after ozone inhalation.

  9. Pelvic Muscle Exercises Using A Home Trainer for Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic muscle exercises can help improve symptoms of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. This article describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with moderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and mild urinary incontinence (UI) who initiated pelvic muscle exercises with the assistance of a novel, at-home trainer equipped with a vaginal sensor and accompanying smartphone app software, the PeriCoach system (Analytica, 2015). After 8 weeks of training with the device, she showed improvements in strength, endurance, and disability, as measured by manual muscle test, electromyography, and Pelvic Floor Disability Index scores. Older women can use biofeedback technology to improve pelvic floor muscle function successfully at home. PMID:27281865

  10. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome from acute inhalation of a dishwasher detergent powder.

    PubMed

    Hannu, Timo J; Riihimäki, Vesa E; Piirilä, Päivi L

    2012-01-01

    Reactive airway dysfunction syndrome, a type of occupational asthma without a latency period, is induced by irritating vapour, fumes or smoke. The present report is the first to describe a case of reactive airway dysfunction syndrome caused by acute exposure to dishwater detergent containing sodium metasilicate and sodium dichloroisocyanurate. The diagnosis was based on exposure data, clinical symptoms and signs, as well as respiratory function tests. A 43-year-old nonatopic male apprentice cook developed respiratory symptoms immediately after exposure to a cloud of detergent powder that was made airborne by vigorous shaking of the package. In spirometry, combined obstructive and restrictive ventilatory impairment developed, and the histamine challenge test revealed bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Even routine handling of a strongly caustic detergent, such as filling a dishwasher container, is not entirely risk free and should be performed with caution. PMID:22679618

  11. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome from acute inhalation of dishwasher detergent powder

    PubMed Central

    Hannu, Timo J; Riihimäki, Vesa E; Piirilä, Päivi L

    2012-01-01

    Reactive airway dysfunction syndrome, a type of occupational asthma without a latency period, is induced by irritating vapour, fumes or smoke. The present report is the first to describe a case of reactive airway dysfunction syndrome caused by acute exposure to dishwater detergent containing sodium metasilicate and sodium dichloroisocyanurate. The diagnosis was based on exposure data, clinical symptoms and signs, as well as respiratory function tests. A 43-year-old nonatopic male apprentice cook developed respiratory symptoms immediately after exposure to a cloud of detergent powder that was made airborne by vigorous shaking of the package. In spirometry, combined obstructive and restrictive ventilatory impairment developed, and the histamine challenge test revealed bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Even routine handling of a strongly caustic detergent, such as filling a dishwasher container, is not entirely risk free and should be performed with caution. PMID:22679618

  12. [Influence of nanosize particles of cobalt ferrite on contractile responses of smooth muscle segment of airways].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaĭtseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; D'iakova, E Iu; Petlina, Z R; Ogorodova, L M; Ageev, B G; Magaeva, A A; Itin, V I; Terekhova, O G; Medvedev, M A

    2012-02-01

    Contractile responses of airways segments of porpoises inhaling nanopowder CoFe2O4 were stidued by means of a mechanographic method. Inhalation of the nanosize particles of CoFe2O4 in vivo and in vitro testing the nanomaterial on isolated smooth muscles led to potentiation histaminergic, cholinergic contractile activity in airways of porpoises and to strengthening of adrenergic relaxing answers. Nanosize particles vary amplitude of hyperpotassium reductions in smooth muscle segments of airways similarly to the effect of depolymerizing drug colchicine. PMID:22650066

  13. Tonic activity in inspiratory muscles during continuous negative airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Meessen, N E; van der Grinten, C P; Folgering, H T; Luijendijk, S C

    1993-05-01

    We studied tonic inspiratory activity (TIA) induced by continuous negative airway pressure (CNAP) in anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats. TIA in the diaphragm and parasternal intercostal muscles (ICM) was quantified in response to tracheal pressure (PTR) = -0.3 to -1.2 kPa. To differentiate between reflexes from rapidly adapting receptors (RARs), slowly adapting receptors (SARs) and C-fiber endings different temperatures of the vagus nerves (TVG) were used between 4 and 37 degrees C. At PTR = -1.2 kPa mean TIA values were 41% and 62% of peak inspiratory EMG activity of control breaths for the diaphragm and ICM, respectively. After vagotomy and for TVG < 6 degrees C CNAP did not induce TIA anymore. Changes in inspiratory and expiratory time during vagal cooling down to 4 degrees C confirmed the selective block of conductance in vagal afferents of the three types of lung receptors. We conclude that CNAP-induced TIA results from stimulation of RARs. Our data strongly indicate that stimulation of SARs suppresses TIA, whereas C-fiber endings are not involved in TIA at all. The results suggest that part of the hyperinflation in bronchial asthma may be caused by TIA in response to mechanical stimulation of RARs. PMID:8327788

  14. Perturbed equilibrium of myosin binding in airway smooth muscle and its implications in bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Fredberg, J J; Inouye, D S; Mijailovich, S M; Butler, J P

    1999-03-01

    In asthma, the mechanisms relating airway obstruction, hyperresponsiveness, and inflammation remain rather mysterious. We show here that regulation of airway smooth muscle length corresponds to a dynamically equilibrated steady state, not the static mechanical equilibrium that had been previously assumed. This dynamic steady state requires as an essential feature a continuous supply of external mechanical energy (derived from tidal lung inflations) that acts to perturb the interactions of myosin with actin, drive the molecular state of the system far away from thermodynamic equilibrium, and bias the muscle toward lengthening. This mechanism leads naturally to the suggestion that excessive airway narrowing in asthma may be associated with the destabilization of that dynamic process and its resulting collapse back to static equilibrium. With this collapse the muscle undergoes a phase transition and virtually freezes at its static equilibrium length. This mechanism may help to elucidate several unexplained phenomena including the multifactorial origins of airway hyperresponsiveness, how allergen sensitization leads to airway hyperresponsiveness, how hyperresponsiveness can persist long after airway inflammation is resolved, and the inability in asthma of deep inspirations to relax airway smooth muscle. PMID:10051279

  15. The impact of vitamin D on asthmatic human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sannette C; Fischer, Kimberly D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  16. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma. PMID:24665390

  17. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  18. Chemerin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qihai; Deng, Yujie; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Yang, Ying; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2015-05-01

    Chemerin is a novel adipocyte-derived factor that induces insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. However, the effect of chemerin on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function has received little attention. In the present study, we investigated whether mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of chemerin-mediated insulin resistance. In this study, we used recombinant adenovirus to express murine chemerin in C57BL/6 mice. The mitochondrial function and structure were evaluated in isolated soleus muscles from mice. The oxidative mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured C2C12 myotubes exposed to recombinant chemerin was analysed by western blotting, immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The overexpression of chemerin in mice reduced the muscle mitochondrial content and increased mitochondrial autophagy, as determined by the increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and higher expression levels of Beclin1 and autophagy-related protein-5 and 7. The chemerin treatment of C2C12 myotubes increased the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, concomitant with a reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased the occurrence of mitochondrial protein carbonyls and mitochondrial DNA deletions. Knockdown of the expression of chemokine-like receptor 1 or the use of mitochondria-targeting antioxidant Mito-TEMPO restored the mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemerin. Furthermore, chemerin exposure in C2C12 myotubes not only reduced the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) but also dephosphorylated forkhead box O3α (FoxO3α). Chemerin-induced mitochondrial autophagy likely through an AKT-FoxO3α-dependent signalling pathway. These findings provide direct evidence that chemerin may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial remodelling and function in skeletal muscle. PMID:25754411

  19. Inhalational exposure to dimethyl sulfate vapor followed by reactive airway dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Zamani, Nasim; Shiva, Hamidreza; Rezaei, Nader

    2010-09-01

    Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is an oily liquid used as a solvent, stabilizer, sulfonation agent, and catalyst. Exposure to DMS primarily happens in the workplace via inhalational contact and damages the upper and lower airways. Our manuscript reports a case of DMS-related reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS). The patient was a healthy 29-year-old man who was referred to our ER after accidental exposure to the vapor of DMS with the complaint of dyspnea, dry cough, photophobia, and hoarseness. His vital signs were normal except for a low-grade fever. Redness of the pharynx, conjunctivitis, and cholinergic signs and symptoms were present. Conservative management with O(2) and fluid therapy was initiated. Twenty hours later, the patient became drowsy and his respiratory symptoms exacerbated; chest X-ray revealed haziness in the base of the right lung and prominence of the vessels of the lung hillum. After 1 week, the liver transaminases rose and C-reactive protein elevated (2+). The patient got better with conservative treatment and was discharged after 9 days; however, exertional dyspnea, wheezing, and thick white sputum persisted and therefore, reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS) related to DMS vapor was confirmed which was treated by prednisolone. Exertional dyspnea continued up to 10 months. Hoarseness lasted for 6 months. This case shows that DMS vapor inhalation can cause RADS especially in the chemical workers who continue working in the contaminated place despite the relatively good air conditioning. PMID:21461165

  20. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A; Morrisey, Edward E

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  1. Large conducting potassium channel reconstituted from airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Savaria, D; Lanoue, C; Cadieux, A; Rousseau, E

    1992-03-01

    Microsomal fractions were prepared from canine and bovine airway smooth muscle (ASM) by differential and gradient centrifugations. Surface membrane vesicles were characterized by binding assays and incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Single-channel activities were recorded in symmetric or asymmetric K+ buffer systems and studied under voltage and Ca2+ clamp conditions. A large-conductance K(+)-selective channel (greater than 220 pS in 150 mM K+) displaying a high Ca2+, low Ba2+, and charybdotoxin (CTX) sensitivity was identified. Time analysis of single-channel recordings revealed a complex kinetic behavior compatible with the previous schemes proposed for Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in a variety of biological surface membranes. We now report that the open probability of the channel at low Ca2+ concentration is enhanced on in vitro phosphorylation, which is mediated via an adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. In addition to this characterization at the molecular level, a second series of pharmacological experiments were designed to assess the putative role of this channel in ASM strips. Our results show that 50 nM CTX, a specific inhibitor of the large conducting Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel, prevents norepinephrine transient relaxation on carbamylcholine-precontracted ASM strips. It was also shown that CTX reversed the steady-state relaxation induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and partially antagonized further relaxation induced by cumulative doses of this potent bronchodilatator. Thus it is proposed that the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels have a physiological role because they are indirectly activated on stimulation of various membrane receptors via intracellular mechanisms. PMID:1372487

  2. A study of airway smooth muscle in asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. With standard Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), imaging ASM is often not possible due to poor structural contrast between the muscle and surrounding tissues. A potential solution to this problem is to utilize additional optical contrast factors intrinsic to the tissue, such as birefringence. Due to its highly ordered structure, ASM is strongly birefringent. Previously, we demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive OCT(PS-OCT) has the potential to be used to visualize ASM as well as easily segment it from the surrounding (weakly) birefringent tissue by exploiting a property which allows it to discriminate the orientation of birefringent fibers. We have already validated our technology with a substantial set of histological comparisons made against data obtained ex vivo. In this work we present a comprehensive comparison of ASM distributions in asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers. By isolating the ASM we parameterize its distribution in terms of both thickness and band width, calculated volumetrically over centimeters of airway. Using this data we perform analyses of the asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using a broad number and variety and subjects.

  3. Lingual Muscle Activity Across Sleep–Wake States in Rats with Surgically Altered Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Rukhadze, Irma; Kalter, Julie; Stettner, Georg M.; Kubin, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients have increased upper airway muscle activity, including such lingual muscles as the genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), and hyoglossus (HG). This adaptation partially protects their upper airway against obstructions. Rodents are used to study the central neural control of sleep and breathing but they do not naturally exhibit OSA. We investigated whether, in chronically instrumented, behaving rats, disconnecting the GH and HG muscles from the hyoid (H) apparatus would result in a compensatory increase of other upper airway muscle activity (electromyogram, EMG) and/or other signs of upper airway instability. We first determined that, in intact rats, lingual (GG and intrinsic) muscles maintained stable activity levels when quantified based on 2 h-long recordings conducted on days 6 through 22 after instrumentation. We then studied five rats in which the tendons connecting the GH and HG muscles to the H apparatus were experimentally severed. When quantified across all recording days, lingual EMG during slow-wave sleep (SWS) was modestly but significantly increased in rats with surgically altered upper airway [8.6 ± 0.7% (SE) vs. 6.1 ± 0.7% of the mean during wakefulness; p = 0.012]. Respiratory modulation of lingual EMG occurred mainly during SWS and was similarly infrequent in both groups, and the incidence of sighs and central apneas also was similar. Thus, a weakened action of selected lingual muscles did not produce sleep-disordered breathing but resulted in a relatively elevated activity in other lingual muscles during SWS. These results encourage more extensive surgical manipulations with the aim to obtain a rodent model with collapsible upper airway. PMID:24803913

  4. c-Myc regulates proliferation and Fgf10 expression in airway smooth muscle after airway epithelial injury in mouse.

    PubMed

    Volckaert, Thomas; Campbell, Alice; De Langhe, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    During lung development, Fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which is expressed in the distal mesenchyme and regulated by Wnt signaling, acts on the distal epithelial progenitors to maintain them and prevent them from differentiating into proximal (airway) epithelial cells. Fgf10-expressing cells in the distal mesenchyme are progenitors for parabronchial smooth muscle cells (PSMCs). After naphthalene, ozone or bleomycin-induced airway epithelial injury, surviving epithelial cells secrete Wnt7b which then activates the PSMC niche to induce Fgf10 expression. This Fgf10 secreted by the niche then acts on a subset of Clara stem cells to break quiescence, induce proliferation and initiate epithelial repair. Here we show that conditional deletion of the Wnt target gene c-Myc from the lung mesenchyme during development does not affect proper epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation. However, in the adult lung we show that after naphthalene-mediated airway epithelial injury c-Myc is important for the activation of the PSMC niche and as such induces proliferation and Fgf10 expression in PSMCs. Our data indicate that conditional deletion of c-Myc from PSMCs inhibits airway epithelial repair, whereas c-Myc ablation from Clara cells has no effect on airway epithelial regeneration. These findings may have important implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and COPD. PMID:23967208

  5. Development and characterization of a 3D multicell microtissue culture model of airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Nishat; Cole, Darren J.; Walker, Matthew J.; Legant, Wesley R.; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher S.; Favreau, John T.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Cowley, Elizabeth A.; Maksym, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cellular and molecular biology is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on flat 2D substrates. However, cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures, and it is well established in other cell types that altering substrate geometry exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall, and highlights a need for more physiologically relevant models of ASM function. We utilized a tissue engineering platform known as microfabricated tissue gauges to develop a 3D culture model of ASM featuring arrays of ∼0.4 mm long, ∼350 cell “microtissues” capable of simultaneous contractile force measurement and cell-level microscopy. ASM-only microtissues generated baseline tension, exhibited strong cellular organization, and developed actin stress fibers, but lost structural integrity and dissociated from the cantilevers within 3 days. Addition of 3T3-fibroblasts dramatically improved survival times without affecting tension development or morphology. ASM-3T3 microtissues contracted similarly to ex vivo ASM, exhibiting reproducible responses to a range of contractile and relaxant agents. Compared with 2D cultures, microtissues demonstrated identical responses to acetylcholine and KCl, but not histamine, forskolin, or cytochalasin D, suggesting that contractility is regulated by substrate geometry. Microtissues represent a novel model for studying ASM, incorporating a physiological 3D structure, realistic mechanical environment, coculture of multiple cells types, and comparable contractile properties to existing models. This new model allows for rapid screening of biochemical and mechanical factors to provide insight into ASM dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23125251

  6. Airway Dysfunction in Obesity: Response to Voluntary Restoration of End Expiratory Lung Volume

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Beno W.; Berger, Kenneth I.; Segal, Leopoldo N.; Stabile, Alexandra; Coles, Katherine D.; Parikh, Manish; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Abnormality in distal lung function may occur in obesity due to reduction in resting lung volume; however, airway inflammation, vascular congestion and/or concomitant intrinsic airway disease may also be present. The goal of this study is to 1) describe the phenotype of lung function in obese subjects utilizing spirometry, plethysmography and oscillometry; and 2) evaluate residual abnormality when the effect of mass loading is removed by voluntary elevation of end expiratory lung volume (EELV) to predicted FRC. Methods 100 non-smoking obese subjects without cardio-pulmonary disease and with normal airflow on spirometry underwent impulse oscillometry (IOS) at baseline and at the elevated EELV. Results FRC and ERV were reduced (44±22, 62±14% predicted) with normal RV/TLC (29±9%). IOS demonstrated elevated resistance at 20 Hz (R20, 4.65±1.07 cmH2O/L/s); however, specific conductance was normal (0.14±0.04). Resistance at 5–20 Hz (R5−20, 1.86±1.11 cmH2O/L/s) and reactance at 5 Hz (X5, −2.70±1.44 cmH2O/L/s) were abnormal. During elevation of EELV, IOS abnormalities reversed to or towards normal. Residual abnormality in R5−20 was observed in some subjects despite elevation of EELV (1.16±0.8 cmH2O/L/s). R5−20 responded to bronchodilator at baseline but not during elevation of EELV. Conclusions This study describes the phenotype of lung dysfunction in obesity as reduction in FRC with airway narrowing, distal respiratory dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness. When R5−20 normalized during voluntary inflation, mass loading was considered the predominant mechanism. In contrast, when residual abnormality in R5−20 was demonstrable despite return of EELV to predicted FRC, mechanisms for airway dysfunction in addition to mass loading could be invoked. PMID:24505355

  7. Airway smooth muscle NOX4 is upregulated and modulates ROS generation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hollins, Fay; Sutcliffe, Amanda; Gomez, Edith; Berair, Rachid; Russell, Richard; Szyndralewiez, Cédric; Saunders, Ruth; Brightling, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The burden of oxidative stress is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, whether the intra-cellular mechanisms controlling the oxidant/anti-oxidant balance in structural airway cells such as airway smooth muscle in COPD is altered is unclear. We sought to determine whether the expression of the NADPH oxidase (NOX)-4 is increased in airway smooth muscle in COPD both in vivo and primary cells in vitro and its role in hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation. We found that in vivo NOX4 expression was up-regulated in the airway smooth muscle bundle in COPD (n = 9) and healthy controls with >20 pack year history (n = 4) compared to control subjects without a significant smoking history (n = 6). In vitro NOX4 expression was increased in airway smooth muscle cells from subjects with COPD (n = 5) compared to asthma (n = 7) and upregulated following TNF-α stimulation. Hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation by airway smooth muscle cells in COPD (n = 5) was comparable to healthy controls (n = 9) but lower than asthma (n = 5); and was markedly attenuated by NOX4 inhibition. Our findings demonstrate that NOX4 expression is increased in vivo and in vitro in COPD and although we did not observe an intrinsic increase in oxidant-induced reactive oxygen species generation in COPD, it was reduced markedly by NOX4 inhibition supporting a potential therapeutic role for NOX4 in COPD. PMID:27435477

  8. A novel bronchial ring bioassay for the evaluation of small airway smooth muscle function in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, John Q; Yang, Dennis; Folz, Rodney J

    2006-08-01

    Advances in our understanding of murine airway physiology have been hindered by the lack of suitable, ex vivo, small airway bioassay systems. In this study, we introduce a novel small murine airway bioassay system that permits the physiological and pharmacological study of intrapulmonary bronchial smooth muscle via a bronchial ring (BR) preparation utilizing BR segments as small as 200 microm in diameter. Using this ex vivo BR bioassay, we characterized small airway smooth muscle contraction and relaxation in the presence and absence of bronchial epithelium. In control BRs, the application of mechanical stretch is followed by spontaneous bronchial smooth muscle relaxation. BRs pretreated with methacholine (MCh) partially attenuate this stretch-induced relaxation by as much as 42% compared with control. MCh elicited a dose-dependent bronchial constriction with a maximal tension (E(max)) of 8.7 +/- 0.2 mN at an EC(50) of 0.33 +/- 0.02 microM. In the presence of nifedipine, ryanodine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and SKF-96365, E(max) to MCh was significantly reduced. In epithelium-denuded BRs, MCh-induced contraction was significantly enhanced to 11.4 +/- 1.0 mN with an EC(50) of 0.16 +/- 0.04 microM (P < 0.01). Substance P relaxed MCh-precontracted BR by 62.1%; however, this bronchial relaxation effect was completely lost in epithelium-denuded BRs. Papaverine virtually abolished MCh-induced constriction in both epithelium-intact and epithelium-denuded bronchial smooth muscle. In conclusion, this study introduces a novel murine small airway BR bioassay that allows for the physiological study of smooth muscle airway contractile responses that may aid in our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma. PMID:16648239

  9. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome in housewives due to a bleach-hydrochloric acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Gorguner, Metin; Aslan, Sahin; Inandi, Tacettin; Cakir, Zeynep

    2004-02-01

    The sudden onset of asthmalike symptoms and persistence of airway reactivity following an acute exposure to an irritant gas or vapor has been termed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). A mixture of sodium hypochlorite (bleach, 40%) and hydrochloric acid (18%) is commonly used as a household cleaning solution in our region. From this mixture, chlorine gas is produced, which can cause airway damage and ensuing RADS. Here we describe findings of patients with RADS due to this cleaning mixture, and determine factors associated with a favorable outcome. Data were collected retrospectively on 55 symptomatic patients presenting to our emergency department after inhalation exposure to a mixture of bleach and hydrochloric acid. Symptoms, past medical and smoking history, details of the exposure, initial peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and oxygenation, and acute reversibility of airways obstruction were documented. All patients met previously defined criteria for the diagnosis of RADS, but did not undergo methacholine challenge testing and bronchoalveolar lavage or histopathologic study. Fifty patients were followed over the course of 3 mo. The majority of exposures (64%) occurred in the bathroom or kitchen. Only 21 of 55 (38%) patients showed an improvement in PEFR of 15% or greater following two beta(2)-agonist inhalation treatments. In follow-up, 48 patients (87%) improved clinically and functionally (FEV(1)). Seven patients (13%) deteriorated, with ARDS developing in two, one of whom died from respiratory failure. Advanced age, initial low PEFR, exposure in a small enclosed area, use immediately after mixing, and prolonged short- and long-term exposures were associated with a poorer prognosis. This descriptive study is the largest case series in the literature of RADS developing after exposure to a bleach-hydrochloric acid mixture. The optimum acute treatment and long-term outcomes for patients with RADS due to this combination still need to be determined

  10. Cigarette smoke enhances proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition by human fetal airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Elizabeth R.; VanOosten, Sarah K.; Holman, Michelle A.; Hohbein, Danielle D.; Thompson, Michael A.; Vassallo, Robert; Pandya, Hitesh C.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a common environmental insult associated with increased risk of developing airway diseases such as wheezing and asthma in neonates and children. In adults, asthma involves airway remodeling characterized by increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, as well as airway hyperreactivity. The effects of cigarette smoke on remodeling and contractility in the developing airway are not well-elucidated. In this study, we used canalicular-stage (18–20 wk gestational age) human fetal airway smooth muscle (fASM) cells as an in vitro model of the immature airway. fASM cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE; 0.5–1.5% for 24–72 h), and cell proliferation, ECM deposition, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses to agonist (histamine 10 μM) were used to evaluate effects on remodeling and hyperreactivity. CSE significantly increased cell proliferation and deposition of ECM molecules collagen I, collagen III, and fibronectin. In contrast, [Ca2+]i responses were not significantly affected by CSE. Analysis of key signaling pathways demonstrated significant increase in extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and p38 activation with CSE. Inhibition of ERK or p38 signaling prevented CSE-mediated changes in proliferation, whereas only ERK inhibition attenuated the CSE-mediated increase in ECM deposition. Overall, these results demonstrate that cigarette smoke may enhance remodeling in developing human ASM through hyperplasia and ECM production, thus contributing to development of neonatal and pediatric airway disease. PMID:25344066

  11. Small airway dysfunction and flow and volume bronchodilator responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pisi, Roberta; Aiello, Marina; Zanini, Andrea; Tzani, Panagiota; Paleari, Davide; Marangio, Emilio; Spanevello, Antonio; Nicolini, Gabriele; Chetta, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated whether a relationship between small airways dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness exists in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods We studied 100 (20 female; mean age: 68±10 years) patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 55% pred ±21%; FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC]: 53%±10%) by impulse oscillometry system. Resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5 and R20, in kPa·s·L−1) and the fall in resistance from 5 Hz to 20 Hz (R5 – R20) were used as indices of total, proximal, and peripheral airway resistance; reactance at 5 Hz (X5, in kPa·s·L−1) was also measured. Significant response to bronchodilator (salbutamol 400 μg) was expressed as absolute (≥0.2 L) and percentage (≥12%) change relative to the prebronchodilator value of FEV1 (flow responders, FRs) and FVC (volume responders, VRs). Results Eighty out of 100 participants had R5 – R20 >0.03 kPa·s·L−1 (> upper normal limit) and, compared to patients with R5 – R20 ≤0.030 kPa·s·L−1, showed a poorer health status, lower values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, and X5, along with higher values of residual volume/total lung capacity and R5 (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Compared to the 69 nonresponders and the 8 FRs, the 16 VRs had significantly higher R5 and R5 – R20 values (P<0.05), lower X5 values (P<0.05), and greater airflow obstruction and lung hyperinflation. Conclusion This study shows that peripheral airway resistance is increased in the vast majority of patients with COPD, who showed worse respiratory reactance, worse spirometry results, more severe lung hyperinflation, and poorer health status. Small airway dysfunction was also associated with the bronchodilator responsiveness in terms of FVC, but not in terms of FEV1. PMID:26150710

  12. O3-induced mucosa-linked airway muscle hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Murlas, C.G.; Murphy, T.P.; Chodimella, V. )

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the effects of ozone exposure (3.0 ppm, 2 h) on the responsiveness of guinea pig airway muscle in vitro from animals developing bronchial hyperreactivity. Muscarinic reactivity in vivo was determined by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) in response to increasing concentrations of aerosolized acetylcholine (ACh) administered before and 30 min after exposure. Immediately after reactivity testing, multiple tracheal rings from ozone- and air-exposed animals were prepared and the contractile responses to increasing concentrations of substance P, ACh, or KCl were assessed in the presence of 10 microM indomethacin with or without 1 microM phosphoramidon, an inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase. Isometric force generation in vitro was measured on stimulation by cumulative concentrations of the agonists, and force generation (in g/cm2) was calculated after determination of muscle cross-sectional area. The smooth muscle of mucosa-intact airways from guinea pigs with ozone-induced bronchial hyper-reactivity proved to be hyperresponsive in vitro to substance P and ACh but not to KCl. Pretreatment with phosphoramidon abolished the increase in substance P responsiveness but had no effect on muscarinic hyperresponsiveness after ozone exposure. Furthermore, substance P responsiveness was not augmented in ozone-exposed airways in which the mucosa had been removed before testing in vitro. Likewise, muscarinic hyperresponsiveness was not present in ozone-exposed airways without mucosa. Our data indicate that airway smooth muscle responsiveness is increased in guinea pigs with ozone-induced bronchial hyperreactivity and suggest that this hyperresponsiveness may be linked to non-cyclooxygenase mucosa-derived factors.

  13. Vulnerability to dysfunction and muscle injury after unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Tesch, P. A.; Hather, B. M.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test whether unloading increases vulnerability to eccentric exercise-induced dysfunction and muscle injury. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SETTING: General community. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Two women and 5 men (73 +/- 3kg [mean +/- SE]) who were active college students but were not trained in lower body resistance exercise volunteered. INTERVENTION: Five weeks of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS), which has been shown to decrease strength and size of the unloaded, left, but not load-bearing, right quadriceps femoris muscle group (QF) by 20% and 14%, respectively; performance of 10 sets of ten eccentric actions with each QF immediately after the ULLS strength tests with a load equivalent to 65% of the post-ULLS eccentric 1-repetition maximum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Concentric and eccentric 1-repetition maximum for the left, unloaded and the right, load-bearing QF measured immediately after ULLS and 1,4,7,9, and 11 days later; cross-sectional area and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of each QF as determined by magnetic resonance imaging and measured the last day of ULLS and 3 days later. RESULTS: The mean load used for eccentric exercise was 23 +/- 2 and 30 +/- 3kg for the left, unloaded and right, load-bearing QF, respectively. The concentric and eccentric 1-repetition maximum for the unloaded and already weakened left QF was further decreased by 18% (p = .000) and 27% (p = .000), respectively, 1 day after eccentric exercise. Strength did not return to post-ULLS levels until 7 days of recovery. The right, load-bearing QF showed a 4% decrease (p = .002) in the eccentric 1-repetition maximum 1 day after eccentric exercise. The left, unloaded QF showed an increase in T2 (p = .002) in 18% of its cross-sectional area 3 days after the eccentric exercise, thus indicating muscle injury. The right, load-bearing QF showed no elevation in T2 (p = .280). CONCLUSION: Unloading increases vulnerability to eccentric exercise-induced dysfunction and muscle

  14. Successful treatment of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome by high-dose vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Varney, Veronica A; Evans, Jane; Bansal, Amolak S

    2011-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is a controversial and poorly understood condition produced by inhalational injury from gas, vapors, or fumes. The symptoms mimic asthma, but appear unresponsive to asthma treatments. If symptoms persist for more than 6 months, there is a risk that they can become chronic. For these cases, effective treatments are lacking and quality of life is poor. We describe the first use of high-dose vitamin D in a patient with this condition, who fulfilled the 1995 American College of Chest Physicians criteria for this syndrome. The patient we describe presented an extremely difficult management problem and was refractory to conventional treatments, but responded to high-dose oral vitamin D supplements. PMID:22034572

  15. Are high-dose toxic exposures always associated with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS)?

    PubMed

    Hickmann, M A; Nelson, E D; Siegel, E G; Bernstein, J A

    2001-01-01

    Bottling plant workers were evaluated for respiratory symptoms following an accidental exposure to a chlorine dioxide aerosol. Six exposed employees underwent medical and occupational histories, skin testing to common allergens, spirometry before and after use of bronchodilators, and methacholine challenge. The reported exposure to chlorine dioxide ranged from 30 min to 12 hr. Physical examinations were all normal. Four workers had positive prick skin tests to common aeroallergens. None of the workers demonstrated significant changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec following use of bronchodilators, and none experienced methacholine hyperresponsiveness. These cases suggest that the occurrence of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is unpredictable and may not always occur in heavily exposed individuals. PMID:11777025

  16. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome due to chlorine: sequential bronchial biopsies and functional assessment.

    PubMed

    Lemière, C; Malo, J L; Boutet, M

    1997-01-01

    Very little information is available on the acute histopathological bronchial alterations caused by reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). We had the opportunity to carry out sequential bronchial biopsies in a subject with RADS due to chlorine (60 h, 15 days, 2 and 5 months after the acute exposure), and also to assess spirometry and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine. A 36 year old worker in a water-filtration plant (nonsmoker) abruptly inhaled high concentrations of chlorine on September 12, 1994. He experienced immediate nasal and throat burning, retrosternal burning and wheezing, and these symptoms persisted during and after the workshift. Two days later, he complained of retrosternal burning, dyspnoea and wheezing. Inspiratory wheezing was documented. His forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was 66% of predicted and the provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) was slightly abnormal (2.5 mg.mL-1). On the following day, the patient underwent bronchial biopsies, which showed almost complete replacement of the epithelium by a fibrinohaemorhagic exsudate. The subject was prescribed inhaled steroids. Fifteen days after the accident, the PC20 was improved to 6 mg.mL-1. Bronchial biopsies showed considerable epithelial desquamation with an inflammatory exudate and swelling of the subepithelial space. Five weeks after the accident, the PC20 was normal (57 mg.mL-1). Inhaled steroids were stopped. Two months after the accident, the PC20 deteriorated to 4 mg.mL-1. Biopsies then showed regeneration of the epithelium by basal cells and there was still a pronounced inflammatory infiltrate. Inhaled steroids were restarted. Three and five months later, the PC20 was normal (24 mg.mL-1). Bronchial biopsies showed a greatly improved epithelium and reduction of the inflammatory infiltrate. This case report shows that reactive airways dysfunction syndrome can cause acute, marked, though partially reversible, histological

  17. Human airway smooth muscle cells secrete amphiregulin via bradykinin/COX-2/PGE2, inducing COX-2, CXCL8, and VEGF expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC) contribute to asthma pathophysiology through an increased smooth muscle mass and elevated cytokine/chemokine output. Little is known about how HASMC and the airway epithelium interact to regulate chronic airway inflammation and remodeling. Amphiregulin is a member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agonists with cell growth and proinflammatory roles and increased expression in the lungs of asthma patients. Here we show that bradykinin (BK) stimulation of HASMC increases amphiregulin secretion in a mechanism dependent on BK-induced COX-2 expression, increased PGE2 output, and the stimulation of HASMC EP2 and EP4 receptors. Conditioned medium from BK treated HASMC induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 mRNA and protein accumulation in airway epithelial cells, which were blocked by anti-amphiregulin antibodies and amphiregulin siRNA, suggesting a paracrine effect of HASMC-derived amphiregulin on airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, recombinant amphiregulin induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 in airway epithelial cells. Finally, we found that conditioned media from amphiregulin-stimulated airway epithelial cells induced amphiregulin expression in HASMC and that this was dependent on airway epithelial cell COX-2 activity. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic axis of interaction between HASMC and epithelial cells that amplifies CXCL8, VEGF, COX-2, and amphiregulin production. PMID:26047642

  18. Effects of upper airway pressure on abdominal muscle activity in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Plowman, L; Lauff, D C; McNamara, F; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1991-12-01

    We have examined arousal and abdominal muscle electromyogram (EMGabd) responses to upper airway pressure stimuli during physiological sleep in four dogs with permanent side-hole tracheal stomata. The dogs were trained to sleep with a tightly fitting snout mask, hermetically sealed in place, while breathing through a cuffed endotracheal tube inserted through the tracheostomy. Sleep stage was determined by behavioral and electroencephalographic criteria. EMGabd activity was measured using bipolar fine-wire electrodes inserted into the abdominal muscle layers. Static increases or decreases in upper airway pressure (+/- 6 cmH2O), when applied at the snout mask or larynx (upper trachea), caused an immediate decrease in EMGabd on the first two to three breaths; EMGabd usually returned to control levels within the 1-min test interval. In contrast, oscillatory pressure waves at 30 Hz and +/- 3 cmH2O amplitude (or -2 to -8 cmH2O amplitude) produced an immediate and sustained reduction in IMGabd in all sleep states. Inhibition of EMGabd could be maintained over many minutes when the oscillatory pressure stimulus was pulsed by using a cycle of 0.5 s on and 0.5 s off. Oscillatory upper airway pressures were also found to be powerful arousal-promoting stimuli, producing arousal in 94% of tests in drowsiness and 66% of tests in slowwave sleep. The results demonstrate the presence of breath-by-breath upper airway control of abdominal muscle activity. PMID:1778951

  19. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  20. Neostigmine but not sugammadex impairs upper airway dilator muscle activity and breathing

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann, M.; Zaremba, S.; Malhotra, A.; Jordan, A. S.; Rosow, C.; Chamberlin, N. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cholinesterase inhibitor-based reversal agents, given in the absence of neuromuscular block, evoke a partial upper airway obstruction by decreasing skeletal upper airway muscle function. Sugammadex reverses neuromuscular block by encapsulating rocuronium. However, its effects on upper airway integrity and breathing are unknown. Methods Fifty-one adult male rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane, tracheostomized, and a femoral artery and vein were cannulated. First, we compared the efficacy of sugammadex 15 mg kg−1 and neostigmine 0.06 mg kg−1 to reverse respiratory effects of rocuronium-induced partial paralysis [train-of-four ratio (T4/T1)=0.5]. Subsequently, we compared the safety of sugammadex and neostigmine given after recovery of the T4/T1 to 1, by measuring phasic genioglossus activity and breathing. Results During partial paralysis (T4/T1=0.5), time to recovery of minute volume to baseline values was 10.9 (2), 75.8 (18), and 153 (54) s with sugammadex, neostigmine, and placebo, respectively (sugammadex was significantly faster than neostigmine and placebo, P<0.05). Recovery of T4/T1 was also faster for sugammadex than neostigmine and placebo. Neostigmine administration after complete recovery of T4/T1 decreased upper airway dilator muscle activity to 64 (30)% of baseline and decreased tidal volume (P<0.05 for both variables), whereas sugammadex had no effect on either variable. Conclusions In contrast to neostigmine, which significantly impairs upper airway dilator muscle activity when given after recovery from neuromuscular block, a reversal dose of sugammadex given under the same conditions does not affect genioglossus muscle activity and normal breathing. Human studies will be required to evaluate the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:18559352

  1. Peripheral Airway Smooth Muscle, but Not the Trachealis, Is Hypercontractile in an Equine Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Bates, Genevieve; Zitouni, Nedjma; Benedetti, Andrea; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2016-05-01

    Heaves is a naturally occurring equine disease that shares many similarities with human asthma, including reversible antigen-induced bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and remodeling. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the trachealis muscle is mechanically representative of the peripheral airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an equine model of asthma. Tracheal and peripheral ASM of heaves-affected horses under exacerbation, or under clinical remission of the disease, and control horses were dissected and freed of epithelium to measure unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), stress (force/cross-sectional area), methacholine effective concentration at which 50% of the maximum response is obtained, and stiffness. Myofibrillar Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, actomyosin in vitro motility, and contractile protein expression were also measured. Horses with heaves had significantly greater Vmax and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in peripheral airway but not in tracheal smooth muscle. In addition, a significant correlation was found between Vmax and the time elapsed since the end of the corticosteroid treatment for the peripheral airways in horses with heaves. Maximal stress and stiffness were greater in the peripheral airways of the horses under remission compared with controls and the horses under exacerbation, potentially due to remodeling. Actomyosin in vitro motility was not different between controls and horses with heaves. These data demonstrate that peripheral ASM is mechanically and biochemically altered in heaves, whereas the trachealis behaves as in control horses. It is therefore conceivable that the trachealis muscle may not be representative of the peripheral ASM in human asthma either, but this will require further investigation. PMID:26473389

  2. Molecular and biological pathways of skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will be a major leading cause of death worldwide in the near future. Weakness and atrophy of the quadriceps are associated with a significantly poorer prognosis and increased mortality in COPD. Despite that skeletal muscle dysfunction may affect both respiratory and limb muscle groups in COPD, the latter are frequently more severely affected. Therefore, muscle dysfunction in COPD is a common systemic manifestation that should be evaluated on routine basis in clinical settings. In the present review, several aspects of COPD muscle dysfunction are being reviewed, with special emphasis on the underlying biological mechanisms. Figures on the prevalence of COPD muscle dysfunction and the most relevant etiologic contributors are also provided. Despite that ongoing research will shed light into the contribution of additional mechanisms to COPD muscle dysfunction, current knowledge points toward the involvement of a wide spectrum of cellular and molecular events that are differentially expressed in respiratory and limb muscles. Such mechanisms are thoroughly described in the article. The contribution of epigenetic events on COPD muscle dysfunction is also reviewed. We conclude that in view of the latest discoveries, from now, on new avenues of research should be designed to specifically target cellular mechanisms and pathways that impair muscle mass and function in COPD using pharmacological strategies and/or exercise training modalities. PMID:27056059

  3. Orai channel-mediated Ca2+ signals in vascular and airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Amy M; Trebak, Mohamed

    2016-03-15

    Orai (Orai1, Orai2, and Orai3) proteins form a family of highly Ca(2+)-selective plasma membrane channels that are regulated by stromal-interacting molecules (STIM1 and STIM2); STIM proteins are Ca(2+) sensors located in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. STIM and Orai proteins are expressed in vascular and airway smooth muscle and constitute the molecular components of the ubiquitous store-operated Ca(2+) entry pathway that mediate the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) current. STIM/Orai proteins also encode store-independent Ca(2+) entry pathways in smooth muscle. Altered expression and function of STIM/Orai proteins have been linked to vascular and airway pathologies, including restenosis, hypertension, and atopic asthma. In this review we discuss our current understanding of Orai proteins and the store-dependent and -independent signaling pathways mediated by these proteins in vascular and airway smooth muscle. We also discuss the current studies linking altered expression and function of Orai proteins with smooth muscle-related pathologies. PMID:26718630

  4. Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a role for exercise training?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction is emerging as an important pathophysiological abnormality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Muscle abnormalities appear to occur frequently and promote dyspnea, fatigue, and exercise limitation in patients with PAH. Preliminary data suggest that targeted muscle training may be of benefit, although further evidence is required to consolidate these findings into specific recommendations for exercise training in patients with PAH. This article reviews the current evidence on prevalence, risk factors, and implications of respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in patients with PAH. It also reviews the impact of exercise rehabilitation on morphologic, metabolic, and functional muscle profile and outcomes in PAH. Future research priorities are highlighted. PMID:26401245

  5. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: occurrence after exposure to a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture.

    PubMed

    Forrester, B G

    1997-04-01

    A previously healthy, 47-year-old millwright was exposed to high airborne levels of a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture; after acute bronchospasm, he required hospitalization. During the next 4 years, he had recurrent acute bronchospasm requiring emergency department visits and three hospitalizations. Review of the patient's medical and occupational history and extensive clinical investigation failed to provide alternate explanations for this hyperresponsive airways disease. This is believed to be the first reported case of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) after exposure to a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture. Physicians should be aware of this possibility when examining patients exposed to such materials. PMID:9114842

  6. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs. PMID:25724668

  7. Smooth muscle in human bronchi is disposed to resist airway distension.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Morgan; Henry, Cyndi; Couture, Christian; Marsolais, David; King, Gregory G; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Bossé, Ynuk

    2016-07-15

    Studying airway smooth muscle (ASM) in conditions that emulate the in vivo environment within which the bronchi normally operate may provide important clues regarding its elusive physiological function. The present study examines the effect of lengthening and shortening of ASM on tension development in human bronchial segments. ASM from each bronchial segment was set at a length approximating in situ length (Linsitu). Bronchial tension was then measured during a slow cyclical strain (0.004Hz, from 0.7Linsitu to 1.3Linsitu) in the relaxed state and at graded levels of activation by methacholine. In all cases, tension was greater at longer ASM lengths, and greater during lengthening than shortening. The threshold of methacholine concentration that was required for ASM to account for bronchial tension across the entire range of ASM lengths tested was on average smaller by 2.8 logs during lengthening than during shortening. The length-dependency of ASM tension, together with this lower threshold of methacholine concentration during lengthening versus shortening, suggest that ASM has a greater ability to resist airway dilation during lung inflation than to narrow the airways during lung deflation. More than serving to narrow the airway, as has long been thought, these data suggest that the main function of ASM contraction is to limit airway wall distension during lung inflation. PMID:27095271

  8. HB-EGF-Promoted Airway Smooth Muscle Cells and Their Progenitor Migration Contribute to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in Asthmatic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Li, Hequan; Yao, Yinan; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Yuehong; Xia, Dajing; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-03-01

    The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells' proliferation, migration, and their progenitor's migration are currently regarded as causative factors for ASM remodeling in asthma. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), a potent mitogen and chemotactic factor, could promote ASM cell proliferation through MAPK pathways. In this study, we obtained primary ASM cells and their progenitors from C57BL/6 mice and went on to explore the role of HB-EGF in these cells migration and the underlying mechanisms. We found that recombinant HB-EGF (rHB-EGF) intratracheal instillation accelerated ASM layer thickening in an OVA-induced asthmatic mouse. Modified Boyden chamber assay revealed that rHB-EGF facilitate ASM cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and ASM cells from asthmatic mice had a greater migration ability than that from normal counterparts. rHB-EGF could stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 in ASM cells but further migration assay showed that only epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (AG1478) or p38 inhibitor (SB203580), but not ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), could inhibit rHB-EGF-mediated ASM cells migration. Actin cytoskeleton experiments exhibited that rHB-EGF could cause actin stress fibers disassembly and focal adhesions formation of ASM cells through the activation of p38. Finally, airway instillation of rHB-EGF promoted the recruitment of bone marrow-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells, which were transferred via caudal vein, migrating into the airway from the circulation. These observations demonstrated that ASM remodeling in asthma might have resulted from HB-EGF-mediated ASM cells and their progenitor cells migration, via p38 MAPK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:26826248

  9. Steroids augment relengthening of contracted airway smooth muscle: potential additional mechanism of benefit in asthma.

    PubMed

    Lakser, O J; Dowell, M L; Hoyte, F L; Chen, B; Lavoie, T L; Ferreira, C; Pinto, L H; Dulin, N O; Kogut, P; Churchill, J; Mitchell, R W; Solway, J

    2008-11-01

    Breathing (especially deep breathing) antagonises development and persistence of airflow obstruction during bronchoconstrictor stimulation. Force fluctuations imposed on contracted airway smooth muscle (ASM) in vitro result in its relengthening, a phenomenon called force fluctuation-induced relengthening (FFIR). Because breathing imposes similar force fluctuations on contracted ASM within intact lungs, FFIR represents a likely mechanism by which breathing antagonises bronchoconstriction. While this bronchoprotective effect appears to be impaired in asthma, corticosteroid treatment can restore the ability of deep breaths to reverse artificially induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects. It has previously been demonstrated that FFIR is physiologically regulated through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. While the beneficial effects of corticosteroids have been attributed to suppression of airway inflammation, the current authors hypothesised that alternatively they might exert their action directly on ASM by augmenting FFIR as a result of inhibiting p38 MAPK signalling. This possibility was tested in the present study by measuring relengthening in contracted canine tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) strips. The results indicate that dexamethasone treatment significantly augmented FFIR of contracted canine TSM. Canine tracheal ASM cells treated with dexamethasone demonstrated increased MAPK phosphatase-1 expression and decreased p38 MAPK activity, as reflected in reduced phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK downstream target, heat shock protein 27. These results suggest that corticosteroids may exert part of their therapeutic effect through direct action on airway smooth muscle, by decreasing p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and thus increasing force fluctuation-induced relengthening. PMID:18768574

  10. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders. PMID:23428645

  11. Work-related reactive airways dysfunction syndrome cases from surveillance in selected US states.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Paul K; Derk, Susan J; Davis, Letitia; Tumpowsky, Catharine; Reilly, Mary Jo; Rosenman, Kenneth D; Schill, Donald P; Valiante, David; Flattery, Jennifer; Harrison, Robert; Reinisch, Florence; Filios, Margaret S; Tift, Brian

    2003-04-01

    The objective was to elaborate the descriptive epidemiology of work-related cases of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Cases of work-related asthma (WRA) were identified in four states in the United States during 1993-1995 as part of the Sentinel Event Notification Systems for Occupational Risks (SENSOR). Information gathered by follow-back interview was used to describe 123 work-related RADS cases and to compare them to 301 other WRA cases whose onset of disease was associated with a known asthma inducer. RADS represented 14% of all new-onset WRA cases identified by the state SENSOR surveillance systems. RADS cases had significant adverse medical and occupational outcomes identified by follow-back interview. In particular, 89% still had breathing problems, 78% had ever sought emergency care and 39% had ever been hospitalized for work-related breathing problems, 54% had applied for worker compensation benefits, and 41% had left the company where they experienced onset of asthma. These values equaled or exceeded the comparable figures for those WRA cases whose onset was attributed to a known inducer. Work-related RADS represents a minority of all WRA cases, but the adverse impact of this condition appears to equal that of other WRA cases. PMID:12708139

  12. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS): guidelines for diagnosis and treatment and insight into likely prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bardana, E J

    1999-12-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is defined as the sudden onset of asthma following a high level exposure to a corrosive gas, vapor, or fume. This variant of occupational asthma continues to generate controversy regarding the criteria for its diagnosis. There is also some disagreement as to the likely prognosis with this disorder. Currently, the diagnosis requires the assumption of normal premorbid pulmonary physiology and absence of bronchial hyperreactivity. Criteria for the diagnosis of RADS are discussed with a proposal for both major and minor criteria to increase the confidence of an accurate diagnosis. The pathology of RADS involves a primarily lymphocytic inflammatory response with some evidence of subepithelial thickening and fibrosis. Most patients with this condition who survive the short-term exposure to a toxicant recover completely without significant clinical or physiologic sequelae. The issue of low-level RADs remains controversial and problematic as a tenable diagnosis, and will require further careful investigation to evaluate the premise that chronic, low-level toxicants are capable of leading to such a condition. More likely, most of the cases which have been reported represent preexisting asthma and/or expressions of an atopic predisposition. PMID:10619325

  13. R-134a (1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane) Inhalation Induced Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Viral; Kham, Nang; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Kapitan, Kent; Henkle, Joseph; White, Peter

    2016-01-01

    R-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is widely used as a refrigerant and as an aerosol propellant. Inhalation of R-134a can lead to asphyxia, transient confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. We report a case of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome secondary to R-134a inhalation. A 60-year-old nonsmoking man without a history of lung disease was exposed to an air conditioner refrigerant spill while performing repairs beneath a school bus. Afterward, he experienced worsening shortness of breath with minimal exertion, a productive cough, and wheezing. He was also hypoxic. He was admitted to the hospital for further evaluation. Spirometry showed airflow obstruction with an FEV1 1.97 L (45% predicted). His respiratory status improved with bronchodilators and oral steroids. A repeat spirometry 2 weeks later showed improvement with an FEV1 2.5 L (60% predicted). Six months after the incident, his symptoms had improved, but he was still having shortness of breath on exertion and occasional cough. PMID:25137406

  14. Differential Expression of Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism Genes in Upper Airway versus Diaphragm Muscle

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, Erik; Spiegler, Sarah; Moyer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Contractile properties of upper airway muscles influence upper airway patency, an issue of particular importance for subjects with obstructive sleep apnea. Expression of genes related to cellular energetics is, in turn, critical for the maintenance of contractile integrity over time during repetitive activation. We tested the hypothesis that sternohyoid has lower expression of genes related to lipid and carbohydrate energetic pathways than the diaphragm. Methods: Sternohyoid and diaphragm from normal adult rats were examined with gene expression arrays. Analysis focused on genes belonging to Gene Ontology (GO) groups carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism. Results: There were 433 genes with at least ± 2-fold significant differential expression between sternohyoid and diaphragm, of which 192 had sternohyoid > diaphragm and 241 had diaphragm > sternohyoid expression. Among genes with higher sternohyoid expression, there was over-representation of the GO group carbohydrate metabolism (P = 0.0053, n = 13 genes, range of differential expression 2.1- to 6.2-fold) but not lipid metabolism (P = 0.44). Conversely, among genes with higher diaphragm expression, there was over-representation of the GO group lipid metabolism (P = 0.0000065, n = 32 genes, range of differential expression 2.0- to 37.9-fold) but not carbohydrate metabolism (P = 0.23). Nineteen genes with diaphragm > sternohyoid expression were related to fatty acid metabolism (P = 0.000000058), in particular fatty acid β oxidation and biosynthesis in the mitochondria. Conclusions: Sternohyoid has much lower gene expression than diaphragm for mitochondrial enzymes that participate in fatty acid oxidation and biosynthesis. This likely contributes to the lower fatigue resistance of pharyngeal upper airway muscles compared with the diaphragm. Citation: van Lunteren E; Spiegler S; Moyer M. Differential expression of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism genes in upper airway versus diaphragm

  15. Endobronchial Ultrasound Reliably Quantifies Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in an Equine Asthma Model.

    PubMed

    Bullone, Michela; Beauchamp, Guy; Godbout, Mireille; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) revealed differences in the thickness of the layer representing subepithelial tissues (L2) between human asthmatics and controls, but whether this measurement correlates with airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling in asthma is unknown. In this study, we sought to determine the ability of EBUS to predict histological ASM remodeling in normal and equine asthmatic airways. We studied 109 isolated bronchi from the lungs of 13 horses. They underwent EBUS examination using a 30 MHz radial probe before being processed for histology. ASM remodeling parameters were evaluated in EBUS images (L2 thickness, L2 area, L2 area/internal perimeter [Pi] and L2 area/Pi2) and histological cuts (ASM area/Pi2), and compared. EBUS was then performed ex vivo on the lungs of 4 horses with heaves, an asthma-like condition of horses, and 7 controls to determine whether central bronchial remodeling could be detected with this technique. An optimized approach was developed based on data variability within airways, subjects, and groups, and then validated in 7 horses (3 controls, 4 with heaves) that underwent EBUS in vivo. L2 area was significantly associated to ASM area in isolated lungs (p<0.0001), in the absence of significant bias related to the airway size. Bronchial size significantly affected EBUS ASM-related parameters, except for L2 area/Pi2. L2 area/Pi2 was increased in the airways of asthmatic horses compared to controls, both ex vivo and in vivo (p<0.05). Bronchial histology confirmed our findings (AASM/Pi2 was increased in asthmatic horses compared to controls, p<0.05). In both horses with heaves and controls, L2 was composed of ASM for the outer 75% of its thickness and by ECM for the remaining inner 25%. In conclusion, EBUS reliably allows assessment of asthma-associated ASM remodeling of central airways in a non-invasive way. PMID:26348727

  16. Endobronchial Ultrasound Reliably Quantifies Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in an Equine Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bullone, Michela; Beauchamp, Guy; Godbout, Mireille; Martin, James G.; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) revealed differences in the thickness of the layer representing subepithelial tissues (L2) between human asthmatics and controls, but whether this measurement correlates with airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling in asthma is unknown. In this study, we sought to determine the ability of EBUS to predict histological ASM remodeling in normal and equine asthmatic airways. We studied 109 isolated bronchi from the lungs of 13 horses. They underwent EBUS examination using a 30 MHz radial probe before being processed for histology. ASM remodeling parameters were evaluated in EBUS images (L2 thickness, L2 area, L2 area/internal perimeter [Pi] and L2 area/Pi2) and histological cuts (ASM area/Pi2), and compared. EBUS was then performed ex vivo on the lungs of 4 horses with heaves, an asthma-like condition of horses, and 7 controls to determine whether central bronchial remodeling could be detected with this technique. An optimized approach was developed based on data variability within airways, subjects, and groups, and then validated in 7 horses (3 controls, 4 with heaves) that underwent EBUS in vivo. L2 area was significantly associated to ASM area in isolated lungs (p<0.0001), in the absence of significant bias related to the airway size. Bronchial size significantly affected EBUS ASM-related parameters, except for L2 area/Pi2. L2 area/Pi2 was increased in the airways of asthmatic horses compared to controls, both ex vivo and in vivo (p<0.05). Bronchial histology confirmed our findings (AASM/Pi2 was increased in asthmatic horses compared to controls, p<0.05). In both horses with heaves and controls, L2 was composed of ASM for the outer 75% of its thickness and by ECM for the remaining inner 25%. In conclusion, EBUS reliably allows assessment of asthma-associated ASM remodeling of central airways in a non-invasive way. PMID:26348727

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Launches Dexamethasone-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy via AMPK/FOXO3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Peng, Yunhua; Wang, Xun; Fan, Yingying; Qin, Chuan; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Cao, Ke; Li, Hua; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-01-01

    Muscle atrophy occurs in several pathologic conditions such as diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as after long-term clinical administration of synthesized glucocorticoid, where increased circulating glucocorticoid accounts for the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy. Others and we previously reported mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle atrophy-related conditions and that mitochondria-targeting nutrients efficiently prevent kinds of muscle atrophy. However, whether and how mitochondrial dysfunction involves glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we measured mitochondrial function in dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro, and we found that mitochondrial respiration was compromised on the 3rd day following after dexamethasone administration, earlier than the increases of MuRF1 and Fbx32, and dexamethasone-induced loss of mitochondrial components and key mitochondrial dynamics proteins. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment caused intracellular ATP deprivation and robust AMPK activation, which further activated the FOXO3/Atrogenes pathway. By directly impairing mitochondrial respiration, FCCP leads to similar readouts in C2C12 myotubes as dexamethasone does. On the contrary, resveratrol, a mitochondrial nutrient, efficiently reversed dexamethasone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and muscle atrophy in both C2C12 myotubes and mice, by improving mitochondrial function and blocking AMPK/FOXO3 signaling. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction acts as a central role in dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and that nutrients or drugs targeting mitochondria might be beneficial in preventing or curing muscle atrophy. PMID:26592738

  18. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  19. IL-1β: a key modulator in asthmatic airway smooth muscle hyper-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhi; Xiao, Hong-tao; Zhang, Yuan; Tong, Rong-Sheng; Zhang, Li-Juan; Bian, Yuan; He, Xia

    2015-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airway. It is characterized by airway hyper-reactivity, which can be attributed to the chronically inflamed airway. However, the molecular mechanism is still under investigation. In this article, we have shown that IL-1β is a key molecule that can orchestrate both Toll-like receptor and muscarinic receptor pathways, and that antagonizing the function of IL-1β has a promising future as a potential drug target for asthma treatment. IL-1β can activate NF-κB pathways via Toll-like receptors, and NF-κB will eventually transactivate the genes of cytokines, chemokines, proteins of the complement system, adhesion molecules and immune receptors involved in inflammation. IL-1β can activate eosinophils, which can release major basic protein (MBP) to antagonize the M2 receptors leading to excessive acetylcholine release. Acetylcholine has an effect on M3 receptors, which are related to airway smooth muscle contraction and mucus production. IL-1β is reported to activate COX-2 resulting in heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase and impairs relaxation of the ASM. IL-1β is involved in mediation of neutrophilic inflammation. Identification of the prominent role of IL-1β in asthma could lead to successful use of anti-IL1β agents. PMID:26134749

  20. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  1. Physiological correction of lingual dysfunction with the "Tongue Right Positioner": Beneficial effects on the upper airways.

    PubMed

    Mauclaire, Claude; Vanpoulle, Frédéric; Saint-Georges-Chaumet, Yann

    2015-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of functional tongue therapy in stabilizing treatments for dental malocclusion and treating sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect on the upper airways of the Tongue Right Positioner device (TRP) used for the correction of atypical swallowing. We analyzed lateral headfilms of 94 orthodontic patients aged between 11 and 17, before the start of treatment and after establishment of mature swallowing, treated with the TRP (TRP group) or by reeducation exercises (control group). In the TRP group, the establishment of mature swallowing occurs twice as fast as in the control group. This led to thinning of the floor of the mouth (-8.38%, P<0.001) linked to anteroposterior enlargement of the pharynx (+10.48%, P<0.01), both probably due to an increase in genioglossal and styloglossal muscle tone and correction of cranio-cervical posture (+2.52%, P<0.01). These results are not dependent on the type of orthodontic treatment. They suggest that the TRP could be used in the treatment of SDB. PMID:26282520

  2. Muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on causes and biological findings

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sergi; Casadevall, Carme; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and/or limb muscle dysfunction, which are frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contribute to their disease prognosis irrespective of the lung function. Muscle dysfunction is caused by the interaction of local and systemic factors. The key deleterious etiologic factors are pulmonary hyperinflation for the respiratory muscles and deconditioning secondary to reduced physical activity for limb muscles. Nonetheless, cigarette smoke, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exercise, exacerbations, anabolic insufficiency, drugs and comorbidities also seem to play a relevant role. All these factors modify the phenotype of the muscles, through the induction of several biological phenomena in patients with COPD. While respiratory muscles improve their aerobic phenotype (percentage of oxidative fibers, capillarization, mitochondrial density, enzyme activity in the aerobic pathways, etc.), limb muscles exhibit the opposite phenotype. In addition, both muscle groups show oxidative stress, signs of damage and epigenetic changes. However, fiber atrophy, increased number of inflammatory cells, altered regenerative capacity; signs of apoptosis and autophagy, and an imbalance between protein synthesis and breakdown are rather characteristic features of the limb muscles, mostly in patients with reduced body weight. Despite that significant progress has been achieved in the last decades, full elucidation of the specific roles of the target biological mechanisms involved in COPD muscle dysfunction is still required. Such an achievement will be crucial to adequately tackle with this relevant clinical problem of COPD patients in the near-future. PMID:26623119

  3. Muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on causes and biological findings.

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Pascual, Sergi; Casadevall, Carme; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and/or limb muscle dysfunction, which are frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contribute to their disease prognosis irrespective of the lung function. Muscle dysfunction is caused by the interaction of local and systemic factors. The key deleterious etiologic factors are pulmonary hyperinflation for the respiratory muscles and deconditioning secondary to reduced physical activity for limb muscles. Nonetheless, cigarette smoke, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exercise, exacerbations, anabolic insufficiency, drugs and comorbidities also seem to play a relevant role. All these factors modify the phenotype of the muscles, through the induction of several biological phenomena in patients with COPD. While respiratory muscles improve their aerobic phenotype (percentage of oxidative fibers, capillarization, mitochondrial density, enzyme activity in the aerobic pathways, etc.), limb muscles exhibit the opposite phenotype. In addition, both muscle groups show oxidative stress, signs of damage and epigenetic changes. However, fiber atrophy, increased number of inflammatory cells, altered regenerative capacity; signs of apoptosis and autophagy, and an imbalance between protein synthesis and breakdown are rather characteristic features of the limb muscles, mostly in patients with reduced body weight. Despite that significant progress has been achieved in the last decades, full elucidation of the specific roles of the target biological mechanisms involved in COPD muscle dysfunction is still required. Such an achievement will be crucial to adequately tackle with this relevant clinical problem of COPD patients in the near-future. PMID:26623119

  4. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  5. [EMG functional changes in masticatory muscles by elastopositioner use in patients with TMJ dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Arsenina, O I; Popova, N V; Komarova, A V; Popova, A V; Pogabalo, I V; Ivanova, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the results of EMG studies in patients with TMJ dysfunction was carried out before and after use of elastpositioner "Corrector". The study revealed significant functional disturbances of the masticatory muscles, which were corrected after applying elastpositioner: there was a trend to decreased activity of masseter and temporal muscles, especially in the stagе of rest. PMID:26271702

  6. Sex Steroids Influence Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor Secretion From Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Freeman, Michelle R; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is emerging as an important player in airway inflammation, remodeling, and hyperreactivity. Separately, there is increasing evidence that sex hormones contribute to pathophysiology in the lung. BDNF and sex steroid signaling are thought to be intricately linked in the brain. There is currently little information on BDNF and sex steroid interactions in the airway but is relevant to understanding growth factor signaling in the context of asthma in men versus women. In this study, we assessed the effect of sex steroids on BDNF expression and secretion in human airway smooth muscle (ASM). Human ASM was treated with estrogen (E2 ) or testosterone (T, 10 nM each) and intracellular BDNF and secreted BDNF measured. E2 and T significantly reduced secretion of BDNF; effects prevented by estrogen and androgen receptor inhibitor, ICI 182,780 (1 μM), and flutamide (10 μM), respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were observed in intracellular BDNF mRNA or protein expression. High affinity BDNF receptor, TrkB, was not altered by E2 or T. E2 (but not T) significantly increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. Notably, Epac1 and Epac2 expression were significantly reduced by E2 and T. Furthermore, SNARE complex protein SNAP25 was decreased. Overall, these novel data suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of E2 or T inhibit BDNF secretion in human ASM, suggesting a potential interaction of sex steroids with BDNF in the airway that is different from brain. The relevance of sex steroid-BDNF interactions may lie in their overall contribution to airway diseases such as asthma. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1586-1592, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566264

  7. Inflammatory responses of airway smooth muscle cells and effects of endothelin receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Jungck, David; Behr, Juergen; Strauch, Justus; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ETRAs), authorized for pulmonary hypertension, have failed to prove their utility in chronic lung diseases with corticosteroid-resistant airway inflammation when applied at late disease stages with emphysema/fibrosis. Earlier administration might prove effective by targeting the interaction between airway inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) participate in linking inflammation with remodeling and that associated genes become differentially suppressed by ambrisentan (A-receptor selective ETRA) and bosentan (nonselective/dual ETRA). Inflammatory responses of ex vivo-cultivated HASMCs to TNF-α were investigated by whole-genome microarray analyses. qRT-PCR and ELISA were used to test inflammatory and remodeling genes for sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan and to investigate differential sensitivities mechanistically. ETRA and corticosteroid effects were compared in HASMCs from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. TNF-α induced the expression of 18 cytokines/chemokines and five tissue remodeling genes involved in severe, corticosteroid-insensitive asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and/or pulmonary hypertension. Thirteen cytokines/chemokines, MMP13, and WISP1 were suppressed by ETRAs. Eight genes had differential sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan depending on the endothelin-B receptor impact on transcriptional regulation and mRNA stabilization. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligands 2 and 5, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and MMP13 had increased sensitivity to bosentan or bosentan/dexamethasone combination versus dexamethasone alone. Suppression of cytokine and remodeling gene expression by ETRAs was confirmed in TNF-α-activated human bronchial epithelial cells. HASMCs and human bronchial epithelial cells participate in the interaction of inflammation and tissue remodeling. This interaction is

  8. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma. PMID:25867172

  9. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  10. Influence of upper airway sensory receptors on respiratory muscle activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Redline, S; Strohl, K P

    1987-07-01

    We reasoned that neural information from upper airway (UA) sensory receptors could influence the relationship between UA and diaphragmatic neuromuscular responses to hypercapnia. In this study, the electromyographic (EMG) activities of the alae nasi (AN), genioglossus (GG), and chest wall (CW) or diaphragm (Di) to ventilatory loading were assessed in six laryngectomized, tracheostomized human subjects and in six subjects breathing with an intact UA before and after topical UA anesthesia. The EMG activities of the UA and thoracic muscles increased at similar rates with increasing hypercapnia in normal subjects, in subjects whose upper airways were anesthetized, and in laryngectomized subjects breathing with a cervical tracheostomy. Furthermore, in the laryngectomized subjects, respiratory muscle EMG activation increased with resistive inspiratory loading (15 cmH2O X l-1 X s) applied at the level of a cervical tracheostomy. At an average expired CO2 fraction of 7.0%, resistive loading resulted in a 93 +/- 26.3% (SE) increase in peak AN EMG activity, a 39 +/- 2.0% increase in peak GG EMG activity, and a 43.2 +/- 16.5% increase in peak CW (Di) EMG activity compared with control values. We conclude that the ventilatory responses of the UA and thoracic muscles to ventilatory loading are not substantially influenced by laryngectomy or UA anesthesia. PMID:3624139

  11. Small airway dysfunction by impulse oscillometry in asthmatic patients with normal forced expiratory volume in the 1st second values.

    PubMed

    Pisi, Roberta; Tzani, Panagiota; Aiello, Marina; Martinelli, Enrico; Marangio, Emilio; Nicolini, Gabriele; Olivieri, Dario; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Small airways are relevant to the pathophysiology of asthma. We investigated whether in asthmatic patients with normal forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV(1)) values, impulse oscillometry system (IOS), as a measure of small airway function, contributed additional information to spirometry either at baseline or after bronchodilator, and whether it was related to the disease control. The fall in resistance from 5 to 20 Hz (R5-R20) and reactance at 5 Hz (X5) by IOS and spirometry measures of small airway function (forced expiratory flow at 25-75% [FEF(25-75)] and forced vital capacity/slow inspiratory vital capacity [FVC/SVC]) at baseline and after 400 micrograms of salbutamol were prospectively measured in 33 asthmatic patients (18 women; age range, 18-66 years). Disease control was assessed by the Asthma Control Test (ACT). R5-R20 but not X5 values were significantly related to FEF(25-75) and FVC/SVC values (p < 0.05 for both correlations). When the bronchodilator response was assessed, no correlation was found among IOS and spirometry changes. ACT scores were related to R5-R20, FEF(25-75), and FVC/SVC values (p < 0.01 for all correlations). In asthmatic patients with normal FEV(1) values, R5-R20 values were related to spirometry measures of small airway function. However, when the bronchodilator response was assessed, IOS and spirometry provided quite different results. Moreover, small airway dysfunction, as assessed by IOS and spirometry, was associated with poor disease control and history of asthma exacerbations. The results of this study confirm the value of IOS, as an investigative tool, and suggest that in asthmatic patients with normal FEV(1) values and poor disease control, small airway function should be investigated. PMID:23406931

  12. Steroids and antihistamines synergize to inhibit rat's airway smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wu, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-06-01

    Both glucocorticoids and H1-antihistamines were widely used on patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and obstructive airway diseases. However, their direct effects on airway smooth muscle were not fully explored. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of prednisolone (Kidsolone) and levocetirizine (Xyzal) on isolated rat trachea submersed in Kreb's solution in a muscle bath. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured. The following assessments of the drug were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine; (3) effect of the drug on electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The result revealed sole use of Kidsolone or Xyzal elicited no significant effect or only a little relaxation response on tracheal tension after methacholine treatment. The tension was 90.5 ± 7.5 and 99.5 ± 0.8 % at 10(-4) M for Xyzal and 10(-5) M for Kidsolone, respectively. However, a dramatically spasmolytic effect was observed after co-administration of Kidsolone and Xyzal and the tension dropped to 67.5 ± 13.6 %, with statistical significance (p < 0.05). As for EFS-induced contractions, Kidsolone had no direct effect but Xyzal could inhibit it, with increasing basal tension. In conclusion, using glucocorticoids alone had no spasmolytic effect but they can be synergized with antihistamines to dramatically relax the trachea smooth muscle within minutes. Therefore, for AR patients with acute asthma attack, combined use of those two drugs is recommended. PMID:25115316

  13. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. PMID:23667744

  14. Ovalbumin sensitization of guinea pig at birth prevents the ontogenetic decrease in airway smooth muscle responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, Pasquale; Wang, Lu; Degan, Simone; Worthington, Charles L.; Pozzato, Valeria; Hussaini, Syed H.; Turner, Wesley C.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.; Murphy, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Airway smooth muscle (ASM) displays a hyperresponsive phenotype at young age and becomes less responsive in adulthood. We hypothesized that allergic sensitization, which causes ASM hyperresponsiveness and typically occurs early in life, prevents the ontogenetic loss of the ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. We therefore studied whether neonatal allergic sensitization, not followed by later allergen challenges, alters the ontogenesis of ASM properties. We neonatally sensitized guinea pigs to ovalbumin and studied them at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months (adult). A Schultz‐Dale response in isolated tracheal rings confirmed sensitization. The occurrence of inflammation was evaluated in the blood and in the submucosa of large airways. We assessed ASM function in tracheal strips as ability to produce force and shortening. ASM content of vimentin was also studied. A Schultz‐Dale response was observed in all 3‐week or older sensitized animals. A mild inflammatory process was characterized by eosinophilia in the blood and in the airway submucosa. Early life sensitization had no effect on ASM force generation, but prevented the ontogenetic decline of shortening velocity and the increase in resistance to shortening. Vimentin increased with age in control but not in sensitized animals. Allergic sensitization at birth without subsequent allergen exposures is sufficient to prevent normal ASM ontogenesis, inducing persistence to adulthood of an ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. PMID:25501429

  15. Studying airway smooth muscle in vivo with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Villiger, Martin; Holz, Jasmin; Szabari, Margit V.; Bouma, Brett E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. We have developed novel techniques that we applied to Polarization Sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) in order to assess ASM, and validated our results with a substantial number of histological matches. In this work we employ our system in the study of ASM distributions in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways with data obtained in vivo from human volunteers. By isolating the ASM and performing volumetric analysis we obtain a variety of informative metrics such as ASM thickness and band width, and compare these quantities between subject types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the degree of birefringence of the ASM can be associated with contractility, allowing us to estimate pressure exerted by ASM during contraction. We apply this technique to in vivo datasets from human volunteers as well.

  16. Effects of miRNA-145 on airway smooth muscle cells function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Sun, Xiuzhen; Wu, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ping; Shi, Hongyang; Xu, Jing; Li, Manxiang

    2015-11-01

    The pathological changes of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contribute to airway remodeling during asthma. Here, we investigated the effect of miR-145 on ASM function. We found that miR-145 was aberrantly more highly expressed in ASM cells exposed to cytokine stimulation that mimic the airway conditions of patients with asthma. Repression of miR-145 resulted in decreased ASM cell proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulation of type I collagen and contractile protein MHC in ASM cells. qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that miR-145 negatively regulated the expression of downstream target Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) protein, and overexpression of KLF4 attenuated the effects of miR-145 on ASM cells. Further studies showed that KLF4 significantly up-regulated the expression of p21 and down-regulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9). In conclusion, miR-145 overexpression in ASM cells significantly inhibited KLF4, and subsequently affected downstream p21, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions, eventually leading to enhanced proliferation and migration of ASM cells in vitro. PMID:26197891

  17. Effect of airway inflammation on smooth muscle shortening and contractility in guinea pig trachealis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R W; Ndukwu, I M; Arbetter, K; Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1993-12-01

    We studied the effect of either 1) immunogenic inflammation caused by aerosolized ovalbumin or 2) neurogenic inflammation caused by aerosolized capsaicin in vivo on guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) contractility in vitro. Force-velocity relationships were determined for nine epithelium-intact TSM strips from ovalbumin-sensitized (OAS) vs. seven sham-sensitized controls and TSM strips for seven animals treated with capsaicin aerosol (Cap-Aer) vs. eight sham controls. Muscle strips were tethered to an electromagnetic lever system, which allowed isotonic shortening when load clamps [from 0 to maximal isometric force (Po)] were applied at specific times after onset of contraction. Contractions were elicited by supramaximal electrical field stimulation (60 Hz, 10-s duration, 18 V). Optimal length for each muscle was determined during equilibration. Maximal shortening velocity (Vmax) was increased in TSM from OAS (1.72 +/- 0.46 mm/s) compared with sham-sensitized animals (0.90 +/- 0.15 mm/s, P < 0.05); Vmax for TSM from Cap-Aer (0.88 +/- 0.11 mm/s) was not different from control TSM (1.13 +/- 0.08 mm/s, P = NS). Similarly, maximal shortening (delta max) was augmented in TSM from OAS (1.01 +/- 0.15 mm) compared with sham-sensitized animals (0.72 +/- 0.14 mm, P < 0.05); delta max for TSM from Cap-Aer animals (0.65 +/- 0.11 mm) was not different from saline aerosol controls (0.71 +/- 0.15 mm, P = NS). We demonstrate Vmax and delta max are augmented in TSM after ovalbumin sensitization; in contrast, neurogenic inflammation caused by capsaicin has no effect on isolated TSM contractility in vitro. These data suggest that airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo that occurs in association with immunogenic or neurogenic inflammation may result from different effects of these types of inflammation on airway smooth muscle. PMID:8279571

  18. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:26722436

  19. Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: a problem of limited smooth muscle relaxation with inspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Skloot, G; Permutt, S; Togias, A

    1995-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperresponsiveness in asthma is caused by an impairment in the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle. If the hypothesis was correct, we reasoned that the sensitivity to inhaled methacholine in normal and asthmatic subjects should be the same if the challenge was carried out under conditions where deep inspirations were prohibited. 10 asthmatic and 10 normal subjects received increasing concentrations of inhaled methacholine under conditions where forced expirations from a normal end-tidal inspiration were performed. When no deep inspirations were allowed, the response to methacholine was similar in the normal and asthmatic subjects, compatible with the hypothesis we propose. Completely contrary to our expectations, however, was the marked responsivity to methacholine that remained in the normal subjects after deep breaths were initiated. 6 of the 10 normal subjects had > 20% reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1) at doses of methacholine < 8 mg/ml, whereas there was < 15% reduction with 75 mg/ml during routine challenge. The ability of normal subjects to develop asthmatic responses when the modulating effects of increases in lung volume was voluntarily suppressed suggests that an intrinsic impairment of the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle is a major feature of asthma. PMID:7593627

  20. A Synthetic Chloride Channel Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Kwok-hei; Mak, Judith Choi-wo; Leung, Susan Wai-sum; Yang, Dan; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic ion channels may have potential therapeutic applications, provided they possess appropriate biological activities. The present study was designed to examine the ability of small molecule-based synthetic Cl– channels to modulate airway smooth muscle responsiveness. Changes in isometric tension were measured in rat tracheal rings. Relaxations to the synthetic chloride channel SCC-1 were obtained during sustained contractions to KCl. The anion dependency of the effect of SCC-1 was evaluated by ion substitution experiments. The sensitivity to conventional Cl– transport inhibitors was also tested. SCC-1 caused concentration-dependent relaxations during sustained contractions to potassium chloride. This relaxing effect was dependent on the presence of extracellular Cl– and HCO3−. It was insensitive to conventional Cl– channels/transport inhibitors that blocked the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated Cl– channels. SCC-1 did not inhibit contractions induced by carbachol, endothelin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. SCC-1 relaxes airway smooth muscle during contractions evoked by depolarizing solutions. The Cl– conductance conferred by this synthetic compound is distinct from the endogenous transport systems for chloride anions. PMID:23049786

  1. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine (Cch) and to identify the MAchR subtype involved. ASMC were isolated from tracheal fragments of Sprague–Dawley rats by enzymatic digestion. Proliferation assays were performed by MTS-PMS method. Viability was confirmed by trypan blue exclusion method. Mitogens as, epidermal growth factor (EGF), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) increased ASMC proliferation (p < 0.05, n = 5). Cch alone increased ASMC proliferation at 24 and 48 hrs. However, combination of Cch with other mitogens exhibited a dual effect, synergistic proliferation effect in the presence of EGF (5 ng/mL) and 5% FBS and inhibiting the proliferation induced by 10% FBS, EGF (10 ng/mL) and TNF-α (10 ng/mL). To determine the MAChR subtype involved in these biological responses, a titration curve of selective muscarinic antagonists were performed. The Cch stimulatory and inhibitory effects on ASCM proliferation was blocked by AF-DX-116 (M2AChR selective antagonist), in greater proportion than 4-DAMP (M3AChR selective antagonist), suggesting that the modulation of muscarinic agonist-induced proliferation is M2AChR mediated responses. Thus, M2AChR can activate multiple signal transduction systems and mediate both effects on ASMC proliferation depending on the plethora and variable airway microenvironments existing in asthma and COPD. PMID:24377382

  2. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  3. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase protects against cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Lark, Daniel S; Reese, Lauren R; Torres, Maria J; Ryan, Terence E; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Neufer, P Darrell

    2016-08-01

    The loss of strength in combination with constant fatigue is a burden on cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and increases mitochondrial H2O2 We hypothesized that the combined effect of cancer and chemotherapy in an immunocompetent breast cancer mouse model (E0771) would compromise skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function, leading to an increase in H2O2-emitting potential and impaired muscle function. Here, we demonstrate that cancer chemotherapy decreases mitochondrial respiratory capacity supported with complex I (pyruvate/glutamate/malate) and complex II (succinate) substrates. Mitochondrial H2O2-emitting potential was altered in skeletal muscle, and global protein oxidation was elevated with cancer chemotherapy. Muscle contractile function was impaired following exposure to cancer chemotherapy. Genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle attenuated mitochondrial H2O2 emission and protein oxidation, preserving mitochondrial and whole muscle function despite cancer chemotherapy. These findings suggest mitochondrial oxidants as a mediator of cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction. PMID:27329802

  4. Laryngeal mask airway without muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    KONG, MING; LI, BEIPING; TIAN, YUNPING

    2016-01-01

    The number of elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement surgeries is on the increase. These patients often suffer from comorbidity such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications, which limits the ability of medical teams to employ anesthesia. Thus, alternative methods are required. The aim of this study was to examine the advantage of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the absence of muscle relaxant in elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement operations. Fifty patients (27 males and 23 females) undergoing femoral head replacements were selected for the study between March 2013 and May 2014. The mean value for the age in this group was 74.6±12.5 years. The patients were randomly distributed into two groups of 25. One group was designated as the treatment group and the second group as the control group. For the treatment group, LMA without muscle relaxant was used, and the control group received routine anesthesia. Variations in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SPO2) in the two groups were monitored at different times. Clinical efficacy and muscle relaxation effects were also analyzed. For the treatment group, the HR, MAP and SPO2 measurements did not reveal any significant variation while these values in the control group demonstrated important dissimilarities. Time to recovery, time to extubation and incidence of throat pain in the treatment group were all markedly decreased as compared to those in control group. The operation time in the treatment group was not significantly different to that of control group. The satisfaction of the muscle relaxation effect in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group while the incidence of adverse reactions was not considerably different. In conclusion, the use of LMA without using muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement surgeries performed on elderly patients showed to be effective and safe. PMID:26889218

  5. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  6. Three Paradigms of Airway Smooth Muscle Hyperresponsiveness in Young Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, Pasquale; Wang, Lu; Murphy, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence for contributions of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to the hyperresponsiveness of newborn and juvenile airways continues to accumulate. In our laboratory three novel paradigms of hyperresponsiveness of newborn and young ASM have recently emerged using a guinea pig model of maturation in three age groups-- 1 week (newborn); 3 week (juvenile) and 2−3 months (adult). These include 1) evidence for a natural decline after newborn and juvenile life of the shortening velocity of ASM shortening associated with a decrease in regulatory myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and a parallel decline in the content of MLC kinase. Associated with the decrease in ASM shortening with age is an increase in the internal resistance to shortening. This relationship can be approximated as dP/dtmax ≈ dP/dLpassive × dL/dtmax (the maximal rate of increase of active stress generation ≈ the passive stiffness × the maximal shortening velocity V0). 2) The second paradigm demonstrates that newborn ASM, unlike that in adults, does not relax with prolonged electrical field stimulation. The impaired relaxation is related to changes in prostaglandin synthesis and acetylcholinesterase function; 3) the third paradigm demonstrates that while oscillatory strain serves to relax adult ASM, the response in newborns is the potentiation of active stress. This is related to developmental changes in the cytoskeleton. Oscillatory stiffness is shown to relate inversely to the expression of myosin light chain kinase. This suggests that developmental changes in shortening relate inversely to the stiffness of the ASM early in shortening, suggesting a dynamic role for the cytoskeleton in facilitating and opposing ASM shortening. Together these paradigms demonstrate that ASM contributes by multiple mechanisms to the natural hyperresponsiveness of newborn and juvenile airways. Future studies will elaborate the mechanisms and extend these paradigms relate to ASM hyperresponsiveness that is increased

  7. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD. PMID:24969654

  8. Baicalin inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Li, Jian-Qiang; Bo, Jian-Ping; Wang, Bei; Tian, Xin-Rui; Liu, Tan-Zhen; Liu, Zhuo-La

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and migration play important roles in airway remodeling in asthma. In vitro platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) induced ASM cell proliferation and migration. Baicalin is one of flavonoid extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis, which has an anti-asthma effect. However, little is known about its role in PDGF-induced proliferation and migration in rat ASM (RASM) cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration. We also identified the signaling pathway by which baicalin influences RASM cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we demonstrated that baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation, arrested PDGF-induced cell-cycle progression. It also suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell migration. Furthermore, baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced expression of phosphorylated p38, ERK1/2 and JNK in RASM cells. In summary, our study is the first to show that baicalin pretreatment can significantly inhibit PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration by suppressing the MAPK signaling pathway, and baicalin may be a useful chemotherapeutic agent for asthma. PMID:26884970

  9. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca(2+) increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  10. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  11. Prostaglandin E2 induces expression of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prostanoid with diverse actions in health and disease. In chronic respiratory diseases driven by inflammation, PGE2 has both positive and negative effects. An enhanced understanding of the receptor-mediated cellular signalling pathways induced by PGE2 may help us separate the beneficial properties from unwanted actions of this important prostaglandin. PGE2 is known to exert anti-inflammatory and bronchoprotective actions in human airways. To date however, whether PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) was unknown. We address this herein and use primary cultures of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to show that PGE2 increases MKP-1 mRNA and protein upregulation in a concentration-dependent manner. We explore the signalling pathways responsible and show that PGE2-induces CREB phosphorylation, not p38 MAPK activation, in ASM cells. Moreover, we utilize selective antagonists of EP2 (PF-04418948) and EP4 receptors (GW 627368X) to begin to identify EP-mediated functional outcomes in ASM cells in vitro. Taken together with earlier studies, our data suggest that PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MKP-1 via cAMP/CREB-mediated cellular signalling in ASM cells and demonstrates that EP2 may, in part, be involved. PMID:27108790

  12. Relaxant Action of Plumula Nelumbinis Extract on Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Chen, Weiwei; Wei, Ming-Yu; Shen, Jinhua; Yu, Meng-Fei; Yang, Guangzhong; Guo, Donglin; Qin, Gangjian; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The traditional herb Plumula Nelumbinis is widely used in the world because it has many biological activities, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidant, antihypertension, and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition. However, the action of Plumula Nelumbinis on airway smooth muscle (ASM) relaxation has not been investigated. A chloroform extract of Plumula Nelumbinis (CEPN) was prepared, which completely inhibited precontraction induced by high K+ in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse tracheal rings, but it had no effect on resting tension. CEPN also blocked voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel- (VDCC-) mediated currents. In addition, ACh-induced precontraction was also completely blocked by CEPN and partially inhibited by nifedipine or pyrazole 3. Besides, CEPN partially reduced ACh-activated nonselective cation channel (NSCC) currents. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CEPN blocked VDCC and NSCC to inhibit Ca2+ influx, resulting in relaxation of precontracted ASM. This finding indicates that CEPN would be a candidate of new potent bronchodilators. PMID:25763092

  13. Role of Dystrophin in Airway Smooth Muscle Phenotype, Contraction and Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Basu, Sujata; Mitchell, Richard W.; Stelmack, Gerald L.; Anderson, Judy E.; Halayko, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Dystrophin links the transmembrane dystrophin-glycoprotein complex to the actin cytoskeleton. We have shown that dystrophin-glycoprotein complex subunits are markers for airway smooth muscle phenotype maturation and together with caveolin-1, play an important role in calcium homeostasis. We tested if dystrophin affects phenotype maturation, tracheal contraction and lung physiology. We used dystrophin deficient Golden Retriever dogs (GRMD) and mdx mice vs healthy control animals in our approach. We found significant reduction of contractile protein markers: smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) and calponin and reduced Ca2+ response to contractile agonist in dystrophin deficient cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed reduced stress fibers and number of smMHC positive cells in dystrophin-deficient cells, when compared to control. Immunoblot analysis of Akt1, GSK3β and mTOR phosphorylation further revealed that downstream PI3K signaling, which is essential for phenotype maturation, was suppressed in dystrophin deficient cell cultures. Tracheal rings from mdx mice showed significant reduction in the isometric contraction to methacholine (MCh) when compared to genetic control BL10ScSnJ mice (wild-type). In vivo lung function studies using a small animal ventilator revealed a significant reduction in peak airway resistance induced by maximum concentrations of inhaled MCh in mdx mice, while there was no change in other lung function parameters. These data show that the lack of dystrophin is associated with a concomitant suppression of ASM cell phenotype maturation in vitro, ASM contraction ex vivo and lung function in vivo, indicating that a linkage between the DGC and the actin cytoskeleton via dystrophin is a determinant of the phenotype and functional properties of ASM. PMID:25054970

  14. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, P.; Park, C. Y.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Tsuda, A.; Sager, T. M.; Molina, R. M.; Donaghey, T. C.; Alencar, A. M.; Kasahara, D. I.; Ericsson, T.; Millet, E. J.; Swenson, J.; Tschumperlin, D. J.; Butler, J. P.; Brain, J. D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Gehr, P.; Zhou, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40–100 nm and less than 44 μm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 μm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 μM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  15. Effect of different bronchodilators on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to contractile agents.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B; Persson, C G

    1991-05-01

    "Functional antagonism" is often used to describe the general relaxant effect of beta 2 agonists and xanthines and their ability to protect the airways against bronchoconstrictor stimuli. This study in guinea pig isolated trachea addresses the question of whether the capacity of these drugs to protect against constrictor stimuli is related to smooth muscle relaxation. Three antimuscarinic drugs were also examined to determine whether antagonism of mediators other than muscarinic agonists might contribute to bronchodilatation by these antimuscarinic drugs. Terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7), 2.2 x 10(-7) M), theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4), 4.4 x 10(-4) M), and enprofylline (5.2 x 10(-5), 1.0 x 10(-4) M) relaxed the tracheal tension that remained after indomethacin treatment. They did not, however, alter the carbachol concentration-response curve significantly. In addition, neither theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4) M) nor terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7) M) altered histamine induced contraction. Atropine sulphate, glycopyrrolate, and ipratropium bromide had EC50 values of 10(-9) - 10(-8) M for relaxation of carbachol induced contractions, whereas concentrations of 10(-6) - 10(-3) M or greater were required to relax contractions induced by allergen and nine other non-muscarinic mediators. It is suggested that bronchodilatation by antimuscarinic drugs in vivo is due to inhibition of acetylcholine induced bronchoconstriction alone and that beta 2 agonists and xanthines have poor ability to protect airway smooth muscle against constrictor stimuli. Hence mechanisms other than bronchodilatation and "functional antagonism" should be considered to explain the protection against constrictor stimuli in asthma seen with beta 2 agonists and xanthines. PMID:2068693

  16. Diacylglycerol-containing docosahexaenoic acid in acyl chain modulates airway smooth muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Hichami, Aziz; Morin, Caroline; Rousseau, Eric; Khan, Naim A

    2005-10-01

    We synthesized and assessed the role of a diacylglycerol (DAG)-containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that is, 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycerol (SDHG), in the contraction of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM). We compared its action with 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (SAG) and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,2-DiC8), a stable DAG analog. The three DAGs (SAG, SDHG, and 1,2-DiC8) induced reversible concentration-dependent contraction of ASM. SDHG induced higher guinea pig ASM contraction than did SAG and 1,2-DiC8. The effects of SDHG were blocked, to different extents, by nifedipine (L-type Ca2+ channel blocker). By employing GF-109203X (protein kinase C [PKC] inhibitor) and lanthanum (La3+), a nonselective cation channel blocker, we observed that SDHG evoked ASM contractile response via PKC-dependent and PKC-independent (but Ca2+-dependent) pathways. Interestingly, SAG exerted its action only by increasing [Ca2+]i and did not require PKC activation. To probe the implication of calcium mobilization, we employed thapsigargin (TG), which also induced ASM contraction in a calcium-dependent manner. SDHG and 1,2-DiC8, in a PKC-dependent manner, induced the phosphorylation of CPI-17 (myosin light chain phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kD). Furthermore, SAG and TG failed to phosphorylate CPI-17 in ASM cells. Our results suggest that different DAG species, produced during a dietary supplementation with fatty acids, could modulate the reactivity of airway smooth muscles in a PKC-dependent and -independent manner, and hence, may play a critical role in health and disease. PMID:15961724

  17. IL-9-mediated induction of eotaxin1/CCL11 in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi; Hamid, Qutayba; Rahman, Sahidur M; Hoeck, Jutta; Yang, Jie; Shan, Lianyu

    2004-08-15

    Recent work has shown the potential importance of IL-9 in allergic diseases. The development of transgenic mice overexpressing IL-9 has suggested a key role for this cytokine in the development of the asthmatic phenotype including airway eosinophilia. In this study, we evaluated the expression of the IL-9R and the effects of IL-9 on human ASM cells by examining the release of Th2-associated chemokines (eotaxin1/CCL11 and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)/CCL17). IL-9R alpha-chain mRNA and surface expression were detected in cultured human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In addition, primary cultured ASM cells, as well as bronchial smooth muscle cells within biopsies of asthmatics and not control subjects, revealed IL-9R protein expression. IL-9 stimulation of human ASM cells resulted in release of eotaxin1/CCL11, but had no effect on the release of TARC/CCL17, in time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in vitro chemotaxis assay demonstrated that conditioned medium from IL-9-stimulated ASM cells attracted human eosinophils. Neutralizing Abs to IL-9, but not to IL-4 or IL-13, reduced significantly IL-9-induced production of eotaxin1/CCL11 from ASM cells. Interestingly, real-time RT-PCR showed that IL-9 up-regulated eotaxin1/CCL11 mRNA expression, but had no effect on TARC/CCL17. Treatment with Act D abrogates IL-9-induced eotaxin1/CCL11 mRNA and protein release by ASM cells. Finally, transfection study using eotaxin1/CCL11 promoter luciferase construct confirmed that IL-9 induced eotaxin1/CCL11 at the transcriptional level. Taken together, these data provide new evidence demonstrating that IL-9-dependent activation of ASM cells contributes to eosinophilic inflammation observed in asthma. PMID:15294996

  18. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  19. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  20. Effects of genetic obesity on rat upper airway muscle and diaphragm contractile properties.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E

    1996-10-01

    The contractile properties of pharyngeal respiratory muscle are altered in sleep apnoea and in conditions associated with sleep apnoea, such as ageing. We hypothesized that the contractile properties of the pharyngeal musculature are also altered by obesity, another factor associated with sleep apnoea. Studies compared a pharyngeal muscle, the sternohyoid, with the diaphragm. These were chosen as representative muscles whose contraction has opposing effects on upper airway patency. Both muscles were removed from nine lean and nine obese male Zucker rats (a genetic model of obesity), and isometric contractile properties were studied in vitro at 37 degrees C. For the sternohyoid muscle, in obese compared to lean animals there were no significant differences in isometric contraction time (15.2 +/- 0.3 vs 14.2 +/- 0.6 ms, respectively), half-relaxation time (13.6 +/- 0.5 vs 12.6 +/- 0.9 ms, respectively), twitch-to-tetanic tension ratio (0.22 +/- 0.02 vs 0.24 +/- 0.02, respectively), force-frequency relationship, fatigue resistance (2 min fatigue index 0.20 +/- 0.03 vs 0.18 +/- 0.02, respectively), or maximal degree of force potentiation during repetitive stimulation (52 +/- 11 vs 74 +/- 20% increase, respectively). For the diaphragm, the only significant effect of obesity was a lowering of the twitch-to-tetanic tension ratio (0.25 +/- 0.01 vs 0.29 +/- 0.02, respectively). In obese, as in lean animals, the sternohyoid had faster isometric twitch kinetics, a larger degree of force potentiation, and lower resistance to fatigue, than the diaphragm. In lean, but not obese, animals the sternohyoid twitch-to-tetanic tension ratio was lower than and the force frequency relationship was located to the right of that of the diaphragm. In this study, genetic obesity in rats was not associated with any significant alterations in the contractile properties of the pharyngeal muscle, and only small changes in the relationship between the contractile properties of the sternohyoid and

  1. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF‐β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Rachel E.; Shaw, Nicole C.; Berry, Luke J.; Hart, Prue H.; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D‐deficient or ‐replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five‐micron sections from formalin‐fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)‐β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D‐deficient and ‐replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF‐β signaling pathway molecules. Eight‐week‐old adult vitamin D‐deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D‐deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D‐deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF‐β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D‐deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D‐deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D‐deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease. PMID:24760528

  2. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting. PMID:24657703

  3. A Small Volatile Bacterial Molecule Triggers Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Murine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tzika, A. Aria; Constantinou, Caterina; Bandyopadhaya, Arunava; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Lee, Sangseok; Mindrinos, Michael; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria integrate distinct signals that reflect specific threats to the host, including infection, tissue damage, and metabolic dysfunction; and play a key role in insulin resistance. We have found that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing infochemical, 2-amino acetophenone (2-AA), produced during acute and chronic infection in human tissues, including in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, acts as an interkingdom immunomodulatory signal that facilitates pathogen persistence, and host tolerance to infection. Transcriptome results have led to the hypothesis that 2-AA causes further harm to the host by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. As normal skeletal muscle function is essential to survival, and is compromised in many chronic illnesses, including infections and CF-associated muscle wasting, we here determine the global effects of 2-AA on skeletal muscle using high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics, in vivo 31P NMR, whole-genome expression analysis and functional studies. Our results show that 2-AA when injected into mice, induced a biological signature of insulin resistance as determined by 1H NMR analysis-, and dramatically altered insulin signaling, glucose transport, and mitochondrial function. Genes including Glut4, IRS1, PPAR-γ, PGC1 and Sirt1 were downregulated, whereas uncoupling protein UCP3 was up-regulated, in accordance with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although 2-AA did not alter high-energy phosphates or pH by in vivo 31P NMR analysis, it significantly reduced the rate of ATP synthesis. This affect was corroborated by results demonstrating down-regulation of the expression of genes involved in energy production and muscle function, and was further validated by muscle function studies. Together, these results further demonstrate that 2-AA, acts as a mediator of interkingdom modulation, and likely effects insulin resistance associated with a

  4. TLR3 activation increases chemokine expression in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Faksh, Arij; Britt, Rodney D; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Pandya, Hitesh C; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-01-15

    Viral infections, such as respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus, adversely affect neonatal and pediatric populations, resulting in significant lung morbidity, including acute asthma exacerbation. Studies in adults have demonstrated that human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells modulate inflammation through their ability to secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The role of ASM in the developing airway during infection remains undefined. In our study, we used human fetal ASM cells as an in vitro model to examine the effect of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists on chemokine secretion. We found that fetal ASM express multiple TLRs, including TLR3 and TLR4, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus infection. Cells were treated with TLR agonists, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] (TLR3 agonist), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist), or R848 (TLR7/8 agonist), and IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) secretion were evaluated. Interestingly, poly(I:C), but neither lipopolysaccharide nor R848, increased IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 secretion. Examination of signaling pathways suggested that the poly(I:C) effects in fetal ASM involve TLR and ERK signaling, in addition to another major inflammatory pathway, NF-κB. Moreover, there are variations between fetal and adult ASM with respect to poly(I:C) effects on signaling pathways. Pharmacological inhibition suggested that ERK pathways mediate poly(I:C) effects. Overall, our data show that poly(I:C) initiates activation of proinflammatory pathways in developing ASM, which may contribute to immune responses to infection and exacerbation of asthma. PMID:26589477

  5. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E.; Rao, Savita P.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S.

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  6. Airway smooth muscle inflammation is regulated by microRNA-145 in COPD.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Lawrence; Sevinç, Kenan; Papazoglou, Ilektra M; Tildy, Bernadett; Detillieux, Karen; Halayko, Andrew J; Chung, Kian Fan; Perry, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, highly debilitating disease of the airways, primarily caused by smoking. Chronic inflammation and structural remodelling are key pathological features of this disease, in part caused by the aberrant function of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells under the regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. miRNA are short, noncoding gene transcripts involved in the negative regulation of specific target genes, through their interactions with mRNA. Previous studies have proposed that mRNA-145 (miR-145) may interact with SMAD3, an important downstream signalling molecule of the TGF-β pathway. TGF-β was used to stimulate primary human ASM cells isolated from healthy nonsmokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. This resulted in a TGF-β-dependent increase in CXCL8 and IL-6 release, most notably in the cells from COPD patients. TGF-β stimulation increased SMAD3 expression, only in cells from COPD patients, with a concurrent increased miR-145 expression. Regulation of miR-145 was found to be negatively controlled by pathways involving the MAP kinases, MEK-1/2 and p38 MAPK. Subsequent, overexpression of miR-145 (using synthetic mimics) in ASM cells from patients with COPD suppressed IL-6 and CXCL8 release, to levels comparable to the nonsmoker controls. Therefore, this study suggests that miR-145 negatively regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release from ASM cells in COPD by targeting SMAD3. PMID:27060571

  7. Human Lung Mast Cell Products Regulate Airway Smooth Muscle CXCL10 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Alkhouri, H.; Cha, V.; Tong, K.; Moir, L. M.; Armour, C. L.; Hughes, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) produces CXCL10 which may attract CXCR3+ mast/T cells to it. Our aim was to investigate the effects of mast cell products on ASM cell CXCL10 production. ASM cells from people with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1β, TNF-α, and/or IFNγ and treated with histamine (1–100 μM) ± chlorpheniramine (H1R antagonist; 1 μM) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist; 50 μM) or tryptase (1 nM) ± leupeptin (serine protease inhibitor; 50 μM), heat-inactivated tryptase, or vehicle for 4 h or 24 h. Human lung mast cells (MC) were isolated and activated with IgE/anti-IgE and supernatants were collected after 2 h or 24 h. The supernatants were added to ASM cells for 48 h and ASM cell CXCL10 production detected using ELISA (protein) and real-time PCR (mRNA). Histamine reduced IL-1β/TNF-α-induced CXCL10 protein, but not mRNA, levels independent of H1 and H2 receptor activation, whereas tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants reduced all cytokine-induced CXCL10. Tryptase also reduced CXCL10 levels in a cell-free system. Leupeptin inhibited the effects of tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants. MC 24 h supernatants contained TNF-α and amplified IFNγ-induced ASM cell CXCL10 production. This is the first evidence that MC can regulate ASM cell CXCL10 production and its degradation. Thus MC may regulate airway myositis in asthma. PMID:24648846

  8. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E; Rao, Savita P; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  9. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  10. Chrysin inhibits human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yun-Shi; Feng, Gan-Zhu; Du, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease characterized by an increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid, has been shown to exert multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-oxidant effects, as well as the potency to ameliorate asthma in animal models. The objective of the present study was to identify the underlying mechanism of the therapeutic effects of chrysin. The impact of chrysin on basal and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation and apoptosis of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) was investigated. Furthermore, the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway was evaluated in HASMCs. The results revealed that chrysin significantly inhibited basal as well as PDGF-induced HASMC proliferation, most likely through the suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, chrysin did not significantly reduce PDGF-induced apoptosis of HASMCs. The present study indicated that chrysin may be a promising medication for controlling airway remodeling and clinical manifestations of asthma. PMID:26502995

  11. The effect of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel inhibitors on the vagal control of guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Alice E; Robusto, Jed; Rakoczy, Joanna; Simmons, David G; Phipps, Simon; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Subtypes of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) family of cation channels are widely expressed on nerves and smooth muscle cells in many organ systems, where they serve to regulate membrane excitability. Here we have assessed whether HCN channel inhibitors alter the function of airway smooth muscle or the neurons that regulate airway smooth muscle tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of the HCN channel inhibitors ZD7288, zatebradine and Cs+ were assessed on agonist and nerve stimulation-evoked changes in guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone using tracheal strips in vitro, an innervated tracheal tube preparation ex vivo or in anaesthetized mechanically ventilated guinea pigs in vivo. HCN channel expression in airway nerves was assessed using immunohistochemistry, PCR and in situ hybridization. KEY RESULTS HCN channel inhibition did not alter airway smooth muscle reactivity in vitro to exogenously administered smooth muscle spasmogens, but significantly potentiated smooth muscle contraction evoked by the sensory nerve stimulant capsaicin and electrical field stimulation of parasympathetic cholinergic postganglionic neurons. Sensory nerve hyperresponsiveness was also evident in in vivo following HCN channel blockade. Cs+, but not ZD7288, potentiated preganglionic nerve-dependent airway contractions and over time induced autorhythmic preganglionic nerve activity, which was not mimicked by inhibitors of potassium channels. HCN channel expression was most evident in vagal sensory ganglia and airway nerve fibres. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS HCN channel inhibitors had a previously unrecognized effect on the neural regulation of airway smooth muscle tone, which may have implications for some patients receiving HCN channel inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24762027

  12. Exploiting the relationship between birefringence and force to measure airway smooth muscle contraction with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to observe airway dynamics is fundamental to forming a complete understanding of pulmonary diseases such as asthma. We have previously demonstrated that Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used to observe structural changes in the airway during bronchoconstriction, but standard OCT lacks the contrast to discriminate airway smooth muscle (ASM) bands- ASM being responsible for generating the force that drives airway constriction- from the surrounding tissue. Since ASM in general exhibits a greater degree of birefringence than the surrounding tissue, a potential solution to this problem lies in the implementation of polarization sensitivity (PS) to the OCT system. By modifying the OCT system so that it is sensitive to the birefringence of tissue under inspection, we can visualize the ASM with much greater clarity and definition. In this presentation we show that the force of contraction can be indirectly measured by an associated increase in the birefringence signal of the ASM. We validate this approach by attaching segments of swine trachea to an isometric force transducer and stimulating contraction, while simultaneously measuring the exerted force and imaging the segment with PS-OCT. We then show how our results may be used to extrapolate the force of contraction of closed airways in absence of additional measurement devices. We apply this technique to assess ASM contractility volumetrically and in vivo, in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers.

  13. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:23669061

  14. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID

  15. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca(2+) release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca(2+) release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca(2+) release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca(2+) release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca(2+) release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca(2+) release - a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes

  16. Screening for muscle wasting and dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan J; Johansen, Kirsten L; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Cuppari, Lilian; Avesani, Carla M

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and muscle function are negatively affected by a variety of conditions inherent to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to dialysis treatment. Skeletal muscle mass and function serve as indicators of the nutritional and clinical state of CKD patients, and low values or derangements over time are strong predictors of poor patient outcomes. However, muscle size and function can be affected by different factors, may decline at different rates, and may have different patient implications. Therefore, operational definitions of frailty and sarcopenia have emerged to encompass these 2 dimensions of muscle health, i.e., size and functionality. The aim of this review is to appraise available methods for assessment of muscle mass and functionality, with an emphasis on their accuracy in the setting of CKD patients. We then discuss the selection of reference cutoffs for defining conditions of muscle wasting and dysfunction. Finally, we review definitions applied in studies addressing sarcopenia and frailty in CKD patients and discuss their applicability for diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:27157695

  17. Severe papillary muscle dysfunction substantiated by atrial pacing during cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Finn, M C; Bower, P J

    1977-05-01

    A patient experienced episodic pulmonary edema accompanying nocturnal angina pectoris. The symptoms were provoked at cardiac catheterization by atrial pacing. Simultaneous onset of chest pain, shortness of breath, and sudden appearance of a large V wave in the pulmonary artery wedge pressure contour confirmed acute mitral valve regurgitation. Rapid reversal of these changes after nitroglycerin administration supported "papillary muscle dysfunction" as the explanation for these hemodynamic changes. PMID:403754

  18. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  19. Myostatin dysfunction is associated with reduction in overload induced hypertrophy of soleus muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Minderis, P; Kilikevicius, A; Baltusnikas, J; Alhindi, Y; Venckunas, T; Bunger, L; Lionikas, A; Ratkevicius, A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate if myostatin dysfunction would promote the gain in muscle mass and peak isometric force (P0 ) of soleus muscle (SOL) in response to functional overloading (FO) after ablation of the gastrocnemius muscle. Fifteen male Berlin high (BEH) mice homozygous for the compact mutation causing dysfunction of myostatin and 17 mice with the corresponding wild-type allele (BEH+/+) were subjected to FO of SOL for 28 days at the age of 14 weeks. Compared with BEH+/+ mice, SOL of BEH was heavier (mean ± SD, 13.5 ± 1.5 vs 21.4 ± 1.8 mg, respectively, P < 0.001). After FO, SOL mass increased relatively more in BEH+/+ than BEH strain (34.9 ± 11.5 vs 17.7 ± 11.9%, respectively, P < 0.01). P0 fell (P < 0.01) only in BEH strain, which also showed an increase (P < 0.01) in optimal muscle length. Specific P0 became even more depressed in BEH compared with BEH+/+ strain (8.4 ± 1.4 vs 10.8 ± 1.3 N/g, respectively, P < 0.001). Phosphorylation p70 S6 kinase did not differ between the strains. In summary, myostatin dysfunction impairs adaptation of SOL muscle to high functional demands. PMID:26304113

  20. Reactive oxygen species induce a Ca(2+)-spark increase in sensitized murine airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Qing-Rong; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Shen, Jinhua; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2013-05-10

    The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activity of spontaneous, transient, localized Ca(2+) increases (known as Ca(2+) sparks) in tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMCs) in an experimental allergic asthma mouse model has not yet been investigated. We used laser confocal microscopy and fluorescent dyes to measure ROS levels and Ca(2+) sparks, and we found that both events were significantly increased in TSMCs obtained from ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized/-challenged mice compared with control mice. ROS levels began to increase in TSMCs after the first OVA challenge, and this increase was sustained. However, this elevation and Ca(2+)-spark increase was abolished after the administration of the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) for 5days. Furthermore, a similar inhibition was also observed following the direct perfusion of NACA into cells isolated from the (OVA)-sensitized mice that were not treated with NACA. Moreover, we used 0.1-mM caffeine treatment to increase the Ca(2+) sparks in single TSMCs and observed cell shortening. In addition, we did not find increases in the mRNA levels of ryanodine (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3Rs) receptors in the tracheal smooth muscle cells of (OVA)-sensitized mice compared with controls. We concluded that ROS and Ca(2+) sparks increased in (OVA)-sensitized TSMCs. We found that ROS induces Ca(2+) sparks, and increased Ca(2+) sparks resulted in the contraction of (OVA)-sensitized TSMCs, resulting in the generation of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). This effect may represent a novel mechanism for AHR pathogenesis and might provide insight into new methods for the clinical prevention and treatment of asthma and asthmatic AHR. PMID:23583396

  1. A conceptual framework: the early and late phases of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Sanchez, Michael A; Morris, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often develop severe diaphragmatic and limb skeletal muscle dysfunction. Impaired muscle function in ARDS is associated with increased mortality, increased duration of mechanical ventilation, and functional disability in survivors. In this review, we propose that muscle dysfunction in ARDS can be categorized into an early and a late phase. These early and late phases are based on the timing in relationship to lung injury and the underlying mechanisms. The early phase occurs temporally with the onset of lung injury, is driven by inflammation and disuse, and is marked predominantly by muscle atrophy from increased protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome, autophagy, and calpain-caspase pathways have all been implicated in early-phase muscle dysfunction. Late-phase muscle weakness persists in many patients despite resolution of lung injury and cessation of ongoing acute inflammation-driven muscle atrophy. The clinical characteristics and mechanisms underlying late-phase muscle dysfunction do not involve the massive protein degradation and atrophy of the early phase and may reflect a failure of the musculoskeletal system to regain homeostatic balance. Owing to these underlying mechanistic differences, therapeutic interventions for treating muscle dysfunction in ARDS may differ during the early and late phases. Here, we review clinical and translational investigations of muscle dysfunction in ARDS, placing them in the conceptual framework of the early and late phases. We hypothesize that this conceptual model will aid in the design of future mechanistic and clinical investigations of the skeletal muscle system in ARDS and other critical illnesses. PMID:26134116

  2. Muscle Disuse as a Pivotal Problem in Sarcopenia-related Muscle Loss and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bell, K E; von Allmen, M T; Devries, M C; Phillips, S M

    2016-01-01

    An age-associated loss of muscle mass and strength--sarcopenia--begins at around the fifth decade of life, with mass being lost at ~0.5-1.2% per year and strength at ~3% per year. Sarcopenia can contribute to a variety of negative health outcomes, including an increased risk for falls and fractures, the development of metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increase the chance of requiring assisted living. Linear sarcopenic declines in muscle mass and strength are, however, punctuated by transient periods of muscle disuse that can accelerate losses of muscle and strength, which could result in increased risk for the aforementioned conditions. Muscle disuse is recognizable with bed rest or immobilization (for example, due to surgery or acute illness requiring hospitalization); however, recent work has shown that even a relative reduction in ambulation (reduced daily steps) results in significant reductions in muscle mass, strength and possibly an increase in disease risk. Although reduced ambulation is a seemingly "benign" form of disuse, compared to bed rest and immobilization, reports have documented that 2-3 weeks of reduced daily steps may induce: negative changes in body composition, reductions in muscle strength and quality, anabolic resistance, and decrements in glycemic control in older adults. Importantly, periods of reduced ambulation likely occur fairly frequently and appear more difficult to fully recover from, in older adults. Here we explore the consequences of muscle disuse due to reduced ambulatory activity in older adults, with frequent comparisons to established models of disuse: bed rest and immobilization. PMID:26980367

  3. A novel role for RhoA GTPase in the regulation of airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang; Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction by RhoA GTPase. In ASM tissues, both myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and actin polymerization are required for active tension generation. RhoA inactivation dramatically suppresses agonist-induced tension development and completely inhibits agonist-induced actin polymerization, but only slightly reduces MLC phosphorylation. The inhibition of MLC phosphatase does not reverse the effects of RhoA inactivation on contraction or actin polymerization. Thus, RhoA regulates ASM contraction through its effects on actin polymerization rather than MLC phosphorylation. Contractile stimulation of ASM induces the recruitment and assembly of paxillin, vinculin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into membrane adhesion complexes (adhesomes) that regulate actin polymerization by catalyzing the activation of cdc42 GTPase by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting target (GIT) - p21-activated kinase (PAK) - PAK-interacting exchange factor (PIX) complex. Cdc42 is a necessary and specific activator of the actin filament nucleation activator, N-WASp. The recruitment and activation of paxillin, vinculin, and FAK is prevented by RhoA inactivation, thus preventing cdc42 and N-WASp activation. We conclude that RhoA regulates ASM contraction by catalyzing the assembly and activation of membrane adhesome signaling modules that regulate actin polymerization, and that the RhoA-mediated assembly of adhesome complexes is a fundamental step in the signal transduction process in response to a contractile agonist. PMID:25531582

  4. Effects of acute ethanol exposure on cytokine production by primary airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kaphalia, Lata; Kalita, Mridul; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Calhoun, William J

    2016-02-01

    Both chronic and binge alcohol abuse can be significant risk factors for inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, metabolic basis of alcohol-related lung disease is not well defined, and may include key metabolites of ethanol [EtOH] in addition to EtOH itself. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EtOH, acetaldehyde [ACE], and fatty acid ethyl esters [FAEEs] on oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated (p)-NF-κB p65 in primary human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells stimulated to produce cytokines using LPS exposure. Both FAEEs and ACE induced evidence of cellular oxidative stress and ER stress, and increased p-NF-κB in nuclear extracts. EtOH and its metabolites decreased p-AMPKα activation, and induced expression of fatty acid synthase, and decreased expression of sirtuin 1. In general, EtOH decreased secretion of IP-10, IL-6, eotaxin, GCSF, and MCP-1. However, FAEEs and ACE increased these cytokines, suggesting that both FAEEs and ACE as compared to EtOH itself are proinflammatory. A direct effect of EtOH could be consistent with blunted immune response. Collectively, these two features of EtOH exposure, coupled with the known inhibition of innate immune response in our model might explain some clinical manifestations of EtOH exposure in the lung. PMID:26721307

  5. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  6. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with unilateral orofacial muscle dysfunction: The efficacy of myofunctional therapy on the treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yasuyo; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi; Kamioka, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    The orofacial muscle is an important factor in the harmony of the occlusion, and its dysfunction significantly influences a patient's occlusion after craniofacial growth and development. In this case report, we describe the successful orthodontic treatment of a patient with unilateral orofacial muscle dysfunction. A boy, 10 years 0 months of age, with a chief complaint of anterior open bite, was diagnosed with a Class III malocclusion with facial musculoskeletal asymmetry. His maxillomandibular relationships were unstable, and he was unable to lift the right corner of his mouth upon smiling because of weak right orofacial muscles. A satisfactory occlusion and a balanced smile were achieved after orthodontic treatment combined with orofacial myofunctional therapy, including muscle exercises. An acceptable occlusion and facial proportion were maintained after a 2-year retention period. These results suggest that orthodontic treatment with orofacial myofunctional therapy is an effective option for a patient with orofacial muscle dysfunction. PMID:27364218

  7. Glucocorticoid and TNF signaling converge at A20 (TNFAIP3) to repress airway smooth muscle cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Altonsy, Mohammed O; Kadiyala, Vineela; Cao, Gaoyuan; Panettieri, Reynold A; Gerber, Anthony N

    2016-08-01

    Airway smooth muscle is a major target tissue for glucocorticoid (GC)-based asthma therapies, however, molecular mechanisms through which the GC receptor (GR) exerts therapeutic effects in this key airway cell type have not been fully elucidated. We previously identified the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, A20 (TNFAIP3), as a mediator of cytokine repression by glucocorticoids (GCs) in airway epithelial cells and defined cooperative regulation of anti-inflammatory genes by GR and NF-κB as a key mechanistic underpinning of airway epithelial GR function. Here, we expand on these findings to determine whether a similar mechanism is operational in human airway smooth muscle (HASM). Using HASM cells derived from normal and fatal asthma samples as an in vitro model, we demonstrate that GCs spare or augment TNF-mediated induction of A20 (TNFAIP3), TNIP1, and NFKBIA, all implicated in negative feedback control of NF-κB-driven inflammatory processes. We applied chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter analysis to show that GR and NF-κB directly regulate A20 expression in HASM through cooperative induction of an intronic enhancer. Using overexpression, we show for the first time that A20 and its interacting partner, TNIP1, repress TNF signaling in HASM cells. Moreover, we applied small interfering RNA-based gene knockdown to demonstrate that A20 is required for maximal cytokine repression by GCs in HASM. Taken together, our data suggest that inductive regulation of A20 by GR and NF-κB contributes to cytokine repression in HASM. PMID:27371733

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induced Airway Epithelial Injury Drives Fibroblast Activation: A Mechanism in Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, L A; Suwara, M I; Carnell, S C; Green, N J; Mahida, R; Dixon, D; Gillespie, C S; Cartwright, T N; Horabin, J; Walker, A; Olin, E; Rangar, M; Gardner, A; Mann, J; Corris, P A; Mann, D A; Fisher, A J

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial infections after lung transplantation cause airway epithelial injury and are associated with an increased risk of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The damaged epithelium is a source of alarmins that activate the innate immune system, yet their ability to activate fibroblasts in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome has not been evaluated. Two epithelial alarmins were measured longitudinally in bronchoalveolar lavages from lung transplant recipients who developed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and were compared to stable controls. In addition, conditioned media from human airway epithelial cells infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was applied to lung fibroblasts and inflammatory responses were determined. Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage of lung transplant recipients growing P. aeruginosa (11.5 [5.4-21.8] vs. 2.8 [0.9-9.4] pg/mL, p < 0.01) and was significantly elevated within 3 months of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (8.3 [1.4-25.1] vs. 3.6 [0.6-17.1] pg/mL, p < 0.01), whereas high mobility group protein B1 remained unchanged. IL-1α positively correlated with elevated bronchoalveolar lavage IL-8 levels (r(2)  = 0.6095, p < 0.0001) and neutrophil percentage (r(2)  = 0.25, p = 0.01). Conditioned media from P. aeruginosa infected epithelial cells induced a potent pro-inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts via an IL-1α/IL-1R-dependent signaling pathway. In conclusion, we propose that IL-1α may be a novel therapeutic target to limit Pseudomonas associated allograft injury after lung transplantation. PMID:26714197

  9. Biological characteristics of tracheal smooth muscle cells regulated by NK-1R in asthmatic rat with airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bing; Liu, Yali; Yue, Xiaozhe; Li, Yinping; Shang, Yunxiao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological characteristic changes of infant rat tracheal smooth muscle cells in asthma airway remodeling and the impact of NK-1R on the mechanism. Ovalbumin (OVA) was used to excited juvenile SD rats by 8 w. Immunofluorescence, MTT assay, transwell chambers, real time quantitative PCR, Western blot and other methods were used to observe the proliferation, migration, synthesis and secretion changes of infant airway remodeling in rat tracheal smooth muscle cell and the Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) expression. 1. NK-1R mRNA, protein expression of airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) of each asthma group were higher than that of the control group, especially the asthma 8 w group had highest expression (P<0.01). 2. The average A value of 8 w asthma group measured by MTT method were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05), WIN62577 10-8 mol/L group had the strongest inhibition of ASMC proliferation (P<0.01). 3. The number of cell migration in the asthma group significantly increased than that in the control group. The number of migrating cells in the NK-1R antagonist group significantly reduced compared with the asthma 8 w group (P<0.05). 4. The average gray value of type III collagen in each asthma group were higher than that of the control group, and the asthma 8 w group had the highest (P<0.01). After NK-1R blocking, the average gray value of type III collagen was significantly lower (P<0.05). ASMC proliferation, migration, synthesis and secretion function increased in the airway remodeling group, and NK-1R played an important role. PMID:26628953

  10. Does smooth muscle in an intact airway undergo length adaptation during a sustained change in transmural pressure?

    PubMed

    Ansell, Thomas K; McFawn, Peter K; McLaughlin, Robert A; Sampson, David D; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Mitchell, Howard W; Noble, Peter B

    2015-03-01

    In isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) strips, an increase or decrease in ASM length away from its current optimum length causes an immediate reduction in force production followed by a gradual time-dependent recovery in force, a phenomenon termed length adaptation. In situ, length adaptation may be initiated by a change in transmural pressure (Ptm), which is a primary physiological determinant of ASM length. The present study sought to determine the effect of sustained changes in Ptm and therefore, ASM perimeter, on airway function. We measured contractile responses in whole porcine bronchial segments in vitro before and after a sustained inflation from a baseline Ptm of 5 cmH2O to 25 cmH2O, or deflation to -5 cmH2O, for ∼50 min in each case. In one group of airways, lumen narrowing and stiffening in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were assessed from volume and pressure signals using a servo-controlled syringe pump with pressure feedback. In a second group of airways, lumen narrowing and the perimeter of the ASM in situ were determined by anatomical optical coherence tomography. In a third group of airways, active tension was determined under isovolumic conditions. Both inflation and deflation reduced the contractile response to EFS. Sustained Ptm change resulted in a further decrease in contractile response, which returned to baseline levels upon return to the baseline Ptm. These findings reaffirm the importance of Ptm in regulating airway narrowing. However, they do not support a role for ASM length adaptation in situ under physiological levels of ASM lengthening and shortening. PMID:25729015

  11. Sirtuin3 Dysfunction Is the Key Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Longaretti, Lorena; Morigi, Marina; Cassis, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance. The mechanism underlying this abnormality, however, is still poorly defined. In a different setting, skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling are regulated by Sirtuin3. Objective Here, we investigate whether angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is associated with Sirtuin3 dysregulation and whether pharmacological manipulation of Sirtuin3 confers protection. Study Design Parental and GLUT4-myc L6 rat skeletal muscle cells exposed to angiotensin II are used as in vitro models of insulin resistance. GLUT4 translocation, glucose uptake, intracellular molecular signals such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, Sirtuin3 protein expression and activity, along with its downstream targets and upstream regulators, are analyzed both in the absence and presence of acetyl-L-carnitine. The role of Sirtuin3 in GLUT4 translocation and intracellular molecular signaling is also studied in Sirtuin3-silenced as well as over-expressing cells. Results Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells via mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in a two-fold increase in superoxide generation. In this context, reactive oxygen species open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and significantly lower Sirtuin3 levels and activity impairing the cell antioxidant defense. Angiotensin II-induced Sirtuin3 dysfunction leads to the impairment of AMP-activated protein kinase/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase signaling. Acetyl-L-carnitine, by lowering angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial superoxide formation, prevents Sirtuin3 dysfunction. This phenomenon implies the restoration of manganese superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Acetyl-L-carnitine protection is abrogated by specific Sirtuin3 siRNA. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance fosters mitochondrial superoxide generation, in

  12. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials. PMID:26761017

  13. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:16014803

  14. The Pro-Proliferative Effects of Nicotine and Its Underlying Mechanism on Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Li, Bing; Zhao, Zhuxiang; Zhou, Yumin; Hu, Guoping; Zou, Weifeng; Hong, Wei; Zou, Yimin; Jiang, Changbin; Zhao, Dongxing; Ran, Pixin

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nicotine, a major component of cigarette smoke, can stimulate the proliferation of non-neuronal cells. Cigarette smoking can promote a variety of pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), atherosclerosis, and cancer. A predominant feature of COPD is airway remodeling, which includes increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. The mechanisms underlying ASM remodeling in COPD have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we show that nicotine induces a profound and time-dependent increase in DNA synthesis in rat airway smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) in vitro. Nicotine also significantly increased the number of RASMCs, which was associated with the increased expression of Cyclin D1, phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) and was dependent on the activation of Akt. The activation of Akt by nicotine occurred within minutes and depended upon the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs). Activated Akt increased the phosphorylation of downstream substrates such as GSK3β. Our data suggest that the binding of nicotine to the nAchRs on RASMCs can regulate cellular proliferation by activating the Akt pathway. PMID:24690900

  15. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  16. Complex I dysfunction underlies the glycolytic switch in pulmonary hypertensive smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Rafikova, Olga; Louise Meadows, Mary; Desai, Ankit A.; Khalpey, Zain; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is essential for cellular function and is usually produced through oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial dysfunction is now being recognized as an important contributing factor in the development cardiovascular diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). In PH there is a metabolic change from oxidative phosphorylation to mainly glycolysis for energy production. However, the mechanisms underlying this glycolytic switch are only poorly understood. In particular the role of the respiratory Complexes in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PH is unresolved and was the focus of our investigations. We report that smooth muscle cells isolated from the pulmonary vessels of rats with PH (PH-PASMC), induced by a single injection of monocrotaline, have attenuated mitochondrial function and enhanced glycolysis. Further, utilizing a novel live cell assay, we were able to demonstrate that the mitochondrial dysfunction in PH-PASMC correlates with deficiencies in the activities of Complexes I–III. Further, we observed that there was an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in the PASMC isolated from rats with PH. We further found that the defect in Complex I activity was due to a loss of Complex I assembly, although the assembly of Complexes II and III were both maintained. Thus, we conclude that loss of Complex I assembly may be involved in the switch of energy metabolism in smooth muscle cells to glycolysis and that maintaining Complex I activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of PH. PMID:26298201

  17. Complex I dysfunction underlies the glycolytic switch in pulmonary hypertensive smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary Louise; Desai, Ankit A; Khalpey, Zain; Yuan, Jason X-J; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    ATP is essential for cellular function and is usually produced through oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial dysfunction is now being recognized as an important contributing factor in the development cardiovascular diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). In PH there is a metabolic change from oxidative phosphorylation to mainly glycolysis for energy production. However, the mechanisms underlying this glycolytic switch are only poorly understood. In particular the role of the respiratory Complexes in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PH is unresolved and was the focus of our investigations. We report that smooth muscle cells isolated from the pulmonary vessels of rats with PH (PH-PASMC), induced by a single injection of monocrotaline, have attenuated mitochondrial function and enhanced glycolysis. Further, utilizing a novel live cell assay, we were able to demonstrate that the mitochondrial dysfunction in PH-PASMC correlates with deficiencies in the activities of Complexes I-III. Further, we observed that there was an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in the PASMC isolated from rats with PH. We further found that the defect in Complex I activity was due to a loss of Complex I assembly, although the assembly of Complexes II and III were both maintained. Thus, we conclude that loss of Complex I assembly may be involved in the switch of energy metabolism in smooth muscle cells to glycolysis and that maintaining Complex I activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of PH. PMID:26298201

  18. Mass psychogenic illness: psychological predisposition and iatrogenic pseudo-vocal cord dysfunction and pseudo-reactive airways disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, Herman; Christopher, Kent L; Repsher, Lawrence; Hill, Ronald H

    2011-06-01

    A multidisciplinary team assessed five patients who alleged chronic medically unexplained multiorgan system symptoms described by idiopathic environmental intolerance allegedly triggered by exposure to solvents used in membrane roofing repair work on an office building. The event precipitated an incident of mass psychogenic illness (MPI). Treating physicians diagnosed irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction (IVCD) and reactive airways disease syndrome (RADS) resulting from exposure. The authors conducted medical, psychological, and industrial hygiene evaluations. Air monitoring data for total volatile organic compounds obtained during the 2-day exposure period, measurements of emissions during membrane roofing repair at a similar site, mathematical modeling of air contaminant concentrations, and injection of tracer gas into the incident building revealed exposure levels well below those doses anticipated to cause clinical symptoms. There was no objective medical evidence validating symptoms. Review of the medical records indicated that the video laryngoscopy data, pulmonary function tests, and medical examinations relied upon by the treating physicians were inconsistent with published criteria for IVCD and RADS. Psychological evaluation identified defensiveness and self-serving misrepresentations of exaggerated health concerns associated with somatization and malingering. Each case had personality traits associated with at least one personality disorder. Social histories identified premorbid life events and stressors associated with distress. This is the first study to assess psychological predisposition, social interaction among the plaintiffs, and iatrogenic reinforcement of beliefs by diagnoses of pseudo-disorders associated with patient misrepresentation of exaggerated health concerns in an incident of MPI. PMID:21302017

  19. Vitamin D Modulates Expression of the Airway Smooth Muscle Transcriptome in Fatal Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin; Nikolos, Christina; Jester, William; Klanderman, Barbara; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Truskowski, Kevin; MacDonald, Kevin; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, asthma is a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease affecting over 300 million people. Some asthma patients remain poorly controlled by conventional therapies and experience more life-threatening exacerbations. Vitamin D, as an adjunct therapy, may improve disease control in severe asthma patients since vitamin D enhances glucocorticoid responsiveness and mitigates airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperplasia. We sought to characterize differences in transcriptome responsiveness to vitamin D between fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM by using RNA-Seq to measure ASM transcript expression in five donors with fatal asthma and ten non-asthma-derived donors at baseline and with vitamin D treatment. Based on a Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p-value <0.05, 838 genes were differentially expressed in fatal asthma vs. non-asthma-derived ASM at baseline, and vitamin D treatment compared to baseline conditions induced differential expression of 711 and 867 genes in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM, respectively. Functional gene categories that were highly represented in all groups included extracellular matrix, and responses to steroid hormone stimuli and wounding. Genes differentially expressed by vitamin D also included cytokine and chemokine activity categories. Follow-up qPCR and individual analyte ELISA experiments were conducted for four cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL13, CXCL12, IL8) to measure TNFα-induced changes by asthma status and vitamin D treatment. Vitamin D inhibited TNFα-induced IL8 protein secretion levels to a comparable degree in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM even though IL8 had significantly higher baseline levels in fatal asthma-derived ASM. Our findings identify vitamin D-specific gene targets and provide transcriptomic data to explore differences in the ASM of fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived donors. PMID:26207385

  20. Bidirectional counter-regulation of human lung mast cell and airway smooth muscle β2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesised that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at tyrosine 350 (Tyr350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC co-culture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC co-culture. These effects were reversed by neutralisation of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr350 occurred within 5 minutes in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were co-cultured, and was inhibited by neutralising SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  1. A deterministic model predicts the properties of stochastic calcium oscillations in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Pengxing; Tan, Xiahui; Donovan, Graham; Sanderson, Michael J; Sneyd, James

    2014-08-01

    The inositol trisphosphate receptor ([Formula: see text]) is one of the most important cellular components responsible for oscillations in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration. Over the past decade, two major questions about the [Formula: see text] have arisen. Firstly, how best should the [Formula: see text] be modeled? In other words, what fundamental properties of the [Formula: see text] allow it to perform its function, and what are their quantitative properties? Secondly, although calcium oscillations are caused by the stochastic opening and closing of small numbers of [Formula: see text], is it possible for a deterministic model to be a reliable predictor of calcium behavior? Here, we answer these two questions, using airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) as a specific example. Firstly, we show that periodic calcium waves in ASMC, as well as the statistics of calcium puffs in other cell types, can be quantitatively reproduced by a two-state model of the [Formula: see text], and thus the behavior of the [Formula: see text] is essentially determined by its modal structure. The structure within each mode is irrelevant for function. Secondly, we show that, although calcium waves in ASMC are generated by a stochastic mechanism, [Formula: see text] stochasticity is not essential for a qualitative prediction of how oscillation frequency depends on model parameters, and thus deterministic [Formula: see text] models demonstrate the same level of predictive capability as do stochastic models. We conclude that, firstly, calcium dynamics can be accurately modeled using simplified [Formula: see text] models, and, secondly, to obtain qualitative predictions of how oscillation frequency depends on parameters it is sufficient to use a deterministic model. PMID:25121766

  2. A-kinase-anchoring proteins coordinate inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heijink, Irene H.; Holtzer, Laura J.; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno; Halayko, Andrew J.; Timens, Wim; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2015-01-01

    β2-Agonist inhibitors can relieve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms by stimulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) compartmentalize cAMP signaling by establishing protein complexes. We previously reported that the β2-agonist fenoterol, direct activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and exchange factor directly activated by cAMP decrease cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced release of neutrophil attractant interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In the present study, we tested the role of AKAPs in CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and assessed the effect of CSE on the expression levels of different AKAPs. We also studied mRNA and protein expression of AKAPs in lung tissue from patients with COPD. Our data show that CSE exposure of ASM cells decreases AKAP5 and AKAP12, both capable of interacting with β2-adrenoceptors. In lung tissue of patients with COPD, mRNA levels of AKAP5 and AKAP12 were decreased compared with lung tissue from controls. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected less AKAP5 protein in ASM of patients with COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II compared with control subjects. St-Ht31, which disrupts AKAP-PKA interactions, augmented CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and diminished its suppression by fenoterol, an effect mediated by disturbed ERK signaling. The modulatory role of AKAP-PKA interactions in the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol in ASM cells and the decrease in expression of AKAP5 and AKAP12 in response to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with COPD suggest that cigarette smoke-induced changes in AKAP5 and AKAP12 in patients with COPD may affect efficacy of pharmacotherapy. PMID:25637608

  3. A-kinase-anchoring proteins coordinate inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Wilfred J; Heijink, Irene H; Holtzer, Laura J; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno; Halayko, Andrew J; Timens, Wim; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2015-04-15

    β2-Agonist inhibitors can relieve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms by stimulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) compartmentalize cAMP signaling by establishing protein complexes. We previously reported that the β2-agonist fenoterol, direct activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and exchange factor directly activated by cAMP decrease cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced release of neutrophil attractant interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In the present study, we tested the role of AKAPs in CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and assessed the effect of CSE on the expression levels of different AKAPs. We also studied mRNA and protein expression of AKAPs in lung tissue from patients with COPD. Our data show that CSE exposure of ASM cells decreases AKAP5 and AKAP12, both capable of interacting with β2-adrenoceptors. In lung tissue of patients with COPD, mRNA levels of AKAP5 and AKAP12 were decreased compared with lung tissue from controls. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected less AKAP5 protein in ASM of patients with COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II compared with control subjects. St-Ht31, which disrupts AKAP-PKA interactions, augmented CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and diminished its suppression by fenoterol, an effect mediated by disturbed ERK signaling. The modulatory role of AKAP-PKA interactions in the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol in ASM cells and the decrease in expression of AKAP5 and AKAP12 in response to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with COPD suggest that cigarette smoke-induced changes in AKAP5 and AKAP12 in patients with COPD may affect efficacy of pharmacotherapy. PMID:25637608

  4. Bidirectional Counterregulation of Human Lung Mast Cell and Airway Smooth Muscle β2 Adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rebecca J; Chachi, Latifa; Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesized that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr(350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC coculture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC coculture. These effects were reversed by neutralization of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr(350) occurred within 5 min in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were cocultured, and was inhibited by neutralizing SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  5. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  6. Myosin filament polymerization and depolymerization in a model of partial length adaptation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ijpma, Gijs; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Cairns, Simeon P; Sieck, Gary C

    2011-09-01

    Length adaptation in airway smooth muscle (ASM) is attributed to reorganization of the cytoskeleton, and in particular the contractile elements. However, a constantly changing lung volume with tidal breathing (hence changing ASM length) is likely to restrict full adaptation of ASM for force generation. There is likely to be continuous length adaptation of ASM between states of incomplete or partial length adaption. We propose a new model that assimilates findings on myosin filament polymerization/depolymerization, partial length adaptation, isometric force, and shortening velocity to describe this continuous length adaptation process. In this model, the ASM adapts to an optimal force-generating capacity in a repeating cycle of events. Initially the myosin filament, shortened by prior length changes, associates with two longer actin filaments. The actin filaments are located adjacent to the myosin filaments, such that all myosin heads overlap with actin to permit maximal cross-bridge cycling. Since in this model the actin filaments are usually longer than myosin filaments, the excess length of the actin filament is located randomly with respect to the myosin filament. Once activated, the myosin filament elongates by polymerization along the actin filaments, with the growth limited by the overlap of the actin filaments. During relaxation, the myosin filaments dissociate from the actin filaments, and then the cycle repeats. This process causes a gradual adaptation of force and instantaneous adaptation of shortening velocity. Good agreement is found between model simulations and the experimental data depicting the relationship between force development, myosin filament density, or shortening velocity and length. PMID:21659490

  7. Isoflurane anesthesia precipitates tauopathy and upper airways dysfunction in pre-symptomatic Tau.P301L mice: possible implication for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Menuet, Clément; Borghgraef, Peter; Voituron, Nicolas; Gestreau, Christian; Gielis, Lies; Devijver, Herman; Dutschmann, Mathias; Van Leuven, Fred; Hilaire, Gérard

    2012-04-01

    The postoperative cognitive decline resulting from volatile anesthesia is gaining acceptance as a major health problem. The common anesthetic isoflurane is suspected to precipitate neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease by unknown mechanisms. We previously validated that 8month old Tau.P301L mice suffer upper airways defects related to tauopathy within the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus that controls upper airways function. We now report that isoflurane anesthesia in young, pre-symptomatic Tau.P301L mice triggered precocious upper airways defects and tauopathy in several brainstem nuclei, including the nucleus ambiguus that contains upper airways motor neurons and the Kolliker-Fuse. The prescription drug memantine, identified as an NMDA receptor antagonist, prevented the post-anesthesia upper airways dysfunction and alleviated tauopathy in the nucleus ambiguus and Kolliker-Fuse. We further identified protocols of anesthesia in young Tau.P301L mice that mitigated adverse effects of isoflurane anesthesia. Thus, our experimental findings in a validated mouse model for tauopathy demonstrate the link between isoflurane anesthesia, earlier onset of tauopathy and earlier onset of functional deficits, highlight the implication of NMDA-receptors in the mechanisms mediating the adverse effects of isoflurane, and potentially identify safer protocols for anesthesia in patients with tauopathy. PMID:22316605

  8. Top-Down Targeted Proteomics Reveals Decrease in Myosin Regulatory Light-Chain Phosphorylation That Contributes to Sarcopenic Muscle Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gregorich, Zachery R; Peng, Ying; Cai, Wenxuan; Jin, Yutong; Wei, Liming; Chen, Albert J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Moss, Richard L; Diffee, Gary M; Ge, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with advancing age, is a significant cause of disability and loss of independence in the elderly and thus, represents a formidable challenge for the aging population. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying sarcopenia-associated muscle dysfunction remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed an integrated approach combining top-down targeted proteomics with mechanical measurements to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) in age-related muscle dysfunction. Top-down targeted proteomic analysis uncovered a progressive age-related decline in the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), a critical protein involved in the modulation of muscle contractility, in the skeletal muscle of aging rats. Top-down tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified a previously unreported bis-phosphorylated proteoform of fast skeletal RLC and localized the sites of decreasing phosphorylation to Ser14/15. Of these sites, Ser14 phosphorylation represents a previously unidentified site of phosphorylation in RLC from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Subsequent mechanical analysis of single fast-twitch fibers isolated from the muscles of rats of different ages revealed that the observed decline in RLC phosphorylation can account for age-related decreases in the contractile properties of sarcopenic fast-twitch muscles. These results strongly support a role for decreasing RLC phosphorylation in sarcopenia-associated muscle dysfunction and suggest that therapeutic modulation of RLC phosphorylation may represent a new avenue for the treatment of sarcopenia. PMID:27362462

  9. Nonadrenergic, noncholinergic responses stabilize smooth muscle tone, with and without parasympathetic activation, in guinea-pig isolated airways.

    PubMed

    Lindén, A; Löfdahl, C G; Ullman, A; Skoogh, B E

    1993-03-01

    In guinea-pig isolated airways, nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) neural responses converge towards a similar level of smooth muscle tone, via a contraction when the tone is low prior to stimulation, and via a relaxation when the tone is high prior to stimulation. We wanted to assess the effect of simultaneous parasympathetic activation on these converging NANC responses, with and without the addition of sympathetic activation. In guinea-pig isolated airways, the spontaneous airway tone was initially abolished by indomethacin (10 microM). In one series, adrenergic depletion by guanethidine (10 microM) was then established, with and without cholinergic blockade by atropine (1 microM). In another series, either cholinergic blockade by atropine (1 microM) or no blockade was utilized. Responses to electrical field stimulation (1,200 mA, 0.5 ms, 3 Hz for 240 s) were studied with no induced tone, at a moderate (0.3 microM) and at a near-maximum (6 microM), histamine-induced tone. The mean level of the tonus equilibrium (% of maximum tone) was higher with the simultaneous NANC and parasympathetic activation than with NANC activation alone (75% compared with 44%, in the main bronchus, n = 8). The level of the tonus equilibrium was also higher with the simultaneous NANC, sympathetic and parasympathetic activation than with NANC and sympathetic activation only (49% compared with 21%, in the main bronchus, n = 8). The pattern was similar in the distal trachea. In conclusion, NANC neural responses can stabilize smooth muscle tone, and this stabilizing effect can be modulated by both parasympathetic and sympathetic activation, in guinea-pig isolated airways. PMID:8472834

  10. Computational simulation of human upper airway collapse using a pressure-/state-dependent model of genioglossal muscle contraction under laminar flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqi; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P.

    2012-01-01

    A three-element, pressure- and state (sleep and wake) -dependent contraction model of the genioglossal muscle was developed based on the microstructure of skeletal muscle and the cross-bridge theory. This model establishes a direct connection between the contractile forces generated in muscle fibers and the measured electromyogram signals during various upper airway conditions. This effectively avoids the difficulty of determining muscle shortening velocity during complex pharyngeal conditions when modeling the muscle’s contractile behaviors. The activation of the genioglossal muscle under different conditions was then simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of varying each modeled parameter on the muscle’s contractile behaviors. This muscle contraction model was then incorporated into our anatomically correct, two-dimensional computational model of the pharyngeal airway to perform a finite-element analysis of air flow, tissue deformation, and airway collapse. The model-predicted muscle deformations are consistent with previous observations regarding upper airway behavior in normal subjects. PMID:15831800

  11. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway. PMID:24885163

  12. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  13. Kv7 potassium channels in airway smooth muscle cells: signal transduction intermediates and pharmacological targets for bronchodilator therapy.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Kakad, Priyanka P; Love, Robert B; Solway, Julian; Dowell, Maria L; Cribbs, Leanne L; Byron, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Expression and function of Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-activated potassium channels in guinea pig and human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) were investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), patch-clamp electrophysiology, and precision-cut lung slices. qRT-PCR revealed expression of multiple KCNQ genes in both guinea pig and human ASMCs. Currents with electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics of Kv7 currents were measured in freshly isolated guinea pig and human ASMCs. In guinea pig ASMCs, Kv7 currents were significantly suppressed by application of the bronchoconstrictor agonists methacholine (100 nM) or histamine (30 μM), but current amplitudes were restored by addition of a Kv7 channel activator, flupirtine (10 μM). Kv7 currents in guinea pig ASMCs were also significantly enhanced by another Kv7.2-7.5 channel activator, retigabine, and by celecoxib and 2,5-dimethyl celecoxib. In precision-cut human lung slices, constriction of airways by histamine was significantly reduced in the presence of flupirtine. Kv7 currents in both guinea pig and human ASMCs were inhibited by the Kv7 channel blocker XE991. In human lung slices, XE991 induced robust airway constriction, which was completely reversed by addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil. These findings suggest that Kv7 channels in ASMCs play an essential role in the regulation of airway diameter and may be targeted pharmacologically to relieve airway hyperconstriction induced by elevated concentrations of bronchoconstrictor agonists. PMID:21964407

  14. Kv7 potassium channels in airway smooth muscle cells: signal transduction intermediates and pharmacological targets for bronchodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Kakad, Priyanka P.; Love, Robert B.; Solway, Julian; Dowell, Maria L.; Cribbs, Leanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Expression and function of Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-activated potassium channels in guinea pig and human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) were investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), patch-clamp electrophysiology, and precision-cut lung slices. qRT-PCR revealed expression of multiple KCNQ genes in both guinea pig and human ASMCs. Currents with electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics of Kv7 currents were measured in freshly isolated guinea pig and human ASMCs. In guinea pig ASMCs, Kv7 currents were significantly suppressed by application of the bronchoconstrictor agonists methacholine (100 nM) or histamine (30 μM), but current amplitudes were restored by addition of a Kv7 channel activator, flupirtine (10 μM). Kv7 currents in guinea pig ASMCs were also significantly enhanced by another Kv7.2–7.5 channel activator, retigabine, and by celecoxib and 2,5-dimethyl celecoxib. In precision-cut human lung slices, constriction of airways by histamine was significantly reduced in the presence of flupirtine. Kv7 currents in both guinea pig and human ASMCs were inhibited by the Kv7 channel blocker XE991. In human lung slices, XE991 induced robust airway constriction, which was completely reversed by addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil. These findings suggest that Kv7 channels in ASMCs play an essential role in the regulation of airway diameter and may be targeted pharmacologically to relieve airway hyperconstriction induced by elevated concentrations of bronchoconstrictor agonists. PMID:21964407

  15. YAP is up-regulated in the bronchial airway smooth muscle of the chronic asthma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Jing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by leukocytic infiltration and tissue remodeling with structural changes including subepithelial fibrosis and ASM cells proliferation. The Hippo pathway is a key regulatory point involved in cell proliferation, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cell differentiation. In order to disclose the relation between asthma and the Hippo pathway, expression of the Yes-associated protein (YAP), a key gene in the Hippo pathway, in the bronchial smooth muscle of chronic asthma model (CAM) was studied. 40 mice were randomly divided into control (wide type) and experimental group to construct CAM using chicken ovalbumin (OVA). Pathological changes of the lung tissues were observed in the CAM mice compared with the control using HE staining method. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect if YAP protein is expressed in the lung tissues. The pathological changes of the CAM group showed that a large number of inflammatory cells infiltration including mainly lymphocytes and a small amount of eosinophilic, with the presence of certain airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, was observed in comparison with the control. IHC results showed that the YAP protein was significantly increased compared with the control groups (P < 0.01). This result was further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay which detected the up-regulation of the YAP gene (P < 0.01) and Western blot. In conclusion, the YAP protein was significantly expressed in the bronchial airway tissues of the CAM mice, and could be used as an indicator for asthma. PMID:26617833

  16. De Novo ACTA2 Mutation Causes a Novel Syndrome of Multisystemic Smooth Muscle Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Østergaard, John R.; Ala-Kokko, Leena M.; Khan, Nadia; Grange, Dorothy K.; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Bradley, Timothy J.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Adès, Lesley; Maher, Joseph F.; Guo, Dongchuan; Buja, L. Maximilian; Kim, Dong; Hyland, James C.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contract to perform many physiological functions, including regulation of blood flow and pressure in arteries, contraction of the pupils, peristalsis of the gut and voiding of the bladder. SMC lineage in these organs is characterized by cellular expression of the SMC isoform of α-actin, encoded by the ACTA2 gene. We report here on a unique and de novo mutation in ACTA2, R179H, that causes a syndrome characterized by dysfunction of SMCs throughout the body, leading to aortic and cerebrovascular disease, fixed dilated pupils, hypotonic bladder, malrotation and hypoperistalsis of the gut and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20734336

  17. Tempol ameliorates pharyngeal dilator muscle dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Skelly, J Richard; Edge, Deirdre; Shortt, Christine M; Jones, James F X; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is implicated in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), an oxidative stress disorder prevalent in men. Pharmacotherapy for OSAS is an attractive option, and antioxidant treatments may prove beneficial. We examined the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on breathing and pharyngeal dilator muscle structure and function in male and female rats. Additionally, we tested the efficacy of antioxidant treatment in preventing (chronic administration) or reversing (acute administration) CIH-induced effects in male rats. Adult male and female Wistar rats were exposed to alternating cycles of normoxia and hypoxia (90 s each; Fi(O(2)) = 5% O(2) at nadir; Sa(O(2)) ∼ 80%) or sham treatment for 8 h/d for 9 days. Tempol (1 mM, superoxide dismutase mimetic) was administered to subgroups of sham- and CIH-treated animals. Breathing was assessed by whole-body plethysmography. Sternohyoid muscle contractile and endurance properties were examined in vitro. Muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area and the activity of key metabolic enzymes were determined. CIH decreased sternohyoid muscle force in male rats only. This was not attributable to fiber transitions or alterations in oxidative or glycolytic enzyme activity. Muscle weakness after CIH was prevented by chronic Tempol supplementation and was reversed by acute antioxidant treatment in vitro. CIH increased normoxic ventilation in male rats only. Sex differences exist in the effects of CIH on the respiratory system, which may contribute to the higher prevalence of OSAS in male subjects. Antioxidant treatment may be beneficial as an adjunct OSAS therapy. PMID:21868712

  18. Selective visualisation of sensory receptors in the smooth muscle layer of ex-vivo airway whole-mounts by styryl pyridinium dyes.

    PubMed

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2007-09-01

    Recently, we established the location, morphology and neurochemical coding of vagal smooth-muscle-associated airway receptors (SMARs) in rat lungs. These receptors were characterised as branching laminar terminals that originated from myelinated nerve fibres and were intercalated between airway smooth-muscle bundles. To allow the direct physiological examination of these receptors, the present investigation aimed at visualising SMARs in airway whole-mounts of rat and mouse lungs ex vivo. Short incubation with various styryl pyridinium dyes (AM1-43, FM2-10, FM4-64 or 4-Di-2-ASP) gave a highly selective fluorescent visualisation of both laminar nerve terminals and myelinated fibres from which they originated throughout the intrapulmonary airway tree in mouse and in rat. The reliable and specific labelling of SMARs ex vivo with these lipophilic membrane dyes was confirmed via immunostaining for protein gene-product 9.5 and vesicular glutamate transporters. Similar to the intrapulmonary location of NEBs, these SMARs appeared to be even more explicitly located near airway bifurcations. Both the trachealis muscle and the smooth-muscle bundles of extrapulmonary bronchi were also shown to contain laminar nerve terminals that were morphologically similar to the SMARs reported in the intrapulmonary airways. Thus, this study provides an in-vitro model enabling, for the first time, the fast and reliable visualisation of SMARs and the myelinated nerve fibres from which they originate in airway whole-mount preparations ex vivo. As such, this model opens up further perspectives and creates a valid basis for direct physiological measurement and manipulation of the individually identified airway receptors. PMID:17522895

  19. Physiological role of receptor activator nuclear factor-kB (RANK) in denervation-induced muscle atrophy and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Sébastien S.; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bossé, Sabrina; Frenette, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The bone remodeling and homeostasis are mainly controlled by the receptor-activator of nuclear factor kB (RANK), its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) pathway. While there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that synchronously regulates bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology remains elusive. Our recent article published in the American Journal of Physiology (Cell Physiology) showed that RANK is also expressed in fully differentiated C2C12 myotubes and skeletal muscles. We used the Cre-Lox approach to inactivate muscle RANK (RANKmko) and showed that RANK deletion preserves the force of denervated fast-twitch EDL muscles. However, RANK deletion had no positive impact on slow-twitch Sol muscles. In addition, denervating RANKmko EDL muscles induced an increase in the total calcium concentration ([CaT]), which was associated with a surprising decrease in SERCA activity. Interestingly, the levels of STIM-1, which mediates Ca2+ influx following the depletion of SR Ca2+ stores, were markedly higher in denervated RANKmko EDL muscles. We speculated that extracellular Ca2+ influx mediated by STIM-1 may be important for the increase in [CaT] and the gain of force in denervated RANKmko EDL muscles. Overall, these findings showed for the first time that the RANKL/RANK interaction plays a role in denervation-induced muscle atrophy and dysfunction. PMID:27547781

  20. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels. PMID:26370402

  1. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid induces protein kinase D–dependent disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Fariba; Meednu, Nida; Emo, Jason A.; Saatian, Bahman; Chapman, Timothy J.; Naydenov, Nayden G.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Georas, Steve N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of the epithelial barrier might be a risk factor for allergen sensitization and asthma. Viral respiratory tract infections are strongly associated with asthma exacerbation, but the effects of respiratory viruses on airway epithelial barrier function are not well understood. Many viruses generate double-stranded RNA, which can lead to airway inflammation and initiate an antiviral immune response. Objectives We investigated the effects of the synthetic double-stranded RNA polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) on the structure and function of the airway epithelial barrier in vitro. Methods 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells and primary airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface were grown to confluence on Transwell inserts and exposed to polyI:C. We studied epithelial barrier function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular flux of fluorescent markers and structure of epithelial apical junctions by means of immunofluorescence microscopy. Results PolyI:C induced a profound decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed markedly reduced junctional localization of zonula occludens-1, occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and disorganization of junction-associated actin filaments. PolyI:C induced protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation, and a PKD antagonist attenuated polyI:C-induced disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction. Conclusions PolyI:C has a powerful and previously unsuspected disruptive effect on the airway epithelial barrier. PolyI:C-dependent barrier disruption is mediated by disassembly of epithelial apical junctions, which is dependent on PKD signaling. These findings suggest a new mechanism potentially underlying the associations between viral respiratory tract infections, airway inflammation, and allergen sensitization. PMID:21996340

  2. Arachidonate-Regulated Ca2+ Influx in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ influx, especially store-operated Ca2+ entry triggered by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release, is a key component of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM). Agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in ASM that involve both influx and SR mechanisms have been previously demonstrated. In nonexcitable cells, [Ca2+]i oscillations involve Ca2+ influx via arachidonic acid (AA) –stimulated channels, which show similarities to store-operated Ca2+ entry, although their molecular identity remains undetermined. Little is known about AA-regulated Ca2+ channels or their regulation in ASM. In enzymatically dissociated human ASM cells loaded with the Ca2+ indicator, fura-2, AA (1–10 μM) triggered [Ca2+]i oscillations that were inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Other fatty acids, such as the diacylglycerol analog, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-SN-glycerol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid (10 μM each), failed to elicit similar [Ca2+]i responses. Preincubation with LaCl3 (1 μM or 1 mM) inhibited AA-induced oscillations. Inhibition of receptor-operated channels (SKF96,365 [10 μM]), lipoxygenase (zileuton [10 μM]), or cyclooxygenase (indomethacin [10 μM]) did not affect oscillation parameters. Inhibition of SR Ca2+ release (ryanodine [10 μM] or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, xestospongin C [1 μM]) decreased [Ca2+]i oscillation frequency and amplitude. Small interfering RNA against caveolin-1, stromal interaction molecule 1, or Orai3 (20 nM each) reduced the frequency and amplitude of AA-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations. In ASM cells derived from individuals with asthma, AA increased oscillation amplitude, but not frequency. These results are highly suggestive of a novel AA-mediated Ca2+–regulatory mechanism in human ASM, reminiscent of agonist-induced oscillations. Given the role of AA in ASM intracellular signaling, especially with inflammation, AA-regulated Ca2+ channels could potentially

  3. Prolonged Fasting Identifies Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction as Consequence Rather Than Cause of Human Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hoeks, Joris; van Herpen, Noud A.; Mensink, Marco; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; van Beurden, Denis; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, but it is debated whether this is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of the disease. To test the concept that mitochondrial dysfunction is secondary to the development of insulin resistance, we employed the unique model of prolonged fasting in humans. Prolonged fasting is a physiologic condition in which muscular insulin resistance develops in the presence of increased free fatty acid (FFA) levels, increased fat oxidation and low glucose and insulin levels. It is therefore anticipated that skeletal muscle mitochondrial function is maintained to accommodate increased fat oxidation unless factors secondary to insulin resistance exert negative effects on mitochondrial function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS While in a respiration chamber, twelve healthy males were subjected to a 60 h fast and a 60 h normal fed condition in a randomized crossover design. Afterward, insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and mitochondrial function was quantified ex vivo in permeabilized muscle fibers using high-resolution respirometry. RESULTS Indeed, FFA levels were increased approximately ninefold after 60 h of fasting in healthy male subjects, leading to elevated intramuscular lipid levels and decreased muscular insulin sensitivity. Despite an increase in whole-body fat oxidation, we observed an overall reduction in both coupled state 3 respiration and maximally uncoupled respiration in permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers, which could not be explained by changes in mitochondrial density. CONCLUSIONS These findings confirm that the insulin-resistant state has secondary negative effects on mitochondrial function. Given the low insulin and glucose levels after prolonged fasting, hyperglycemia and insulin action per se can be excluded as underlying mechanisms, pointing toward elevated plasma FFA and/or intramuscular fat accumulation as possible

  4. IgE induces proliferation in human airway smooth muscle cells: role of MAPK and STAT3 pathways.

    PubMed

    Redhu, Naresh Singh; Shan, Lianyu; Al-Subait, Duaa; Ashdown, Heather L; Movassagh, Hesam; Lamkhioued, Bouchaib; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2013-01-01

    Airway remodeling is not specifically targeted by current asthma medications, partly owing to the lack of understanding of remodeling mechanisms, altogether posing great challenges in asthma treatment. Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass due to hyperplasia/hypertrophy contributes significantly to overall airway remodeling and correlates with decline in lung function. Recent evidence suggests that IgE sensitization can enhance the survival and mediator release in inflammatory cells. Human ASM (HASM) cells express both low affinity (FcεRII/CD23) and high affinity IgE Fc receptors (FcεRI), and IgE can modulate the contractile and synthetic function of HASM cells. IgE was recently shown to induce HASM cell proliferation but the detailed mechanisms remain unknown. We report here that IgE sensitization induces HASM cell proliferation, as measured by 3H-thymidine, EdU incorporation, and manual cell counting. As an upstream signature component of FcεRI signaling, inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) abrogated the IgE-induced HASM proliferation. Further analysis of IgE-induced signaling depicted an IgE-mediated activation of Erk 1/2, p38, JNK MAPK, and Akt kinases. Lastly, lentiviral-shRNA-mediated STAT3 silencing completely abolished the IgE-mediated HASM cell proliferation. Collectively, our data provide mechanisms of a novel function of IgE which may contribute, at least in part, to airway remodeling observed in allergic asthma by directly inducing HASM cell proliferation. PMID:24499258

  5. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  6. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  7. Mitochondria dysfunction in lung cancer-induced muscle wasting in C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Julie B.; Moylan, Jennifer S.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Cancer cachexia is a syndrome which results in severe loss of muscle mass and marked fatigue. Conditioned media from cachexia-inducing cancer cells triggers metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle, including decreased mitochondrial respiration, which may contribute to fatigue. We hypothesized that Lewis lung carcinoma conditioned medium (LCM) would impair the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) and increase production of reactive oxygen species, ultimately leading to decreased mitochondrial respiration. We incubated C2C12 myotubes with LCM for 30 min, 2, 4, 24 or 48 h. We measured protein content by western blot; oxidant production by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF), and MitoSox; cytochrome c oxidase activity by oxidation of cytochrome c substrate; and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of intact myotubes by Seahorse XF Analyzer. Results: LCM treatment for 2 or 24 h decreased basal OCR and ATP-related OCR, but did not alter the content of mitochondrial complexes I, III, IV and V. LCM treatment caused a transient rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS). In particular, mitochondrial superoxide (MitoSOX) was elevated at 2 h. 4-Hydroxynonenal, a marker of oxidative stress, was elevated in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of cell lysates after LCM treatment. Conclusion: These data show that lung cancer-conditioned media alters electron flow in the ETC and increases mitochondrial ROS production, both of which may ultimately impair aerobic metabolism and decrease muscle endurance. PMID:25566096

  8. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea exhibit genioglossus dysfunction that is normalized after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Carrera, M; Barbé, F; Sauleda, J; Tomás, M; Gómez, C; Agustí, A G

    1999-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of pharyngeal closure during sleep. The pathogenesis of OSAS is unclear. We hypothesized that the genioglossus (GG), the most important pharyngeal dilator muscle, would be abnormal in patients with OSAS. Further, because treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is very effective clinically in these patients, we investigated the effects of CPAP upon the structure and function of the GG. We studied 16 patients with OSAS (nine of them at diagnosis and seven after having been under treatment with CPAP for at least 1 yr) and 11 control subjects in whom OSAS was excluded clinically. A biopsy of the GG was obtained in each subject, mounted in a tissue bath, and stimulated through platinum electrodes. The following measurements were obtained: maximal twitch tension, contraction time, half-relaxation time, the force-frequency relationship, and the response to a fatiguing protocol. The percentage of type I ("slow twitch") and type II ("fast twitch") fibers was also quantified. Patients with OSAS showed a greater GG fatigability than did control subjects (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Interestingly, this abnormality was entirely corrected by CPAP. Likewise, the percentage of type II fibers was significantly higher in patients with OSAS (59 +/- 4%) than in control subjects (39 +/- 4%, p < 0.001) and, again, these structural changes were corrected by CPAP (40 +/- 3%, p < 0.001). These results show that the function and structure of the GG is abnormal in patients with OSAS. Because these abnormalities are corrected by CPAP, we suggest that they are likely a consequence, not a cause, of the disease. PMID:10351945

  9. Functional and biochemical characterization of soleus muscle in Down syndrome mice: insight into the muscle dysfunction seen in the human condition.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Patrick M; Keslacy, Stefan; Middleton, Frank A; DeRuisseau, Lara R; Fernhall, Bo; Kanaley, Jill A; DeRuisseau, Keith C

    2012-12-15

    Persons with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit low muscle strength that significantly impairs their physical functioning. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS also exhibits muscle weakness in vivo and may be a useful model to examine DS-associated muscle dysfunction. Therefore, the purpose of this experiment was to directly assess skeletal muscle function in the Ts65Dn mouse and to reveal potential mechanisms of DS-associated muscle weakness. Soleus muscles were harvested from anesthetized male Ts65Dn and wild-type (WT) colony controls. In vitro muscle contractile experiments revealed normal force generation of nonfatigued Ts65Dn soleus, but a 12% reduction in force was observed during recovery from fatiguing contractions compared with WT muscle (P < 0.05). Indicators of oxidative stress and mitochondrial oxidative capacity were assessed to reveal potential mechanisms of DS-associated muscle weakness. Protein expression of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), a triplicated gene in persons with DS and Ts65Dn mice, was increased 25% (P < 0.05) in Ts65Dn soleus. Nontriplicated antioxidant protein expression was similar between groups. Lipid peroxidation was unaltered in Ts65Dn animals, but protein oxidation was 20% greater compared with controls (P < 0.05). Cytochrome-c oxidase expression was 22% lower in Ts65Dn muscle (P < 0.05), while expression of citrate synthase was similar between groups. Microarray analysis revealed alteration of numerous pathways in Ts65Dn muscle, including proteolysis, glucose and fat metabolism, neuromuscular transmission, and ATP biosynthesis. In summary, despite biochemical and gene expression differences in soleus muscle of Ts65Dn animals, the functional properties of skeletal muscle likely contribute a minor part to the in vivo muscle weakness. PMID:23115123

  10. Effect of subchronic in vivo exposure to nitrogen dioxide on lung tissue inflammation, airway microvascular leakage, and in vitro bronchial muscle responsiveness in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, P; Rado, V; Di Stefano, A; Papi, A; Boniotti, A; Zancuoghi, G; Boschetto, P; Romano, M; Salmona, M; Ciaccia, A; Fabbri, L M; Mapp, C E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a previous study on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats exposed in vivo for seven days to 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2), it has been shown that there is an influx of macrophages into the airways. The present study investigated the effect of seven day exposure to 10 ppm NO2, on: (a) lung tissue inflammation and morphology; (b) airway microvascular leakage; (c) in vitro contractile response of main bronchi. METHODS: Lung tissue was studied by light microscopy, after fixing the lungs by inflation with 4% formalin at a pressure of 20 cm H2O. Microvascular leakage was measured by extravasation of Evans blue dye in the larynx, trachea, main bronchi, and intrapulmonary airways. Smooth muscle responsiveness was evaluated by concentration-responses curves to acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-3) M), serotonin (10(-9)-10(-4) M), and voltage-response curves (12-28 V) to electrical field stimulation. RESULTS: Histology showed an increased total inflammation at the level of respiratory bronchioles and alveoli. No influx of inflammatory cells was found in the main bronchi. A loss of cilia in the epithelium of small airways and ectasia of alveolar capillaries was also found. By contrast, no alterations to microvascular permeability or modification of bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness was found. CONCLUSIONS: Subchronic exposure to 10 ppm NO2 causes airway inflammation and structural damage, but does not cause any persistent alteration to microvascular permeability or bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness in rats. Images Figure 1 PMID:8758032

  11. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  12. Drosophila TDP-43 dysfunction in glia and muscle cells cause cytological and behavioural phenotypes that characterize ALS and FTLD

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Danielle C.; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Lazarou, Luke; Greenstein, Max; Simoes, Fabio A.; Di Domenico, Angelique; Solomon, Daniel A.; Lowe, Simon; Alsubaie, Rawan; Cheng, Daryl; Buckley, Stephen; Humphrey, Dickon M.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Hirth, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates and nuclear clearance of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Studies in Drosophila, zebrafish and mouse demonstrate that the neuronal dysfunction of TDP-43 is causally related to disease formation. However, TDP-43 aggregates are also observed in glia and muscle cells, which are equally affected in ALS and FTLD; yet, it is unclear whether glia- or muscle-specific dysfunction of TDP-43 contributes to pathogenesis. Here, we show that similar to its human homologue, Drosophila TDP-43, Tar DNA-binding protein homologue (TBPH), is expressed in glia and muscle cells. Muscle-specific knockdown of TBPH causes age-related motor abnormalities, whereas muscle-specific gain of function leads to sarcoplasmic aggregates and nuclear TBPH depletion, which is accompanied by behavioural deficits and premature lethality. TBPH dysfunction in glia cells causes age-related motor deficits and premature lethality. In addition, both loss and gain of Drosophila TDP-43 alter mRNA expression levels of the glutamate transporters Excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) and EAAT2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that both loss and gain of TDP-43 function in muscle and glial cells can lead to cytological and behavioural phenotypes in Drosophila that also characterize ALS and FTLD and identify the glutamate transporters EAAT1/2 as potential direct targets of TDP-43 function. These findings suggest that together with neuronal pathology, glial- and muscle-specific TDP-43 dysfunction may directly contribute to the aetiology and progression of TDP-43-related ALS and FTLD. PMID:23727833

  13. Drosophila TDP-43 dysfunction in glia and muscle cells cause cytological and behavioural phenotypes that characterize ALS and FTLD.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Danielle C; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Lazarou, Luke; Greenstein, Max; Simoes, Fabio A; Di Domenico, Angelique; Solomon, Daniel A; Lowe, Simon; Alsubaie, Rawan; Cheng, Daryl; Buckley, Stephen; Humphrey, Dickon M; Shaw, Christopher E; Hirth, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates and nuclear clearance of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Studies in Drosophila, zebrafish and mouse demonstrate that the neuronal dysfunction of TDP-43 is causally related to disease formation. However, TDP-43 aggregates are also observed in glia and muscle cells, which are equally affected in ALS and FTLD; yet, it is unclear whether glia- or muscle-specific dysfunction of TDP-43 contributes to pathogenesis. Here, we show that similar to its human homologue, Drosophila TDP-43, Tar DNA-binding protein homologue (TBPH), is expressed in glia and muscle cells. Muscle-specific knockdown of TBPH causes age-related motor abnormalities, whereas muscle-specific gain of function leads to sarcoplasmic aggregates and nuclear TBPH depletion, which is accompanied by behavioural deficits and premature lethality. TBPH dysfunction in glia cells causes age-related motor deficits and premature lethality. In addition, both loss and gain of Drosophila TDP-43 alter mRNA expression levels of the glutamate transporters Excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) and EAAT2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that both loss and gain of TDP-43 function in muscle and glial cells can lead to cytological and behavioural phenotypes in Drosophila that also characterize ALS and FTLD and identify the glutamate transporters EAAT1/2 as potential direct targets of TDP-43 function. These findings suggest that together with neuronal pathology, glial- and muscle-specific TDP-43 dysfunction may directly contribute to the aetiology and progression of TDP-43-related ALS and FTLD. PMID:23727833

  14. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwen; Cruz, Tina; Irion, Uwe; Moussian, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them) are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila. PMID:26621831

  15. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlie K; Gowda, Alpana; Barad, Meredith; Mackey, Sean C; Carroll, Ian R

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  16. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  17. Abnormal Histone Methylation is Responsible for Increased VEGF165a Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Rachel L.; John, Alison E.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), a key angiogenic molecule, is aberrantly expressed in several diseases including asthma where it contributes to bronchial vascular remodelling and chronic inflammation. Asthmatic human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells hypersecrete VEGF but the mechanism is unclear. Here we defined the mechanism in HASM cells from non-asthmatic (NA) and asthmatic (A) patients. We found that asthmatic cells lacked a repression complex at the VEGF promoter which was present in non-asthmatic cells. Recruitment of G9A, trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and a resultant decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) at the VEGF promoter was critical to repression of VEGF secretion in non-asthmatic cells. At the asthmatic promoter H3K9me3 was absent due to failed recruitment of G9a; RNA pol II binding, in association with TAF1, was increased, H3K4me3 was present and Sp1 binding was exaggerated and sustained. In contrast DNA methylation and histone acetylation were similar in A and NA cells. This is the first study to show that airway cells in asthma have altered epigenetic regulation of remodelling gene(s). Histone methylation at genes such as VEGF may be an important new therapeutic target. PMID:22689881

  18. [Role of bronchodilators in therapy for COPD-mechanisms of LABA and LAMA on airway smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Kume, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABAs) and anticholinergics (LAMAs) are widely used clinically as therpy for COPD. Clinical reports have demonstrated that LABAs (salmeterol, formoterol, indacaterol, olodaterol, vilanterol) and LAMAs (tiotropium, glycopyrronium, umeclidinium, aclidinium) are useful to improving symptoms and lung function, and to reducing exacerbation and hospitarization. LABAs expect salmeterol are strong partial agonists, and LAMAs are non-specific antagonists. Ca2+ dynamics and Ca2+ sensitization contribute to relaxation of airway smooth muscle in these bronchodilators. LABAs act on orthosteric and allosteric sites on the β2-adrenergic receptors. In contrast, LAMAs act not only on orthosteric site on the muscarinic receptors, but also allosteric site on the β2-adrenergic receptors, leading to enhancing β2-adrenergic action. Allosteric GPCR modulation is involved in the synergistic effects between LABAs and LAMAs. PMID:27254952

  19. Vasoactive peptides upregulate mRNA expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Vijay K T; Willems-Widyastuti, Anna; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Garrelds, Ingrid M; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Saxena, Pramod R; Sharma, Hari S

    2007-01-01

    Airway remodeling and associated angiogenesis are documented features of asthma, of which the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Angiotensin (ANG)II and endothelin (ET)-1 are potent vasoconstricting circulatory hormones implicated in asthma. We investigated the effects of ANG II and ET-1 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells proliferation and growth and examined the mRNA expression and release of the angiogenic peptide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Serum deprived (48 h) human ASM cells were incubated with ANG II (100 nM) or ET-1 (10 nM) for 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h and the endogenous synthesis of VEGF was examined in relation to control cells receiving serum free culture medium. ET-1 induced time dependent DNA biosynthesis as determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Using northern blot hybridization, we detected two mRNA species of 3.9 and 1.7 kb encoding VEGF in the cultured smooth muscle cells. Both ANG II and ET-1 induced the mRNA expression (two- to threefold) and secretion (1.8- to 2.8-fold) of VEGF reaching maximal levels between 4-8 h of incubation. Induced expression and release of VEGF declined after 8 h of ANG II incubation while levels remained elevated in the case of ET-1. The conditioned medium derived from ET-1-treated ASM cells induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell number in porcine pulmonary artery endothelial as well as human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, the VEGF tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor blocked the conditioned medium induced mitogenesis in endothelial cells. Our results suggest a potential role for ANG II and ET-1 in ASM cell growth and upregulation of VEGF that may participate in endothelial cell proliferation via paracrine mechanisms and thus causing pathological angiogenesis and vascular remodelling seen during asthma. PMID:17406064

  20. T-bet is induced by interferon-γ to mediate chemokine secretion and migration in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An inappropriate balance between T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokine production underlies inflammatory changes that result in airway disease. Expression of the T-box transcription factor T-bet regulates differentiation of Th cells and production of Th1 cytokines, particularly IFNγ. T-bet-deficient mice develop airway hyperreactivity, undergo airway remodeling, and exhibit defects in IFNγ production while overproducing Th2 cytokines. T-bet is also reduced in the airways of asthmatic patients, suggesting loss of T-bet expression or activity promotes development of inflammatory airway disease. We present novel data demonstrating T-bet expression is induced in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) by IFNγ. This IFNγ-stimulated expression of T-bet is dependent on signaling through JAK2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) and activates T-bet-dependent DNA binding activity. Expression of T-bet stimulates IFNγ-stimulated IFNγ expression, secretion, and promoter activity, while inhibiting IFNγ-stimulated release of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2, regulated on activation normal T-expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5, and eotaxin/CCL11. This is accompanied by changes in expression of the chemokine receptors CCR3 and IL12Rβ2 and TNFα. T-bet expression also reduces chemotactic migration of ASMC in response to serum and PDGF, which contributes to airway hyperplasia. These results are the first to identify T-bet expression and activity in a structural cell of the lung and may provide new insights into therapeutic targets for inflammatory airway disease. PMID:21239533

  1. Metabolic abnormalities induced by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of the renal carcinoma Eker (TSC2+/-) rat model.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yumi; Shirai, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Hino, Okio; Tsujii, Yoshimasa; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kazami, Machiko; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) is a mediator of insulin signal transduction, and a loss of function in TSC2 induces hyperactivation of mTORC1 pathway, which leads to tumorigenesis. We have previously demonstrated that Eker rat model, which is heterozygous for a TSC2 mutation, exhibits hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia. The present study was to investigate whether these changes also can affect metabolism in skeletal muscle of the Eker rat. Wild-type (TSC2+/+) and Eker (TSC2+/-) rats underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, and the latter showed decrease in whole-body glucose utilization. Additionally, reductions in the expression of glycolysis-, lipolysis-, and ketone body-related genes in skeletal muscle were observed in Eker rats. Furthermore, ATP content and mitochondrial DNA copy number were lower in skeletal muscle of Eker rats. These data demonstrate that heterozygous to mutation TSC2 not only affects the liver metabolism, but also skeletal muscle metabolism, via mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27031579

  2. Parabronchial smooth muscle constitutes an airway epithelial stem cell niche in the mouse lung after injury.

    PubMed

    Volckaert, Thomas; Dill, Erik; Campbell, Alice; Tiozzo, Caterina; Majka, Susan; Bellusci, Saverio; De Langhe, Stijn P

    2011-11-01

    During lung development, parabronchial SMC (PSMC) progenitors in the distal mesenchyme secrete fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which acts on distal epithelial progenitors to promote their proliferation. β-catenin signaling within PSMC progenitors is essential for their maintenance, proliferation, and expression of Fgf10. Here, we report that this Wnt/Fgf10 embryonic signaling cascade is reactivated in mature PSMCs after naphthalene-induced injury to airway epithelium. Furthermore, we found that this paracrine Fgf10 action was essential for activating surviving variant Clara cells (the cells in the airway epithelium from which replacement epithelial cells originate) located at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions and adjacent to neuroendocrine bodies. After naphthalene injury, PSMCs secreted Fgf10 to activate Notch signaling and induce Snai1 expression in surviving variant Clara cells, which subsequently underwent a transient epithelial to mesenchymal transition to initiate the repair process. Epithelial Snai1 expression was important for regeneration after injury. We have therefore identified PSMCs as a stem cell niche for the variant Clara cells in the lung and established that paracrine Fgf10 signaling from the niche is critical for epithelial repair after naphthalene injury. These findings also have implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and cancer. PMID:21985786

  3. Airway occlusion pressure and diaphragm global electromyogram analysis for evaluation of inspiratory muscle drive and neuromechanical coupling in cattle.

    PubMed

    Desmecht, D J; Linden, A S; Rollin, F A; Lekeux, P M

    1994-06-01

    Although healthy and diseased bovine respiratory tracts have been intensively studied during the last years, to the authors' knowledge, there have been no attempts to objectively examine the inspiratory drive from the brain to the nerves and muscles and its transformation in pressure. Such technique would be useful in assessing the possibility of altered ventilatory drive or inspiratory muscle fatigue in the context of an animal with ventilatory failure. The relation among ventilation, airway opening occlusion pressure generated 100 milliseconds after onset of inspiration (Pawo100ms) and 6 indexes describing diaphragmatic electromyographic activity (EMGdi) recorded via implanted fishhooks was evaluated during free and impeded CO2 rebreathing in 6 young bulls. The best significant linear correlations (r > 0.8) with inspiratory center afferent stimulation, as judged by end-tidal CO2 concentration in expired air, were found for Pawo100ms, peak moving time average or variance EMGdi, and mean integrated EMGdi, whatever had been the respiratory impedance. However, with an inspiratory load, Pawo100ms responses systematically had greater increase for a given change in the driving EMGdi, implying dependence of the former not only on neural input, but also on configurational factors that determine inspiratory muscle excitation-pressure generation couplings. The reproducibility of EMGdi absolute values and changes was satisfactory up to 10 hours, but could not be repeated from one day to the other. It was concluded that, provided the constancy of the electrical coupling of the recording system to the tissue being studied is ensured, specific EMGdi and Pawo100ms values correlate reliably with amount of CO2 during free and loaded breathing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7944009

  4. L-thyroxine promotes a proliferative airway smooth muscle phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Naeimi, Saeideh; Bos, I Sophie T; Menzen, Mark H; Halayko, Andrew J; Hashjin, Goudarz Sadeghi; Meurs, Herman

    2015-02-01

    Hypothyroidism may reduce, whereas hyperthyroidism may aggravate, asthma symptoms. The mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. Since thyroid hormones have central roles in cell growth and differentiation, we hypothesized that airway remodeling, in particular increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, may be involved. To address this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and l-thyroxine (T4) in the absence and presence of the profibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on human ASM cell phenotype switching. T3 (1-100 nM) and T4 (1-100 nM) did not affect basal ASM proliferation. However, when combined with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml), T4 synergistically increased the proliferative response, whereas only a minor effect was observed for T3. In line with a switch from a contractile to a proliferative ASM phenotype, T4 reduced the TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼50%. Cotreatment with T3 reduced TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼25%. The synergistic increase in proliferation was almost fully inhibited by the integrin αvβ3 antagonist tetrac (100 nM), whereas no significant effects of the thyroid receptor antagonist 1-850 (3 μM) were observed. Inhibition of MEK1/2, downstream of the integrin αvβ3, also inhibited the T4- and TGF-β1-induced proliferative responses. Collectively, the results indicate that T4, and to a lesser extent T3, promotes a proliferative ASM phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1, which is predominantly mediated by the membrane-bound T4 receptor αvβ3. These results indicate that thyroid hormones may enhance ASM remodeling in asthma, which could be of relevance for hyperthyroid patients with this disease. PMID:25480330

  5. BET Bromodomains Regulate Transforming Growth Factor-β-induced Proliferation and Cytokine Release in Asthmatic Airway Smooth Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark M.; Durham, Andrew L.; Austin, Philip J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass is increased in asthma, and ASM cells from patients with asthma are hyperproliferative and release more IL-6 and CXCL8. The BET (bromo- and extra-terminal) family of proteins (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4) govern the assembly of histone acetylation-dependent chromatin complexes. We have examined whether they modulate proliferation and cytokine expression in asthmatic ASM cells by studying the effect of BET bromodomain mimics JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762. ASM cells from healthy individuals and nonsevere and severe asthmatics were pretreated with JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 prior to stimulation with FCS and TGF-β. Proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation. IL-6 and CXCL8 release was measured by ELISA, and mRNA expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. ChIP using a specific anti-Brd4 antibody and PCR primers directed against the transcriptional start site of IL-6 and CXCL8 gene promoters was performed. Neither JQ1/SGCBD01 nor I-BET762 had any effect on ASM cell viability. JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 inhibited FCS+TGF-β-induced ASM cell proliferation and IL-6 and CXCL8 release in healthy individuals (≥ 30 nm) and in nonsevere and severe asthma patients (≥100 nm), with the latter requiring higher concentrations of these mimics. JQ1/SGCBD01 reduced Brd4 binding to IL8 and IL6 promoters induced by FCS+TGF-β. Mimics of BET bromodomains inhibit aberrant ASM cell proliferation and inflammation with lesser efficiency in those from asthmatic patients. They may be effective in reducing airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:25697361

  6. A new nitrosyl ruthenium complex nitric oxide donor presents higher efficacy than sodium nitroprusside on relaxation of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Castro, Patrícia F S; Pereira, Amanda de C; Rogrigues, Gerson J; Batista, Aline C; da Silva, Roberto S; Bendhack, Lusiane M; Rocha, Matheus L

    2011-08-17

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been demonstrated to be the primary agent in relaxing airways in humans and animals. We investigated the mechanisms involved in the relaxation induced by NO-donors, ruthenium complex [Ru(terpy)(bdq)NO(+)](3+) (TERPY) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in isolated trachea of rats contracted with carbachol in an isolated organs chamber. For instance, we verified the contribution of K(+) channels, the importance of sGC/cGMP pathway, the influence of the extra and intracellular Ca(2+) sources and the contribution of the epithelium on the relaxing response. Additionally, we have used confocal microscopy in order to analyze the action of the NO-donors on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. The results demonstrated that both compounds led to the relaxation of trachea in a dependent-concentration way. However, the maximum effect (E(max)) of TERPY is higher than the SNP. The relaxation induced by SNP (but not TERPY) was significantly reduced by pretreatment with ODQ (sGC inhibitor). Only TERPY-induced relaxation was reduced by tetraethylammonium (K(+) channels blocker) and by pre-contraction with 75mM KCl (membrane depolarization). The response to both NO-donors was not altered by the presence of thapsigargin (sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor). The epithelium removal has reduced the relaxation only to SNP, and it has no effect on TERPY. The both NO-donors reduced the contraction evoked by Ca(2+) influx, while TERPY have shown a higher inhibitory effect on contraction. Moreover, the TERPY was more effective than SNP in reducing the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration measured by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, these results show that TERPY induces airway smooth muscle relaxation by cGMP-independent mechanisms, it involves the fluxes of Ca(2+) and K(+) across the membrane, it is more effective in reducing cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and inducing relaxation in the rat trachea than the standard drug, SNP. PMID:21605670

  7. The Role of Inflammation Resolution Speed in Airway Smooth Muscle Mass Accumulation in Asthma: Insight from a Theoretical Model

    PubMed Central

    Chernyavsky, Igor L.; Croisier, Huguette; Chapman, Lloyd A. C.; Kimpton, Laura S.; Hiorns, Jonathan E.; Brook, Bindi S.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Billington, Charlotte K.; Hall, Ian P.; Johnson, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a large amount of in vitro data, the dynamics of airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass increase in the airways of patients with asthma is not well understood. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes qualitatively the growth dynamics of ASM cells over short and long terms in the normal and inflammatory environments typically observed in asthma. The degree of ASM accumulation can be explained by an increase in the rate at which ASM cells switch between non-proliferative and proliferative states, driven by episodic inflammatory events. Our model explores the idea that remodelling due to ASM hyperplasia increases with the frequency and magnitude of these inflammatory events, relative to certain sensitivity thresholds. It highlights the importance of inflammation resolution speed by showing that when resolution is slow, even a series of small exacerbation events can result in significant remodelling, which persists after the inflammatory episodes. In addition, we demonstrate how the uncertainty in long-term outcome may be quantified and used to design an optimal low-risk individual anti-proliferative treatment strategy. The model shows that the rate of clearance of ASM proliferation and recruitment factors after an acute inflammatory event is a potentially important, and hitherto unrecognised, target for anti-remodelling therapy in asthma. It also suggests new ways of quantifying inflammation severity that could improve prediction of the extent of ASM accumulation. This ASM growth model should prove useful for designing new experiments or as a building block of more detailed multi-cellular tissue-level models. PMID:24632688

  8. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Nezih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Kanat, Ayhan; Batcik, Osman Ersagun; Yazar, Ugur; Zorba, Orhan Unal

    2014-01-01

    Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD) in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW) Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was counteracted by a trend

  9. Pretreatment with a soluble activin type IIB receptor/Fc fusion protein improves hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Mosqueira, Matias; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia, or reduced oxygen, occurs in a variety of clinical and environmental situations. Hypoxic exposure is associated with decreased muscle mass and a concomitant reduction in exercise capacity, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. The activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) superfamily members that are involved in the negative regulation of lean tissue mass. Given that hypoxia has negative effects on muscle mass and function and that modulation of the ActRIIB has been shown to increase muscle mass, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological targeting of the ActRIIB for 2 wk would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and function in mice after exposure to normobaric hypoxia. ActRIIB modulation was achieved using a soluble activin receptor/Fc fusion protein (sActRIIB) in mice housed in a hypoxic chamber for 1 or 2 wk. Hypoxia induced a reduction in body weight in PBS- and sActRIIB-treated mice, although sActRIIB-treated mice remained larger throughout the hypoxic exposure. The absolute forces generated by extensor digitorum longus muscles were also significantly greater in sActRIIB- than PBS-treated mice and were more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced force drop after eccentric lengthening contractions. In summary, sActRIIB pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction. These data suggest that targeting the ActRIIB is an effective strategy to counter hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction and to preacclimatize to hypoxia in clinical or high-altitude settings. PMID:19864340

  10. Pretreatment with a soluble activin type IIB receptor/Fc fusion protein improves hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Mosqueira, Matias; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia, or reduced oxygen, occurs in a variety of clinical and environmental situations. Hypoxic exposure is associated with decreased muscle mass and a concomitant reduction in exercise capacity, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. The activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a receptor for transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily members that are involved in the negative regulation of lean tissue mass. Given that hypoxia has negative effects on muscle mass and function and that modulation of the ActRIIB has been shown to increase muscle mass, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological targeting of the ActRIIB for 2 wk would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and function in mice after exposure to normobaric hypoxia. ActRIIB modulation was achieved using a soluble activin receptor/Fc fusion protein (sActRIIB) in mice housed in a hypoxic chamber for 1 or 2 wk. Hypoxia induced a reduction in body weight in PBS- and sActRIIB-treated mice, although sActRIIB-treated mice remained larger throughout the hypoxic exposure. The absolute forces generated by extensor digitorum longus muscles were also significantly greater in sActRIIB- than PBS-treated mice and were more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced force drop after eccentric lengthening contractions. In summary, sActRIIB pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction. These data suggest that targeting the ActRIIB is an effective strategy to counter hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction and to preacclimatize to hypoxia in clinical or high-altitude settings. PMID:19864340

  11. Comparative Study of Protective Effects of Salbutamol and Beclomethasone against Insulin Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity on Isolated Tracheal Smooth Muscle of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mahjabeen; Tayyaba Khan, Bushra; Bakhtiar, Salman; Anwar, Mohammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational insulin was withdrawn from the market due to its potential to produce airway hyper-reactivity and bronchoconstriction. So the present study was designed to explore the acute effects of insulin on airway reactivity of guinea pigs and protective effects of salbutamol and beclomethasone against insulin induced airway hyper-responsiveness on isolated tracheal smooth muscle of guinea pig. Effects of varying concentrations of insulin (10-7 to 10-3 M), insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol (10-7 M) and beclomethasone (10-6 M) were studied on isolated tracheal tissue of guinea pig by constructing cumulative concentration response curves. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle contractions were recorded on four channel oscillograph. The mean ± SEM of maximum amplitudes of contraction with increasing concentrations of insulin, insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol and beclomethasone were 35 ± 1.13 mm, 14.55 ± 0.62 mm and 22 ± 1.154 mm respectively. Although salbutamol and beclomethasone both had a profound inhibitory effect on insulin induced airway hyper-reactivity, yet salbutamol is more efficacious than beclomethasone. So we suggest that pretreatment of inhaled insulin with salbutamol may be preferred over beclomethasone in amelioration of its potential respiratory adverse effects such as bronchoconstriction. PMID:25901165

  12. Lead induction of crop dysfunction in pigeons through a direct action on neural or smooth muscle components of crop tissue.

    PubMed

    Boyer, I J; Cory-Slechta, D A; DiStefano, V

    1985-09-01

    Lead acetate solutions administered p.o. to pigeons produce crop stasis. Crop dysfunction may be an indirect effect on crop activity by a direct interaction with the cerebellum or some other site associated with lead-induced ataxia. Alternatively, crop stasis may be due to the direct interaction of lead with sites on the smooth muscle or neural elements in crop tissue. A behavioral test for ataxia was performed on pigeons given lead by crop intubation or i.m. injection. Blood lead concentrations were also monitored. Lead-induced ataxia was separable from lead-induced crop dysfunction depending on the route of lead administration, suggesting that lead-induced crop stasis is not secondary to toxicity at a site associated with ataxia. Intramuscular treatment produced crop stasis more readily than did crop intubation. This probably reflects different mechanisms of absorption and metabolism. A Tris-succinate medium was devised which accommodated the solubility characteristics of lead, permitting studies of crop tissue in vitro. Lead chloride added to crop tissue in tris-succinate medium caused a concentration-related reversible relaxation. Crop circular muscle was more sensitive to Pb++ than was longitudinal muscle, in agreement with the effects of other agonists. The EC30 of crop circular smooth muscle in plasma was 1000 microM PbCl2 compared to 3 microM in Tris-succinate medium. The results suggest that lead induces crop dysfunction by acting either directly on crop smooth muscle or on neural elements in crop tissue. PMID:2993587

  13. Obesity is associated with insulin resistance but not skeletal muscle dysfunction or all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Recent work has found that older adults with obesity and systemic inflammation have associated metabolic dysfunction but do not have associated lower lean mass or strength. However, this lean mass estimate may be inflated with obesity, given that 15 % of adipose tissue is composed of fat-free tissue. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate, in a nationally representative sample of adults, whether obese adults with chronic systemic inflammation (unhealthy) have differences in lean mass, muscle strength, and insulin resistance when compared to normal weight individuals without elevated levels of systemic inflammation (healthy). A secondary objective was to determine whether these potential differences were moderated by physical activity and to determine if these groups had a differential risk for all-cause mortality. Our findings suggests that the unhealthy group was associated with higher upper body lean mass (β = 823; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 637-1010; P < 0.001), lower body lean mass (β = 2724; 95 % CI 2291-3158; P < 0.001), and strength (β = 34.6; 95 % CI 13.5-55.7; P = 0.003) compared to the healthy group despite having systemic inflammation and correcting for fat-free adipose tissue. However, the unhealthy group was associated with insulin resistance (odds ratio (OR) = 16.1; 95 % CI 2.7-96.1; P = 0.005) although this finding was attenuated in those physically active (OR = 8.5; 95 % CI 2.43-30.15; P = 0.003). Despite this metabolic dysfunction, there was no difference in all-cause mortality risk between groups (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16 (95 % CI 0.69-1.96; P = 0.54)) suggesting that higher amounts of lean mass and strength may be protective of premature mortality. PMID:26698153

  14. Sepsis induces long-term metabolic and mitochondrial muscle stem cell dysfunction amenable by mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocheteau, P.; Chatre, L.; Briand, D.; Mebarki, M.; Jouvion, G.; Bardon, J.; Crochemore, C.; Serrani, P.; Lecci, P. P.; Latil, M.; Matot, B.; Carlier, P. G.; Latronico, N.; Huchet, C.; Lafoux, A.; Sharshar, T.; Ricchetti, M.; Chrétien, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, or systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is the major cause of critical illness resulting in admission to intensive care units. Sepsis is caused by severe infection and is associated with mortality in 60% of cases. Morbidity due to sepsis is complicated by neuromyopathy, and patients face long-term disability due to muscle weakness, energetic dysfunction, proteolysis and muscle wasting. These processes are triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines and metabolic imbalances and are aggravated by malnutrition and drugs. Skeletal muscle regeneration depends on stem (satellite) cells. Herein we show that mitochondrial and metabolic alterations underlie the sepsis-induced long-term impairment of satellite cells and lead to inefficient muscle regeneration. Engrafting mesenchymal stem cells improves the septic status by decreasing cytokine levels, restoring mitochondrial and metabolic function in satellite cells, and improving muscle strength. These findings indicate that sepsis affects quiescent muscle stem cells and that mesenchymal stem cells might act as a preventive therapeutic approach for sepsis-related morbidity. PMID:26666572

  15. Vascular Smooth Muscle Mineralocorticoid Receptor Contributes to Coronary and Left Ventricular Dysfunction After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Gueret, Alexandre; Harouki, Najah; Favre, Julie; Galmiche, Guillaume; Nicol, Lionel; Henry, Jean-Paul; Besnier, Marie; Thuillez, Christian; Richard, Vincent; Kolkhof, Peter; Mulder, Paul; Jaisser, Frédéric; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists slow down the progression of heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI), but the cell-specific role of MR in these benefits is unclear. In this study, the role of MR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Two months after coronary artery ligation causing MI, mice with VSMC-specific MR deletion (MI-MR(SMKO)) and mice treated with the MR antagonist finerenone (MI-fine) had improved left ventricular compliance and elastance when compared with infarcted control mice (MI-CTL), as well as reduced interstitial fibrosis. Importantly, the coronary reserve assessed by magnetic resonance imaging was preserved (difference in myocardial perfusion before and after induction of vasodilatation, mL mg (-1) min(-1): MI-CTL: 1.1±0.5, nonsignificant; MI-MR(SMKO): 4.6±1.6 [P<0.05]; MI-fine: 3.6±0.7 [P<0.01]). The endothelial function, tested on isolated septal coronary arteries by analyzing the acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide-dependent relaxation, was also improved by MR deletion in VSMCs or by finerenone treatment (relaxation %: MI-CTL: 36±5, MI-MR(SMKO): 54±3, and MI-fine: 76±4; P<0.05). Such impairment of the coronary endothelial function on MI involved an oxidative stress that was reduced when MR was deleted in VSMCs or by finerenone treatment. Moreover, short-term incubation of coronary arteries isolated from noninfarcted animals with low-dose angiotensin-II (10(-9) mol/L) induced oxidative stress and impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation in CTL but neither in MR(SMKO) nor in mice pretreated with finerenone. In conclusion, deletion of MR in VSMCs improved left ventricular dysfunction after MI, likely through maintenance of the coronary reserve and improvement of coronary endothelial function. MR blockage by finerenone had similar effects. PMID:26902493

  16. A mannose receptor mediates mannosyl-rich glycoprotein-induced mitogenesis in bovine airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lew, D B; Songu-Mize, E; Pontow, S E; Stahl, P D; Rattazzi, M C

    1994-01-01

    The putative mannose receptor (MR), previously implicated in mannosyl-rich glycoprotein-induced mitogenesis in bovine airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, was studied to determine its properties. Specific binding of the mitogenic neoglycoprotein, mannosylated bovine serum albumin (Man-BSA) to ASM cells was saturable, with an apparent Kd = 5.0 x 10(-8) M. Cell-bound ManBSA-colloidal gold conjugate was localized by electron microscopy to clathrin-coated pits on the cell surface, and was found to undergo internalization to endosomes; this was inhibitable by weak bases and swainsonine, that also inhibited ligand-induced mitogenesis. The ASM-MR, isolated by mannose-affinity chromatography, had the same apparent molecular mass as the macrophage (Mø) MR (M(r) = 175 kD), and was immunoprecipitated by an anti-MøMR immune serum. This antiserum blocked 125I-labeled-ManBSA binding to intact ASM cells, stimulated mitogenesis, and immunolocalized the ASM-MR in cytoplasmic vesicles compatible with endosomes. A monoclonal antibody directed against the MøMR also reacted with the ASM-MR; like the polyclonal antibodies, it stimulated mitogenesis as effectively as beta-hexosaminidases. These data indicate that the ASM-MR shares a number of functional and structural properties with the MøMR and suggest that similar receptors may have different main functions in different cells. Images PMID:7962531

  17. Nanotubes connect CD4+ T cells to airway smooth muscle cells: novel mechanism of T cell survival.

    PubMed

    Al Heialy, Saba; Zeroual, Melissa; Farahnak, Soroor; McGovern, Toby; Risse, Paul-André; Novali, Mauro; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Roman, Horia N; Martin, James G

    2015-06-15

    Contact between airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and activated CD4(+) T cells, a key interaction in diseases such as asthma, triggers ASM cell proliferation and enhances T cell survival. We hypothesized that direct contact between ASM and CD4(+) T cells facilitated the transfer of anti-apoptotic proteins via nanotubes, resulting in increased survival of activated CD4(+) T cells. CD4(+) T cells, isolated from PBMCs of healthy subjects, when activated and cocultured with ASM cells for 24 h, formed nanotubes that were visualized by immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy. Cell-to-cell transfer of the fluorescent dye calcein-AM confirmed cytoplasmic communication via nanotubes. Immunoreactive B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and induced myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein (Mcl-1), two major anti-apoptotic proteins, were present within the nanotubes. Downregulation of Mcl-1 by small interfering RNA in ASM cells significantly increased T cell apoptosis, whereas downregulation of Bcl-2 had no effect. Transfer of GFP-tagged Mcl-1 from ASM cells to CD4(+) T cells via the nanotubes confirmed directionality of transfer. In conclusion, activated T cells communicate with ASM cells via nanotube formation. Direct transfer of Mcl-1 from ASM to CD(+) T cells via nanotubes is involved in T cell survival. This study provides a novel mechanism of survival of CD4(+) T cells that is dependent on interaction with a structural cell. PMID:25934863

  18. Selective targeting of the α5-subunit of GABAA receptors relaxes airway smooth muscle and inhibits cellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, Gene T.; Siviski, Matthew E.; Yim, Peter D.; Fu, Xiao Wen; Poe, Michael M.; Cook, James M.; Harrison, Neil; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical need for novel bronchodilators for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive diseases remains a major medical issue. Modulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) chloride via GABAA receptor activation to achieve relaxation of precontracted ASM represents a potentially beneficial therapeutic option. Since human ASM GABAA receptors express only the α4- and α5-subunits, there is an opportunity to selectively target ASM GABAA receptors to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Recently, a novel compound (R)-ethyl8-ethynyl-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-4-methyl-4H-benzo[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepine-3-carboxylate (SH-053-2′F-R-CH3) with allosteric selectivity for α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors has become available. We questioned whether this novel GABAA α5-selective ligand relaxes ASM and affects intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) regulation. Immunohistochemical staining localized the GABAA α5-subunit to human ASM. The selective GABAA α5 ligand SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 relaxes precontracted intact ASM; increases GABA-activated chloride currents in human ASM cells in voltage-clamp electrophysiology studies; and attenuates bradykinin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, store-operated Ca2+ entry, and methacholine-induced Ca2+ oscillations in peripheral murine lung slices. In conclusion, selective subunit targeting of endogenous α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors on ASM may represent a novel therapeutic option to treat severe bronchospasm. PMID:25659897

  19. Selective targeting of the α5-subunit of GABAA receptors relaxes airway smooth muscle and inhibits cellular calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Gallos, George; Yocum, Gene T; Siviski, Matthew E; Yim, Peter D; Fu, Xiao Wen; Poe, Michael M; Cook, James M; Harrison, Neil; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Emala, Charles W

    2015-05-01

    The clinical need for novel bronchodilators for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive diseases remains a major medical issue. Modulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) chloride via GABAA receptor activation to achieve relaxation of precontracted ASM represents a potentially beneficial therapeutic option. Since human ASM GABAA receptors express only the α4- and α5-subunits, there is an opportunity to selectively target ASM GABAA receptors to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Recently, a novel compound (R)-ethyl8-ethynyl-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-4-methyl-4H-benzo[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepine-3-carboxylate (SH-053-2'F-R-CH3) with allosteric selectivity for α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors has become available. We questioned whether this novel GABAA α5-selective ligand relaxes ASM and affects intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) regulation. Immunohistochemical staining localized the GABAA α5-subunit to human ASM. The selective GABAA α5 ligand SH-053-2'F-R-CH3 relaxes precontracted intact ASM; increases GABA-activated chloride currents in human ASM cells in voltage-clamp electrophysiology studies; and attenuates bradykinin-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i, store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and methacholine-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in peripheral murine lung slices. In conclusion, selective subunit targeting of endogenous α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors on ASM may represent a novel therapeutic option to treat severe bronchospasm. PMID:25659897

  20. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  1. Interleukin-1α drives the dysfunctional cross-talk of the airway epithelium and lung fibroblasts in COPD.

    PubMed

    Osei, Emmanuel T; Noordhoek, Jacobien A; Hackett, Tillie L; Spanjer, Anita I R; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Heijink, Irene H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been associated with aberrant epithelial-mesenchymal interactions resulting in inflammatory and remodelling processes. We developed a co-culture model using COPD and control-derived airway epithelial cells (AECs) and lung fibroblasts to understand the mediators that are involved in remodelling and inflammation in COPD.AECs and fibroblasts obtained from COPD and control lung tissue were grown in co-culture with fetal lung fibroblast or human bronchial epithelial cell lines. mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators, pro-fibrotic molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins were assessed.Co-culture resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-8/CXCL8 and heat shock protein (Hsp70) from lung fibroblasts, and decreased expression of ECM molecules (e.g. collagen, decorin) that was not different between control and COPD-derived primary cells. This pro-inflammatory effect was mediated by epithelial-derived IL-1α and increased upon epithelial exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). When exposed to CSE, COPD-derived AECs elicited a stronger IL-1α response compared with control-derived airway epithelium and this corresponded with a significantly enhanced IL-8 release from lung fibroblasts.We demonstrate that, through IL-1α production, AECs induce a pro-inflammatory lung fibroblast phenotype that is further enhanced with CSE exposure in COPD, suggesting an aberrant epithelial-fibroblast interaction in COPD. PMID:27418555

  2. A New Approach for the Study of Lung Smooth Muscle Phenotypes and Its Application in a Murine Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Cortez, Jesus; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Arno, Anneliese; Aven, Linh; Ram-Mohan, Sumati; Patel, Kruti R.; Lu, Jining; King, Oliver D.; Ai, Xingbin; Fine, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypes of lung smooth muscle cells in health and disease are poorly characterized. This is due, in part, to a lack of methodologies that allow for the independent and direct isolation of bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMCs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from the lung. In this paper, we describe the development of a bi-fluorescent mouse that permits purification of these two cell populations by cell sorting. By subjecting this mouse to an acute allergen based-model of airway inflammation that exhibits many features of asthma, we utilized this tool to characterize the phenotype of so-called asthmatic BSMCs. First, we examined the biophysical properties of single BSMCs from allergen sensitized mice and found increases in basal tone and cell size that were sustained ex vivo. We then generated for the first time, a comprehensive characterization of the global gene expression changes in BSMCs isolated from the bi-fluorescent mice with allergic airway inflammation. Using statistical methods and pathway analysis, we identified a number of differentially expressed mRNAs in BSMCs from allergen sensitized mice that code for key candidate proteins underlying changes in matrix formation, contractility, and immune responses. Ultimately, this tool will provide direction and guidance for the logical development of new markers and approaches for studying human lung smooth muscle. PMID:24040256

  3. SIRT1 attenuates high glucose-induced insulin resistance via reducing mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Li-Na; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Shao, Ming-Wei; Liu, Fei; Li, Fei; Qin, Gui-Jun

    2015-05-01

    Insulin resistance is often characterized as the most critical factor contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sustained high glucose is an important extracellular environment that induces insulin resistance. Acquired insulin resistance is associated with reduced insulin-stimulated mitochondrial activity as a result of increased mitochondrial dysfunction. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is one member of the SIRT2 (Sir2)-like family of proteins involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in mammals. Although SIRT1 has a therapeutic effect on metabolic deterioration in insulin resistance, it is still not clear how SIRT1 is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that pcDNA3.1 vector-mediated overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates insulin resistance in the high glucose-induced insulin-resistant skeleton muscle cells. These beneficial effects were associated with ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction. Further studies have demonstrated that SIRT1 restores mitochondrial complex I activity leading to decreased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, SIRT1 significantly elevated the level of another SIRT which is named SIRT3, and SIRT3 siRNA-suppressed SIRT1-induced mitochondria complex activity increments. Taken together, these results showed that SIRT1 improves insulin sensitivity via the amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction, and this is achieved through the SIRT1-SIRT3-mitochondrial complex I pathway. PMID:25710929

  4. Effects of age on muscarinic agonist-induced contraction an IP accumulation in airway smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Wills-Karp, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of age on carbachol-stimulated force development and ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production was studied in tracheal rings from guinea pigs aged 1 month and 25 months of age. The pD{sub 2} for the contractile response to carbachol was significantly reduced in tracheal tissues from old animals as compared to that of the young tissues, respectively. In contrast, inositol phosphate formation was not altered with increasing age when stimulated by carbachol or NaF, a direct activator of G proteins. Carbachol-induced inositol phosphate accumulation was inhibited by treatment with 1{mu}g/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that IP1 accumulation is coupled to a pertussis-toxin-sensitive protein. The pD{sub 2} values for contraction were significantly different from the pD{sub 2} values for IP1 accumulation, in both young and old tissues, respectively. These data suggest that IP1 accumulation is not responsible for the decreased contractile ability in tracheal smooth muscle during aging.

  5. Activation of PPARδ signaling improves skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism and endurance function in an animal model of ischemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zizola, Cynthia; Kennel, Peter J; Akashi, Hirokazu; Ji, Ruiping; Castillero, Estibaliz; George, Isaac; Homma, Shunichi; Schulze, P Christian

    2015-05-01

    Exercise intolerance in heart failure has been linked to impaired skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. Oxidative metabolism and exercise capacity are regulated by PPARδ signaling. We hypothesized that PPARδ stimulation reverts skeletal muscle oxidative dysfunction. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in C57BL/6 mice and the development of ventricular dysfunction was monitored over 8 wk. Mice were randomized to the PPARδ agonist GW501516 (5 mg/kg body wt per day for 4 wk) or placebo 8 wk post-MI. Muscle function was assessed through running tests and grip strength measurements. In muscle, we analyzed muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber types, metabolic gene expression, fatty acid (FA) oxidation and ATP content. Signaling pathways were studied in C2C12 myotubes. FA oxidation and ATP levels decreased in muscle from MI mice compared with sham- operated mice. GW501516 administration increased oleic acid oxidation levels in skeletal muscle of the treated MI group compared with placebo treatment. This was accompanied by transcriptional changes including increased CPT1 expression. Further, the PPARδ-agonist improved running endurance compared with placebo. Cell culture experiments revealed protective effects of GW501516 against the cytokine-induced decrease of FA oxidation and changes in metabolic gene expression. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in HF is associated with impaired PPARδ signaling and treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516 corrects oxidative capacity and FA metabolism and improves exercise capacity in mice with LV dysfunction. Pharmacological activation of PPARδ signaling could be an attractive therapeutic intervention to counteract the progressive skeletal muscle dysfunction in HF. PMID:25713305

  6. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    1. Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function. 2. Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 microM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50 approximately 100 microM). 3. Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2 approximately 4.5). Glaucine (10 microM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2 approximately 3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (-log IC50 approximately 4.3). 4. Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89. 5. In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  7. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-01-01

    Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function.Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 μM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50∼100 μM).Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2∼4.5). Glaucine (10 μM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2∼3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (−log IC50∼4.3).Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89.In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  8. Targeting the γ-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor α4 Subunit in Airway Smooth Muscle to Alleviate Bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Gene T; Gallos, George; Zhang, Yi; Jahan, Rajwana; Stephen, Michael Rajesh; Varagic, Zdravko; Puthenkalam, Roshan; Ernst, Margot; Cook, James M; Emala, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells express γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAARs), and that GABAAR agonists acutely relax ASM. Among the GABAAR α subunits, human ASM cells express only α4 and α5, providing the opportunity for selective pharmacologic targeting. Novel GABAAR-positive allosteric modulators designed for enhanced α4/α6 subunit selectivity were synthesized using iterative computational analyses (CMD-45 and XHe-III-74). Studies using oocyte heterologous expression systems confirmed that CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 led to significantly greater augmentation of currents induced by a 3% maximal effective concentration (EC3) of GABA [EC3]-induced currents in oocytes expressing α4 or α6 subunits (along with β3 and γ2) compared with other α subunits. CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 also led to greater ex vivo relaxation of contracted wild-type mouse tracheal rings compared with tracheal rings from GABAAR α4 subunit (Gabra4) knockout mice. Furthermore, CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 significantly relaxed precontracted human ASM ex vivo, and, at a low concentration, both ligands led to a significant leftward shift in albuterol-mediated ASM relaxation. In vivo, inhaled XHe-III-74 reduced respiratory system resistance in an asthmatic mouse model. Pretreatment of human ASM cells with CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 inhibited histamine-induced increases in intracellular calcium concentrations in vitro, an effect that was lost when calcium was omitted from the extracellular buffer, suggesting that inhibition of calcium influx due to alterations in plasma membrane potential may play a role in the mechanism of ASM relaxation. Selective targeting of the GABAAR α4 subunit with inhaled ligands may be a novel therapeutic pathway to treat bronchoconstriction, while avoiding sedative central nervous system effects, which are largely mediated by α1-3 subunit-containing GABAARs in the brain. PMID:26405827

  9. Age-dependent biochemical dysfunction in skeletal muscle of triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer`s disease.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Cardoso, Vera F; Castro, Marisa; Oliveira, M M; Moreira, Paula I; Peixoto, Francisco; Videira, Romeu A

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Alzheimer`s disease as a systemic pathology shifted the research paradigm toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease considering the pathophysiological changes in both brain and peripheral tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of disease progression on physiological relevant features of skeletal muscle obtained from 3, 6 and 12 month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a model of Alzheimer`s disease, and respective agematched nonTg mice. Our results showed that skeletal muscle functionality is already affected in 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice as evidenced by deficient acetylcholinesterase and catalase activities as well as by alterations in fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Additionally, an age-dependent accumulation of amyloid-β1-40 peptide occurred in skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice, an effect that preceded bioenergetics mitochondrial dysfunction, which was only detected at 12 months of age, characterized by decreased respiratory control ratio and ADP/O index and by an impairment of complex I activity. HPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed significant changes in phospholipid composition of skeletal muscle tissues from 3xTg-AD mice with 12 months of age when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Increased levels of lyso-phosphatidylcholine associated with a decrease of phosphatidylcholine molecular species containing arachidonic acid were detected in 3xTg-AD mice, indicating an enhancement of phospholipase A2 activity and skeletal muscle inflammation. Additionally, a decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens content and an increase in phosphatidylinositol levels was observed in 3xTg-AD mice when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Altogether, these observations suggest that the skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice are more prone to oxidative and inflammatory events. PMID:25654504

  10. Age-Dependent Biochemical Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle of Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer`s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Cardoso, Vera F.; Castro, Marisa; Oliveira, M.M.; Moreira, Paula I.; Peixoto, Francisco; A.Videira, Romeu

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Alzheimer`s disease as a systemic pathology shifted the research paradigm toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease considering the pathophysiological changes in both brain and peripheral tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of disease progression on physiological relevant features of skeletal muscle obtained from 3, 6 and 12 month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a model of Alzheimer`s disease, and respective agematched nonTg mice. Our results showed that skeletal muscle functionality is already affected in 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice as evidenced by deficient acetylcholinesterase and catalase activities as well as by alterations in fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Additionally, an age-dependent accumulation of amyloid-β1-40 peptide occurred in skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice, an effect that preceded bioenergetics mitochondrial dysfunction, which was only detected at 12 months of age, characterized by decreased respiratory control ratio and ADP/O index and by an impairment of complex I activity. HPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed significant changes in phospholipid composition of skeletal muscle tissues from 3xTg-AD mice with 12 months of age when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Increased levels of lyso-phosphatidylcholine associated with a decrease of phosphatidylcholine molecular species containing arachidonic acid were detected in 3xTg-AD mice, indicating an enhancement of phospholipase A2 activity and skeletal muscle inflammation. Additionally, a decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens content and an increase in phosphatidylinositol levels was observed in 3xTg-AD mice when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Altogether, these observations suggest that the skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice are more prone to oxidative and inflammatory events. PMID:25654504

  11. Cyclophilin D, a target for counteracting skeletal muscle dysfunction in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gineste, Charlotte; Hernandez, Andres; Ivarsson, Niklas; Cheng, Arthur J; Naess, Karin; Wibom, Rolf; Lesko, Nicole; Bruhn, Helene; Wedell, Anna; Freyer, Christoph; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Carlström, Mattias; Lanner, Johanna T; Andersson, Daniel C; Bruton, Joseph D; Wredenberg, Anna; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance are hallmark symptoms in mitochondrial disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to impaired skeletal muscle function and ultimately muscle weakness in these patients. In a mouse model of lethal mitochondrial myopathy, the muscle-specific Tfam knock-out (KO) mouse, we previously demonstrated an excessive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in isolated muscle fibers that could be inhibited by the cyclophilin D (CypD) inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). Here we show that the Tfam KO mice have increased CypD levels, and we demonstrate that this increase is a common feature in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. We tested the effect of CsA treatment on Tfam KO mice during the transition from a mild to terminal myopathy. CsA treatment counteracted the development of muscle weakness and improved muscle fiber Ca(2+) handling. Importantly, CsA treatment prolonged the lifespan of these muscle-specific Tfam KO mice. These results demonstrate that CsA treatment is an efficient therapeutic strategy to slow the development of severe mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:26374844

  12. Long-term skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with hypermetabolism in severely burned children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long-term impact of burn trauma on skeletal muscle bioenergetics remains unknown. Here, we determined respiratory capacity and function of skeletal muscle mitochondria in healthy individuals and in burn victims for up to two years post-injury. Biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis...

  13. Ageing in relation to skeletal muscle dysfunction: redox homoeostasis to regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; McDonagh, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Ageing is associated with a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality and function-sarcopenia, associated with reduced independence and quality of life in older generations. A better understanding of the mechanisms, both genetic and epigenetic, underlying this process would help develop therapeutic interventions to prevent, slow down or reverse muscle wasting associated with ageing. Currently, exercise is the only known effective intervention to delay the progression of sarcopenia. The cellular responses that occur in muscle fibres following exercise provide valuable clues to the molecular mechanisms regulating muscle homoeostasis and potentially the progression of sarcopenia. Redox signalling, as a result of endogenous generation of ROS/RNS in response to muscle contractions, has been identified as a crucial regulator for the adaptive responses to exercise, highlighting the redox environment as a potentially core therapeutic approach to maintain muscle homoeostasis during ageing. Further novel and attractive candidates include the manipulation of microRNA expression. MicroRNAs are potent gene regulators involved in the control of healthy and disease-associated biological processes and their therapeutic potential has been researched in the context of various disorders, including ageing-associated muscle wasting. Finally, we discuss the impact of the circadian clock on the regulation of gene expression in skeletal muscle and whether disruption of the peripheral muscle clock affects sarcopenia and altered responses to exercise. Interventions that include modifying altered redox signalling with age and incorporating genetic mechanisms such as circadian- and microRNA-based gene regulation, may offer potential effective treatments against age-associated sarcopenia. PMID:27215643

  14. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  15. Effects of sustained hypoxia on sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle during development.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Jayne C; McMorrow, Clodagh; Bradford, Aidan; Jones, James F X; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2014-04-01

    Sustained hypoxia is a dominant feature of respiratory disease. Despite the clinical significance, the effects of sustained hypoxia on the form and function of respiratory muscle during development are relatively underexplored. Wistar rats were exposed to 1 week of sustained hypoxia (ambient pressure 450 mmHg) or normoxia at various time points during development. Sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle contractile and endurance properties were assessed in vitro. Muscle succinate dehydrogenase and myosin heavy chain composition were determined. The role of reactive oxygen species in hypoxia-induced muscle remodelling was assessed. Sustained hypoxia increased sternohyoid muscle force and fatigue in early but not late development, effects that persisted after return to normoxia. Hypoxia-induced sternohyoid muscle fatigue was not attributable to fibre type transitions or to a decrease in oxidative capacity. Chronic supplementation with the superoxide scavenger tempol did not prevent hypoxia-induced sternohyoid muscle fatigue, suggesting that mechanisms unrelated to oxidative stress underpin hypoxia-induced maladaptation in sternohyoid muscle. Sustained hypoxia had no effect on diaphragm muscle fatigue. We conclude that there are critical windows during development for hypoxia-induced airway dilator muscle maladaptation. Sustained hypoxia-induced impairment of upper airway muscle endurance may persist into later life. Upper airway muscle dysfunction could have deleterious consequences for the control of pharyngeal airway calibre in vivo. PMID:23766332

  16. Sphingomyelinase promotes oxidant production and skeletal muscle contractile dysfunction through activation of NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, James A.; Abo-Zahrah, Reem; Pal, Rituraj; Rodney, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of sphingomyelinase (SMase) have been detected in a variety of diseases. SMase has been shown to increase muscle derived oxidants and decrease skeletal muscle force; however, the sub-cellular site of oxidant production has not been elucidated. Using redox sensitive biosensors targeted to the mitochondria and NADPH oxidase (Nox2), we demonstrate that SMase increased Nox2-dependent ROS and had no effect on mitochondrial ROS in isolated FDB fibers. Pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown of Nox2 activity prevented SMase induced ROS production and provided protection against decreased force production in the diaphragm. In contrast, genetic overexpression of superoxide dismutase within the mitochondria did not prevent increased ROS production and offered no protection against decreased diaphragm function in response to SMase. Our study shows that SMase induced ROS production occurs in specific sub-cellular regions of skeletal muscle; however, the increased ROS does not completely account for the decrease in muscle function. PMID:25653619

  17. Calcineurin/Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells–Coupled Vanilliod Transient Receptor Potential Channel 4 Ca2+ Sparklets Stimulate Airway Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Limin; Sullivan, Michelle N.; Chase, Marlee; Gonzales, Albert L.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) contributes to the remodeling and irreversible obstruction of airways during severe asthma, but the mechanisms underlying this disease process are poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that Ca2+ influx through the vanilliod transient receptor potential channel (TRPV) 4 stimulates ASMC proliferation. We found that synthetic and endogenous TRPV4 agonists increase proliferation of primary ASMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca2+ influx through individual TRPV4 channels produces Ca2+ microdomains in ASMCs, called “TRPV4 Ca2+ sparklets.” We also show that TRPV4 channels colocalize with the Ca2+/calmodulin–dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in ASMCs. Activated calcineurin dephosphorylates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors cytosolic (c) to allow nuclear translocation and activation of synthetic transcriptional pathways. We show that ASMC proliferation in response to TRPV4 activity is associated with calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of the NFATc3 isoform tagged with green florescent protein. Our findings suggest that Ca2+ microdomains created by TRPV4 Ca2+ sparklets activate calcineurin to stimulate nuclear translocation of NFAT and ASMC proliferation. These findings further suggest that inhibition of TRPV4 could diminish asthma-induced airway remodeling. PMID:24392954

  18. Effect of the plant derivative Compound A on the production of corticosteroid-resistant chemokines in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gavrila, Adelina; Chachi, Latifa; Tliba, Omar; Brightling, Christopher; Amrani, Yassine

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical models of human conditions including asthma showed the therapeutic potential of Compound A (CpdA), a dissociated glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GRα) ligand. Whether CpdA inhibits GC resistance, a central feature of severe asthma, has not been addressed. We investigated whether CpdA modulates cytokine-induced GC resistance in human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Healthy and asthmatic ASM cells were treated with TNF-α/IFN-γ for 24 hours in the presence or absence of CpdA. ELISA and quantitative PCR assays were used to assess the effect of CpdA on chemokine expression. Activation of GRα by CpdA was assessed by quantitative PCR, immunostaining, and receptor antagonism using RU486. An effect of CpdA on the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) was investigated using immunoblot, immunostaining, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. CpdA inhibited production of fluticasone-resistant chemokines CCL5, CX3CL1, and CXCL10 at protein and mRNA levels in both asthmatic and healthy cells. CpdA failed to induce expression of GC-induced Leucine Zipper while transiently inducing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) at both mRNA and protein levels. CpdA inhibitory action was not associated with GRα nuclear translocation, nor was it prevented by RU486 antagonism. Activation of IRF-1 by TNF-α/IFN-γ was inhibited by CpdA. IRF-1 siRNA knockdown reduced cytokine-induced CCL5 and CX3CL1 production. siRNA MKP-1 prevented the inhibitory effect of CpdA on cytokine-induced CXCL10 production. For the first time, we show that CpdA inhibits the production of GC-resistant chemokines via GRα-independent mechanisms involving the inhibition of IRF-1 and up-regulation of MKP-1. Thus, targeting CpdA-sensitive pathways in ASM cells represents an alternative therapeutic approach to treat GC resistance in asthma. PMID:25897650

  19. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E; Noll, Elisa M; Walker, Simone A; Lloyd, Clare M; Rankin, Sara M; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-04-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  20. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E.; Noll, Elisa M.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.; Rankin, Sara M.; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  1. Contribution of the Mitochondria to Locomotor Muscle Dysfunction in Patients With COPD.

    PubMed

    Taivassalo, Tanja; Hussain, Sabah N A

    2016-05-01

    COPD is a significant public health challenge, notably set to become the third leading cause of death and fifth leading cause of chronic disability worldwide by the next decade. Skeletal muscle impairment is now recognized as a disabling, extrapulmonary consequence of COPD that is associated with reduced quality of life and premature mortality. Because COPD typically manifests in older individuals, these clinical features may overlie normal age-associated declines in muscle function and performance. Although physical inactivity, oxidative stress, inflammation, hypoxia, malnutrition, and medications all likely contribute to this comorbidity, a better understanding of the underlying mechanism is needed to develop effective therapies. Mitochondrial alterations have been described; these alterations include reductions in density and oxidative enzyme activity, increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, and induction of muscle proteolysis including autophagy. This review focuses on the perspective that mitochondrial alterations contribute to impaired locomotor muscle performance in patients with COPD by reducing oxidative capacity and thus endurance, as well as by triggering proteolysis and thus contributing to atrophy and weakness. We discuss how the potential underlying mechanisms converge on mitochondria by targeting the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator-1α signaling pathway (thereby reducing mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity and potentially increasing fiber atrophy) and how taking advantage of normal muscle plasticity and mitochondrial biogenesis may reverse this pathophysiology. We propose recent therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator-1α levels, such as endurance training and exercise mimetic drugs, with the strong rationale for increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function and thus improving the muscle phenotype in COPD. PMID:26836890

  2. Examining Sexual Dysfunction in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of Cross-Sectional Mixed-Methods Research

    PubMed Central

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Chandrashekar, Aravind; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Wittmann, Daniela A; Latini, David M; Goltz, Heather Honoré

    2014-01-01

    Introduction More than 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed in the United States annually; with 75% being non-muscle-invasive (NMIBC). Research examining sexual dysfunction in bladder cancer survivors is limited, and previous studies have focused on cystectomy patients. Aims To evaluate the impact of sexual dysfunction on NMIBC survivors. Methods Mixed-methods data collection integrated a quantitative survey (Study 1; n = 117) and semi-structured qualitative interviews (Study 2; n = 26) from a non-overlapping sample of NMIBC survivors. We performed descriptive and classification and regression tree (CART) analyses of survey data and qualitative analysis of interviews. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported sexual activity, interest in sex, and physiologic symptoms (e.g., male erectile/ejaculatory difficulties, female vaginal dryness) over the previous 4 weeks; partner communication about sexuality; contamination concerns; illness intrusiveness. Results Participants in these studies averaged 65 years of age (mean and median) and were male (77%), white (91%), and married (75%). Survey (Study 1) results linked NMIBC treatment to sexual symptoms and relationship issues. Many participants reported sexual inactivity (38.8%). Sexually active participants reported erectile difficulties (60.0%), vaginal dryness (62.5%), and worry about contaminating partner with treatment agents (23.2%). While almost one-half reported the usefulness of talking with partners about sexual function, only one-fifth of participants reported sharing all concerns with their partners. CART analysis supported the importance of communication. One-half of interviewees (Study 2) reported sexual dysfunction. Two-thirds reported negative impacts on their relationships, including perceived loss of intimacy and divorce; over one-third were sexually inactive for fear of contaminating their partner or spreading NMIBC. Conclusions Survivors' sexual symptoms may result from NMIBC, comorbidities, or

  3. CD16⁺ monocytes with smooth muscle cell characteristics are reduced in human renal chronic transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Boersema, M; van den Born, J C; van Ark, J; Harms, G; Seelen, M A; van Dijk, M C R F; van Goor, H; Navis, G J; Popa, E R; Hillebrands, J L

    2015-05-01

    In chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD), persistent (allo)immune-mediated inflammation eventually leads to tissue remodeling including neointima formation in intragraft arteries. We previously showed that recipient-derived neointimal α-SMA(+) smooth muscle-like cells are present in human renal allografts with CTD. Human PBMC contain myeloid cells capable of differentiating into α-SMA(+) cells in vitro; the phenotype of the ancestral subset is as yet unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether monocyte subsets contain cells with smooth muscle-like cell differentiation capacity and whether CTD in renal transplant recipients is associated with a shift in these monocyte subsets. To accomplish this goal, monocyte subsets from healthy controls were sorted based on CD14 and CD16 expression to investigate gene expression levels of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and SM22α. CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes displayed increased α-SMA and SM22α mRNA expression compared with CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes, suggesting increased differentiation potential toward smooth muscle-like cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in non-CTD transplant recipients the percentage of CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes was reduced, with an even further reduction in patients with CTD. To determine a potential correlation between CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes and α-SMA(+) cell outgrowth potential in vitro, PBMC of healthy controls and transplant recipients with and without CTD were cultured under fibrotic culture conditions, and indeed a significant correlation (p=0.0002, r=0.62) was observed. Finally, double staining for α-SMA and CD16 revealed presence of α-SMA(+)CD16(+) cells in kidney explants from CTD patients, albeit at very low numbers. Our data represent evidence that, compared to CD14(++)CD16(-) monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes have an increased expression of smooth muscle cell-associated genes. This monocyte subpopulation is reduced in renal transplant patients with CTD, possibly due to selective

  4. Interference with PPARγ Function in Smooth Muscle Causes Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Keen, Henry L.; Baumbach, Gary L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand activated transcription factor playing a critical role in metabolism. Thiazolidinediones, high affinity PPARγ ligands used clinically to treat type-II diabetes, have been reported to lower blood pressure and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Some mutations in PPARγ cause type-II diabetes and severe hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that PPARγ in vascular muscle plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutations in PPARγ under the control of a smooth muscle-specific promoter exhibit a loss of responsiveness to nitric oxide and striking alterations in contractility in the aorta, hypertrophy and inward remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation, and systolic hypertension. These results identify PPARγ as pivotal in vascular muscle as a regulator of vascular structure, vascular function and blood pressure, potentially explaining some of the cardioprotective effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:18316027

  5. Bone is Not Alone: the Effects of Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Avin, Keith G; Moorthi, Ranjani N

    2015-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a decline in muscle mass, strength, and function, collectively called "sarcopenia." Sarcopenia is associated with hospitalizations and mortality in CKD and is therefore important to understand and characterize. While the focus of skeletal health in CKD has traditionally focused on bone and mineral aberrations, it is now recognized that sarcopenia must also play a role in poor musculoskeletal health in this population. In this paper, we present an overview of skeletal muscle changes in CKD, including defects in skeletal muscle catabolism and anabolism in uremic tissue. There are many gaps in knowledge in this field that should be the focus for future research to unravel pathogenesis and therapies for musculoskeletal health in CKD. PMID:25691218

  6. Muscle-derived stem/progenitor cell dysfunction limits healthspan and lifespan in a murine progeria model

    PubMed Central

    Lavasani, Mitra; Robinson, Andria R.; Lu, Aiping; Song, Minjung; Feduska, Joseph M.; Ahani, Bahar; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Feldman, Chelsea H.; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Huard, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    With ageing, there is a loss of adult stem cell function. However, there is no direct evidence that this has a causal role in ageing-related decline. We tested this using muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs) in a murine progeria model. Here we show that MDSPCs from old and progeroid mice are defective in proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Intraperitoneal administration of MDSPCs, isolated from young wild-type mice, to progeroid mice confer significant lifespan and healthspan extension. The transplanted MDSPCs improve degenerative changes and vascularization in tissues where donor cells are not detected, suggesting that their therapeutic effect may be mediated by secreted factor(s). Indeed, young wild-type-MDSPCs rescue proliferation and differentiation defects of aged MDSPCs when co-cultured. These results establish that adult stem/progenitor cell dysfunction contributes to ageing-related degeneration and suggests a therapeutic potential of post-natal stem cells to extend health. PMID:22215083

  7. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9–14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9–14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study

  8. Insulin resistance in SHR/NDmc-cp rats correlates with enlarged perivascular adipocytes and endothelial cell dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hariya, Natsuyo; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Inoue, Seiya; Morioka, Kosuke; Shimada, Masaya; Okuda, Tohru; Goda, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic adipose tissue in skeletal muscle is implicated in the development of insulin resistance, which is frequently induced by abnormal dietary habits such as excessive eating and a high-fat diet. However, the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes are unknown. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive corpulent congenic (SHR/NDmc-cp) rats as a model of insulin resistance from excessive eating. SHR/NDmc-cp rats displayed overt insulin resistance with high plasma glucose, insulin, and triacylglycerol concentrations relative to control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In contrast, streptozotocin (STZ)-treated WKY rats had high glucose but low insulin concentrations. Ectopic adipocytes were found around blood vessels in the gastrocnemius in SHR/NDmc-cp rats. Areas of perivascular adipocytes and protein expression of resistin were greater in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in control and STZ-treated WKY rats. The level of the phosphorylated (active) form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the gastrocnemius was lower in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in the other groups. Insulin-resistant SHR/NDmc-cp rats showed enlarged perivascular adipocytes and greater endothelial cell dysfunction in the gastrocnemius. PMID:24759260

  9. Undernutrition during pregnancy in mice leads to dysfunctional cardiac muscle respiration in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Thrush, A. Brianne; Quizi, Jessica; Antoun, Ghadi; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, its effect on energetics in heart remains unknown. In the present study, we examined respiration in cardiac muscle and liver from adult mice that were undernourished in utero. We report that in utero undernutrition is associated with impaired cardiac muscle energetics, including decreased fatty acid oxidative capacity, decreased maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate and decreased proton leak respiration. No differences in oxidative characteristics were detected in liver. We also measured plasma acylcarnitine levels and found that short-chain acylcarnitines are increased with in utero undernutrition. Results reveal the negative impact of suboptimal maternal nutrition on adult offspring cardiac energy metabolism, which may have life-long implications for cardiovascular function and disease risk. PMID:26182362

  10. The Effect of Stage II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction on Deep Compartment Muscle Strength: A New Strength Test

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jeff R.; Nomides, Candace; Neville, Christopher Glenn; Flemister, Adolph Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare isometric subtalar inversion and forefoot adduction strength in subjects with Stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) to controls. Materials and Methods Twenty four subjects with Stage II PTTD and fifteen matched controls volunteered for this study. A force transducer (Model SML-200, Interface, Scottsdale, AZ) was connected with a resistance plate and oscilloscope (TDS 410A, Tektronix, Beaverton, OR) to the foot. Via the oscilloscope, subjects were given feedback on the amount of force produced and muscle activation of the anterior tibialis (AT) muscle. Subjects were instructed to maintain a plantar flexion force while performing a maximal voluntary subtalar inversion and forefoot adduction effort. A two-way ANOVA model with the factors including, side (involved/uninvolved) and group (control/PTTD) was used. Results The PTTD group on the involved side showed significantly decreased subtalar inversion and foot adduction strength (0.70 ± 0.24 N/Kg) compared to the uninvolved side (0.94 ± 0.24 N/Kg) and controls (involved side = 0.99 ± 0.24 N/Kg, uninvolved side = 0.97 ± 0.21 N/Kg). The average AT activation was between 11–17% for both groups, however, showing considerable variability in subjects with PTTD. Conclusion These data confirm a subtalar inversion and forefoot adduction strength deficit by 20% to 30% in subjects with Stage II PTTD. Although isolating the PT muscle is difficult, a test specific to subtalar inversion and forefoot adduction demonstrated the weakness in this population. PMID:18778667

  11. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Su; Wu, Hengfang; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  12. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LU, YAO; LI, SU; WU, HENGFANG; BIAN, ZHIPING; XU, JINDAN; GU, CHUNRONG; CHEN, XIANGJIAN; YANG, DI

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  13. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  14. Advanced glycation end-products induce skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction in diabetic mice via a RAGE-mediated, AMPK-down-regulated, Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Yang, Rong-Sen; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Yang, Ting-Hua; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic myopathy, a less studied complication of diabetes, exhibits the clinical observations characterized by a less muscle mass, muscle weakness and a reduced physical functional capacity. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), known to play a role in diabetic complications, has been identified in ageing human skeletal muscles. However, the role of AGEs in diabetic myopathy remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of AGEs on myogenic differentiation and muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro. We also evaluated the therapeutic potential of alagebrium chloride (Ala-Cl), an inhibitor of AGEs. Muscle fibre atrophy and immunoreactivity for AGEs, Atrogin-1 (a muscle atrophy marker) and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expressions were markedly increased in human skeletal muscles from patients with diabetes as compared with control subjects. Moreover, in diabetic mice we found increased blood AGEs, less muscle mass, lower muscular endurance, atrophic muscle size and poor regenerative capacity, and increased levels of muscle AGE and receptor for AGE (RAGE), Atrogin-1 and phosphorylated AMPK, which could be significantly ameliorated by Ala-Cl. Furthermore, in vitro, AGEs (in a dose-dependent manner) reduced myotube diameters (myotube atrophy) and induced Atrogin-1 protein expression in myotubes differentiated from both mouse myoblasts and primary human skeletal muscle-derived progenitor cells. AGEs exerted a negative regulation of myogenesis of mouse and human myoblasts. Ala-Cl significantly inhibited the effects of AGEs on myotube atrophy and myogenesis. We further demonstrated that AGEs induced muscle atrophy/myogenesis impairment via a RAGE-mediated AMPK-down-regulation of the Akt signalling pathway. Our findings support that AGEs play an important role in diabetic myopathy, and that an inhibitor of AGEs may offer a therapeutic strategy for managing the dysfunction of muscle due to diabetes or ageing. PMID:26586640

  15. Low molecular weight guluronate prevents TNF-α-induced oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dun, Yun-lou; Zhou, Xiao-lin; Guan, Hua-shi; Yu, Guang-li; Li, Chun-xia; Hu, Ting; Zhao, Xia; Cheng, Xiao-lei; He, Xiao-xi; Hao, Jie-jie

    2015-09-01

    Muscle wasting is associated with a variety of chronic or inflammatory disorders. Evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokines play a vital role in muscle inflammatory pathology and this may result in oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. In our study, we used microwave degradation to prepare a water-soluble low molecular weight guluronate (LMG) of 3000 Da from Fucus vesiculosus obtained from Canada, the Atlantic Ocean. We demonstrated the structural characteristics, using HPLC, FTIR and NMR of LMG and investigated its effects on oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), a cell inflammatory cytokine. The results indicated that LMG could alleviate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GSH and SOD), promote mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and upregulate the expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain protein in TNF-α-induced C2C12 cells. LMG supplement also increased the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial biogenesis related genes in TNF-α-induced C2C12 cells. LMG may exert these protective effects through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. These suggest that LMG is capable of protecting TNF-α-induced C2C12 cells against oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26205038

  16. Altering sphingolipid composition with aging induces contractile dysfunction of gastric smooth muscle via K(Ca) 1.1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Shinkyu; Kim, Ji Aee; Kim, Tae Hun; Li, Hai-Yan; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Oh, Seikwan; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H; Suh, Suk Hyo

    2015-12-01

    K(Ca) 1.1 regulates smooth muscle contractility by modulating membrane potential, and age-associated changes in K(Ca) 1.1 expression may contribute to the development of motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Sphingolipids (SLs) are important structural components of cellular membranes whose altered composition may affect K(Ca) 1.1 expression. Thus, in this study, we examined whether altered SL composition due to aging may affect the contractility of gastric smooth muscle (GSM). We studied changes in ceramide synthases (CerS) and SL levels in the GSM of mice of varying ages and compared them with those in young CerS2-null mice. The levels of C16- and C18-ceramides, sphinganine, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were increased, and levels of C22, C24:1 and C24 ceramides were decreased in the GSM of both aged wild-type and young CerS2-null mice. The altered SL composition upregulated K(Ca) 1.1 and increased K(Ca) 1.1 currents, while no change was observed in K(Ca) 1.1 channel activity. The upregulation of KC a 1.1 impaired intracellular Ca²⁺mobilization and decreased phosphorylated myosin light chain levels, causing GSM contractile dysfunction. Additionally, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, protein kinase Cζ , c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and nuclear factor kappa-B were found to be involved in K(Ca) 1.1 upregulation. Our findings suggest that age-associated changes in SL composition or CerS2 ablation upregulate K(Ca) 1.1 via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase Cζ /c-Jun N-terminal kinases/nuclear factor kappa-B-mediated pathway and impair Ca²⁺ mobilization, which thereby induces the contractile dysfunction of GSM. CerS2-null mice exhibited similar effects to aged wild-type mice; therefore, CerS2-null mouse models may be utilized for investigating the pathogenesis of aging-associated motility disorders. PMID:26288989

  17. Involvement of Interleukin-17A-Induced Hypercontractility of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Cells in Persistent Gut Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Akiho, Hirotada; Tokita, Yohei; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Satoh, Kazuko; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Tsuchiya, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ihara, Eikichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim The etiology of post-inflammatory gastrointestinal (GI) motility dysfunction, after resolution of acute symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and intestinal infection, is largely unknown, however, a possible involvement of T cells is suggested. Methods Using the mouse model of T cell activation-induced enteritis, we investigated whether enhancement of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction by interleukin (IL)-17A is involved in postinflammatory GI hypermotility. Results Activation of CD3 induces temporal enteritis with GI hypomotility in the midst of, and hypermotility after resolution of, intestinal inflammation. Prolonged upregulation of IL-17A was prominent and IL-17A injection directly enhanced GI transit and contractility of intestinal strips. Postinflammatory hypermotility was not observed in IL-17A-deficient mice. Incubation of a muscle strip and SMCs with IL-17A in vitro resulted in enhanced contractility with increased phosphorylation of Ser19 in myosin light chain 2 (p-MLC), a surrogate marker as well as a critical mechanistic factor of SMC contractility. Using primary cultured murine and human intestinal SMCs, IκBζ- and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK)-mediated downregulation of the regulator of G protein signaling 4 (RGS4), which suppresses muscarinic signaling of contraction by promoting inactivation/desensitization of Gαq/11 protein, has been suggested to be involved in IL-17A-induced hypercontractility. The opposite effect of L-1β was mediated by IκBζ and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Conclusions We propose and discuss the possible involvement of IL-17A and its downstream signaling cascade in SMCs in diarrheal hypermotility in various GI disorders. PMID:24796324

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition for Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Lee, Jen Y.; Natanek, Amanda; Lewis, Amy; Murphy, Patrick B.; Hart, Nicholas; Moxham, John; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Kemp, Paul R.; Polkey, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle impairment is a recognized complication of COPD, predicting mortality in severe disease. Increasing evidence implicates the renin-angiotensin system in control of muscle phenotype. We hypothesized that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition would improve quadriceps function and exercise performance in COPD. METHODS: This double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial investigated the effect of the ACE inhibitor, fosinopril, on quadriceps function in patients with COPD with quadriceps weakness. Primary outcomes were change in quadriceps endurance and atrophy signaling at 3 months. Quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (QMVC), mid-thigh CT scan of the cross-sectional area (MTCSA), and incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Eighty patients were enrolled (mean [SD], 65 [8] years, FEV1 43% [21%] predicted, 53% men). Sixty-seven patients (31 fosinopril, 36 placebo) completed the trial. The treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in systolic BP (Δ−10.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, −19.9 to −1.1; P = .03) and serum ACE activity (Δ−20.4 IU/L; 95% CI, −31.0 to −9.8; P < .001) compared with placebo. No significant between-group differences were observed in the primary end points of quadriceps endurance half-time (Δ0.5 s; 95% CI, −13.3-14.3; P = .94) or atrogin-1 messenger RNA expression (Δ−0.03 arbitrary units; 95% CI, −0.32-0.26; P = .84). QMVC improved in both groups (fosinopril: Δ1.1 kg; 95% CI, 0.03-2.2; P = .045 vs placebo: Δ3.6 kg; 95% CI, 2.1-5.0; P < .0001) with a greater increase in the placebo arm (between-group, P = .009). No change was shown in the MTCSA (P = .09) or ISWD (P = .51). CONCLUSIONS: This randomized controlled trial found that ACE inhibition, using fosinopril for 3 months, did not improve quadriceps function or exercise performance in patients with COPD with quadriceps weakness. TRIAL REGISTRY: Current Controlled Trials; No.: ISRCTN05581879; URL: www

  19. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  20. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  1. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:23697359

  2. Upregulation of TRPM7 augments cell proliferation and interleukin-8 release in airway smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoling; Yang, Cheng; Huang, Linjie; Chen, Ming; Shi, Jianting; Ouyang, Lihua; Tang, Tiantian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yiqun; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2016-06-01

    Proliferation and synthetic function (i.e. the capacity to release numerous chemokines and cytokines) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) are important in airway remodeling induced by cigarette smoke exposure. However, the molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is expressed ubiquitously and is crucial for the cellular physiological function of many cell types. The present study aimed to detect the expression of TRPM7 in ASMCs from smoke‑exposed rats and determine the importance of TRPM7 in proliferation and interleukin‑8 (IL‑8) release. ASMCs were isolated and cultured from smoke‑exposed rats. Expression levels of TRPM7 were determined by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 was silenced with TRPM7‑short hairpin RNA lentivirus vector. DNA synthesis, cell number and IL‑8 release of ASMCs induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay, hemocytometer and enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. It was determined that mRNA and protein expression levels of TRPM7 were increased in ASMCs from smoke‑exposed rats. Stimulation with CSE or TNF‑α elevated DNA synthesis, cell number and IL‑8 release were more marked in ASMCs from smoke‑exposed rats. Silencing of TRPM7 reduced DNA synthesis, cell number and IL‑8 release induced by CSE or TNF‑α in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. In conclusion, expression of TRPM7 increased significantly in ASMCs from smoke‑exposed rats and the upregulation of TRPM7 led to augmented cell proliferation and IL-8 release in ASMCs from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:27108806

  3. Upregulation of TRPM7 augments cell proliferation and interleukin-8 release in airway smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XIAOLING; YANG, CHENG; HUANG, LINJIE; CHEN, MING; SHI, JIANTING; OUYANG, LIHUA; TANG, TIANTIAN; ZHANG, WEI; LI, YIQUN; LIANG, RUIYUN; JIANG, SHANPING

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and synthetic function (i.e. the capacity to release numerous chemokines and cytokines) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) are important in airway remodeling induced by cigarette smoke exposure. However, the molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is expressed ubiquitously and is crucial for the cellular physiological function of many cell types. The present study aimed to detect the expression of TRPM7 in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and determine the importance of TRPM7 in proliferation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. ASMCs were isolated and cultured from smoke-exposed rats. Expression levels of TRPM7 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 was silenced with TRPM7-short hairpin RNA lentivirus vector. DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release of ASMCs induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay, hemocytometer and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. It was determined that mRNA and protein expression levels of TRPM7 were increased in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Stimulation with CSE or TNF-α elevated DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release were more marked in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Silencing of TRPM7 reduced DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release induced by CSE or TNF-α in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. In conclusion, expression of TRPM7 increased significantly in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and the upregulation of TRPM7 led to augmented cell proliferation and IL-8 release in ASMCs from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:27108806

  4. Hypermethylation of Cox5a Promoter Is Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle of High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Su, Lei; Yu, Shuang; Zhu, Xiao-nan; Cao, Xiao-pei; Xiao, Hai-peng

    2014-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) is an environmental factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. A number of genes influencing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were found to be downregulated in skeletal muscle of humans and rats treated with HFD and have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and consequent type 2 diabetes. In this study, we hypothesized that DNA methylation plays a crucial role in the regulation of OXPHOS genes in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to HFD. Using whole genome promoter methylation analysis of skeletal muscle followed by qPCR and bisulfite sequencing analysis, we identified hypermethylation of Cox5a in HFD rats. Furthermore, we found that Cox5a hypermethylation was associated with downregulation of Cox5a expression at the mRNA and protein level, and a reduction in mitochondrial complex IV activity and ATP content in HFD-induced insulin resistant rats compared to controls. Moreover, we found that while exposure to palmitate resulted in hypermethylation of the Cox5a promoter in rat myotubes, demethylation with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine was associated with preserved Cox5a expression, as well as restoration of complex IV activity and cellular ATP content. These novel observations indicate that Cox5a hypermethylation is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of HFD-induced insulin resistant rats. PMID:25436770

  5. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Hua, Chia-ho; Daw, Najat; Navid, Fariba; Davidoff, Andrew M.; McGregor, Lisa; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; McCrarey, Lola; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by the degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.

  6. Chronic effects of mechanical force on airways.

    PubMed

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Airways are embedded in the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung. In utero, this mechanical environment is defined largely by fluid secretion into the developing airway lumen. Clinical, whole lung, and cellular studies demonstrate pivotal roles for mechanical distention in airway morphogenesis and cellular behavior during lung development. In the adult lung, the mechanical environment is defined by a dynamic balance of surface, tissue, and muscle forces. Diseases of the airways modulate both the mechanical stresses to which the airways are exposed as well as the structure and mechanical behavior of the airways. For instance, in asthma, activation of airway smooth muscle abruptly changes the airway size and stress state within the airway wall; asthma also results in profound remodeling of the airway wall. Data now demonstrate that airway epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts respond to their mechanical environment. A prominent role has been identified for the epithelium in transducing mechanical stresses, and in both the fetal and mature airways, epithelial cells interact with mesenchymal cells to coordinate remodeling of tissue architecture in response to the mechanical environment. PMID:16460284

  7. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles.

    PubMed

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Schultz, Eric J; Gearinger, Rachel L; Saad, Nancy S; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle functions, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  8. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Schultz, Eric J.; Gearinger, Rachel L.; Saad, Nancy S.; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A.E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle function, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  9. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 by cytokines in human cultured airway smooth muscle cells: novel inflammatory role of this cell type

    PubMed Central

    Belvisi, Maria G; Saunders, Michael A; Haddad, El-Bdaoui; Hirst, Stuart J; Yacoub, Magdi H; Barnes, Peter J; Mitchell, Jane A

    1997-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) is the enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) which can then be further metabolized to prostanoids which modulate various airway functions. COX exists in at least two isoforms. COX-1 is expressed constitutively, whereas COX-2 is expressed in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Prostanoids are produced under physiological and pathophysiological conditions by many cell types in the lung. However, the regulation of the different COX isoforms in human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells has not yet been determined.COX-1 and COX-2 protein were measured by Western blot analysis with specific antibodies for COX-1 and COX-2. COX-2 mRNA levels were assessed by Northern blot analysis by use of a COX-2 cDNA probe. COX activity was determined by measuring conversion of either endogenous or exogenous arachidonic acid to three metabolites, PGE2, thromboxane B2 or 6-ketoPGF1α by radioimmunoassay.Under control culture conditions HASM cells expressed COX-1, but not COX-2, protein. However, a mixture of cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interferon γ (IFNγ) each at 10 ng ml−1) induced COX-2 mRNA expression, which was maximal at 12 h and inhibited by dexamethasone (1 μM; added 30 min before the cytokines). Furthermore, COX-2 protein was detected 24 h after the cytokine treatment and the expression of this protein was also inhibited by dexamethasone (1 μM) and cyclohexamide (10 μg ml−1; added 30 min before the cytokines).Untreated HASM cells released low or undetectable amounts of all COX metabolites measured over a 24 h period. Incubation of the cells with the cytokine mixture (IL-1β, TNFα, IFNγ each at 10 ng ml−1 for 24 h) caused the accumulation of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1α.In experiments where COX-2 metabolized endogenous stores of arachidonic acid, treatment of HASM cells with IL-1β in combination with TNFα caused a similar release of PGE2 to that when

  10. Functional Effects of WNT1-Inducible Signaling Pathway Protein-1 on Bronchial Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Proliferation in OVA-Induced Airway Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingjin; Du, Yuejun; Xu, Zhibo; Jiang, Youfan

    2016-02-01

    Upregulation of WISP1 has been demonstrated in lung remodeling. Moreover, it has been recently found that some signaling components of WNT pathway can activate GSK3β signaling to mediate remodeling of airway smooth muscle (ASM) in asthma. Therefore, we hypothesized that WISP1, a signaling molecule downstream of the WNT signaling pathway, is involved in PI3K/GSK3β signaling to mediate ASM remodeling in asthma. Our results showed that WISP1 depletion partly suppressed OVA-induced ASM hypertrophy in vivo. In vitro, WISP1 could induce hBSMC hypertrophy and proliferation, accompanied by upregulation of levels of PI3K, p-Akt, p-GSK3β, and its own expression. TGF-β treatment could increase expression of PI3K, p-Akt, p-GSK3β, and WISP1. SH-5 treatment could partly suppress TGF-β-induced hypertrophy and proliferation of hBSMC, and depress expression of p-GSK3β and WISP1. In conclusion, WISP1 may be a potential inducer of ASM proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma. The pro-remodeling effect of WISP1 is likely due to be involved in PI3K-GSK3β-dependent noncanonical TGF-β signaling. PMID:26242865

  11. Short-term variability in respiratory impedance and effect of deep breath in asthmatic and healthy subjects with airway smooth muscle activation and unloading.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alessandro; Pellegrino, Riccardo; Gulotta, Carlo; Antonelli, Andrea; Pompilio, Pasquale; Crimi, Claudia; Torchio, Roberto; Dutto, Luca; Parola, Paolo; Dellacà, Raffaele L; Brusasco, Vito

    2013-09-01

    Inspiratory resistance (RINSP) and reactance (XINSP) were measured for 7 min at 5 Hz in 10 subjects with mild asymptomatic asthma and 9 healthy subjects to assess the effects of airway smooth muscle (ASM) activation by methacholine (MCh) and unloading by chest wall strapping (CWS) on the variability of lung function and the effects of deep inspiration (DI). Subjects were studied at control conditions, after MCh, with CWS, and after MCh with CWS. In all experimental conditions XINSP was significantly more negative in subjects with asthma than in healthy subjects, suggesting greater inhomogeneity in the former. However, the variability in both RINSP and XINSP was increased by either ASM activation or CWS, without significant difference between groups. DI significantly reversed MCh-induced changes in RINSP both in subjects with asthma and healthy subjects, but XINSP in the former only. This effect was impaired by CWS more in subjects with asthma than in healthy subjects. The velocity of RINSP and XINSP recovery after DI was faster in subjects with asthma than healthy subjects. In conclusion, these results support the opinion that the short-term variability in respiratory impedance is related to ASM tone or operating length, rather than to the disease. Nevertheless, ASM in individuals with asthma differs from that in healthy individuals in an increased velocity of shortening and a reduced sensitivity to mechanical stress when strain is reduced. PMID:23766502

  12. Role of microRNAs in gastrointestinal smooth muscle fibrosis and dysfunction: novel molecular perspectives on the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Rattan, Satish

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a group of short noncoding RNA molecules with important roles in cellular biology. miRNAs regulate gene expression by repressing translation or degrading the target mRNA. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggests that miRNAs are implicated in many diseases and could be potential biomarkers. Fibrosis and/smooth muscle (SM) dysfunction contributes to the morbidity and mortality associated with several diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Currently available therapeutic modalities are unsuccessful in efficiently blocking or reversing fibrosis and/or SM dysfunction. Recent understanding of the role of miRNAs in signaling pathway of fibrogenesis and SM phenotype switch has provided a new insight into translational research. However, much is still unknown about the molecular targets and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the GIT. This review discusses miRNA biology, pathophysiology of fibrosis, and aging- associated SM dysfunction in relation to the deregulation of miRNAs in the GIT. We also highlight the role of selected miRNAs associated with fibrosis and SM dysfunction-related diseases of the GIT. PMID:26822916

  13. Viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of airway smooth muscle tissue: roles of mechanical force and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoru; Majumdar, Arnab; Kume, Hiroaki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Naruse, Keiji; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Suki, Béla

    2006-06-01

    The viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle tissues were investigated by measuring the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli using pseudorandom small-amplitude length oscillations between 0.12 and 3.5 Hz superimposed on static strains of either 10 or 20% of initial length. The G" and G' spectra were interpreted using a linear viscoelastic model incorporating damping (G) and stiffness (H), respectively. Both G and H were elevated following an increase in strain from 10 to 20%. There was no change in harmonic distortion (K(d)), an index of dynamic nonlinearity, between 10 and 20% strains. Application of methacholine at 10% strain significantly increased G and H while it decreased K(d). Cytochalasin D, isoproterenol, and HA-1077, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly decreased both G and H but increased K(d). Following cytochalasin D, G, H, and K(d) were all elevated when mean strain increased from 10 to 20%. There were no changes in hysteresivity, G/H, under any condition. We conclude that not all aspects of the viscoelastic properties of tracheal smooth muscle strips are similar to those previously observed in cultured cells. We attribute these differences to the contribution of the extracellular matrix. Additionally, using a network model, we show that the dynamic nonlinear behavior, which has not been observed in cell culture, is associated with the state of the contractile stress and may derive from active polymerization within the cytoskeleton. PMID:16414980

  14. Allergen-induced airway remodeling is impaired in galectin-3 deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Kang, Bit Na; Hosseinkhani, Reza M.; Ha, Sung Gil; Frenzel, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2010-01-01

    The role played by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal-3) in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of asthma that leads to airway dysfunction and poor clinical outcome in humans, was investigated in a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and Gal-3 knock-out (KO) mice were subjected to repetitive allergen challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) up to 12 weeks and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue collected after the last challenge were evaluated for cellular features associated with airway remodeling. Compared to WT mice, chronic OVA challenge in Gal-3 KO mice resulted in diminished remodeling of the airways with significantly reduced mucus secretion, sub-epithelial fibrosis, smooth muscle thickness, and peribronchial angiogenesis. The higher degree of airway remodeling in WT mice was associated with higher Gal-3 expression in the BALF as well as lung tissue. Cell counts in BALF and lung immunohistology demonstrated that eosinophil infiltration in OVA-challenged Gal-3 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to WT mice. Evaluation of cellular mediators associated with eosinophil recruitment and airway remodeling revealed that levels of eotaxin-1, IL-5, IL-13, FIZZ1 and TGF-β were substantially lower in Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, leukocytes from Gal-3 KO mice demonstrated decreased trafficking (rolling) on vascular endothelial adhesion molecules compared to WT cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Gal-3 is an important lectin that promotes airway remodeling via airway recruitment of inflammatory cells, specifically eosinophils, and the development of a Th2 phenotype as well as increased expression of eosinophil-specific chemokines, pro-fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators. PMID:20543100

  15. Activity of the oxidation products of oleum terebinthinae "Landes" on guinea pig airway smooth muscle in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, J; Burgess, M F; Cassidy, F; Clarke, G D

    1987-11-01

    The oxidation products of Oleum Terebinthinae "Landes" (Ozothin; in the following briefly called Ox. O. T. L.) have been described in many studies as being of benefit in the treatment of disturbed tracheobronchial function in obstructive airways diseases. Previous literature has dealt mainly with the influence of Ox. O. T. L. on the visco-elastic properties of mucus. However, the purpose of the present work was to study the bronchospasmolytic component. Using a standard methodology for the measurement of bronchospasmolytic effects, it could be demonstrated that Ox.O.T.L., given orally or as an aerosol, protected conscious guinea pigs against histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. The potency was lower than that of isoprenaline but was significant and reproducible. These results in vivo are paralleled by effects observed on guinea pig lung strips and tracheal spiral preparations. Ox.O.T.L. relaxed, in a dose-dependent fashion, guinea pig lung strip preparations contracted with histamine. Potency and efficacy was, however, less than that of isoprenaline. Similarly, in guinea pig tracheal spiral preparations, Ox.O.T.L. was less potent than isoprenaline in counteracting carbachol-elevated tone. However, efficacy equalled that of isoprenaline. Ox.O.T.L. was approximately 3 times more potent in the isolated tracheal spiral preparation than in lung strips. The activity of non-oxidised turpentine oil and terpin hydrate against histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in conscious animals and in the isolated organ preparations was substantially lower than that of the oxidation products of O.T.L. PMID:3440034

  16. Irritant-induced airway disorders.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M; Bernstein, I Leonard

    2011-11-01

    Thousands of persons experience accidental high-level irritant exposures each year but most recover and few die. Irritants function differently than allergens because their actions proceed nonspecifically and by nonimmunologic mechanisms. For some individuals, the consequence of a single massive exposure to an irritant, gas, vapor or fume is persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the clinical picture of asthma, referred to as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Repeated irritant exposures may lead to chronic cough and continual airway hyperresponsiveness. Cases of asthma attributed to repeated irritant-exposures may be the result of genetic and/or host factors. PMID:21978855

  17. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  18. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  20. Schisandrin B inhibits the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells via microRNA-135a suppressing the expression of transient receptor potential channel 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Luo-Xian; Guo, Ya-Li; Zhao, Li-Min; Tang, Xue-Yi; Tian, Cui-Jie; Cheng, Dong-Jun; Chen, Xian-Liang; Ma, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhuo-Chang

    2016-07-01

    Airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) was known to involve in the pathophysiology of asthma. Schisandrin B was reported to have anti-asthmatic effects in a murine asthma model. However, the molecular mechanism involving in the effect of Schisandrin B on ASMCs remains poorly understood. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: rats as the control (Group 1), sensitized rats (Group 2), sensitized rats and intragastric-administrated Schisandrin B (Group 3). The expression of miR-135a and TRPC1 was detected in the rats from three groups. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB was used to induce the proliferation of isolated ASMCs, and the expression of miR-135a and TRPC1 was detected in PDGF-BB-treated ASMCs. Cell viability was examined in ASMCs transfected with miR-135a inhibitor or si-TRPC1. The expression of TRPC1 was examined in A10 cells pretreated with miR-135a inhibitor or miR-135a mimic. In this study, we found that Schisandrin B attenuated the inspiratory and expiratory resistances in sensitized rats. Schisandrin B upregulated the mRNA level of miR-135a and decreased the expression of TRPC1 in sensitized rats. In addition, Schisandrin B reversed the expression of miR-135a and TRPC1 in PDGF-BB-induced ASMCs. Si-TRPC1 abrogated the increasing proliferation of ASMCs induced by miR-135a inhibitor. We also found that miR-135a regulated the expression of TRPC1 in the A10 cells. These results demonstrate that Schisandrin B inhibits the proliferation of ASMCs via miR-135a suppressing the expression of TRPC1. PMID:26916957

  1. Theophylline Represses IL-8 Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Independently of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition. Novel Role as a Protein Phosphatase 2A Activator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijeshkumar S; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Oliver, Brian G; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-06-01

    Theophylline is an old drug experiencing a renaissance owing to its beneficial antiinflammatory effects in chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multiple modes of antiinflammatory action have been reported, including inhibition of the enzymes that degrade cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Using primary cultures of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, we recently revealed that PDE4 inhibitors can potentiate the antiinflammatory action of β2-agonists by augmenting cAMP-dependent expression of the phosphatase that deactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-MAPK phosphatase (MKP)-1. Therefore, the aim of this study was to address whether theophylline repressed cytokine production in a similar, PDE-dependent, MKP-1-mediated manner. Notably, theophylline did not potentiate cAMP release from ASM cells treated with the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol. Moreover, theophylline (0.1-10 μM) did not increase formoterol-induced MKP-1 messenger RNA expression nor protein up-regulation, consistent with the lack of cAMP generation. However, theophylline (at 10 μM) was antiinflammatory and repressed secretion of the neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine IL-8, which is produced in response to TNF-α. Because theophylline's effects were independent of PDE4 inhibition or antiinflammatory MKP-1, we then wished to elucidate the novel mechanisms responsible. We investigated the impact of theophylline on protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, and show that theophylline increases TNF-α-induced PP2A activity in ASM cells. Confirmatory results were obtained in A549 lung epithelial cells. PP2A activators have beneficial effects in ex vivo and in vivo models of respiratory disease. Thus, our study is the first to link theophylline with PP2A activation as a novel mechanism to control respiratory inflammation. PMID:26574643

  2. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate activates TRPC3 channels to cause extracellular Ca2+ influx in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Tengyao; Hao, Qiongyu; Zheng, Yun-Min; Liu, Qing-Hua; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Transient receptor potential-3 (TRPC3) channels play a predominant role in forming nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and are significantly increased in their activity and expression in asthmatic ASMCs. To extend these novel findings, we have explored the regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of TRPC3 channels. Our data for the first time reveal that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), an important endogenous signaling molecule, can significantly enhance the activity of single NSCCs in ASMCs. The analog of diacylglycerol (DAG; another endogenous signaling molecule), 1-oleyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (SAG), and 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycerol (SLG) all augment NSCC activity. The effects of IP3 and OAG are fully abolished by lentiviral short-hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated TRPC3 channel knockdown (KD). The stimulatory effect of IP3 is eliminated by heparin, an IP3 receptor (IP3R) antagonist that blocks the IP3-binding site, but not by xestospongin C, the IP3R antagonist that has no effect on the IP3-binding site. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated KD of IP3R1, IP3R2, or IP3R3 does not alter the excitatory effect of IP3. TRPC3 channel KD greatly inhibits IP3-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. IP3R1 KD produces a similar inhibitory effect. TRPC3 channel and IP3R1 KD both diminish the muscarinic receptor agonist methacholine-evoked Ca(2+) responses. Taking these findings together, we conclude that IP3, the important intracellular second messenger, may activate TRPC3 channels to cause extracellular Ca(2+) influx, in addition to opening IP3Rs to induce intracellular Ca(2+) release. This novel extracellular Ca(2+) entry route may play a significant role in mediating IP3-mediated numerous cellular responses in ASMCs and other cells. PMID:26453517

  3. The small heat shock-related protein, HSP20, is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase substrate that is involved in airway smooth muscle relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Komalavilas, Padmini; Penn, Raymond B.; Flynn, Charles R.; Thresher, Jeffrey; Lopes, Luciana B.; Furnish, Elizabeth J.; Guo, Manhong; Pallero, Manuel A.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Brophy, Colleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the cAMP/cAMP-dependent PKA pathway leads to relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM). The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the small heat shock-related protein HSP20 in mediating PKA-dependent ASM relaxation. Human ASM cells were engineered to constitutively express a green fluorescent protein-PKA inhibitory fusion protein (PKI-GFP) or GFP alone. Activation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathways by isoproterenol (ISO) or forskolin led to increases in the phosphorylation of HSP20 in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells. Forskolin treatment in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells led to a loss of central actin stress fibers and decreases in the number of focal adhesion complexes. This loss of stress fibers was associated with dephosphorylation of the actin-depolymerizing protein cofilin in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells. To confirm that phosphorylated HSP20 plays a role in PKA-induced ASM relaxation, intact strips of bovine ASM were precontracted with serotonin followed by ISO. Activation of the PKA pathway led to relaxation of bovine ASM, which was associated with phosphorylation of HSP20 and dephosphorylation of cofilin. Finally, treatment with phosphopeptide mimetics of HSP20 possessing a protein transduction domain partially relaxed precontracted bovine ASM strips. In summary, ISO-induced phosphorylation of HSP20 or synthetic phosphopeptide analogs of HSP20 decreases phosphorylation of cofilin and disrupts actin in ASM, suggesting that one possible mechanism by which HSP20 mediates ASM relaxation is via regulation of actin filament dynamics. PMID:17993590

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  5. The effects of botulinum toxin injections into the cricopharyngeus muscle of patients with cricopharyngeus dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness.

    PubMed

    Woisard-Bassols, Virginie; Alshehri, Sarah; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2013-03-01

    This prospective, open study was carried out in order to assess changes in the swallowing and dietary status after injection of Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) into the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) in a series of patients with cricopharyngeus (CP) muscle dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness during at least 1 year follow-up after treatment. Patients who had a cricopharyngeus (CP) muscle dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness and who were at risk for aspiration were included in the study. The upper border of the cricoid cartilage was identified and the CP muscle localized using a standard electromyogram (EMG). The dose of BoNT-A was determined depending on the results of EMG performed just before the injection. Outcomes were assessed by the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), the level of residue in the pyriform sinus and the National Institute of Health-Swallow Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) on a video fluoroscopic swallowing (VFSS) assessment, the patient's subjective impressions of their ability to swallow by the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI), and changes in dietary status by the Functional Oral Intake Scale. Eleven patients underwent the complete assessment of swallowing function at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. After the first set of treatment, seven patients had a good response and four did not respond. A significant decrease in the PAS score (p = 0.03), the amount of residue (p = 0.04) and the NIH-SSS score (p = 0.03) was observed 3 months after the injection in comparison with the first VFSS before the treatment. A relapse of dysphagia occurred in 3 out of the 11 treated patients; at 3 and 4 months for 2 patients with a Wallenberg syndrome, and at 11 months for a patient with cranial nerve paralysis after a surgery for a glomus tumor. Two of them underwent a second injection. One patient had a good response and remained stable for at least 1 year. The second did not respond either to the second injection or to a myotomy of the

  6. Electrical Stimulation Improves Rat Muscle Dysfunction Caused by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Hypercapnia via Regulation of miRNA-Related Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cui-Cui; Huang, Shi-Yuan; Shen, Jie; Jiang, Xian-Xun; Wang, Xiao-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) is a powerful exercise training that may relieve muscle dysfunction in COPD. This study investigated whether electrical stimulation may have atypical adaptations via activation of miRNA related pathways in counteracting COPD muscle dysfunction. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups. With the exception of the rats in the control group, the experimental rats were exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) (9∼11%O2,5.5∼6.5%CO2) for 2 or 4 weeks. Electrical stimulation was performed immediately after each CIHH session. Following assessment of the running capacity, biopsy samples were obtained from the gastrocnemius of the rats. The miR-1, miR-133a and miR-133b levels were measured, as well as their related proteins: phosphorylation of Akt (p-AKT), PGC-1alpha (PGC-1α), histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and serum response factor (SRF). Myosin heavy chainⅡa (MHCⅡa) and myosin heavy chainⅡb (MHCⅡb) were also measured to assess fiber type changes. After 2 weeks, compared with the controls, only miR-1 and miR-133a were significantly increased (p<0.05) in the exposure group. After 4 weeks, the exposure group exhibited a decreased running distance (p = 0.054) and MHCⅡa-to-MHCⅡb shift (p<0.05). PGC-1α (p = 0.051), nuclear HDAC4 (p = 0.058), HDAC4, p-AKT, PGC-1α and SRF was also significantly decreased (p<0.05). In contrast, miR-1 and miR-133a were significantly increased (p<0.05). Four weeks of electrical stimulation can partly reversed those changes, and miR-133b exhibited a transient increase after 2 weeks electrical stimulation. Our study indicate miRNAs may have roles in the response of CIHH-impaired muscle to changes during electrical stimulation. PMID:27023369

  7. Electrical Stimulation Improves Rat Muscle Dysfunction Caused by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Hypercapnia via Regulation of miRNA-Related Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lu-Lu; Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Zhao, Cui-Cui; Huang, Shi-Yuan; Shen, Jie; Jiang, Xian-Xun; Wang, Xiao-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) is a powerful exercise training that may relieve muscle dysfunction in COPD. This study investigated whether electrical stimulation may have atypical adaptations via activation of miRNA related pathways in counteracting COPD muscle dysfunction. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups. With the exception of the rats in the control group, the experimental rats were exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) (9∼11%O2,5.5∼6.5%CO2) for 2 or 4 weeks. Electrical stimulation was performed immediately after each CIHH session. Following assessment of the running capacity, biopsy samples were obtained from the gastrocnemius of the rats. The miR-1, miR-133a and miR-133b levels were measured, as well as their related proteins: phosphorylation of Akt (p-AKT), PGC-1alpha (PGC-1α), histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and serum response factor (SRF). Myosin heavy chainIIa (MHCIIa) and myosin heavy chainIIb (MHCIIb) were also measured to assess fiber type changes. After 2 weeks, compared with the controls, only miR-1 and miR-133a were significantly increased (p<0.05) in the exposure group. After 4 weeks, the exposure group exhibited a decreased running distance (p = 0.054) and MHCIIa-to-MHCIIb shift (p<0.05). PGC-1α (p = 0.051), nuclear HDAC4 (p = 0.058), HDAC4, p-AKT, PGC-1α and SRF was also significantly decreased (p<0.05). In contrast, miR-1 and miR-133a were significantly increased (p<0.05). Four weeks of electrical stimulation can partly reversed those changes, and miR-133b exhibited a transient increase after 2 weeks electrical stimulation. Our study indicate miRNAs may have roles in the response of CIHH-impaired muscle to changes during electrical stimulation. PMID:27023369

  8. Protection from palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA damage prevents from mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and impaired insulin signaling in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Solodushko, Viktoriya A; Wilson, Glenn L; Rachek, Lyudmila I

    2012-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/(apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase (hOGG1) to mitochondria in L6 myotubes. After palmitate exposure, we evaluated mtDNA damage, mitochondrial function, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, insulin signaling pathways, and glucose uptake. Protection of mtDNA from palmitate-induced damage by overexpression of hOGG1 targeted to mitochondria significantly diminished palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide production, restored the decline in ATP levels, reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) kinase, prevented cells from entering apoptosis, increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinase (Akt) (Ser473) and tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and thereby enhanced glucose transporter 4 translocation to plasma membrane, and restored insulin signaling. Addition of a specific inhibitor of JNK mimicked the effect of mitochondrial overexpression of hOGG1 and partially restored insulin sensitivity, thus confirming the involvement of mtDNA damage and subsequent increase of oxidative stress and JNK activation in insulin signaling in L6 myotubes. Our results are the first to report that mtDNA damage is the proximal cause in palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired insulin signaling and provide strong evidence that targeting DNA repair enzymes into mitochondria in skeletal muscles could be a potential therapeutic treatment for insulin resistance. PMID:22128025

  9. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  10. Systems-level airway models of bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding lung and airway behavior presents a number of challenges, both experimental and theoretical, but the potential rewards are great in terms of both potential treatments for disease and interesting biophysical phenomena. This presents an opportunity for modeling to contribute to greater understanding, and here, we focus on modeling efforts that work toward understanding the behavior of airways in vivo, with an emphasis on asthma. We look particularly at those models that address not just isolated airways but many of the important ways in which airways are coupled both with each other and with other structures. This includes both interesting phenomena involving the airways and the layer of airway smooth muscle that surrounds them, and also the emergence of spatial ventilation patterns via dynamic airway interaction. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:459-467. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27348217

  11. The effect of ozone on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, A.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to the development of exaggerated bronchoconstrictor responses since a persistent link has been noted between pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. In these studies guinea pigs were exposed to 2.0 ppm ozone for 4 hours, then immediately sacrificed or allowed to breathe filtered air for up to 14 days. Following ozone exposure there was an immediate massive neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophils in lung digest dropped to control values within 3-12 hours post-ozone but remained elevated in BAL fluid for 3 days. There was probable eosinophil degranulation within the first 24 hours post-ozone. Guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to vigal stimulation through 3 days post-ozone. Although they were also hyperresponsive to ACh, responses to MCh were unchanged. Neuronal M[sub 2] receptors were dysfunctional through 3 days post-ozone. There was resolution of inflammation, airway responsiveness, and neuronal M[sub 2] receptor function by 14 days post-exposure. This investigation has (1) confirmed an immediate lung inflammation following acute ozone exposure; (2) established that cells in BAL give a distorted reflection of inflammatory events in lung digest; (3) demonstrated that ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness is at least partially due to efferent cholinergic mechanisms without functional changes of muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle; (4) shown that ACh may not be an appropriate agent to test ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness; and (5) demonstrated that inhibitory neuronal M[sub 2] receptors are dysfunctional following ozone exposure. There was close linkage between these events, suggesting that they may be causally related. This investigation proposes a specific mechanism, dysfunction of neuronal M[sub 2] receptors, by which inflammatory cells could cause airway hyperresponsiveness following acute ozone exposure.

  12. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  13. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  15. Acute administration of ivacaftor to people with cystic fibrosis and a G551D-CFTR mutation reveals smooth muscle abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L.; Barnes, Janel K.; Gallagher, Charles G.; Sieren, Jered P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Fischer, Anthony J.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Welsh, Michael J.; McKone, Edward F.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Airflow obstruction is common in cystic fibrosis (CF), yet the underlying pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. People with CF often exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness, CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in airway smooth muscle (ASM), and ASM from newborn CF pigs has increased contractile tone, suggesting that loss of CFTR causes a primary defect in ASM function. We hypothesized that restoring CFTR activity would decrease smooth muscle tone in people with CF. Methods To increase or potentiate CFTR function, we administered ivacaftor to 12 adults with CF with the G551D-CFTR mutation; ivacaftor stimulates G551D-CFTR function. We studied people before and immediately after initiation of ivacaftor (48 hours) to minimize secondary consequences of CFTR restoration. We tested smooth muscle function by investigating spirometry, airway distensibility, and vascular tone. Results Ivacaftor rapidly restored CFTR function, indicated by reduced sweat chloride concentration. Airflow obstruction and air trapping also improved. Airway distensibility increased in airways less than 4.5 mm but not in larger-sized airways. To assess smooth muscle function in a tissue outside the lung, we measured vascular pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index, which both decreased following CFTR potentiation. Finally, change in distensibility of <4.5-mm airways correlated with changes in PWV. Conclusions Acute CFTR potentiation provided a unique opportunity to investigate CFTR-dependent mechanisms of CF pathogenesis. The rapid effects of ivacaftor on airway distensibility and vascular tone suggest that CFTR dysfunction may directly cause increased smooth muscle tone in people with CF and that ivacaftor may relax smooth muscle. Funding This work was funded in part from an unrestricted grant from the Vertex Investigator-Initiated Studies Program. PMID:27158673

  16. Dietary Enrichment with Fish Oil Prevents High Fat-Induced Metabolic Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Philp, Lisa K.; Heilbronn, Leonie K.; Janovska, Alena; Wittert, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    High saturated fat (HF-S) diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO) diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus) and white (extensor digitorum longus) muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group). Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic and gene

  17. Pilot study investigating the ability of an herbal composite to alleviate clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction in horses with recurrent airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Wendy; Charch, Armen; Brewer, Dyanne; Clarke, Andrew F.

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), known previously as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is a debilitating respiratory condition that significantly contributes to lost training days and illness in racehorses. Herbs are becoming increasingly popular for the prophylaxis or treatment of the clinical signs of RAO despite a paucity of research on efficacy and safety. We evaluated the ability of an herbal composite containing garlic, white horehound, boneset, aniseed, fennel, licorice, thyme, and hyssop to reduce the clinical signs of RAO, hypothesizing that the product would safely reduce signs and would improve the inflammatory cell profile within the lungs. The composite was fed to 6 horses with symptomatic RAO for 21 d in a crossover manner. Ventigraphs were used to record respiratory rate and intrapleural pressure; the proportion of inflammatory cells in fluid aspirated from the trachea was determined. Blood biochemical and hematologic screening was conducted to identify possible adverse effects. Treatment with the composite did not result in statistically significant changes in any of the parameters evaluated. A trend to a decrease in respiratory rate (P = 0.1) and an increase in the proportion of macrophages (P = 0.1) was observed in the horses receiving the herbal composite compared with placebo. These data indicate a potential for the herbal composite to safely reduce the elevated respiratory rate in horses with RAO. Future research with a greater number of horses is warranted to further characterize the effect of this product on horses with RAO. PMID:17479778

  18. Suppression of the increasing level of acetylcholine-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ in guinea pig airway smooth muscle cells by mabuterol

    PubMed Central

    SONG, XIRUI; ZHAO, CHAO; DAI, CAILING; REN, YANXIN; AN, NAN; WEN, HUIMIN; PAN, LI; CHENG, MAOSHENG; ZHANG, YUYANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish an effective method for the in vitro culture of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, and also investigate the suppressive effect of mabuterol hydrochloride (Mab) on the increased level of intracellular Ca2+ in ASM cells induced with acetylcholine (Ach). Two different methods, i.e. with or without collagenase to pretreat tracheal tissues, were applied to the manufacture of ASM cells. Cell viability was determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthinazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence were used for the identification of ASM cells. Different concentration levels (10−3, 10−4, 10−5, 10−6 and 10−7 mmol/l) of Mab were administered 5 min before Ach (10−4 M) treatment, respectively. The Ca2+ fluorescent probe, Fura-2/AM or Fluo-3/AM were applied to the inspection of Ca2+ fluorescent intensity with Varioskan Flash, immunocytometry systems and an inverted system microscope, respectively. The results showed that the fresh method, in which isolated tracheal tissues were previously treated with collagenase for 20 min, was more advantageous for the preparation of guinea pig ASM cells compared to when the enzyme was not used. The time for the ASM cells to initially migrate out of the ‘tissue blocks’ and the culture having to be generated due to the thick cell density was significantly less. On identification with immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescent staining, >95% of the cells were ASM cells. Mab (10−3−10−7 mmol/l) significantly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by Ach in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory rates of intracellular Ca2+ by different concentrations of Mab, from low to high, were 14.93, 24.73, 40.06, 48.54 and 57.13%, respectively, when Varioskan Flash was used for determination. In conclusion, this novel method has a shorter harvesting period for ASM cells. Mab can suppress the increasing level of intracellular Ca2

  19. Multum non multa: airway distensibility by forced oscillations.

    PubMed

    Mermigkis, Charalampos; Schiza, Sophia E; Panagou, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Airway distensibility although appears to be unaffected by airway smooth muscle tone probably related to airway remodelling, after bronchodilator treatment is significantly increased in subjects with asthma. We assessed airway distensibity and its first moment derivative in two patients with mild intermittent asthma and normal spirometry. The increase in airway distensibility after bronchodilation measured at the tidal volume range during quiet breathing by forced oscillations was not accompanied by a change in its first moment, while the latter showed a significant increase in a second patient after anti-inflammatory treatment. It appears that airway distensibility is sensitive to reduction of bronchial smooth muscle tone after bronchodilation, but in addition its first moment might provide information on a change of both bronchial smooth muscle tone and small airways inflammation. PMID:27374218

  20. SIRT1 activation by pterostilbene attenuates the skeletal muscle oxidative stress injury and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yedong; Di, Shouyin; Fan, Chongxi; Cai, Liping; Gao, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Dong, Yushu; Li, Tian; Wu, Guiling; Lv, Jianjun; Yang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is harmful to skeletal muscles and causes mitochondrial oxidative stress. Pterostilbene (PTE), an analogue of resveratrol, has organic protective effects against oxidative stress. However, no studies have investigated whether PTE can protect against IR-related skeletal muscular injury. In this study, we sought to evaluate the protective effect of PTE against IR-related skeletal muscle injury and to determine the mechanisms in this process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with PTE for a week and then underwent limb IR surgery. The IR injury induced segmental necrosis and apoptosis, myofilament disintegration, thicker interstitial spaces, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in the muscular tissue was inhibited, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were up-regulated, and superoxide dismutase was down-regulated after IR. However, these effects were significantly inhibited by PTE in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism underlying IR injury is attributed to the down-regulation of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1)-FOXO1/p53 pathway and the increase of the Bax/Bcl2 ratio, Cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1, Cleaved Caspase 3, which can be reversed with PTE. Furthermore, EX527, an SIRT1 inhibitor, counteracted the protective effects of PTE on IR-related muscle injury. In conclusion, PTE has protective properties against IR injury of the skeletal muscles. The mechanism of this protective effect depends on the activation of the SIRT1-FOXO1/p53 signaling pathway and the decrease of the apoptotic ratio in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:27270300

  1. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  2. In vitro effect of medicinal plants used to treat erectile dysfunction on smooth muscle relaxation and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Rakuambo, N C; Meyer, J J M; Hussein, A; Huyser, C; Mdlalose, S P; Raidani, T G

    2006-04-21

    Chloroform and ethanol extracts of root bark of Securidaca longepedunculata, Wrightia natalensis and Rhoicissus tridentata were investigated for their in vitro activity on the contraction of corpus cavernosal smooth muscle of white New Zealand rabbits. Some of the extracts of these plants relaxed the corpus cavernosal smooth muscle at low concentrations. The highest activity was obtained from Securidaca longepedunculata chloroform extracts at a concentration of 13.0 mg/ml, which induced 66.6% relaxation. Viagra was used as a positive control in this study. Extracts of Securidaca longepedunculata added to human spermatozoa affected certain sperm parameters negatively at 6.5 mg/ml and higher whilst there was no effect at 1.0 mg/ml. PMID:16309865

  3. Recent insights into the relationship between airway inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Siva, R; Berry, M; Pavord, I D

    2003-01-01

    There have been important recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway dysfunction. Observational studies have shown that eosinophilic airway inflammation is not always present in asthma nor is it an exclusive feature of asthma. Its presence seems to be more closely linked to the presence of corticosteroid responsive airways disease and the occurrence of severe exacerbations than the presence of symptoms or the extent of airway dysfunction--indeed recent evidence suggests that in asthma these features may be more closely linked to the site of localisation of mast cells in the airway wall. One implication of this new understanding of the significance of eosinophilic airway inflammation is that it predicts that measuring airway inflammation might provide information that it is not readily available from a more traditional clinical assessment, and that patients might do better if this information is available. Recent studies support this view, showing a marked reduction in asthma exacerbation in patients with moderate to severe disease who are managed with reference to markers of airway inflammation as well as symptoms and simple tests of airway function. The development of new agents that have the potential to modulate specific aspects of airway inflammation, together with refinements in non-invasive techniques to assess the efficacy of these agents offers the prospect of further refining our understanding of the role of this aspect of the inflammatory response in asthma and other airway diseases. PMID:15148839

  4. A systematic study on the influence of the main ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract on the β2-adrenergic responsiveness of human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Greunke, Christian; Hage-Hülsmann, Anne; Sorkalla, Thomas; Keksel, Nelli; Häberlein, Felix; Häberlein, Hanns

    2015-04-01

    The bronchospasmolytic and secretolytic effects of ivy leaves dry extracts can be explained by an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness of the bronchi. Recently, it was shown that α-hederin inhibits the internalization of β2-adrenergic receptors (ß2AR) under stimulating conditions. α-Hederin pretreated alveolar type II cells and human airway smooth muscle cells revealed an increased ß2AR binding and an elevated intracellular cAMP level, respectively. In order to identify whether additional compounds also mediate an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness, we examined the ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract (EA 575) protocatechuic acid, neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, hederacoside B, and β-hederin. Within all the tested substances, only β-hederin inhibited the internalization of GFP-tagged ß2AR in stably transfected HEK293 cells. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy β-hederin (1 μM, 24 h) pretreated HASM cells showed a statistically significant increase in the ß2AR binding from 33.0 ± 8.9% to 44.1 ± 11.5% which was distributed with 36.0 ± 9.5% for τbound1 and 8.1 ± 2.6% for τbound2, respectively (n = 8, p < 0.05). The increased binding was selectively found for the receptor-ligand complex with unrestricted lateral mobility (τbound1 of 0.9 ± 0.1 ms, D1 = 9.1 ± 0.2 μm(2)/s, n = 8), whereas the binding of ß2AR with hindered lateral mobility (τbound2 of 64.2 ± 47.6 ms, D2 = 0.15 ± 0.02 μm(2)/s, n = 8) was not affected. Compared to control cells, a statistically significant increase of 17.5 ± 6.4% (n = 4, p < 0.05) and 24.2 ± 5.8% (n = 4, p < 0.001) in the cAMP formation was found for β-hederin pretreated HASM cells after stimulation with 10 μM of terbutaline and simultaneous stimulation with 10 μM terbutaline and 10 μM forskolin, respectively. Within this systematic study

  5. Pelvic Belt Effects on Pelvic Morphometry, Muscle Activity and Body Balance in Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Soisson, Odette; Lube, Juliane; Germano, Andresa; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Josten, Christoph; Sichting, Freddy; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.; Hammer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is frequently involved in low back and pelvic girdle pain. However, morphometrical and functional characteristics related to SIJ pain are poorly defined. Pelvic belts represent one treatment option, but evidence still lacks as to their pain-reducing effects and the mechanisms involved. Addressing these two issues, this case-controlled study compares morphometric, functional and clinical data in SIJ patients and healthy controls and evaluates the effects of short-term pelvic belt application. Methods Morphometric and functional data pertaining to pelvic belt effects were compared in 17 SIJ patients and 17 controls. Lumbar spine and pelvis morphometries were obtained from 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Functional electromyography data of pelvis and leg muscles and center of pressure excursions were measured in one-leg stance. The numerical rating scale was used to evaluate immediate pain-reducing effects. Results Pelvic morphometry was largely unaltered in SIJ patients and also by pelvic belt application. The angle of lumbar lateral flexion was significantly larger in SIJ patients without belt application. Muscle activity and center of pressure were unaffected by SIJ pain or by belt application in one-leg stance. Nine of 17 patients reported decreased pain intensities under moderate belt application, four reported no change and four reported increased pain intensity. For the entire population investigated here, this qualitative description was not confirmed on a statistical significant level. Discussion Minute changes were observed in the alignment of the lumbar spine in the frontal plane in SIJ patients. The potential pain-decreasing effects of pelvic belts could not be attributed to altered muscle activity, pelvic morphometry or body balance in a static short-term application. Long-term belt effects will therefore be of prospective interest. PMID:25781325

  6. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  7. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juciane Maria de Andrade; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Florsheim, Esther; Albuquerque, Layra Lucy; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Gomes, Eliane; Tavares de Lima, Wothan; de Franco, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Orlando Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh), which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic) and allergen-induced (extrinsic) airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax) or minimally (AIRmin) to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation. PMID:23691511

  8. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  9. Lung Transplantation: The State of the Airways.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aliya N; Garrity, Edward R

    2016-03-01

    Context .- Lung transplantation has become a viable option for definitive treatment of several end-stage lung diseases for which there are no other options available. However, long-term survival continues to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction, which primarily affects the airways. Objective . -To highlight the complications occurring mainly in the airways of the lung transplant recipient from the early to late posttransplant periods. Data Sources .- Review literature focusing on the airways in patients with lung transplants and clinical experience of the authors. Conclusions .- Postsurgical complications and infections of the airways have decreased because of better techniques and management. Acute cellular rejection of the airways can be distinguished from infection pathologically and on cultures. Separating small from large airways need not be an issue because both are risk factors for bronchiolitis obliterans. Grading of airway rejection needs to be standardized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction consists of both bronchiolitis obliterans and restrictive allograft syndrome, neither of which can be treated very effectively at present. PMID:26927718

  10. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  11. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII) Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC) in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Belleau, Joseph T; Gandhi, Radha K; McPherson, Holly M; Lew, D Betty

    2005-01-01

    Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4), 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF) and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination)(n = 3). The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue for new therapeutic options

  12. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and dysfunctional breathing (DB) disorders may mimic or coexist with asthma, leading to overtreatment with corticosteroids with consequent morbidity. Iatrogenic complications can be averted by early and correct diagnosis. VCD, also termed paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD), is characterized by intermittent paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, mainly during inspiration, leading to airflow obstruction and dyspnea. Patients with VCD may have repetitive emergency room visits due to acute dyspnea (mimicking exacerbations of asthma). In the seminal descriptions of VCD, young women (often with psychiatric issues) predominated; however, other groups at increased risk for developing VCD include elite athletes, military recruits, and individuals exposed to irritants (inhaled or aspirated). Chronic postnasal drip, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may lead to laryngeal hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of VCD may be difficult because physical exam and spirometry may be normal between episodes. During symptomatic episodes, spirometry typically reveals variable extrathoracic airway obstruction (truncated inspiratory flow volume loop). The gold standard for identifying VCD is flexible fiberoptic rhinolaryngoscopy. Management of VCD includes identification and treatment of underlying disorders (eg, chronic postnasal drip, LPR, GER, anxiety, depression) and a multidisciplinary approach (including highly trained speech therapists). Speech therapy and biofeedback play a critical role in teaching techniques to override various dysfunctional breathing habits. When postnasal drip, LPR, or GER coexist, these disorders should be aggressively treated. With successful therapy, corticosteroids can often be discontinued. During severe, acute episodes of VCD, therapeutic strategies include heliox (80% helium/20% oxygen), topical lidocaine, anxiolytics, and superior laryngeal blocks with Clostridium botulinum toxin

  13. Force potentiation in respiratory muscles: comparison of diaphragm and sternohyoid.

    PubMed

    Van Lunteren, E; Vafaie, H

    1993-06-01

    Coordinated contraction of thoracic and pharyngeal upper airway respiratory muscles optimizes ventilation, whereas pharyngeal muscle dysfunction may lead to obstructive apneas during sleep. We hypothesized that the force potentiation exhibited by the pharyngeal respiratory muscle, the sternohyoid, in keeping with its faster contractile kinetics, would be greater than that of the thoracic respiratory muscle, the diaphragm. Rat muscles were studied in vitro at 37 degrees C with three force-potentiating protocols: posttetanic twitch potentiation, staircase phenomenon (twitch potentiation), and a classic fatigue paradigm. The sternohyoid had a faster isometric contraction time, a more rightward located force-frequency relationship, and both a more rapid onset and a greater degree of fatigue than the diaphragm. During the early portion of the fatigue protocols, the increase in force was significantly greater for the sternohyoid muscle than the diaphragm (e.g., 33 vs. 3% increase at 20 Hz, P < 0.005). During repetitive twitches at 2, 3, and 5 Hz (staircase test), sternohyoid muscle force increased more than diaphragm force at the higher stimulus frequencies (e.g., by 38 vs. 23% at 5 Hz, P < 0.01). After brief tetanic stimuli, sternohyoid twitch force increased more than diaphragm twitch force (e.g., 73 vs. 14% increase after 125 Hz tetanus, P < 0.005). These data indicate that force potentiation is exhibited by both diaphragm and sternohyoid respiratory muscles, but to different extents, when activated repetitively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8322961

  14. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  15. Respiratory control and sternohyoid muscle structure and function in aged male rats: decreased susceptibility to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Skelly, J Richard; Edge, Deirdre; Shortt, Christine M; Jones, James F X; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2012-03-15

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common respiratory disorder characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). We have shown that CIH causes upper airway muscle dysfunction in the rat due to oxidative stress. Ageing is an independent risk factor for the development of OSAS perhaps due to respiratory muscle remodelling and increased susceptibility to hypoxia. We sought to examine the effects of CIH on breathing and pharyngeal dilator muscle structure and function in aged rats. Aged (18-20 months), male Wistar rats were exposed to alternating cycles of normoxia and hypoxia (90 s each; F(I)O(2)=5% O(2) at nadir) or sham treatment for 8h/day for 9 days. Following CIH exposure, breathing was assessed by whole-body plethysmography. In addition, sternohyoid muscle contractile and endurance properties were examined in vitro. Muscle fibre type and cross-sectional area, and the activity of key oxidative and glycolytic enzymes were determined. CIH had no effect on basal breathing or ventilatory responses to hypoxia or hypercapnia. CIH did not alter succinate dehydrogenase or glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme activities, myosin heavy chain fibre areal density or cross-sectional area. Sternohyoid muscle force and endurance were unaffected by CIH exposure. Since we have established that this CIH paradigm causes sternohyoid muscle weakness in adult male rats, we conclude that aged rats have decreased susceptibility to CIH-induced stress. We suggest that structural remodelling with improved hypoxic tolerance in upper airway muscles may partly compensate for impaired neural regulation of the upper airway and increased propensity for airway collapse in aged mammals. PMID:22122888

  16. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  17. Breathtaking TRP channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in airway chemosensation and reflex control.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Bret F; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-12-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  18. Treatment with a combination of ginger, L-citrulline, muira puama and Paullinia cupana can reverse the progression of corporal smooth muscle loss, fibrosis and veno-occlusive dysfunction in the aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, Monica G.; Hlaing, Su M.; Chan, Andre; Artaza, Jorge N.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Aging associated erectile dysfunction is characterized within the corpora by a progressive apoptosis of the smooth muscle cells and their replacement by collagen. Nitric oxide from iNOS has been shown to inhibit these histological changes in the corpora while PDE5 inhibitors as well as certain nutraceuticals such as ginger, paullinia cupana, muira puama and L-citrulline are known to enhance the effects of NO. We evaluated whether the daily oral administration for 2 months with a combination of ginger, paullinia cupana, muira puama and L-citrulline (COMP-4) can effectively delay the ongoing corporal fibrosis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis and cavernosal veno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD) seen in middle aged rats similar to that seen with tadalafil. Methods 10 Month old Fisher 344 rats were treated or not for two months with COMP-4, tadalafil or a combination of tadalafil plus COMP-4. CVOD was determined by dynamic infusion cavernosometry. Penile sections of the corpora cavernosa were subjected to Masson trichrome staining to evaluate fibrosis and immunohistochemistry for desmin as a marker of smooth muscle content and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by image analysis. Oxidative stress levels were determined by GSH/GSSG ratio in whole blood. Results a decline in the non-treated rat's erectile function is evident by 10-12 months of age and is accompanied by a decrease in the corporal smooth muscle content determined by desmin expression and an increase in corporal fibrosis. The daily treatment for two months with COMP-4 reverses this process by reducing systemic oxidative stress and increasing desmin and iNOS expression, similar to that seen with tadalafil or the combination of COMP-4 plus tadalafil. Conclusion An oral combination of ginger, muira puama, Paullinia cupana and L-citrulline seems to be as effective as daily PDE5 inhibitor therapy in either delaying or reversing the onset of the histological and functional characteristics of aging

  19. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  20. Bronchoconstriction and airway biology: potential impact and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gosens, Reinoud; Grainge, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that mechanical forces occurring in the airway as a consequence of bronchoconstriction are sufficient to not only induce symptoms but also influence airway biology. Animal and human in vitro and in vivo work demonstrates that the airways are structurally and functionally altered by mechanical stress induced by bronchoconstriction. Compression of the airway epithelium and mechanosensing by the airway smooth muscle trigger the activation and release of growth factors, causing cell proliferation, extracellular matrix protein accumulation, and goblet cell differentiation. These effects of bronchoconstriction are of major importance to asthma pathophysiology and appear sufficient to induce remodeling independent of the inflammatory response. We review these findings in detail and discuss previous studies in light of this new evidence regarding the influence of mechanical forces in the airways. Furthermore, we highlight potential impacts of therapies influencing mechanical forces on airway structure and function in asthma. PMID:25732446

  1. Regulation of airway neurogenic inflammation by neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, G U; Bellofiore, S; Geppetti, P

    1998-12-01

    Airway neurogenic inflammation is caused by tachykinins released from peripheral nerve endings of sensory neurons within the airways, and is characterized by plasma protein extravasation, airway smooth muscle contraction and increased secretion of mucus. Tachykinins are degraded and inactivated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase, which is located mainly at the surface of airway epithelial cells, but is also present in airway smooth muscle cells, submucosal gland cells and fibroblasts. The key role of NEP in limiting and regulating the neurogenic inflammation provoked by different stimuli has been demonstrated in a large series of studies published in recent years. It has also been shown that a variety of factors, which are relevant for airway diseases, including viral infections, allergen exposure, inhalation of cigarette smoke and other respiratory irritants, is able to reduce NEP activity, thus enhancing the effects of tachykinins within the airways. On the basis of these observations, the reduction of neutral endopeptidase activity may be regarded as a factor that switches neurogenic airway responses from their physiological and protective functions to a detrimental role that increases and perpetuates airway inflammation. However, further studies are needed to assess the role of neutral endopeptidase down regulation in the pathogenesis of asthma and other inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:9877509

  2. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increases rat sternohyoid muscle NADPH oxidase expression with attendant modest oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robert; Lemaire, Paul; Lewis, Philip; McDonald, Fiona B.; Lucking, Eric; Hogan, Sean; Sheehan, David; Healy, Vincent; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) causes upper airway muscle dysfunction. We hypothesized that the superoxide generating NADPH oxidase (NOX) is upregulated in CIH-exposed muscle causing oxidative stress. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (5% O2 at the nadir for 90 s followed by 210 s of normoxia), for 8 h per day for 14 days. The effect of CIH exposure on the expression of NOX subunits, total myosin and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adducts in sternohyoid muscle was determined by western blotting and densitometry. Sternohyoid protein free thiol and carbonyl group contents were determined by 1D electrophoresis using specific fluorophore probes. Aconitase and glutathione reductase activities were measured as indices of oxidative stress. HIF-1α content and key oxidative and glycolytic enzyme activities were determined. Contractile properties of sternohyoid muscle were determined ex vivo in the absence and presence of apocynin (putative NOX inhibitor). We observed an increase in NOX 2 and p47 phox expression in CIH-exposed sternohyoid muscle with decreased aconitase and glutathione reductase activities. There was no evidence, however, of increased lipid peroxidation or protein oxidation in CIH-exposed muscle. CIH exposure did not affect sternohyoid HIF-1α content or aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. Citrate synthase activity was also unaffected by CIH exposure. Apocynin significantly increased sternohyoid force and power. We conclude that CIH exposure upregulates NOX expression in rat sternohyoid muscle with concomitant modest oxidative stress but it does not result in a HIF-1α-dependent increase in glycolytic enzyme activity. Constitutive NOX activity decreases sternohyoid force and power. Our results implicate NOX-dependent reactive oxygen species in CIH-induced upper airway muscle dysfunction which likely relates to redox modulation of key regulatory proteins in excitation

  3. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  4. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  5. Dietary Intervention Restored Menses in Female Athletes with Exercise-Associated Menstrual Dysfunction with Limited Impact on Bone and Muscle Health

    PubMed Central

    Cialdella-Kam, Lynn; Guebels, Charlotte P.; Maddalozzo, Gianni F.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-related menstrual dysfunction (ExMD) is associated with low energy availability (EA), decreased bone mineral density (BMD), and increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. We investigated whether a 6-month carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PRO) supplement (360 kcal/day, 54 g CHO/day, 20 g PRO/day) intervention would improve energy status and musculoskeletal health and restore menses in female athletes (n = 8) with ExMD. At pre/post-intervention, reproductive and thyroid hormones, bone health (BMD, bone mineral content, bone markers), muscle strength/power and protein metabolism markers, profile of mood state (POMS), and energy intake (EI)/energy expenditure (7 day food/activity records) were measured. Eumenorrheic athlete controls with normal menses (Eumen); n = 10) were measured at baseline. Multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate differences between groups and pre/post-intervention blocking on participants. Improvements in EI (+382 kcal/day; p = 0.12), EA (+417 kcal/day; p = 0.17) and energy balance (EB; +466 kcal/day; p = 0.14) were observed with the intervention but were not statistically significant. ExMD resumed menses (2.6 ± 2.2-months to first menses; 3.5 ± 1.9 cycles); one remaining anovulatory with menses. Female athletes with ExMD for >8 months took longer to resume menses/ovulation and had lower BMD (low spine (ExMD = 3; Eumen = 1); low hip (ExMD = 2)) than those with ExMD for <8 months; for 2 ExMD the intervention improved spinal BMD. POMS fatigue scores were 15% lower in ExMD vs. Eumen (p = 0.17); POMS depression scores improved by 8% in ExMD (p = 0.12). EI, EA, and EB were similar between groups, but the intervention (+360 kcal/day) improved energy status enough to reverse ExMD despite no statistically significant changes in EI. Similar baseline EA and EB between groups suggests that some ExMD athletes are more sensitive to EA and EB fluctuations. PMID:25090245

  6. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  7. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  8. Airway wall eosinophilia is not a feature of equine heaves.

    PubMed

    Dubuc, J; Lavoie, J-P

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether eosinophils infiltrate the airway wall of horses with heaves. Eosinophils were evaluated using paraffin embedded lung tissues from six heaves-affected horses in crisis and six aged-matched controls. Slides were stained using Luna's method and eosinophils enumerated using histomorphometric techniques. Total eosinophil counts (expressed per mm(2) of basement membrane) were significantly higher in the airways of controls horses than in horses with heaves. Intraluminal, intraepithelial, and airway smooth muscle eosinophils counts were also increased in control horses. The results suggest that eosinophils do not contribute to the persistent airway obstruction in heaves. PMID:25239297

  9. Dynamics of airway response in lung microsections: a tool for studying airway-extra cellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Afzal

    2016-01-01

    The biological configuration of extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in how mechanical interactions of the airway with its parenchymal attachments affect the dynamics of airway responses in different pulmonary disorders including asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It is now recognized that mechanical interactions between airway tissue and ECM play a key regulatory role on airway physiology and kinetics that can lead to the reorganization and remodeling of airway connective tissue. A connective tissue is composed of airway smooth muscle cells (ASM) and the ECM, which includes variety of glycoproteins and therefore the extent of interactions between ECM and ASM affects airway dynamics during exacerbations of major pulmonary disorders. Measurement of the velocity and magnitude of airway closure or opening provide important insights into the functions of the airway contractile apparatus and the interactions with its surrounding connective tissues. This review highlights suitability of lung microsection technique in studying measurements of airway dynamics (narrowing/opening) and associated structural distortions in airway compartments. PMID:27176036

  10. Long-term effects of acupuncture treatment on airway smooth muscle in a rat model of smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Wu, Song; Tang, Hongtu; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lushan; Zhou, Huanjiao; Zhou, Miao; Wang, Hua; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases. It is a chronic inflammatory process characterised by airway obstruction and progressive lung inflammation, associated with difficulty breathing and insensitivity to corticosteroid therapy. Although there is some preliminary evidence to suggest a beneficial effect of acupuncture on COPD, its mechanism of action has not been investigated. Our aim was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture in a rat model of COPD induced by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Methods Sixty Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to the smoke of 15 cigarettes for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for 3 months to induce COPD and treated with acupuncture at BL13 (Feishu), BL23 (Shenshu) and Dingchuan (COPD+Acupuncture, n=15), sham acupuncture (COPD+Sham, n=15) or left untreated (n=15). Exposed rats were compared with controls not exposed to CS (control, n=15). Pulmonary function was measured, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by ELISA. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) protein and mRNA expression were examined in lung tissue and in bronchus. Results Acupuncture treatment appeared to protect pulmonary function and reduce the COPD-induced inflammatory response by decreasing cell inflammation and the production of TNF-α and IL-8. Acupuncture also enhanced HDAC2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting a possible direct effect on protein structure through post-translational modifications. Conclusions Our results suggest that acupuncture regulates inflammatory cytokines and contributes to lung protection in a rat model of smoke-induced COPD by modulating HDAC2. PMID:26345700

  11. Overexpression of Smad2 Drives House Dust Mite–mediated Airway Remodeling and Airway Hyperresponsiveness via Activin and IL-25

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Lisa G.; Mathie, Sara A.; Walker, Simone A.; Pegorier, Sophie; Jones, Carla P.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Airway hyperreactivity and remodeling are characteristic features of asthma. Interactions between the airway epithelium and environmental allergens are believed to be important in driving development of pathology, particularly because altered epithelial gene expression is common in individuals with asthma. Objectives: To investigate the interactions between a modified airway epithelium and a common aeroallergen in vivo. Methods: We used an adenoviral vector to generate mice overexpressing the transforming growth factor-β signaling molecule, Smad2, in the airway epithelium and exposed them to house dust mite (HDM) extract intranasally. Measurements and Main Results: Smad2 overexpression resulted in enhanced airway hyperreactivity after allergen challenge concomitant with changes in airway remodeling. Subepithelial collagen deposition was increased and smooth muscle hyperplasia was evident resulting in thickening of the airway smooth muscle layer. However, there was no increase in airway inflammation in mice given the Smad2 vector compared with the control vector. Enhanced airway hyperreactivity and remodeling did not correlate with elevated levels of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13 or IL-4. However, mice overexpressing Smad2 in the airway epithelium showed significantly enhanced levels of IL-25 and activin A after HDM exposure. Blocking activin A with a neutralizing antibody prevented the increase in lung IL-25 and inhibited subsequent collagen deposition and also the enhanced airway hyperreactivity observed in the Smad2 overexpressing HDM-exposed mice. Conclusions: Epithelial overexpression of Smad2 can specifically alter airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in response to an aeroallergen. Moreover, we have identified novel roles for IL-25 and activin A in driving airway hyperreactivity and remodeling. PMID:20339149

  12. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  13. Platelet-derived-growth-factor stimulation of the p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in airway smooth muscle: role of pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-proteins, c-Src tyrosine kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, A M; Rakhit, S; Pyne, S; Pyne, N J

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism used by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to activate the mitogen-activated- protein-kinase (p42/p44 MAPK) pathway was investigated in cultured airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. We have found that pertussis toxin (PTX, which was used to inactivate the heterotrimeric G-protein Gi) induced an approx. 40-50% decrease in the activation of c-Src and p42/p44 MAPK by PDGF. An essential role for c-Src was confirmed using the c-Src inhibitor, PP1, which abolished p42/p44 MAPK activation (PP1 and PTX were without effect on PDGFR tyrosine phosphorylation). Furthermore, the PTX-dependent decrease in c-Src and p42/p44 MAPK activation appeared correlated. These findings suggest that the PDGFR can utilize the PTX-sensitive G-protein, Gi, to regulate c-Src and subsequent p42/p44 MAPK activation. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) has been shown by others to be involved in p42/p44 MAPK activation. This is confirmed here by experiments which showed that PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) reduced the activation of p42/p44 MAPK by PDGF. PI3K activity was increased in Grb-2 immunoprecipitates from PDGF-stimulated cells and was decreased by pretreating these cells with PTX. These findings show that Gi might also promote Grb-2-PI3K complex formation and that Grb-2 may be a site at which PI3K is integrated into the p42/p44 MAPK cascade. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Gi enables the PDGFR to signal more efficiently to p42/p44 MAPK, and this appears to be achieved through the regulation of c-Src and Grb-2/PI3K, which are intermediates in the p42/p44 MAPK cascade. PMID:9882612

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation of the p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in airway smooth muscle. Role of endothelial differentiation gene 1, c-Src tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rakhit, S; Conway, A M; Tate, R; Bower, T; Pyne, N J; Pyne, S

    1999-01-01

    We report here that cultured airway smooth muscle cells contain transcripts of endothelial differentiation gene 1 (EDG-1), a prototypical orphan Gi-coupled receptor whose natural ligand is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). This is consistent with data that showed that S1P activated both c-Src and p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/p44 MAPK) in a pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive manner in these cells. An essential role for c-Src was confirmed by using the c-Src inhibitor, PP1, which markedly decreased p42/p44 MAPK activation. We have also shown that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K) inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) decreased p42/p44 MAPK activation. An essential role for PI-3K was supported by experiments that showed that PI-3K activity was increased in Grb-2 immunoprecipitates from S1P-stimulated cells. Significantly, Grb-2 associated PI-3K activity was decreased by pretreatment of cells with PTX. Finally, we have shown that the co-stimulation of cells with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and S1P (which failed to stimulate DNA synthesis) elicited a larger p42/p44 MAPK activation over a 30 min stimulation compared with each agonist alone. This was associated with a S1P-dependent increase in PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. These results demonstrate that S1P activates c-Src and Grb-2-PI-3K (intermediates in the p42/p44 MAPK cascade) via a PTX-sensitive mechanism. This action of S1P is consistent with the stimulation of EDG-1 receptors. S1P might also function as a co-mitogen with PDGF, producing a more robust activation of a common permissive signal transduction pathway linked to DNA synthesis. PMID:10051434

  15. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  16. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Erica Y; Scalzitti, Nicholas J; Dion, Gregory R; Bowe, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  17. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  18. Exercise-induced airways constriction 1

    PubMed Central

    Simonsson, Bo G.; Skoogh, B-E.; Ekström-Jodal, B.

    1972-01-01

    Airway conductance was measured in a body plethysmograph at different lung volumes before and after graded exercise. In 14 out of 19 patients, mostly asthmatics, airway conductance fell significantly after exercise. These subjects also showed other signs of an increased bronchial reactivity to different stimuli, including forced breathing, hyperventilation, and cold air, but they had no exogenous allergy. The exercise-induced bronchoconstriction could be blocked by atropine in six of the nine patients tested. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with clinical and physiological evidence of increased airway reactivity thus seems to be primarily mediated via a vagal reflex, probably from hyperresponsive airway mechanoreceptors reacting to increased ventilatory flow or lung distension. No relation was found between PaCO2 or pH and the severity of airways constriction. Cromoglycic acid failed to block the exercise reaction in five of the six hyperreactive patients tested. In addition to or following the vagal reflex a disturbed relation between beta and alpha receptors in bronchial muscles or a release of humoral spasmogens may contribute to the progression of post-exercise airways constriction. PMID:4624586

  19. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  20. Heterogeneous ageing of skeletal muscle microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2016-04-15

    The distribution of blood flow to skeletal muscle during exercise is altered with advancing age. Changes in arteriolar function that are muscle specific underlie age-induced changes in blood flow distribution. With advancing age, functional adaptations that occur in resistance arterioles from oxidative muscles differ from those that occur in glycolytic muscles. Age-related adaptations of morphology, as well as changes in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle signalling, differ in muscle of diverse fibre type. Age-induced endothelial dysfunction has been reported in most skeletal muscle arterioles; however, unique alterations in signalling contribute to the dysfunction in arterioles from oxidative muscles as compared with those from glycolytic muscles. In resistance arterioles from oxidative muscle, loss of nitric oxide signalling contributes significantly to endothelial dysfunction, whereas in resistance arterioles from glycolytic muscle, alterations in both nitric oxide and prostanoid signalling underlie endothelial dysfunction. Similarly, adaptations of the vascular smooth muscle that occur with advancing age are heterogeneous between arterioles from oxidative and glycolytic muscles. In both oxidative and glycolytic muscle, late-life exercise training reverses age-related microvascular dysfunction, and exercise training appears to be particularly effective in reversing endothelial dysfunction. Patterns of microvascular ageing that develop among muscles of diverse fibre type and function may be attributable to changing patterns of physical activity with ageing. Importantly, aerobic exercise training, initiated even at an advanced age, restores muscle blood flow distribution patterns and vascular function in old animals to those seen in their young counterparts. PMID:26575597

  1. Cytokine-Induced S-Nitrosylation of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Expression of Phosphodiesterase 1A Contribute to Dysfunction of Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Nalli, Ancy D.; Kumar, Divya P.; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Hu, Wenhui; Mahavadi, Sunila; Grider, John R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of proinflammatory cytokines on the expression and activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cGMP–phosphodiesterases (PDEs) was determined in intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle. In control muscle cells, cGMP levels are regulated via activation of sGC and PDE5; the activity of the latter is regulated via feedback phosphorylation by cGMP-dependent protein kinase. In muscle cells isolated from muscle strips cultured with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or obtained from the colon of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-treated mice, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was induced and sGC was S-nitrosylated, resulting in attenuation of nitric oxide (NO)–induced sGC activity and cGMP formation. The effect of cytokines on sGC S-nitrosylation and activity was blocked by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W [N-([3-(aminomethyl)phenyl]methyl)ethanimidamide dihydrochloride]. The effect of cytokines on cGMP levels measured in the absence of IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine), however, was partly reversed by 1400W or PDE1 inhibitor vinpocetine and completely reversed by a combination of 1400W and vinpocetine. Expression of PDE1A was induced and was accompanied by an increase in PDE1A activity in muscle cells isolated from muscle strips cultured with IL-1β or TNF-α or obtained from the colon of TNBS-treated mice; the effect of cytokines on PDE1 expression and activity was blocked by MG132 (benzyl N-[(2S)-4-methyl-1-[[(2S)-4-methyl-1-[[(2S)-4-methyl-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]-1-oxopentan-2-yl]carbamate), an inhibitor of nuclear factor κB activity. NO-induced muscle relaxation was inhibited in longitudinal muscle cells isolated from muscle strips cultured with IL-1β or TNF-α or obtained from the colon of TNBS-treated mice, and this inhibition was completely reversed by the combination of both 1400W and vinpocetine. Inhibition of smooth muscle relaxation during inflammation reflects the

  2. Medical management considerations for upper airway disease.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, G L

    1992-06-01

    The conducting airways, also commonly referred to as the upper airways, provide for the passage of air to and from the atmosphere and lungs. Anatomical components include the nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and mainstem bronchi. Clinical problems involving the conducting airways can be manifested by relatively mild clinical signs of stertorous breathing, by life-threatening dyspnea, or by chronic bouts of inspiratory stridor and cough. Concurrent disease of the lower respiratory system (ie, chronic bronchitis) as well as other organ systems (ie, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine) may significantly contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of upper airway disease. Diagnosis of the diseases of the conducting airways is primarily based on history and physical examination. The dynamic nature of some conditions, related to the phases of respiration, can make diagnosis more difficult. In addition to direct visualization, radiographic and endoscopic evaluation are often useful. Many upper airway problems, especially congenital conditions, lend themselves to surgical palliation that should be performed as early in life as possible. Medical management is often directed at treating underlying diseases and the relief of clinical signs. Historically, the use of variety of drugs have been advocated and frequently include decongestants, cough suppressants, bronchodilators, glucocorticoids, and antibiotics. However, their use may be detrimental and contraindicated. In addition, therapy for some conditions (ie, laryngeal paralysis and intrathoracic tracheal collapse) may be better directed at increasing airway muscle tone in order to stabilized airway patency. Therapeutic agents that may be useful include aspirin and digitalis. The overall objective to medical management must be to balance potential therapeutic benefit against untoward effects in order to minimize clinical signs and to improve the animal's quality of life. PMID:1643322

  3. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  4. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  5. Small Airway Targeted Therapy in Pediatric Asthma: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by inflammation of proximal and distal airways. As new formulations of extrafine aerosol particles have become available, targeting small airways for the management of asthma has been investigated. As new studies attempt to explore the correlation between small airway dysfunction and clinical outcomes in asthma, well-designed clinical trials are needed to compare targeted and standard therapy for asthma management especially in pediatric patients. PMID:24380019

  6. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    or airway malacia. Use of positive pressure to maintain airway patency in these children allows cephalad clearance of secretions. Patients with segmental atelectasis, particularly related to asthma, may benefit from intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, positive expiratory pressure, or PDPV. Prevention of postoperative atelectasis is particularly well suited to positive expiratory pressure, which is not as painful as techniques using oscillations. Neurologically abnormal patients who are unable to cooperate with any active method are also treated using intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, PDPV, and suctioning, if necessary. Musculoskeletal abnormalities, muscular dystrophies, myasthenia gravis, poliomyelitis, or other similar diseases require stabilization of bellows function. Optimizing ventilation in patients with such abnormalities may require positive pressure ventilation either during sleep or continuously. Externally applied pressure, such as with the In-Exsufflator or the cyclically inflated pneumatic belt, can augment the patient's own efforts and is sometimes helpful. Normalizing the vital capacity and functional residual capacity typically helps to improve the ability to cough and clear secretions. Assisted cough devices or maneuvers are described in other papers by Bach and Hill. Not all patients who have weak muscles require nocturnal or continuous support, and may benefit from positive expiratory pressure mask treatments. Further studies are sorely needed for this population. Long-term controlled trials are urgently needed to help establish the best types of treatment for patients with CF and bronchiectasis. Such studies will become more complicated by the introduction of new treatments, such as DNase and other therapies that alter secretions, and may begin to change mucociliary or cough clearance. The selection of appropriate outcome measures is central to studying these questions, and it is unclear which are the most important. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED

  7. [A case of rupture of the left ventricle free wall with papillary muscle dysfunction following acute myocardial infarction, operated on successfully].

    PubMed

    de Lima, R; Perdigão, C; Neves, L; Cravino, J; Dantas, M; Bordalo, A; Pais, F; Diogo, A N; Ferreira, R; Ribeiro, C

    1990-09-01

    The authors present a case of left ventricular free wall rupture post acute myocardial infarction, associated with mitral papillary posterior muscle necrosis, operated by infartectomy and mitral valvular protesis replacement. They refer the various complications occurred during the hospital staying, and discuss its medical and surgical approach. The patient was discharged alive and six months after the infarction keeps a moderate activity. PMID:2257157

  8. Effect of Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction on the Repair of the Injured Enteric Nerve-Interstitial Cells of Cajal-Smooth Muscle Cells Network in Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mu-Cang; Xie, Ming-Zheng; Ma, Bin; Qi, Qing-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) group, and Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD) group. The network of enteric nerves-interstitial cells of Cajal- (ICC-) smooth muscle cells (SMC) in small intestine was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the numbers of cholinergic/nitriergic nerves, and the deep muscular plexus of ICC (ICC-DMP) and connexin43 (Cx43) in small intestine with MODS were significantly decreased. The network integrity of enteric nerves-ICC-SMC was disrupted. The ultrastructures of ICC-DMP, enteric nerves, and SMC were severely damaged. After treatment with DCQD, the damages were repaired and the network integrity of enteric nerves ICC-SMC was significantly recovered. In conclusion, the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal motility dysfunction in MODS in part may be due to the damages to enteric nerves-ICC-SMC network and gap junctions. The therapeutic mechanism of DCQD in part may be that it could repair the damages and maintain the integrity of enteric nerves ICC-SMC network. PMID:25477993

  9. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Berraies, Anissa; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Hamzaoui, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma. PMID:24729717

  10. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  11. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  12. Dietary Salba (Salvia hispanica L) seed rich in α-linolenic acid improves adipose tissue dysfunction and the altered skeletal muscle glucose and lipid metabolism in dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M E; Ferreira, M R; Chicco, A; Lombardo, Y B

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the effect of dietary Salba (chia) seed rich in n-3 α-linolenic acid on the morphological and metabolic aspects involved in adipose tissue dysfunction and the mechanisms underlying the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD). Rats were fed a SRD for 3 months. Thereafter, half the rats continued with SRD while in the other half, corn oil (CO) was replaced by chia seed for 3 months (SRD+chia). In control group, corn starch replaced sucrose. The replacement of CO by chia seed in the SRD reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, cell volume and size distribution, improved lipogenic enzyme activities, lipolysis and the anti-lipolytic action of insulin. In the skeletal muscle lipid storage, glucose phosphorylation and oxidation were normalized. Chia seed reversed the impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthase activity, glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate and GLUT-4 protein levels as well as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. PMID:24120122

  13. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  14. Down-regulation of the mitochondrial matrix peptidase ClpP in muscle cells causes mitochondrial dysfunction and decreases cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Ranjit, Rojina; Qaisar, Rizwan; Nair, Binoj C; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael E; Fok, Wilson C; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-02-01

    The caseinolytic peptidase P (ClpP) is the endopeptidase component of the mitochondrial matrix ATP-dependent ClpXP protease. ClpP degrades unfolded proteins to maintain mitochondrial protein homeostasis and is involved in the initiation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)). Outside of an integral role in the UPR(mt), the cellular function of ClpP is not well characterized in mammalian cells. To investigate the role of ClpP in mitochondrial function, we generated C2C12 muscle cells that are deficient in ClpP using siRNA or stable knockdown using lentiviral transduction. Reduction of ClpP levels by ~70% in C2C12 muscle cells resulted in a number of mitochondrial alterations including reduced mitochondrial respiration and reduced oxygen consumption rate in response to electron transport chain (ETC) complex I and II substrates. The reduction in ClpP altered mitochondrial morphology, changed the expression level of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and blunted UPR(mt) induction. In addition, ClpP deficient cells showed increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased membrane potential. At the cellular level, reduction of ClpP impaired myoblast differentiation, cell proliferation and elevated phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) suggesting an inhibition of translation. Our study is the first to define the effects of ClpP deficiency on mitochondrial function in muscle cells in vitro. In addition, we have uncovered novel effects of ClpP on mitochondrial morphology, cell proliferation and protein translation pathways in muscle cells. PMID:26721594

  15. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  16. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  17. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  18. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  19. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yafi, Faysal A; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man's quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner's sexual experience and the couple's quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  20. A role for p38(MAPK)/HSP27 pathway in smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hedges, J C; Dechert, M A; Yamboliev, I A; Martin, J L; Hickey, E; Weber, L A; Gerthoffer, W T

    1999-08-20

    Smooth muscle cells are exposed to growth factors and cytokines that contribute to pathological states including airway hyperresponsiveness, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and hyperplasia. A common feature of several of these conditions is migration of smooth muscle beyond the initial boundary of the organ. Signal transduction pathways activated by extracellular signals that instigate migration are mostly undefined in smooth muscles. We measured migration of cultured tracheal myocytes in response to platelet-derived growth factor, interleukin-1beta, and transforming growth factor-beta. Cellular migration was blocked by SB203580, an inhibitor of p38(MAPK). Time course experiments demonstrated increased phosphorylation of p38(MAPK). Activation of p38(MAPK) resulted in the phosphorylation of HSP27 (heat shock protein 27), which may modulate F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of p38(MAPK) activity inhibited phosphorylation of HSP27. Adenovirus-mediated expression of activated mutant MAPK kinase 6b(E), an upstream activator for p38(MAPK), increased cell migration, whereas overexpression of p38alpha MAPK dominant negative mutant and an HSP27 phosphorylation mutant blocked cell migration completely. The results indicate that activation of the p38(MAPK) pathway by growth factors and proinflammatory cytokines regulates smooth muscle cell migration and may contribute to pathological states involving smooth muscle dysfunction. PMID:10446196

  1. Mitochondrial Transplantation Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Inhibition of Cholinergic Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Liping; Yu, Xiangyuan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yankai; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Tongfei; Li, Jiansha; Xia, Jingyan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholinergic activity has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness, and alternations of mitochondrial structure and function appear to be involved in many lung diseases including airway hyperresponsiveness. It is crucial to clarify the cause-effect association between mitochondrial dysfunction and cholinergic hyperactivity in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. Male SD rats and cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide administration; mitochondria isolated from airway epithelium were delivered into epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-induced cholinergic hyperactivity in vitro and the airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in vivo were reversed by the transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. The rescue effects of exogenous mitochondria were imitated by the elimination of excessive reactive oxygen species or blockage of muscarinic M3 receptor, but inhibited by M receptor enhancer. Mitochondrial transplantation effectively attenuates cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-stimulated airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of ROS-enhanced epithelial cholinergic hyperactivity. PMID:27279915

  2. Deep dry needling of trigger points located in the lateral pterygoid muscle: Efficacy and safety of treatment for management of myofascial pain and temporomandibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Granados-Nunez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco-Javier; Lopez-Martos, Ricardo; Ruiz-Canela-Mendez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine whether deep dry needling (DDN) of trigger points (TPs) in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) would significantly reduce pain and improve function, compared with methocarbamol/paracetamol medication. Material and Methods Forty-eight patients with chronic myofascial pain located in the LPM were selected and randomly assigned to one of two groups (DDN test group, n=24; drug-treated control group, n=24). The test group received three applications of needling of the LPM once per week for three weeks, while control group patients were given two tablets of a methocarbamol/paracetamol combination every six hours for three weeks. Assessments were carried out pretreatment, 2 and 8 weeks after finishing the treatment. Results A statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was detected for both groups with respect to pain reduction at rest and with mastication, but the DDN test group had significantly better levels of pain reduction. Moreover, statistically significant differences (p<0.05) up to day 70 in the test group were seen with respect to maximum mouth opening, laterality and protrusion movements compared with pretreatment values. Pain reduction in the test group was greater as a function of pain intensity at baseline. The evaluation of efficacy as assessed both by patients/investigators was better for the test group. 41% of the patients receiving the combination drug treatment described unpleasant side effects (mostly drowsiness). Conclusions DDN of TPs in the LPM showed better efficacy in reducing pain and improving maximum mouth opening, laterality, and protrusion movements compared with methocarbamol/paracetamol treatment. No adverse events were observed with respect to DDN. Key words: Myofascial pain syndrome, myofascial trigger points, deep dry needling, lateral pterygoid muscle, randomized controlled trial, temporomandibular disorders. PMID:25662558

  3. Amelioration of palmitate-induced metabolic dysfunction in L6 muscle cells expressing low levels of receptor-interacting protein 140.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Silvana; Turcotte, Lorraine P

    2015-11-01

    We have shown that reduced expression of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) alters the regulation of fatty-acid (FA) oxidation in muscle. To determine whether a high level of FA availability alters the effects of RIP140 on metabolic regulation, L6 myotubes were transfected with or without RNA interference oligonucleotide sequences to reduce RIP140 expression, and then incubated with high levels of palmitic acid, with or without insulin. High levels of palmitate reduced basal (53%-58%) and insulin-treated (24%-44%) FA uptake and oxidation, and increased basal glucose uptake (88%). In cells incubated with high levels of palmitate, low RIP140 increased basal FA uptake and insulin-treated FA oxidation and glucose uptake, and decreased basal glucose uptake and insulin-treated FA uptake. Under basal conditions, low RIP140 increased the mRNA content of FAT/CD36 (159%) and COX4 (61%), as well as the protein content of Nur77 (68%), whereas the mRNA expression of FGF21 (50%) was decreased, as was the protein content of CPT1b (35%) and FGF21 (44%). Under insulin-treated conditions, low RIP140 expression increased the mRNA content of MCAD (84%) and Nur77 (84%), as well as the protein content of Nur77 (23%). Thus, a low level of RIP140 restores the rates of FA uptake in the basal state, in part via a reduction in upstream insulin signaling. Our data also indicate that the protein expression of Nur77 may be modulated by RIP140 when muscle cells are metabolically challenged by high levels of palmitate. PMID:26406163

  4. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  5. Nonlinear Compliance Modulates Dynamic Bronchoconstriction in a Multiscale Airway Model

    PubMed Central

    Hiorns, Jonathan E.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Brook, Bindi S.

    2014-01-01

    The role of breathing and deep inspirations (DI) in modulating airway hyperresponsiveness remains poorly understood. In particular, DIs are potent bronchodilators of constricted airways in nonasthmatic subjects but not in asthmatic subjects. Additionally, length fluctuations (mimicking DIs) have been shown to reduce mean contractile force when applied to airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and tissue strips. However, these observations are not recapitulated on application of transmural pressure (PTM) oscillations (that mimic tidal breathing and DIs) in isolated intact airways. To shed light on this paradox, we have developed a biomechanical model of the intact airway, accounting for strain-stiffening due to collagen recruitment (a large component of the extracellular matrix (ECM)), and dynamic actomyosin-driven force generation by ASM cells. In agreement with intact airway studies, our model shows that PTM fluctuations at particular mean transmural pressures can lead to only limited bronchodilation. However, our model predicts that moving the airway to a more compliant point on the static pressure-radius relationship (which may involve reducing mean PTM), before applying pressure fluctuations, can generate greater bronchodilation. This difference arises from competition between passive strain-stiffening of ECM and force generation by ASM yielding a highly nonlinear relationship between effective airway stiffness and PTM, which is modified by the presence of contractile agonist. Effectively, the airway at its most compliant may allow for greater strain to be transmitted to subcellular contractile machinery. The model predictions lead us to hypothesize that the maximum possible bronchodilation of an airway depends on its static compliance at the PTM about which the fluctuations are applied. We suggest the design of additional experimental protocols to test this hypothesis. PMID:25517167

  6. The Role of the Extracellular Matrix Protein Mindin in Airway Response to Environmental Airways Injury

    PubMed Central

    Frush, Sarah; Li, Zhuowei; Potts, Erin N.; Du, Wanglei; Eu, Jerry P.; Garantziotis, Stavros; He, You-Wen; Foster, W. Michael

    2011-01-01

    mindin in airway smooth muscle contractility after exposure to ozone. PMID:21684833

  7. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  8. MOEBIUS SYNDROME: CHALLENGES OF AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Budić, Ivana; Šurdilović, Dušan; Slavković, Anđelka; Marjanović, Vesna; Stević, Marija; Simić, Dušica

    2016-03-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes. PMID:27276780

  9. LIGHT is a crucial mediator of airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chong, Inn-Wen; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are major health problems globally. Airway epithelial cells play important role in airway remodeling, which is a critical process in the pathogenesis of diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate that LIGHT, an inflammatory factor secreted by T cells after allergen exposure, is responsible for promoting airway remodeling. LIGHT increased primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expressing MMP-9. The induction of EMT was associated with increased NF-κB activation and p300/NF-κB association. The interaction of NF-κB with p300 facilitated NF-κB acetylation, which in turn, was bound to the promoter of ZEB1, resulting in E-cadherin downregulation. LIGHT also stimulated HBECs to produce numerous cytokines/chemokines that could worsen airway inflammation. Furthermore, LIGHT enhanced HBECs to secrete activin A, which increased bronchial smooth muscle cell (BSMC) migration. In contrast, depletion of activin A decreased such migration. The findings suggest a new molecular determinant of LIGHT-mediated pathogenic changes in HBECs and that the LIGHT-related vicious cycle involving HBECs and BSMCs may be a potential target for the treatment of chronic inflammation airway diseases with airway remodeling. PMID:25251281

  10. Patient-Specific Airway Wall Remodeling in Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mona; Kuschner, Ware G; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lung disease affects more than a quarter of the adult population; yet, the mechanics of the airways are poorly understood. The pathophysiology of chronic lung disease is commonly characterized by mucosal growth and smooth muscle contraction of the airways, which initiate an inward folding of the mucosal layer and progressive airflow obstruction. Since the degree of obstruction is closely correlated with the number of folds, mucosal folding has been extensively studied in idealized circular cross sections. However, airflow obstruction has never been studied in real airway geometries; the behavior of imperfect, non-cylindrical, continuously branching airways remains unknown. Here we model the effects of chronic lung disease using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth. We perform finite element analysis of patient-specific Y-branch segments created from magnetic resonance images. We demonstrate that the mucosal folding pattern is insensitive to the specific airway geometry, but that it critically depends on the mucosal and submucosal stiffness, thickness, and loading mechanism. Our results suggests that patient-specific airway models with inherent geometric imperfections are more sensitive to obstruction than idealized circular models. Our models help to explain the pathophysiology of airway obstruction in chronic lung disease and hold promise to improve the diagnostics and treatment of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and respiratory failure. PMID:25821112

  11. Restoring Functional Status: A Long-Term Case Report of Severe Lung and Ventilatory Muscle Pump Dysfunction Involving Recurrent Bacterial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Sobush, Dennis C.; Laatsch, Linda; Lipchik, Randolph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prolonged mechanical ventilation contributes to immobility and deconditioning making efforts to safely discontinue ventilator support desirable. This case report documents how implementing physical therapy treatment interventions, based on the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, can help to restore a person's functional status even after multiple years of mechanical ventilation dependency. Case Description A patient (female; aged 63 years) with severe restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment has survived 34 recurrent pneumonias involving 6 bacterial pathogens while being mechanically ventilated at home. A 3-year study was approved and informed consent obtained for a home exercise program of resistive extremity and inspiratory muscle training along with exercise reconditioning. Tolerable distances walked, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, hours spent on versus off mechanical ventilation, activities performed within and around her home, and community excursions taken were charted. Outcomes Daily time tolerated off the ventilator improved from less than one to 12 hours, distance walked in 6 minutes increased 33%, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures improved 62% and 9.6% respectively. These improvements made out-of-home social excursions possible. Discussion and Conclusions This patient's functional status improved following multiple physical therapy interventions dictated by the evaluation of initial physical therapy examination findings according to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Long term mechanical ventilator dependency in the home environment did not exclude this patient from achieving clinically significant gains in functional status even when having severe restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairment. PMID:22833704

  12. Peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB rescues diaphragm muscle contractile dysfunction in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer M; Kline, William; Canan, Benjamin D; Ricca, Daniel J; Kaspar, Brian; Delfín, Dawn A; DiRienzo, Kelly; Clemens, Paula R; Robbins, Paul D; Baldwin, Albert S; Flood, Pat; Kaumaya, Pravin; Freitas, Michael; Kornegay, Joe N; Mendell, Jerry R; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Guttridge, Denis C; Janssen, Paul M L

    2011-01-01

    Deterioration of diaphragm function is one of the prominent factors that contributes to the susceptibility of serious respiratory infections and development of respiratory failure in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). The NF-κB signaling pathway has been implicated as a contributing factor of dystrophic pathology, making it a potential therapeutic target. Previously, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB via a small NEMO Binding Domain (NBD) peptide was beneficial for reducing pathological features of mdx mice. Now, we stringently test the effectiveness and clinical potential of NBD by treating mdx mice with various formulations of NBD and use diaphragm function as our primary outcome criteria. We found that administering DMSO-soluble NBD rescued 78% of the contractile deficit between mdx and wild-type (WT) diaphragm. Interestingly, synthesis of a GLP NBD peptide as an acetate salt permitted its solubility in water, but as a negative consequence, also greatly attenuated functional efficacy. However, replacing the acetic acid counterion of the NBD peptide with trifluoroacetic acid retained the peptide's water solubility and significantly restored mdx diaphragm contractile function and improved histopathological indices of disease in both diaphragm and limb muscle. Together, these results support the feasibility of using a mass-produced, water-soluble NBD peptide for clinical use. PMID:21267511

  13. Sternohyoid muscle fatigue properties of dy/dy dystrophic mice, an animal model of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2003-10-01

    Humans with merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy have both sucking problems during infancy and sleep-disordered breathing during childhood. We hypothesized that merosin-deficient pharyngeal muscles fatigue faster than normal muscles. This was tested in vitro using sternohyoid muscle from an animal model of this disease, the dy/dy dystrophic mouse. Isometric twitch contraction and half-relaxation times were similar for dy/dy and normal sternohyoid. However, rate of force loss during repetitive 25-Hz train stimulation was markedly diminished in dystrophic compared with normal sternohyoid muscle. Furthermore, force potentiation, which occurred during the early portion of the fatigue-inducing stimulation, had a longer duration in dystrophic compared with normal muscle (approximately 60 versus 20 s). As a result of these two processes, at the end of 2 min of stimulation, force of dystrophic muscle had decreased by 8 +/- 5% and that of normal muscle by 69 +/- 4% (p < 0.0001). The potassium-channel blocker, 3,4-diaminopyridine, increased force of dy/dy sternohyoid muscle during twitch and 25-Hz contractions by 148 +/- 20% (p < 0.00001) and 109 +/- 18% (p < 0.00002), respectively. During repetitive 25-Hz stimulation, force of 3,4-diaminopyridine-treated dystrophic muscle remained significantly higher than that of untreated muscle, despite the early force potentiation being eliminated and fatigue being accelerated. Thus, merosin deficiency reduces fatigue and prolongs the duration of force potentiation. The latter alterations may partially preserve the integrity of upper airway muscle function, without which the severity of pharyngeal complications (feeding problems, sleep-related respiratory dysfunction) might be even more pronounced in the human merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophies. PMID:12840158

  14. Progressive vocal cord dysfunction subsequent to a chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Allan, Patrick F; Abouchahine, Sahar; Harvis, Lee; Morris, Michael J

    2006-06-01

    Chlorine gas inhalation, similar to other toxic gas exposures, can impart a variety of effects to the entire airway ranging from mucous membrane irritation to acute respiratory distress syndrome. The extent and location of damage is determined by numerous situational factors such as the duration of exposure, quantity of gas released, environmental factors, and instituted chemical defense measures. Reactive airways dysfunction and nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness are commonly reported as sequelae to chlorine exposure. This article constitutes the first case of a single antecedent chlorine exposure inducing progressive vocal cord dysfunction. PMID:16293397

  15. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  16. Memory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Memory is the cognitive ability that allows to acquire, store and recall information; its dysfunction is called amnesia and can be a presentation of unilateral ischemic stroke in the territory of the posterior cerebral and anterior choroidal artery as well as subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22377863

  17. Ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth; Carpenter, Christina; Oates, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction may occur after many different disorders ranging from traumatic spinal cord injury to diabetes mellitus. With an understanding of the many facets and nuances of the ejaculatory apparatus, both anatomic and neurologic, the well-versed clinician can proceed along a safe, efficient, and appropriate treatment algorithm to help affected men and their partners achieve parenthood. PMID:24286771

  18. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  19. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  20. Cholesterol loading re-programs the miR-143/145-myocardin axis to convert aortic smooth muscle cells to a dysfunctional macrophage-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Nishi, Hitoo; Long, Xiaochun; Ouimet, Mireille; Savji, Nazir; Martinez, Fernando O.; Cassella, Courtney P.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Ramsey, Stephen A.; Miano, Joseph M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously showed that cholesterol loading in vitro converts mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from a contractile state to one resembling macrophages. In human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques it has become appreciated that ~40% of cells classified as macrophages by histological markers may be of VSMC origin. We therefore sought to gain insight into the molecular regulation of this clinically relevant process. Approach and Results VSMC of mouse (or human) origin were incubated with cyclodextrin-cholesterol complexes for 72 hours, at which time the expression at the protein and mRNA levels of contractile-related proteins were reduced and of macrophage markers increased. Concurrent was down regulation of miR-143/145, which positively regulate the master VSMC-differentiation transcription factor myocardin (MYOCD). Mechanisms were further probed in mouse VSMC. Maintaining the expression of MYOCD or miR-143/145 prevented and reversed phenotypic changes caused by cholesterol loading. Reversal was also seen when cholesterol efflux was stimulated after loading. Notably, despite expression of macrophage markers, bioinformatic analyses showed that cholesterol-loaded cells remained closer to the VSMC state, consistent with impairment in classical macrophage functions of phagocytosis and efferocytosis. In apoE-deficient atherosclerotic plaques, cells positive for VSMC and macrophage markers were found lining the cholesterol-rich necrotic core. Conclusions Cholesterol loading of VSMC converts them to a macrophage–appearing state by downregulating the miR-143/145-myocardin axis. Though these cells would be classified by immunohistochemistry as macrophages in human and mouse plaques, their transcriptome and functional properties imply that their contributions to atherogenesis would not be those of classical macrophages. PMID:25573853

  1. Traumatic brain injury in vivo and in vitro contributes to cerebral vascular dysfunction through impaired gap junction communication between vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Xiang; Mueller, Martin; Hawkins, Bridget E; Mathew, Babu P; Parsley, Margaret A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Hellmich, Helen L; Prough, Donald S; Dewitt, Douglas S

    2014-04-15

    Gap junctions (GJs) contribute to cerebral vasodilation, vasoconstriction, and, perhaps, to vascular compensatory mechanisms, such as autoregulation. To explore the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on vascular GJ communication, we assessed GJ coupling in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells subjected to rapid stretch injury (RSI) in vitro and VSM in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) harvested from rats subjected to fluid percussion TBI in vivo. Intercellular communication was evaluated by measuring fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). In VSM cells in vitro, FRAP increased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) after mild RSI, but decreased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) after moderate or severe RSI. FRAP decreased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) 30 min and 2 h, but increased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) 24 h after RSI. In MCAs harvested from rats 30 min after moderate TBI in vivo, FRAP was reduced significantly (p<0.05), compared to MCAs from rats after sham TBI. In VSM cells in vitro, pretreatment with the peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) scavenger, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron[III], prevented RSI-induced reductions in FRAP. In isolated MCAs from rats treated with the ONOO(-) scavenger, penicillamine, GJ coupling was not impaired by fluid percussion TBI. In addition, penicillamine treatment improved vasodilatory responses to reduced intravascular pressure in MCAs harvested from rats subjected to moderate fluid percussion TBI. These results indicate that TBI reduced GJ coupling in VSM cells in vitro and in vivo through mechanisms related to generation of the potent oxidant, ONOO(-). PMID:24341563

  2. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  3. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Davies, Donna E.; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL–8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4–6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  4. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M; Collins, Jane E; Davies, Donna E; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL-8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4-6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  5. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  6. Systems physiology of the airways in health and obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-09-01

    Fresh air entering the mouth and nose is brought to the blood-gas barrier in the lungs by a repetitively branching network of airways. Provided the individual airway branches remain patent, this airway tree achieves an enormous amplification in cross-sectional area from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. Obstructive lung diseases such as asthma occur when airway patency becomes compromised. Understanding the pathophysiology of these obstructive diseases thus begins with a consideration of the factors that determine the caliber of an individual airway, which include the force balance between the inward elastic recoil of the airway wall, the outward tethering forces of its parenchymal attachments, and any additional forces due to contraction of airway smooth muscle. Other factors may also contribute significantly to airway narrowing, such as thickening of the airway wall and accumulation of secretions in the lumen. Airway obstruction becomes particularly severe when these various factors occur in concert. However, the effect of airway abnormalities on lung function cannot be fully understood only in terms of what happens to a single airway because narrowing throughout the airway tree is invariably heterogeneous and interdependent. Obstructive lung pathologies thus manifest as emergent phenomena arising from the way in which the airway tree behaves a system. These emergent phenomena are studied with clinical measurements of lung function made by spirometry and by mechanical impedance measured with the forced oscillation technique. Anatomically based computational models are linking these measurements to underlying anatomic structure in systems physiology terms. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:423-437. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27340818

  7. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  8. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  9. Compliance Measurements of the Upper Airway in Pediatric Down Syndrome Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J; Shott, Sally R; Amin, Raouf S; Gutmark, Ephraim J

    2016-04-01

    Compliance of soft tissue and muscle supporting the upper airway are two of several factors contributing to pharyngeal airway collapse. We present a novel, minimally invasive method of estimating regional variations in pharyngeal elasticity. Magnetic resonance images for pediatric sleep apnea patients with Down syndrome [9.5 ± 4.3 years (mean age ± standard deviation)] were analyzed to segment airways corresponding to baseline (no mask pressure) and two positive pressures. A three dimensional map was created to evaluate axial and circumferential variation in radial displacements of the airway, dilated by the positive pressures. The displacements were then normalized with respect to the appropriate transmural pressure and radius of an equivalent circle to obtain a measure of airway compliance. The resulting elasticity maps indicated the least and most compliant regions of the pharynx. Airway stiffness of the most compliant region [403 ± 204 (mean ± standard deviation) Pa] decreased with severity of obstructive sleep apnea. The non-linear response of the airway wall to continuous positive airway pressure was patient specific and varied between anatomical locations. We identified two distinct elasticity phenotypes. Patient phenotyping based on airway elasticity can potentially assist clinical practitioners in decision making on the treatments needed to improve airway patency. PMID:26215306

  10. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  11. Neuromuscular dysfunction in nonbacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, W J; Schmidt, R A; Lue, T F; Tanagho, E A

    1987-08-01

    Although chronic nonbacterial prostatitis is common, the condition remains poorly understood and refractory to treatment. Another approach, i.e., a urodynamic explanation, seems warranted. The underlying cause of the symptoms may be an inappropriate spasm of of the distal urethra/external sphincteric unit, leading to increased pressure in the prostatic urethra with a resultant reflux of urine into the prostatic ducts. The presence of urine (sterile or infected) could induce ductal and periductal inflammation, which could further aggravate spasm of the involved pelvic musculature, exacerbating the voiding dysfunction. We present 3 patients in whom this sequence of events was documented radiographically and urodynamically. Consequently, treatment involved modulation of the dysfunction of the distal urethra/external sphincteric unit: (1) reeducation by reassurance and biofeedback was the initial line of therapy; (2) pharmacologic manipulation using alpha-blockers (to affect smooth and striated muscle irritability) and striated muscle relaxants was next tried; (3) finally, in unremitting symptoms, we used selective sacral-root electro-stimulation, successfully fatiguing the involved muscles and relieving the voiding dysfunction. PMID:3497475

  12. Effect of nanodisperse ferrite cobalt (CoFe2O4) particles on contractile reactions in guinea pigs airways.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; D'yakova, E Yu; Nosarev, A V; Zaitseva, T N; Petlina, Z R; Ogorodova, L M; Ageev, B G; Magaeva, A A; Itin, V I; Terekhova, O G

    2010-07-01

    The effect of nanopowder CoFe(2)O(4)on contractile responses of smooth-muscle segments of guinea pigs airways was studied by mechanography. Both in vivo inhalation of nanopowder aerosol or in vitro application of nanopowder to isolated airway segments increased the amplitude of contractile responses to histamine and potentiated the dilatory reaction to adrenergic salbutamol. PMID:21113462

  13. Dysfunctional voiding.

    PubMed

    Chiozza, M L

    2002-01-01

    Wetting may be considered the Cinderella of paediatric medicine. Before discussing dysfunctional voiding, the milestones of the normal development of continence in the child and the definitions used to describe this topic are presented. Bladder storage requires (1): accommodation of increasing volumes of urine at low intravesical pressure and with appropriate sensation; (2): a bladder outlet that is closed and not modified during increase in intra-abdominal pressure; (3): absence of involuntary bladder contractions. Development of continence in the child involves three independent factors maturing concomitantly: (1) development of normal bladder capacity; (2) maturation of urethral sphincter function; (3) development of neural control over bladder-sphincter function. All these processes are discussed. Abnormalities of any of these maturational sequences, which run parallel and overlapping, may result in clinically evident abnormalities of bladder sphincter control. Although dysfunctional voiding (DV) in children is very common its prevalence has not been well studied and, to date, and its origin is not well known. In a correct evaluation of functional voiding we must take into account different elements: the bladder capacity (that increases during the first 8 years of life roughly 30 ml per year), the micturition frequency, post-void residual volumes, bladder dynamics, urinary flow rates. Thus the correct assessment of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction should include a detailed history. Signs of DV range from urge syndrome to complex incontinence patterns during the day and the night. In addition to incontinence problems, children may have frequency, urgency, straining to void, weak or interrupted urinary stream, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and chronic constipation with or without encopresis. DV are also referred in enuretic children who wet the bed more than one time per night and have a functional bladder capacity lower than attended for age

  14. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure

    PubMed Central

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Boyer, Laurent; Taillé, Camille; Delclaux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93) and after (n = 78) methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw), reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3), an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20). Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66) and Slope3 (SC = 0.35). By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8) but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways. PMID:26599006

  15. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Boyer, Laurent; Taillé, Camille; Delclaux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93) and after (n = 78) methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw), reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3), an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20). Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66) and Slope3 (SC = 0.35). By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8) but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways. PMID:26599006

  16. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction. PMID:26276827

  17. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  19. Role of Central Neurotransmission and Chemoreception on Airway Control

    PubMed Central

    Kc, Prabha; Martin, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes work on central neurotransmission, chemoreception and CNS control of cholinergic outflow to the airways. First, we describe the neural transmission of bronchoconstrictive signals from airway afferents to the airway-related vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) via the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) and, second, we characterize evidence for a modulatory effect of excitatory glutamatergic, and inhibitory GABAergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic pathways on AVPN output. Excitatory signals arising from bronchopulmonary afferents and/or the peripheral chemosensory system activate second order neurons within the nTS, via a glutamate-AMPA (alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor signaling pathway. These nTS neurons, using the same neurotransmitter-receptor unit, transmit information to the AVPNs, which in turn convey the central command through descending fibers and airway intramural ganglia to airway smooth muscle, submucosal secretory glands, and the vasculature. The strength and duration of this reflex-induced bronchoconstriction is modulated by GABAergic-inhibitory inputs. In addition, central noradrenergic and serotonergic inhibitory pathways appear to participate in the regulation of cholinergic drive to the tracheobronchial system. Down-regulation of these inhibitory influences results in a shift from inhibitory to excitatory drive, which may lead to increased excitability of AVPNs, heightened airway responsiveness, greater cholinergic outflow to the airways and consequently bronchoconstriction. In summary, centrally coordinated control of airway tone and respiratory drive serve to optimize gas exchange and work of breathing under normal homeostatic conditions. Greater understanding of this process should enhance our understanding of its disruption under pathophysiologic states. PMID:20359553

  20. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285