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Sample records for airway muscle dysfunction

  1. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2014-05-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  2. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  3. CXCL8 histone H3 acetylation is dysfunctional in airway smooth muscle in asthma: regulation by BET.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Rachel L; Patel, Jamie K; John, Alison E; Tatler, Amanda L; Mazengarb, Lisa; Brightling, Christopher E; Knox, Alan J

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation and remodeling and CXCL8 is a CXC chemokine that drives steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. We have shown that airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells isolated from asthmatic individuals secrete more CXCL8 than cells from nonasthmatic individuals. Here we investigated chromatin modifications at the CXCL8 promoter in ASM cells from nonasthmatic and asthmatic donors to further understand how CXCL8 is dysregulated in asthma. ASM cells from asthmatic donors had increased histone H3 acetylation, specifically histone H3K18 acetylation, and increased binding of histone acetyltransferase p300 compared with nonasthmatic donors but no differences in CXCL8 DNA methylation. The acetylation reader proteins Brd3 and Brd4 were bound to the CXCL8 promoter and Brd inhibitors inhibited CXCL8 secretion from ASM cells by disrupting Brd4 and RNA polymerase II binding to the CXCL8 promoter. Our results show a novel dysregulation of CXCL8 transcriptional regulation in asthma characterized by a promoter complex that is abnormal in ASM cells isolated from asthmatic donors and can be modulated by Brd inhibitors. Brd inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy for steroid-resistant inflammation.

  4. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  5. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  6. Clinical significance of upper airway dysfunction in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed Central

    García-Pachón, E.; Martí, J.; Mayos, M.; Casan, P.; Sanchis, J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--To assess the occurrence, functional characteristics and prognostic value of upper airway dysfunction in motor neurone disease, 27 patients unselected for respiratory symptoms were studied. METHODS--Upper airway function was evaluated by analysis of the maximal flow-volume loop. Neurological diagnosis was established from the clinical history and physical examination. The degree of impairment was quantified by the Appel score. RESULTS--Twelve patients (group A) showed abnormalities of the maximal flow-volume loop consistent with flow limitation (seven patients) or instability of upper airway function (gross oscillations of airflow, five patients). The remaining 15 patients (group B) exhibited a normal or generally reduced maximal flow-volume loop, suggestive of muscle weakness. No differences were observed between groups in general physical condition, rate of disease progression, or duration of disease. CONCLUSIONS--Upper airway dysfunction in patients with motor neurone disease was a frequent finding. It was present more often, but not exclusively, in patients with bulbar features and was unrelated to prognosis. PMID:7940430

  7. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  8. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. PMID:27274324

  9. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. PMID:27274324

  10. Clinical characteristics of adult asthma associated with small airway dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kjellberg, S; Houltz, B K; Zetterström, O; Robinson, P D; Gustafsson, Per M

    2016-08-01

    Suboptimal asthma control is common despite modern asthma therapy. The degree of peripheral airway involvement remains unclear and poor medication delivery to these regions might be a contributing reason for this failure in obtaining adequate symptom control. A cohort of 196 adults (median (range) age 44 (18-61) years, 109 females, 54 ex-smokers, six current smokers) with physician-diagnosed asthma were recruited from primary care. Subjects were characterized clinically by interviews, questionnaires, skin prick tests (SPT) and blood eosinophil counts. Lung function was assessed by spirometry, impulse oscillometry (IOS) and nitrogen multiple breath washout (N2 MBW). IOS assessed peripheral airway resistance (FDR, frequency dependence of resistance). N2 MBW assessed global ventilation inhomogeneity (LCI, lung clearance index), specific indices of peripheral airway function (Scond × VT and Sacin × VT; VT, tidal volume), and inter-regional inhomogeneity (specific ventilation ratio). Never-smoking healthy cohorts of 158 and 400 adult subjects provided local reference values for IOS and N2 MBW variables, respectively. Peripheral airway dysfunction was detected in 31% (FDR or specific ventilation ratio) to 47% (Scond x VT) of subjects. Risk factors for peripheral airway dysfunction were identified. Among subjects with low FEV1 and either positive smoking history and/or blood eosinophilia (>4.0%), 63% had abnormality across all peripheral airway outcomes, whilst only one subject was completely normal. Abnormal peripheral airway function was present in a large proportion of adult asthmatics at baseline. Reduced FEV1, a positive smoking history, and/or blood eosinophilia identified "a small airway asthma subtype" that might benefit from peripheral airway targeted therapy. PMID:27492518

  11. Upper airway muscles awake and asleep.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric

    2002-06-01

    Upper airway (UA) structures are involved in different respiratory and non-respiratory tasks. The coordination of agonist and antagonist UA dilators is responsible for their mechanical function and their ability to maintain UA patency throughout the respiratory cycle. The activity of these muscles is linked with central respiratory activity but also depends on UA pressure changes and is greatly influenced by sleep. UA muscles are involved in determining UA resistance and stability (i.e. closing pressure), and the effect of sleep on these variables may be accounted for by its effect on tonic and phasic skeletal muscle activities. The mechanical effects of UA dilator contraction also depend on their physiological properties (capacity to generate tension in vitro, activity of the anaerobic enzymatic pathway, histo-chemical characteristics that may differ between subjects who may or may not have sleep-related obstructive breathing disorders). These characteristics may represent an adaptive process to an increased resistive loading of these muscles. The apparent discrepancy between the occurrence of UA closure and an increased capacity to generate tension in sleep apnea patients may be due to a reduction in the effectiveness of UA muscle contraction in these patients; such an increase in tissue stiffness could be accounted for by peri-muscular tissue characteristics. Therefore, understanding of UA muscle physiological characteristics should take into account its capacity for force production and its mechanical coupling with other UA tissues. Important research goals for the future will be to integrate these issues with other physiological features of the disease, such as UA size and dimension, histological characteristics of UA tissues and the effect of sleep on muscle function. Such integration will better inform understanding of the role of pharyngeal UA muscles in the pathophysiology of the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. PMID:12531123

  12. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction.

  13. Restoring airway epithelial barrier dysfunction: a new therapeutic challenge in allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Steelant, B; Seys, S F; Boeckxstaens, G; Akdis, C A; Ceuppens, J L; Hellings, P W

    2016-09-01

    An intact functional mucosal barrier is considered to be crucial for the maintenance of airway homeostasis as it protects the host immune system from exposure to allergens and noxious environmental triggers. Recent data provided evidence for the contribution of barrier dysfunction to the development of inflammatory diseases in the airways, skin and gut. A defective barrier has been documented in chronic rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it remains to be elucidated to what extent primary (genetic) versus secondary (inflammatory) mechanisms drive barrier dysfunction. The precise pathogenesis of barrier dysfunction in patients with chronic mucosal inflammation and its implications on tissue inflammation and systemic absorption of exogenous particles are only partly understood. Since epithelial barrier defects are linked with chronicity and severity of airway inflammation, restoring the barrier integrity may become a useful approach in the treatment of allergic diseases. We here provide a state-of-the-art review on epithelial barrier dysfunction in upper and lower airways as well as in the intestine and the skin and on how barrier dysfunction can be restored from a therapeutic perspective.

  14. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  15. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  16. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  17. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  18. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  19. Acute expanded perlite exposure with persistent reactive airway dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Du, Chung-Li; Wang, Jung-Der; Chu, Po-Chin; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon

    2010-01-01

    Expanded perlite has been assumed as simple nuisance, however during an accidental spill out in Taiwan, among 24 exposed workers followed for more than 6 months, three developed persisted respiratory symptoms and positive provocation tests were compatible with reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. During simulation experiment expanded perlite is shown to be very dusty and greatly exceed current exposure permission level. Review of literature and evidence, though exposure of expanded perlite below permission level may be generally safe, precautionary protection of short term heavy exposure is warranted.

  20. Muscle redundancy does not imply robustness to muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kutch, Jason J.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that muscle redundancy grants the CNS numerous options to perform a task. Does muscle redundancy, however, allow sufficient robustness to compensate for loss or dysfunction of even a single muscle? Are all muscles equally redundant? We combined experimental and computational approaches to establish the limits of motor robustness for static force production. In computer- controlled cadaveric index fingers, we find that only a small subset (<5%) of feasible forces is robust to loss of any one muscle. Importantly, the loss of certain muscles compromises force production significantly more than others. Further computational modeling of a multi-joint, multi-muscle leg demonstrates that this severe lack of robustness generalizes to whole limbs. These results provide a biomechanical basis to begin to explain why redundant motor systems can be vulnerable to even mild neuromuscular pathology. PMID:21420091

  1. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME.

  2. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME. PMID:26998359

  3. Contribution of airway closure to chronic postbronchiolitis airway dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, Ronald L; Tuffaha, Amjad

    2004-03-01

    Genetically susceptible Brown Norway rats develop a chronic asthmalike syndrome after recovering from viral bronchiolitis at an early age. We hypothesized that airway closure is an important mechanism of airflow obstruction in postbronchiolitis rats. Rats were studied 8-12 wk after inoculation with Sendai virus or sterile vehicle at 3-4 wk of age. Under light pentobarbital anesthesia, rats were instrumented with an orotracheal catheter and an esophageal pressure monitor and placed in a total body plethysmograph. Lung volumes and forced-expiratory maneuvers were measured using the Boyle's law method and software-controlled valving of positive and negative pressures to elicit lung inflations and rapid deflations; pulmonary resistance was measured during spontaneous tidal breathing; and quasi-static pressure-volume curves were obtained with passive inflations and deflations in fully anesthetized, paralyzed rats. Compared with controls, the postbronchiolitis rats had elevated pulmonary resistance and reduced forced-expiratory volume in 0.2 s. Most of the reduced forced-expiratory volume in 0.2 s was associated with reduced forced vital capacity, indicating premature airway closure as a prominent mechanism. The reduced airflow in postbronchiolitis rats was highly dependent on lung volume, being nearly normal at 70% lung capacity, but sevenfold less than normal at 30% lung capacity. Increased respiratory system hysteresis between functional reserve capacity and total lung capacity was evidence for increased airway closure at normal end-expiratory lung volumes in postbronchiolitis rats. We conclude that airway instability and closure is a prominent mechanism of the chronic airway dysfunction in rats that have recovered from viral bronchiolitis at an early age. PMID:14594863

  4. A theoretical analysis of the effect of airway smooth muscle load on airway narrowing.

    PubMed

    Macklem, P T

    1996-01-01

    We used published data for the elastic properties of a 2-mm outer-diameter canine bronchus and assumed values for the thickness of the wall components and lung parenchymal shear modulus to estimate the load on airway smooth muscle and its effect on airway narrowing. The following relationships were calculated: (1) luminal and smooth muscle radii of curvature and transmural pressure; (2) the isovolume, transmural pressures developed by the smooth muscle to narrow the lumen at distending pressures of 20, 10, 5, and 2 cm H2O; (3) the equilibrium tension developed by, and thus the load on, the airway smooth muscle as a function of smooth muscle length during isovolume bronchoconstriction. From these calculations a smooth muscle length-tension diagram was drawn allowing the interactions between submucosal thickening, peribronchial thickening, load, and smooth muscle contractility to be analyzed. The analysis indicates that: (1) the load on smooth muscle decreases by more than an order of magnitude between a distending pressure of 20 and 2 cm H2O; (2) increasing smooth muscle contractility has more effect at large rather than at small distending pressures; (3) peribronchial inflammation decreases both load and the slope of the relationship between peribronchial and pleural pressures. Decreases in load may be an important mechanism producing excessive bronchoconstriction in asthma. PMID:8542167

  5. Influence of sleep on response to negative airway pressure of tensor palatini muscle and retropalatal airway.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; White, D P

    1993-11-01

    Increased retropalatal airway resistance may be caused by a sleep-induced loss of palatal muscle activity and a diminished ability of these muscles to respond to the increasing intrapharyngeal negative pressure that develops during sleep. To investigate these possibilities, in six normal subjects, we determined the effect of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep on 1) the tensor palatini (TP) electromyogram (EMG) response to rapid-onset negative-pressure generations (NPG) in the upper airway and 2) the collapsibility of the retropalatal airway during these NPGs. During wakefulness, the change in TP EMG from basal to peak levels (during NPG) was 19.8 +/- 3.2 arbitrary units (P < 0.005). This was markedly reduced during sleep (3.6 +/- 1.5 arbitrary units; P < 0.001). The latency of the TP EMG response was 48.5 +/- 5.6 ms during wakefulness but was prolonged during sleep (105.0 +/- 12.2 ms; P < 0.02). The peak transpalatal pressure during NPG (a measure of airway collapse) was 2.1 +/- 0.7 cmH2O during wakefulness and increased to 5.3 +/- 0.8 cmH2O during sleep (P < 0.05). We conclude that the brisk reflex response of the TP muscle to negative pressure during wakefulness is markedly reduced during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, in association with a more collapsible retropalatal airway. We speculate that the reduction in this TP reflex response contributes to retropalatal airway narrowing during sleep in normal subjects.

  6. Platelet membranes induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Grenegård, Magnus; Lindström, Eva G

    2011-01-01

    The role of platelets in airway disease is poorly understood although they have been suggested to influence on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). Platelets have been found localized in the airways in autopsy material from asthmatic patients and have been implicated in airway remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of various platelet fractions on proliferation of ASMC obtained from guinea pigs (GP-ASMC) and humans (H-ASMC). Proliferation of ASMC was measured by the MTS assay and the results confirmed by measurements of the DNA content. A key observation was that the platelet membrane preparations induced a significant increase in the proliferation of both GP-ASMC (129.9 ± 3.0 %) and H-ASMC (144.8 ± 12.2). However, neither supernatants from lysed or filtrated thrombin stimulated platelets induced ASMC proliferation to the same extent as the membrane preparation. We have previously shown that platelet-induced proliferation is dependent on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways. In the present work we established that platelet membrane-induced ASMC proliferation was reduced in the presence of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI and the 5-LOX inhibitor AA-861. In conclusion, our results showed that platelet membranes significantly induced ASMC proliferation, demonstrating that the mitogenic effect of platelets and platelet membranes on ASMC is mainly due to membrane-associated factors. The effects of platelet membranes were evident on both GP-ASMC and H-ASMC and involved 5-LOX and ROS. These new findings are of importance in understanding the mechanisms contributing to airway remodeling and may contribute to the development of new pharmacological tools in the treatment of inflammatory airway diseases.

  7. Impact of obstructive apnea syndrome on upper airway respiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Eva

    2005-07-28

    This article reviews studies of upper airway muscles in humans, with emphasis on muscle fiber structural and electrophysiological changes observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The concept of OSAS as a progressive disease is discussed and also possible causes. These include local nervous lesions in the upper airway, both motor and sensory. Previous muscle biopsy studies have given evidence for motor neuron lesions such as, e.g., the phenomenon of type grouping in histological sections. New data obtained with concentric needle EMG recordings from the palatopharyngeus muscles are also presented. In 10/12 OSAS patients there were typical findings indicating motor neuropathy (reduced EMG activity at maximal voluntary effort, long and polyphasic motor-unit potentials and, in two cases, spontaneous denervation activity), whereas such findings were only present in 3/15 patients with habitual snoring. This supports the hypothesis that progression from habitual snoring to the clinical disease of OSAS could be attributed to peripheral neurogenic lesions. PMID:16054444

  8. Mechanisms of BDNF regulation in asthmatic airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin produced by airway smooth muscle (ASM), enhances inflammation effects on airway contractility, supporting the idea that locally produced growth factors influence airway diseases such as asthma. We endeavored to dissect intrinsic mechanisms regulating endogenous, as well as inflammation (TNF-α)-induced BDNF secretion in ASM of nonasthmatic vs. asthmatic humans. We focused on specific Ca(2+) regulation- and inflammation-related signaling cascades and quantified BDNF secretion. We find that TNF-α enhances BDNF release by ASM cells, via several mechanisms relevant to asthma, including transient receptor potential channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 (but not TRPC1), ERK 1/2, PI3K, PLC, and PKC cascades, Rho kinase, and transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Basal BDNF expression and secretion are elevated in asthmatic ASM and increase further with TNF-α exposure, involving many of these regulatory mechanisms. We conclude that airway BDNF secretion is regulated at multiple levels, providing a basis for autocrine effects of BDNF under conditions of inflammation and disease, with potential downstream influences on contractility and remodeling. PMID:27317689

  9. Tumor necrosis factor regulates NMDA receptor-mediated airway smooth muscle contractile function and airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Anaparti, Vidyanand; Pascoe, Christopher D; Jha, Aruni; Mahood, Thomas H; Ilarraza, Ramses; Unruh, Helmut; Moqbel, Redwan; Halayko, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    We have shown that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) are receptor-operated calcium entry channels in human airway smooth muscle (HASM) during contraction. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) augments smooth muscle contractility by influencing pathways that regulate intracellular calcium flux and can alter NMDA-R expression and activity in cortical neurons and glial cells. We hypothesized that NMDA-R-mediated Ca(2+) and contractile responses of ASM can be altered by inflammatory mediators, including TNF. In cultured HASM cells, we assessed TNF (10 ng/ml, 48 h) effect on NMDA-R subunit abundance by quantitative PCR, confocal imaging, and immunoblotting. We observed dose- and time-dependent changes in NMDA-R composition: increased obligatory NR1 subunit expression and altered regulatory NR2 and inhibitory NR3 subunits. Measuring intracellular Ca(2+) flux in Fura-2-loaded HASM cultures, we observed that TNF exposure enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization and changed the temporal pattern of Ca(2+) flux in individual myocytes induced by NMDA, an NMDA-R selective analog of glutamate. We measured airway responses to NMDA in murine thin-cut lung slices (TCLS) from allergen-naive animals and observed significant airway contraction. However, NMDA acted as a bronchodilator in TCLS from house dust mice-challenged mice and in allergen-naive TCLS subjected to TNF exposure. All contractile or bronchodilator responses were blocked by a selective NMDA-R antagonist, (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate, and bronchodilator responses were prevented by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) or indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). Collectively, we show that TNF augments NMDA-R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization in HASM cells, whereas in multicellular TCLSs allergic inflammation and TNF exposure leads to NMDA-R-mediated bronchodilation. These findings reveal the unique contribution of ionotrophic NMDA-R to airway hyperreactivity.

  10. Effect of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle remodeling in an equine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Gélinas-Lymburner, Emilie; David, Florent; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that airway smooth muscle remodeling is an early event in asthma, but whether it remains a dynamic process late in the course of the disease is unknown. Moreover, little is known about the effects of an antigenic exposure on chronically established smooth muscle remodeling. We measured the effects of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle in the central and peripheral airways of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring airway disease that shares similarities with chronic asthma. Heaves-affected horses (n = 6) and age-matched control horses (n = 5) were kept on pasture before being exposed to indoor antigens for 30 days to induce airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. Peripheral lung and endobronchial biopsies were collected before and after antigenic exposure by thoracoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and enzymatic labeling were used for morphometric analyses of airway smooth muscle mass and proliferative and apoptotic myocytes. In the peripheral airways, heaves-affected horses had twice as much smooth muscle as control horses. Remodeling was associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia and in situ proliferation, without reduced apoptosis. Further antigenic exposure had no effect on the morphometric data. In central airways, proliferating myocytes were increased compared with control horses only after antigenic exposure. Peripheral airway smooth muscle mass is stable in chronically affected animals subjected to antigenic exposure. This increased mass is maintained in a dynamic equilibrium by an elevated cellular turnover, suggesting that targeting smooth muscle proliferation could be effective at decreasing chronic remodeling.

  11. Airway smooth muscle and bronchospasm: fluctuating, fluidizing, freezing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Trepat, Xavier; Nguyen, Trang T. B.; Lenormand, Guillaume; Oliver, Madavi; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    We review here four recent findings that have altered in a fundamental way our understanding of airways smooth muscle (ASM), its dynamic responses to physiological loading, and their dominant mechanical role in bronchospasm. These findings highlight ASM remodeling processes that are innately out-of-equilibrium and dynamic, and bring to the forefront a striking intersection between topics in condensed matter physics and ASM cytoskeletal biology. By doing so, they place in a new light the role of enhanced ASM mass in airway hyper-responsiveness as well as in the failure of a deep inspiration to relax the asthmatic airway. These findings have established that (i) ASM length is equilibrated dynamically, not statically; (ii) ASM dynamics closely resemble physical features exhibited by so-called soft glassy materials; (iii) static force-length relationships fail to describe dynamically contracted ASM states; (iv) stretch fluidizes the ASM cytoskeleton. Taken together, these observations suggest that at the origin of the bronchodilatory effect of a deep inspiration, and its failure in asthma, may lie glassy dynamics of the ASM cell. PMID:18514592

  12. Structural and functional changes in the airway smooth muscle of asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Seow, C Y; Schellenberg, R R; Paré, P D

    1998-11-01

    It has been recognized since the early 1920s that the amount of smooth muscle in asthmatic subjects' airways is markedly increased. More recent studies have confirmed that in fatal asthma there is a significant increase in the thickness of airway smooth muscle. For subjects who have had asthma and who died for other reasons or had a lobectomy, the increase in muscle layer thickness is less striking. An increase in smooth muscle mass could have a dual effect on airway narrowing: one due to the thickening of airway wall, the other due to a concomitant increase in force generation. However, it is not known whether the increased muscle mass, due either to hypertrophy or hyperplasia, is accompanied by an increase in force. Proliferation of smooth muscle cells often produces noncontractile cells in vitro. Comparison of force generation by muscle preparations from asthmatic and control airways shows conflicting results, with some studies demonstrating an increase in force in asthmatic muscle preparations and others showing no increase. The discrepancy could be due to a failure to take into account the length-tension relationship of the muscle preparations in some studies. No force velocity data are available for human airway smooth muscle. However, there is some evidence for an increased amount of shortening in airway smooth muscle preparations from patients with asthma. This could be due to an increase in force generation and/or a decrease in tissue elastance in asthmatic airways. Muscle contractility and tissue elastance are in turn influenced by cytokines, matrix-degrading enzymes, and other inflammatory mediators present in the airways of asthmatic subjects. Data from in vitro studies of a canine "asthma model" indicate an increase in both shortening velocity and amount of shortening compared with littermate control animals. An increase in the compliance of the parallel elastic element of the sensitized airway preparation could account for the mechanical alterations

  13. Influence of wakefulness on pharyngeal airway muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu‐Lun; Jordan, Amy S; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew; Heinzer, Raphael A; Eikermann, Matthias; Schory, Karen; Dover, Louise; White, David P

    2007-01-01

    Background Whether loss of wakefulness itself can influence pharyngeal dilator muscle activity and responsiveness is currently unknown. A study was therefore undertaken to assess the isolated impact of sleep on upper airway muscle activity after minimising respiratory/mechanical inputs. Methods Ten healthy subjects were studied. Genioglossus (GG), tensor palatini (TP) and diaphragm (DIA) electromyography (EMG), ventilation and sleep‐wake status were recorded. Non‐invasive positive pressure ventilation was applied. Expiratory pressure was adjusted to yield the lowest GGEMG, thereby minimising airway negative pressure (mechanoreceptor) effects. Inspiratory pressure, respiratory rate and inspiratory time were adjusted until the subjects ceased spontaneous ventilation, thereby minimising central respiratory input. Muscle activity during wakefulness, wake‐sleep transitions, stable non‐rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were evaluated in the supine position. Results In transitions from wakefulness to sleep, significant decrements were observed in both mean GGEMG and TPEMG (1.6 (0.5)% to 1.3 (0.4)% of maximal GGEMG; 4.3 (2.3)% to 3.7 (2.1)% of maximal TPEMG). Compared with sleep onset, the activity of TP during stable NREM sleep and REM sleep was further decreased (3.7 (2.1)% vs 3.0 (2.0)% vs 3.0 (2.0)% of maximal EMG). However, GGEMG was only further reduced during REM sleep (1.3 (0.4)% vs 1.0 (0.3)% vs 1.1 (0.4)% of maximal EMG). Conclusion This study suggests that wakefulness per se, independent of respiratory/mechanical stimuli, can influence pharyngeal dilator muscle activity. PMID:17389755

  14. IL-6 trans-signaling increases expression of airways disease genes in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mac B.; Deshpande, Deepak A.; Chou, Jeffery; Cui, Wei; Smith, Shelly; Langefeld, Carl; Hastie, Annette T.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic data suggest that IL-6 trans-signaling may have a pathogenic role in the lung; however, the effects of IL-6 trans-signaling on lung effector cells have not been investigated. In this study, human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells were treated with IL-6 (classical) or IL-6+sIL6R (trans-signaling) for 24 h and gene expression was measured by RNAseq. Intracellular signaling and transcription factor activation were assessed by Western blotting and luciferase assay, respectively. The functional effect of IL-6 trans-signaling was determined by proliferation assay. IL-6 trans-signaling had no effect on phosphoinositide-3 kinase and Erk MAP kinase pathways in HASM cells. Both classical and IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM involves activation of Stat3. However, the kinetics of Stat3 phosphorylation by IL-6 trans-signaling was different than classical IL-6 signaling. This was further reflected in the differential gene expression profile by IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM cells. Under IL-6 trans-signaling conditions 36 genes were upregulated, including PLA2G2A, IL13RA1, MUC1, and SOD2. Four genes, including CCL11, were downregulated at least twofold. The expression of 112 genes was divergent between IL-6 classical and trans-signaling, including the genes HILPDA, NNMT, DAB2, MUC1, WWC1, and VEGFA. Pathway analysis revealed that IL-6 trans-signaling induced expression of genes involved in regulation of airway remodeling, immune response, hypoxia, and glucose metabolism. Treatment of HASM cells with IL-6+sIL6R induced proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting a role for IL-6 trans-signaling in asthma pathogenesis. These novel findings demonstrate differential effect of IL-6 trans-signaling on airway cells and identify IL-6 trans-signaling as a potential modifier of airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26001777

  15. Models to study airway smooth muscle contraction in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro: implications in understanding asthma.

    PubMed

    Wright, David; Sharma, Pawan; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Rissé, Paul-Andre; Ngo, Melanie; Maarsingh, Harm; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jha, Aruni; Halayko, Andrew J; West, Adrian R

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic obstructive airway disease characterised by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway wall remodelling. The effector of airway narrowing is the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM), yet the question of whether an inherent or acquired dysfunction in ASM contractile function plays a significant role in the disease pathophysiology remains contentious. The difficulty in determining the role of ASM lies in limitations with the models used to assess contraction. In vivo models provide a fully integrated physiological response but ASM contraction cannot be directly measured. Ex vivo and in vitro models can provide more direct assessment of ASM contraction but the loss of factors that may modulate ASM responsiveness and AHR, including interaction between multiple cell types and disruption of the mechanical environment, precludes a complete understanding of the disease process. In this review we detail key advantages of common in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro models of ASM contraction, as well as emerging tissue engineered models of ASM and whole airways. We also highlight important findings from each model with respect to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  16. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Case reports of persistent airways hyperreactivity following high-level irritant exposures.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S M; Weiss, M A; Bernstein, I L

    1985-07-01

    Two individuals developed an asthma-like illness after a single exposure to high levels of an irritating aerosol, vapor, fume, or smoke. Symptoms developed within a few hours. A consistent physiologic accompaniment was airways hyperreactivity, with the two subjects showing positive methacholine challenge tests. No documented preexisting respiratory illness was identified, nor did subjects relate past respiratory complaints. Respiratory symptoms and airways hyperreactivity persisted for at least four years after the incident. The incriminated etiologic agents all shared a common characteristic of being irritant in nature. Bronchial biopsy specimens showed an airways inflammatory response. This report suggests that acute high-level irritant exposures may produce an asthma-like syndrome in some individuals, with long-term sequelae and chronic airways disease. Nonimmunologic mechanisms seems to be operative in the pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  17. Targeting the airway smooth muscle for asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca

    2009-10-01

    Asthma is a complex respiratory disease whose incidence has increased worldwide in the last decade. Currently there is no cure for asthma. Although bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory medications are effective medicines in some asthmatic patients, it is clear that an unmet therapeutic need persists for a subpopulation of individuals with severe asthma. This chronic lung disease is characterized by airflow limitation, lung inflammation, and remodeling that includes increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition to its contractile properties, the ASM also contributes to the inflammatory process by producing active mediators, which modify the extracellular matrix composition and interact with inflammatory cells. These undesirable functions make interventions aimed at reducing ASM abundance an attractive strategy for novel asthma therapies. The following three mechanisms could limit the accumulation of smooth muscle: decreased cell proliferation, augmented cell apoptosis, and reduced cell migration into the smooth muscle layer. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway or statins hold promise for asthma treatment, because they exhibit anti-inflammatory, antimigratory, and antiproliferative effects in preclinical and clinical studies, and they can target the smooth muscle. This review will discuss current knowledge of ASM biology and identify gaps in the field to stimulate future investigations of the cellular mechanisms that control ASM overabundance in asthma. Targeting ASM has the potential to be an innovative venue of treatment for patients with asthma.

  18. Contribution of air pollution to COPD and small airway dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Berend, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Although in many Western countries levels of ambient air pollution have been improving with the setting of upper limits and better urban planning, air pollution in developing countries and particularly those with rapid industrialization has become a major global problem. Together with increased motor vehicle ownership and traffic congestion, there is a growing issue with airborne particles of respirable size. These particles are thought responsible for respiratory and cardiovascular effects and have also been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. The pathologic effects in the lung are mediated via inflammatory pathways and involve oxidative stress similar to cigarette smoking. These effects are seen in the peripheral airways where the smaller particle fractions are deposited and lead to airway remodelling. However, emphysema and loss of bronchioles seen with cigarette smoking have not been described with ambient air pollution, and there are few studies specifically looking at peripheral airway function. Definitive evidence of air pollution causing COPD is lacking and a different study design is required to link air pollution and COPD.

  19. Contribution of air pollution to COPD and small airway dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Berend, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Although in many Western countries levels of ambient air pollution have been improving with the setting of upper limits and better urban planning, air pollution in developing countries and particularly those with rapid industrialization has become a major global problem. Together with increased motor vehicle ownership and traffic congestion, there is a growing issue with airborne particles of respirable size. These particles are thought responsible for respiratory and cardiovascular effects and have also been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. The pathologic effects in the lung are mediated via inflammatory pathways and involve oxidative stress similar to cigarette smoking. These effects are seen in the peripheral airways where the smaller particle fractions are deposited and lead to airway remodelling. However, emphysema and loss of bronchioles seen with cigarette smoking have not been described with ambient air pollution, and there are few studies specifically looking at peripheral airway function. Definitive evidence of air pollution causing COPD is lacking and a different study design is required to link air pollution and COPD. PMID:26412571

  20. Insulin NO-dependent action on airways smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Papayianni, M; Gourgoulianis, K I; Molyvdas, P A

    2001-02-01

    In order to find out how insulin acts on airway smooth muscle and which mechanisms could be involved, we studied the effect of insulin on contraction induced, first, by KCl and, second, by Acetylcholine (Ach), before and after epithelium removal, and finally in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Tracheal smooth muscle strips from 24 rabbits, 6 being used for each experiment. Each muscle strip was pretreated with a solution containing either 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) Ach and increasing doses of insulin (range 10(-10)--10(-5) M) in the presence or absence of 10(-4) M L-NAME. A reference curve for contraction evoked by 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) M Ach in the presence or absence of 10(-4) M L-NAME was recorded each time before the pretreatment mentioned above. Insulin evoked a concentration-dependent inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction, induced by 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) M Ach. After epithelium removal, insulin (10(-8), 10(-7) M) evoked statistically significant increases to the contractions induced by 10(-5) M Ach compared to the contractions induced by 10(-5) M Ach and insulin in the presence of epithelium (P < 0.05). These increases were higher when 10(-4) M l-NAME was added to the bath (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate that insulin inhibits tracheal smooth muscle contraction by acting on epithelium and releasing NO.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of cytokine function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Deborah; Damera, Gautam; Sukkar, Maria B.; Tliba, Omar

    2009-01-01

    The immuno-modulatory properties of airway smooth muscle have become of increasing importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and structural remodeling of the airway wall in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ASM cells respond to many cytokines, growth factors and lipid mediators to produce a wide array of immuno-modulatory molecules which may in turn orchestrate and perpetuate the disease process in asthma and COPD. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured ASM, few have identified intracellular signaling pathways by which cytokines modulate or induce these cellular responses. In this review we provide an overview of the transcriptional mechanisms as well as intracellular signaling pathways regulating cytokine functions in ASM cells. The recent discovery of toll-like receptors in ASM cells represents a significant development in our understanding of the immuno-modulatory capabilities of ASM cells. Thus, we also review emerging evidence of the inflammatory response to toll-like receptor activation in ASM cells. PMID:19393330

  2. Airway mechanics and methods used to visualize smooth muscle dynamics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P R; McParland, B E; Mitchell, H W; Noble, P B; Politi, A Z; Ressmeyer, A R; West, A R

    2009-10-01

    Contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by the physiological, structural and mechanical environment in the lung. We review two in vitro techniques, lung slices and airway segment preparations, that enable in situ ASM contraction and airway narrowing to be visualized. Lung slices and airway segment approaches bridge a gap between cell culture and isolated ASM, and whole animal studies. Imaging techniques enable key upstream events involved in airway narrowing, such as ASM cell signalling and structural and mechanical events impinging on ASM, to be investigated.

  3. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  4. Respiratory dysfunction in ventilated patients: can inspiratory muscle training help?

    PubMed

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A; Paratz, J D; Boots, R J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with prolonged and difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. This dysfunction in ventilator-dependent patients is multifactorial: there is evidence that inspiratory muscle weakness is partially explained by disuse atrophy secondary to ventilation, and positive end-expiratory pressure can further reduce muscle strength by negatively shifting the length-tension curve of the diaphragm. Polyneuropathy is also likely to contribute to apparent muscle weakness in critically ill patients, and nutritional and pharmaceutical effects may further compound muscle weakness. Moreover, psychological influences, including anxiety, may contribute to difficulty in weaning. There is recent evidence that inspiratory muscle training is safe and feasible in selected ventilator-dependent patients, and that this training can reduce the weaning period and improve overall weaning success rates. Extrapolating from evidence in sports medicine, as well as the known effects of inspiratory muscle training in chronic lung disease, a theoretical model is proposed to describe how inspiratory muscle training enhances weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Possible mechanisms include increased protein synthesis (both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibres), enhanced limb perfusion via dampening of a sympathetically-mediated metaboreflex, reduced lactate levels and modulation of the perception of exertion, resulting in less dyspnoea and enhanced exercise capacity.

  5. Functional significance of increased airway smooth muscle in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R K; Wiggs, B R; Kuwano, K; Hogg, J C; Paré, P D

    1993-06-01

    Using a computational model, we investigated the effect of the morphologically determined increased airway smooth muscle mass, adventitial mass, and submucosal mass observed in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the increase in airway resistance in response to a bronchoconstricting stimulus. The computational model of Wiggs et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 69: 849-860, 1990) was modified in such a way that smooth muscle shortening was limited by the maximal stress that the muscle could develop at the constricted length. Increased adventitial thickness was found to increase constriction by reducing parenchymal interdependence. Increased submucosal thickness led to greater luminal occlusion for any degree of smooth muscle shortening. Increased muscle thickness allowed greater smooth muscle shortening against the elastic loads provided by parenchymal interdependence and airway wall stiffness. We found that for constant airway mechanics, as reflected by the passive area-pressure curves of the airways, the increased muscle mass is likely to be the most important abnormality responsible for the increased resistance observed in response to bronchoconstricting stimuli in asthma and COPD. For a given maximal muscle stress, greater muscle thickness allows the development of greater tension and thus more constriction of the lumen. PMID:8365980

  6. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome from acute inhalation of a dishwasher detergent powder.

    PubMed

    Hannu, Timo J; Riihimäki, Vesa E; Piirilä, Päivi L

    2012-01-01

    Reactive airway dysfunction syndrome, a type of occupational asthma without a latency period, is induced by irritating vapour, fumes or smoke. The present report is the first to describe a case of reactive airway dysfunction syndrome caused by acute exposure to dishwater detergent containing sodium metasilicate and sodium dichloroisocyanurate. The diagnosis was based on exposure data, clinical symptoms and signs, as well as respiratory function tests. A 43-year-old nonatopic male apprentice cook developed respiratory symptoms immediately after exposure to a cloud of detergent powder that was made airborne by vigorous shaking of the package. In spirometry, combined obstructive and restrictive ventilatory impairment developed, and the histamine challenge test revealed bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Even routine handling of a strongly caustic detergent, such as filling a dishwasher container, is not entirely risk free and should be performed with caution. PMID:22679618

  7. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome from acute inhalation of dishwasher detergent powder

    PubMed Central

    Hannu, Timo J; Riihimäki, Vesa E; Piirilä, Päivi L

    2012-01-01

    Reactive airway dysfunction syndrome, a type of occupational asthma without a latency period, is induced by irritating vapour, fumes or smoke. The present report is the first to describe a case of reactive airway dysfunction syndrome caused by acute exposure to dishwater detergent containing sodium metasilicate and sodium dichloroisocyanurate. The diagnosis was based on exposure data, clinical symptoms and signs, as well as respiratory function tests. A 43-year-old nonatopic male apprentice cook developed respiratory symptoms immediately after exposure to a cloud of detergent powder that was made airborne by vigorous shaking of the package. In spirometry, combined obstructive and restrictive ventilatory impairment developed, and the histamine challenge test revealed bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Even routine handling of a strongly caustic detergent, such as filling a dishwasher container, is not entirely risk free and should be performed with caution. PMID:22679618

  8. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  9. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics. PMID:25663674

  10. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2015-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics.

  11. Pelvic Muscle Exercises Using A Home Trainer for Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic muscle exercises can help improve symptoms of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. This article describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with moderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and mild urinary incontinence (UI) who initiated pelvic muscle exercises with the assistance of a novel, at-home trainer equipped with a vaginal sensor and accompanying smartphone app software, the PeriCoach system (Analytica, 2015). After 8 weeks of training with the device, she showed improvements in strength, endurance, and disability, as measured by manual muscle test, electromyography, and Pelvic Floor Disability Index scores. Older women can use biofeedback technology to improve pelvic floor muscle function successfully at home. PMID:27281865

  12. Inhalational exposure to dimethyl sulfate vapor followed by reactive airway dysfunction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Zamani, Nasim; Shiva, Hamidreza; Rezaei, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is an oily liquid used as a solvent, stabilizer, sulfonation agent, and catalyst. Exposure to DMS primarily happens in the workplace via inhalational contact and damages the upper and lower airways. Our manuscript reports a case of DMS-related reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS). The patient was a healthy 29-year-old man who was referred to our ER after accidental exposure to the vapor of DMS with the complaint of dyspnea, dry cough, photophobia, and hoarseness. His vital signs were normal except for a low-grade fever. Redness of the pharynx, conjunctivitis, and cholinergic signs and symptoms were present. Conservative management with O2 and fluid therapy was initiated. Twenty hours later, the patient became drowsy and his respiratory symptoms exacerbated; chest X-ray revealed haziness in the base of the right lung and prominence of the vessels of the lung hillum. After 1 week, the liver transaminases rose and C-reactive protein elevated (2+). The patient got better with conservative treatment and was discharged after 9 days; however, exertional dyspnea, wheezing, and thick white sputum persisted and therefore, reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS) related to DMS vapor was confirmed which was treated by prednisolone. Exertional dyspnea continued up to 10 months. Hoarseness lasted for 6 months. This case shows that DMS vapor inhalation can cause RADS especially in the chemical workers who continue working in the contaminated place despite the relatively good air conditioning. PMID:21461165

  13. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  14. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Rodrigo; Nieto, Javier; Ibarra, Sergio; Haas, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR) is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1) initial baseline phase; (2) rapid contraction phase; (3) tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4) late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1) down-training; (2) accessory muscle isolation; (3) discrimination training; (4) muscle strengthening; (5) endurance training; and (6) electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course. PMID:25006337

  15. A study of airway smooth muscle in asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. With standard Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), imaging ASM is often not possible due to poor structural contrast between the muscle and surrounding tissues. A potential solution to this problem is to utilize additional optical contrast factors intrinsic to the tissue, such as birefringence. Due to its highly ordered structure, ASM is strongly birefringent. Previously, we demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive OCT(PS-OCT) has the potential to be used to visualize ASM as well as easily segment it from the surrounding (weakly) birefringent tissue by exploiting a property which allows it to discriminate the orientation of birefringent fibers. We have already validated our technology with a substantial set of histological comparisons made against data obtained ex vivo. In this work we present a comprehensive comparison of ASM distributions in asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers. By isolating the ASM we parameterize its distribution in terms of both thickness and band width, calculated volumetrically over centimeters of airway. Using this data we perform analyses of the asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using a broad number and variety and subjects.

  16. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  17. Cooling-induced contraction in ovine airways smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S M; Pilcher, C W; Williams, K I

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of cold-induced bronchoconstriction is poorly understood. This prompted the present study whose aim was to determine the step-wise direct effect of cooling on smooth muscle of isolated ovine airways and analyse the role of calcium in the mechanisms involved. Isolated tracheal strips and bronchial segments were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs' solution for isometric tension recording. Tissue responses during stepwise cooling from 37 to 5 degrees C were examined. Cooling induced a rapid and reproducible contraction proportional to cooling temperature in ovine tracheal and bronchial preparations which was epithelium-independent. On readjustment to 37 degrees C the tone returned rapidly to basal level. Maximum contraction was achieved at a temperature of 5 degrees C for trachea and 15 degrees C for bronchiole. Cooling-induced contractions (CIC) was resistant to tetrodotoxin (1; 10 micrometer), and not affected by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (1 micrometer) or the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (1 micrometer), or the histamine H1-antagonist mepyramine (1 micrometer) or indomethacin (1 micrometer). Ca2+ antagonists (nifedipine and verapamil) and Mn2+ raised tracheal but not bronchiolar tone and augmented CIC. Incubation in Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing Krebs' solution for 5 min had no effect on CIC, although it significantly reduced KCl-induced contraction by up to 75%. Cooling inhibited Ca2+ influx measured using 45Ca2+ uptake. Caffeine (100 micrometer) significantly inhibited CIC. The results show that cooling-induced contractions do not appear to involve activation of nerve endings, all surface reception systems or Ca2+ influx. However, CIC is mainly dependent on release of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:10072702

  18. Development and characterization of a 3D multicell microtissue culture model of airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Nishat; Cole, Darren J.; Walker, Matthew J.; Legant, Wesley R.; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher S.; Favreau, John T.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Cowley, Elizabeth A.; Maksym, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cellular and molecular biology is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on flat 2D substrates. However, cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures, and it is well established in other cell types that altering substrate geometry exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall, and highlights a need for more physiologically relevant models of ASM function. We utilized a tissue engineering platform known as microfabricated tissue gauges to develop a 3D culture model of ASM featuring arrays of ∼0.4 mm long, ∼350 cell “microtissues” capable of simultaneous contractile force measurement and cell-level microscopy. ASM-only microtissues generated baseline tension, exhibited strong cellular organization, and developed actin stress fibers, but lost structural integrity and dissociated from the cantilevers within 3 days. Addition of 3T3-fibroblasts dramatically improved survival times without affecting tension development or morphology. ASM-3T3 microtissues contracted similarly to ex vivo ASM, exhibiting reproducible responses to a range of contractile and relaxant agents. Compared with 2D cultures, microtissues demonstrated identical responses to acetylcholine and KCl, but not histamine, forskolin, or cytochalasin D, suggesting that contractility is regulated by substrate geometry. Microtissues represent a novel model for studying ASM, incorporating a physiological 3D structure, realistic mechanical environment, coculture of multiple cells types, and comparable contractile properties to existing models. This new model allows for rapid screening of biochemical and mechanical factors to provide insight into ASM dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23125251

  19. Long-term clearance from small airways in subjects with ciliary dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Maria; Falk, Rolf; Hjelte, Lena; Philipson, Klas; Svartengren, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if long-term clearance from small airways is dependent on normal ciliary function. Six young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) inhaled 111 Indium labelled Teflon particles of 4.2 μm geometric and 6.2 μm aerodynamic diameter with an extremely slow inhalation flow, 0.05 L/s. The inhalation method deposits particles mainly in the small conducting airways. Lung retention was measured immediately after inhalation and at four occasions up to 21 days after inhalation. Results were compared with data from ten healthy controls. For additional comparison three of the PCD subjects also inhaled the test particles with normal inhalation flow, 0.5 L/s, providing a more central deposition. The lung retention at 24 h in % of lung deposition (Ret24) was higher (p < 0.001) in the PCD subjects, 79 % (95% Confidence Interval, 67.6;90.6), compared to 49 % (42.3;55.5) in the healthy controls. There was a significant clearance after 24 h both in the PCD subjects and in the healthy controls with equivalent clearance. The mean Ret24 with slow inhalation flow was 73.9 ± 1.9 % compared to 68.9 ± 7.5 % with normal inhalation flow in the three PCD subjects exposed twice. During day 7–21 the three PCD subjects exposed twice cleared 9 % with normal flow, probably representing predominantly alveolar clearance, compared to 19 % with slow inhalation flow, probably representing mainly small airway clearance. This study shows that despite ciliary dysfunction, clearance continues in the small airways beyond 24 h. There are apparently additional clearance mechanisms present in the small airways. PMID:16712736

  20. Muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  1. Signaling and regulation of G protein-coupled receptors in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Charlotte K; Penn, Raymond B

    2003-01-01

    Signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediates numerous airway smooth muscle (ASM) functions including contraction, growth, and "synthetic" functions that orchestrate airway inflammation and promote remodeling of airway architecture. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the GPCRs that have been identified in ASM cells, and discuss the extent to which signaling via these GPCRs has been characterized and linked to distinct ASM functions. In addition, we examine the role of GPCR signaling and its regulation in asthma and asthma treatment, and suggest an integrative model whereby an imbalance of GPCR-derived signals in ASM cells contributes to the asthmatic state. PMID:12648290

  2. Upper Airway Collapsibility (Pcrit) and Pharyngeal Dilator Muscle Activity are Sleep Stage Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Carberry, Jayne C.; Jordan, Amy S.; White, David P.; Wellman, Andrew; Eckert, Danny J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: An anatomically narrow/highly collapsible upper airway is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Upper airway muscle activity contributes to airway patency and, like apnea severity, can be sleep stage dependent. Conversely, existing data derived from a small number of participants suggest that upper airway collapsibility, measured by the passive pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit) technique, is not sleep stage dependent. This study aimed to determine the effect of sleep stage on Pcrit and upper airway muscle activity in a larger cohort than previously tested. Methods: Pcrit and/or muscle data were obtained from 72 adults aged 20–64 y with and without OSA.Pcrit was determined via transient reductions in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during N2, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Genioglossus and tensor palatini muscle activities were measured: (1) awake with and without CPAP, (2) during stable sleep on CPAP, and (3) in response to the CPAP reductions used to quantify Pcrit. Results: Pcrit was 4.9 ± 1.4 cmH2O higher (more collapsible) during REM versus SWS (P = 0.012), 2.3 ± 0.6 cmH2O higher during REM versus N2 (P < 0.001), and 1.6 ± 0.7 cmH2O higher in N2 versus SWS (P = 0.048). Muscle activity decreased from wakefulness to sleep and from SWS to N2 to REM sleep for genioglossus but not for tensor palatini. Pharyngeal muscle activity increased by ∼50% by breath 5 following CPAP reductions. Conclusions: Upper airway collapsibility measured via the Pcrit technique and genioglossus muscle activity vary with sleep stage. These findings should be taken into account when performing and interpreting “passive” Pcrit measurements. Citation: Carberry JC, Jordan AS, White DP, Wellman A, Eckert DJ. Upper airway collapsibility (Pcrit) and pharyngeal dilator muscle activity are sleep stage dependent. SLEEP 2016;39(3):511–521. PMID:26612386

  3. O3-induced mucosa-linked airway muscle hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Murlas, C.G.; Murphy, T.P.; Chodimella, V. )

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the effects of ozone exposure (3.0 ppm, 2 h) on the responsiveness of guinea pig airway muscle in vitro from animals developing bronchial hyperreactivity. Muscarinic reactivity in vivo was determined by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) in response to increasing concentrations of aerosolized acetylcholine (ACh) administered before and 30 min after exposure. Immediately after reactivity testing, multiple tracheal rings from ozone- and air-exposed animals were prepared and the contractile responses to increasing concentrations of substance P, ACh, or KCl were assessed in the presence of 10 microM indomethacin with or without 1 microM phosphoramidon, an inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase. Isometric force generation in vitro was measured on stimulation by cumulative concentrations of the agonists, and force generation (in g/cm2) was calculated after determination of muscle cross-sectional area. The smooth muscle of mucosa-intact airways from guinea pigs with ozone-induced bronchial hyper-reactivity proved to be hyperresponsive in vitro to substance P and ACh but not to KCl. Pretreatment with phosphoramidon abolished the increase in substance P responsiveness but had no effect on muscarinic hyperresponsiveness after ozone exposure. Furthermore, substance P responsiveness was not augmented in ozone-exposed airways in which the mucosa had been removed before testing in vitro. Likewise, muscarinic hyperresponsiveness was not present in ozone-exposed airways without mucosa. Our data indicate that airway smooth muscle responsiveness is increased in guinea pigs with ozone-induced bronchial hyperreactivity and suggest that this hyperresponsiveness may be linked to non-cyclooxygenase mucosa-derived factors.

  4. Mechanical state of airway smooth muscle at very short lengths.

    PubMed

    Meiss, Richard A; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2004-02-01

    Although the shortening of smooth muscle at physiological lengths is dominated by an interaction between external forces (loads) and internal forces, at very short lengths, internal forces appear to dominate the mechanical behavior of the active tissue. We tested the hypothesis that, under conditions of extreme shortening and low external force, the mechanical behavior of isolated canine tracheal smooth muscle tissue can be understood as a structure in which the force borne and exerted by the cross bridge and myofilament array is opposed by radially disposed connective tissue in the presence of an incompressible fluid matrix (cellular and extracellular). Strips of electrically stimulated tracheal muscle were allowed to shorten maximally under very low afterload, and large longitudinal sinusoidal vibrations (34 Hz, 1 s in duration, and up to 50% of the muscle length before vibration) were applied to highly shortened (active) tissue strips to produce reversible cross-bridge detachment. During the vibration, peak muscle force fell exponentially with successive forced elongations. After the episode, the muscle either extended itself or exerted a force against the tension transducer, depending on external conditions. The magnitude of this effect was proportional to the prior muscle stiffness and the amplitude of the vibration, indicating a recoil of strained connective tissue elements no longer opposed by cross-bridge forces. This behavior suggests that mechanical behavior at short lengths is dominated by tissue forces within a tensegrity-like structure made up of connective tissue, other extracellular matrix components, and active contractile elements.

  5. Airway smooth muscle in asthma: linking contraction and mechanotransduction to disease pathogenesis and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Noble, Peter B; Pascoe, Chris D; Lan, Bo; Ito, Satoru; Kistemaker, Loes E M; Tatler, Amanda L; Pera, Tonio; Brook, Bindi S; Gosens, Reinoud; West, Adrian R

    2014-12-01

    Asthma is an obstructive airway disease, with a heterogeneous and multifactorial pathogenesis. Although generally considered to be a disease principally driven by chronic inflammation, it is becoming increasingly recognised that the immune component of the pathology poorly correlates with the clinical symptoms of asthma, thus highlighting a potentially central role for non-immune cells. In this context airway smooth muscle (ASM) may be a key player, as it comprises a significant proportion of the airway wall and is the ultimate effector of acute airway narrowing. Historically, the contribution of ASM to asthma pathogenesis has been contentious, yet emerging evidence suggests that ASM contractile activation imparts chronic effects that extend well beyond the temporary effects of bronchoconstriction. In this review article we describe the effects that ASM contraction, in combination with cellular mechanotransduction and novel contraction-inflammation synergies, contribute to asthma pathogenesis. Specific emphasis will be placed on the effects that ASM contraction exerts on the mechanical properties of the airway wall, as well as novel mechanisms by which ASM contraction may contribute to more established features of asthma such as airway wall remodelling.

  6. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood. PMID:25204635

  7. Development and maintenance of force and stiffness in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Deng, Linhong

    2015-03-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays a central role in the excessive narrowing of the airway that characterizes the primary functional impairment in asthma. This phenomenon is known as airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Emerging evidence suggests that the development and maintenance of ASM force involves dynamic reorganization of the subcellular filament network in both the cytoskeleton and the contractile apparatus. In this review, evidence is presented to support the view that regulation of ASM contraction extends beyond the classical actomyosin interaction and involves processes within the cytoskeleton and at the interfaces between the cytoskeleton, the contractile apparatus, and the extracellular matrix. These processes are initiated when the muscle is activated, and collectively they cause the cytoskeleton and the contractile apparatus to undergo structural transformation, resulting in a more connected and solid state that allows force generated by the contractile apparatus to be transmitted to the extracellular domain. Solidification of the cytoskeleton also serves to stiffen the muscle and hence the airway. Oscillatory strain from tidal breathing and deep inspiration is believed to be the counter balance that prevents hypercontraction and stiffening of ASM in vivo. Dysregulation of this balance could lead to AHR seen in asthma.

  8. Reflex tracheal smooth muscle contraction and bronchial vasodilation evoked by airway cooling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pisarri, T E; Giesbrecht, G G

    1997-05-01

    Cooling intrathoracic airways by filling the pulmonary circulation with cold blood alters pulmonary mechanoreceptor discharge. To determine whether this initiates reflex changes that could contribute to airway obstruction, we measured changes in tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial arterial flow evoked by cooling. In nine chloralose-anesthetized open-chest dogs, the right pulmonary artery was cannulated and perfused; the left lung, ventilated separately, provided gas exchange. With the right lung phasically ventilated, filling the right pulmonary circulation with 5 degrees C blood increased smooth muscle tension in an innervated upper tracheal segment by 23 +/- 6 (SE) g from a baseline of 75 g. Contraction began within 10 s of injection and was maximal at approximately 30s. The response was abolished by cervical vagotomy. Bronchial arterial flow increased from 8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml/min, with little effect on arterial blood pressure. The time course was similar to that of the tracheal response. This response was greatly attenuated after cervical vagotomy. Blood at 20 degrees C also increased tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial flow, whereas 37 degrees C blood had little effect. The results suggested that alteration of airway mechanoreceptor discharge by cooling can initiate reflexes that contribute to airway obstruction. PMID:9134906

  9. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  10. Swine confinement buildings: effects of airborne particles and settled dust on airway smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Demanche, Annick; Bonlokke, Jakob; Beaulieu, Marie-Josee; Assayag, Evelyne; Cormier, Yvon

    2009-01-01

    Swine confinement workers are exposed to various contaminants. These agents can cause airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. This study was undertaken to evaluate if the bronchoconstrictive effects of swine barn air and settled dust are mediated by endotoxin, and if these effects are directly mediated on airway smooth muscles. Mouse tracheas where isolated and mounted isometrically in organ baths. Tracheas, with or without epithelium, were attached to a force transducer and tension was recorded. Concentrated swine building air at 68 EU/ml or settled dust extract at 0.01 g/ml were added for 20 minutes and tracheal smooth muscle contraction was measured. Direct role of LPS was assessed by removing it from air concentrates with an endotoxin affinity resin. Swine barn air and settled dust extract caused contraction of tracheal smooth muscle by 26 and 20%, respectively, of the maximal induced by methacholine. Removal of epithelium did not affect the contractile effects. LPS alone and LPS with peptidoglycans did not induce contraction. However, when endotoxin was removed from swine barn air concentrates, it lost 24% of its contractile effect. Concentrated swine barn air and settled dust have direct effects on airway smooth muscles. This effect is partially due to LPS but a synergy with other components of the environment of swine confinement buildings is required. PMID:20047256

  11. Vulnerability to dysfunction and muscle injury after unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Tesch, P. A.; Hather, B. M.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test whether unloading increases vulnerability to eccentric exercise-induced dysfunction and muscle injury. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SETTING: General community. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Two women and 5 men (73 +/- 3kg [mean +/- SE]) who were active college students but were not trained in lower body resistance exercise volunteered. INTERVENTION: Five weeks of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS), which has been shown to decrease strength and size of the unloaded, left, but not load-bearing, right quadriceps femoris muscle group (QF) by 20% and 14%, respectively; performance of 10 sets of ten eccentric actions with each QF immediately after the ULLS strength tests with a load equivalent to 65% of the post-ULLS eccentric 1-repetition maximum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Concentric and eccentric 1-repetition maximum for the left, unloaded and the right, load-bearing QF measured immediately after ULLS and 1,4,7,9, and 11 days later; cross-sectional area and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of each QF as determined by magnetic resonance imaging and measured the last day of ULLS and 3 days later. RESULTS: The mean load used for eccentric exercise was 23 +/- 2 and 30 +/- 3kg for the left, unloaded and right, load-bearing QF, respectively. The concentric and eccentric 1-repetition maximum for the unloaded and already weakened left QF was further decreased by 18% (p = .000) and 27% (p = .000), respectively, 1 day after eccentric exercise. Strength did not return to post-ULLS levels until 7 days of recovery. The right, load-bearing QF showed a 4% decrease (p = .002) in the eccentric 1-repetition maximum 1 day after eccentric exercise. The left, unloaded QF showed an increase in T2 (p = .002) in 18% of its cross-sectional area 3 days after the eccentric exercise, thus indicating muscle injury. The right, load-bearing QF showed no elevation in T2 (p = .280). CONCLUSION: Unloading increases vulnerability to eccentric exercise-induced dysfunction and muscle

  12. Skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism in an animal model of pulmonary emphysema: formoterol and skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sullo, Nikol; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Matteis, Maria; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Lombardi, Assunta; Lucattelli, Monica; Polverino, Francesca; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cirino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction is a significant contributor to exercise limitation in pulmonary emphysema. This study investigated skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism before and after aerosol exposure to a long-acting β-agonist (LABA), such as formoterol, in the pallid mouse (B6.Cg-Pldnpa/J), which has a deficiency in serum α(1)-antitrypsin (α(1)-PI) and develops spontaneous pulmonary emphysema. C57 BL/6J and its congener pallid mice of 8-12 and 16 months of age were treated with vehicle or formoterol aerosol challenge for 120 seconds. Morphological and morphometric studies and evaluations of mitochondrial adenosine diphosphate-stimulated respiration and of cytochrome oxidase activity on skeletal muscle were performed. Moreover, the mtDNA content in skeletal muscle and the mediators linked to muscle mitochondrial function and biogenesis, as well as TNF-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), were also evaluated. The lungs of pallid mice at 12 and 16 months of age showed patchy areas of airspace enlargements, with the destruction of alveolar septa. No significant differences were observed in basal values of mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes between C57 BL/6J and pallid mice. Exposure to LABA significantly improved mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes in emphysematous mice, where the mtDNA content was significantly higher with respect to 8-month-old pallid mice. This effect was compared with a significant increase of PGC-1α in skeletal muscles of 16-month-old pallid mice, with no significant changes in TNF-α concentrations. In conclusion, in emphysematous mice that showed an increased mtDNA content, exposure to inhaled LABA can improve mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes. PGC-1α may serve as a possible mediator of this effect.

  13. Airway responsiveness: role of inflammation, epithelium damage and smooth muscle tension.

    PubMed

    Gourgoulianis, K I; Domali, A; Molyvdas, P A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the effect of epithelium damage on mechanical responses of airway smooth muscles under different resting tension. We performed acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-5) M)-induced contraction on tracheal strips from 30 rabbits in five groups (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) before and after epithelium removal. At low resting tension (0.5-1.5 g), the epithelium removal decreased the ACh-induced contractions. At 2 g resting tension, the epithelium removal increased the ACh-induced contractions of airways with intact epithelium about 20%. At 2.5 g resting tension, the elevation of contraction is about 25% (P<0.01). Consequently, after epithelium loss, the resting tension determines the airway smooth muscles responsiveness. In asthma, mediators such as ACh act on already contracted inflammatory airways, which results in additional increase of contraction. In contrast, low resting tension, a condition that simulates normal tidal breathing, protects from bronchoconstriction even when the epithelium is damaged. PMID:10704081

  14. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs.

  15. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M.; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs. PMID:25724668

  16. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  17. HB-EGF-Promoted Airway Smooth Muscle Cells and Their Progenitor Migration Contribute to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in Asthmatic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Li, Hequan; Yao, Yinan; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Yuehong; Xia, Dajing; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-03-01

    The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells' proliferation, migration, and their progenitor's migration are currently regarded as causative factors for ASM remodeling in asthma. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), a potent mitogen and chemotactic factor, could promote ASM cell proliferation through MAPK pathways. In this study, we obtained primary ASM cells and their progenitors from C57BL/6 mice and went on to explore the role of HB-EGF in these cells migration and the underlying mechanisms. We found that recombinant HB-EGF (rHB-EGF) intratracheal instillation accelerated ASM layer thickening in an OVA-induced asthmatic mouse. Modified Boyden chamber assay revealed that rHB-EGF facilitate ASM cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and ASM cells from asthmatic mice had a greater migration ability than that from normal counterparts. rHB-EGF could stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 in ASM cells but further migration assay showed that only epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (AG1478) or p38 inhibitor (SB203580), but not ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), could inhibit rHB-EGF-mediated ASM cells migration. Actin cytoskeleton experiments exhibited that rHB-EGF could cause actin stress fibers disassembly and focal adhesions formation of ASM cells through the activation of p38. Finally, airway instillation of rHB-EGF promoted the recruitment of bone marrow-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells, which were transferred via caudal vein, migrating into the airway from the circulation. These observations demonstrated that ASM remodeling in asthma might have resulted from HB-EGF-mediated ASM cells and their progenitor cells migration, via p38 MAPK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

  18. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  19. Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a role for exercise training?

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Marios; Peacock, Andrew J; Johnson, Martin K

    2015-09-01

    Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction is emerging as an important pathophysiological abnormality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Muscle abnormalities appear to occur frequently and promote dyspnea, fatigue, and exercise limitation in patients with PAH. Preliminary data suggest that targeted muscle training may be of benefit, although further evidence is required to consolidate these findings into specific recommendations for exercise training in patients with PAH. This article reviews the current evidence on prevalence, risk factors, and implications of respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in patients with PAH. It also reviews the impact of exercise rehabilitation on morphologic, metabolic, and functional muscle profile and outcomes in PAH. Future research priorities are highlighted.

  20. Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a role for exercise training?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction is emerging as an important pathophysiological abnormality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Muscle abnormalities appear to occur frequently and promote dyspnea, fatigue, and exercise limitation in patients with PAH. Preliminary data suggest that targeted muscle training may be of benefit, although further evidence is required to consolidate these findings into specific recommendations for exercise training in patients with PAH. This article reviews the current evidence on prevalence, risk factors, and implications of respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in patients with PAH. It also reviews the impact of exercise rehabilitation on morphologic, metabolic, and functional muscle profile and outcomes in PAH. Future research priorities are highlighted. PMID:26401245

  1. R-134a (1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane) Inhalation Induced Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Viral; Kham, Nang; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Kapitan, Kent; Henkle, Joseph; White, Peter

    2016-01-01

    R-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is widely used as a refrigerant and as an aerosol propellant. Inhalation of R-134a can lead to asphyxia, transient confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. We report a case of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome secondary to R-134a inhalation. A 60-year-old nonsmoking man without a history of lung disease was exposed to an air conditioner refrigerant spill while performing repairs beneath a school bus. Afterward, he experienced worsening shortness of breath with minimal exertion, a productive cough, and wheezing. He was also hypoxic. He was admitted to the hospital for further evaluation. Spirometry showed airflow obstruction with an FEV1 1.97 L (45% predicted). His respiratory status improved with bronchodilators and oral steroids. A repeat spirometry 2 weeks later showed improvement with an FEV1 2.5 L (60% predicted). Six months after the incident, his symptoms had improved, but he was still having shortness of breath on exertion and occasional cough. PMID:25137406

  2. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Is Sufficient for Airway Smooth Muscle Hypertrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huan; Dokshin, Gregoriy A.; Lei, Jing; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Bitar, Khalil N.; Fingar, Diane C.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Bentley, J. Kelley

    2008-01-01

    We examined the role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibition in airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, a structural change found in patients with severe asthma. LiCl, SB216763, and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) against GSK-3β, each of which inhibit GSK-3β activity or expression, increased human bronchial smooth muscle cell size, protein synthesis, and expression of the contractile proteins α-smooth muscle actin, myosin light chain kinase, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and SM22. Similar results were obtained following treatment of cells with cardiotrophin (CT)-1, a member of the interleukin-6 superfamily, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a proasthmatic cytokine. GSK-3β inhibition increased mRNA expression of α-actin and transactivation of nuclear factors of activated T cells and serum response factor. siRNA against eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bε (eIF2Bε) attenuated LiCl- and SB216763-induced protein synthesis and expression of α-actin and SM22, indicating that eIF2B is required for GSK-3β-mediated airway smooth muscle hypertrophy. eIF2Bε siRNA also blocked CT-1- but not TGF-β-induced protein synthesis. Infection of human bronchial smooth muscle cells with pMSCV GSK-3β-A9, a retroviral vector encoding a constitutively active, nonphosphorylatable GSK-3β, blocked protein synthesis and α-actin expression induced by LiCl, SB216763, and CT-1 but not TGF-β. Finally, lungs from ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged mice demonstrated increased α-actin and CT-1 mRNA expression, and airway myocytes isolated from ovalbumin-treated mice showed increased cell size and GSK-3β phosphorylation. These data suggest that inhibition of the GSK-3β/eIF2Bε translational control pathway contributes to airway smooth muscle hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, TGF-β-induced hypertrophy does not depend on GSK-3β/eIF2B signaling. PMID:18252708

  3. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders.

  4. Influence of sleep onset on upper-airway muscle activity in apnea patients versus normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1996-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may have augmented pharyngeal dilator muscle activity during wakefulness, to compensate for deficient anatomy. However, the isolated effect of sleep on the activity of these muscles (comparing OSA patients with controls) has not been studied. We therefore determined waking levels of genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) muscle activity (% of maximum electromyographic [EMG] activity) in 10 OSA patients and eight controls, and then assessed the impact of the first two breaths of sleep (theta electroencephalographic [EEG] activity) following a period of stable wakefulness. Apnea patients demonstrated greater genioglossal (27.4 +/- 4.0 versus 10.7 +/- 2.1%) and tensor palatini (31.9 +/- 6.5 versus 10.6 +/- 1.9%) EMG activity than did controls during wakefulness. This augmented muscle activity in apnea patients could be reduced to near control levels during wakefulness with the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the upper airway. At sleep onset, control subjects demonstrated small but consistent decrements in the activity of both the TP and GG muscles. On the other hand, apnea patients demonstrated large, significantly greater decrements in TP EMG at sleep onset than did the control subjects. The effect of sleep on GG EMG in apnea patients was inconsistent, with most (n = 7) demonstrating large (significantly larger than controls) decrements in genioglossal activity. However, three OSA patients demonstrated small increments in GG EMG at sleep onset despite falling TP EMG and obstructive apnea or hypopnea. We conclude that sleep onset is associated with significantly larger decrements in TP muscle EMG activity in OSA patients than in controls, which may represent a loss of neuromuscular compensation that is present during wakefulness. However, our results for the GG muscle were more variable, and did not always support this hypothesis.

  5. Physiological correction of lingual dysfunction with the "Tongue Right Positioner": Beneficial effects on the upper airways.

    PubMed

    Mauclaire, Claude; Vanpoulle, Frédéric; Saint-Georges-Chaumet, Yann

    2015-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of functional tongue therapy in stabilizing treatments for dental malocclusion and treating sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect on the upper airways of the Tongue Right Positioner device (TRP) used for the correction of atypical swallowing. We analyzed lateral headfilms of 94 orthodontic patients aged between 11 and 17, before the start of treatment and after establishment of mature swallowing, treated with the TRP (TRP group) or by reeducation exercises (control group). In the TRP group, the establishment of mature swallowing occurs twice as fast as in the control group. This led to thinning of the floor of the mouth (-8.38%, P<0.001) linked to anteroposterior enlargement of the pharynx (+10.48%, P<0.01), both probably due to an increase in genioglossal and styloglossal muscle tone and correction of cranio-cervical posture (+2.52%, P<0.01). These results are not dependent on the type of orthodontic treatment. They suggest that the TRP could be used in the treatment of SDB.

  6. Prevention of airway hyperresponsiveness induced by left ventricular dysfunction in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of strategies for treatment of the altered static lung volume and against the development of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) following a left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) induced by myocardial ischaemia was investigated in a rat model of sustained postcapillary pulmonary hypertension. Methods Airway resistance (Raw) was identified from the respiratory system input impedance (Zrs) in four groups of rats. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV) was determined plethysmographically, and Zrs was measured under baseline conditions and following iv infusions of 2, 6 or 18 μg/kg/min methacholine. Sham surgery was performed in the rats in Group C, while the left interventricular coronary artery was ligated and Zrs and its changes following identical methacholine challenges were reassessed in the same rats 8 weeks later, during which no treatment was applied (Group I), or the animals were treated daily with a combination of an angiotensin enzyme converter inhibitor and a diuretic (enalapril and furosemide, Group IE), or a calcium channel blocker (diltiazem, Group ID). The equivalent dose of methacholine causing a 100% increase in Raw (ED50) was determined in each group. Diastolic pulmonary arterial pressure (PapD) was assessed by introducing a catheter into the pulmonary artery. Results The sustained presence of a LVD increased PapD in all groups of rats, with variable but significant elevations in Groups I (p = 0.004), ID (p = 0.013) and IE (p = 0.006). A LVD for 8 weeks induced no changes in baseline Raw but elevated the EELV independently of the treatments. In Group I, BHR consistently developed following the LVD, with a significant decrease in ED50 from 10.0 ± 2.5 to 6.9 ± 2.5 μg/kg/min (p = 0.006). The BHR was completely abolished in both Groups ID and IE, with no changes in ED50 (9.5 ± 3.6 vs. 10.7 ± 4.7, p = 0.33 and 10.6 ± 2.1 vs. 9.8 ± 3.5 μg/kg/min p = 0.56, respectively). Conclusions

  7. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  8. Novel identification of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR1 that promotes contraction in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Kentaro; Zhang, Yi; Mizuta, Fumiko; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshiya; Masaki, Eiji; Emala, Charles W

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for asthma. Previous studies have demonstrated that free fatty acid levels are elevated in the plasma of obese individuals. Medium- and long-chain free fatty acids act as endogenous ligands for the free fatty acid receptors FFAR1/GPR40 and FFAR4/GPR120, which couple to Gq proteins. We investigated whether FFAR1 and FFAR4 are expressed on airway smooth muscle and whether they activate Gq-coupled signaling and modulate airway smooth muscle tone. We detected the protein expression of FFAR1 and FFAR4 in freshly dissected native human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle and cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The long-chain free fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) and GW9508 (FFAR1/FFAR4 dual agonist) dose-dependently stimulated transient intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increases and inositol phosphate synthesis in HASM cells. Downregulation of FFAR1 or FFAR4 in HASM cells by small interfering RNA led to a significant inhibition of the long-chain free fatty acids-induced transient [Ca(2+)]i increases. Oleic acid, linoleic acid, or GW9508 stimulated stress fiber formation in HASM cells, potentiated acetylcholine-contracted guinea pig tracheal rings, and attenuated the relaxant effect of isoproterenol after an acetylcholine-induced contraction. In contrast, TUG-891 (FFAR4 agonist) did not induce the stress fiber formation or potentiate acetylcholine-induced contraction. These results suggest that FFAR1 is the functionally dominant free fatty acid receptor in both human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle. The free fatty acid sensors expressed on airway smooth muscle could be an important modulator of airway smooth muscle tone.

  9. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  10. T lymphocytes adhere to airway smooth muscle cells via integrins and CD44 and induce smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity that is associated with a lymphocytic infiltrate in the bronchial submucosa. The interactions between infiltrating T lymphocytes with cellular and extracellular matrix components of the airway and the consequences of these interactions have not been defined. We demonstrate the constitutive expression of CD44 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in culture as well as in human bronchial tissue transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. In contrast, basal levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression are minimal but are induced on ASM by inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Activated, but not resting T cells, adhere to cultured ASM; stimulation of the ASM with TNF-alpha enhanced this adhesion. Adhesion was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) on T cells and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on ASM cells. The observed integrin-independent adhesion was mediated by CD44/hyaluronate interactions as it was inhibited by anti-CD44 mAb 5F12 and by hyaluronidase. Furthermore, the adhesion of activated T lymphocytes induced DNA synthesis in growth-arrested ASM cells. Thus, the interaction between T cells and ASM may provide insight into the mechanisms that induce bronchial inflammation and possibly ASM cell hyperplasia seen in asthma. PMID:7520473

  11. Sex Steroids Influence Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor Secretion From Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Freeman, Michelle R; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is emerging as an important player in airway inflammation, remodeling, and hyperreactivity. Separately, there is increasing evidence that sex hormones contribute to pathophysiology in the lung. BDNF and sex steroid signaling are thought to be intricately linked in the brain. There is currently little information on BDNF and sex steroid interactions in the airway but is relevant to understanding growth factor signaling in the context of asthma in men versus women. In this study, we assessed the effect of sex steroids on BDNF expression and secretion in human airway smooth muscle (ASM). Human ASM was treated with estrogen (E2 ) or testosterone (T, 10 nM each) and intracellular BDNF and secreted BDNF measured. E2 and T significantly reduced secretion of BDNF; effects prevented by estrogen and androgen receptor inhibitor, ICI 182,780 (1 μM), and flutamide (10 μM), respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were observed in intracellular BDNF mRNA or protein expression. High affinity BDNF receptor, TrkB, was not altered by E2 or T. E2 (but not T) significantly increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. Notably, Epac1 and Epac2 expression were significantly reduced by E2 and T. Furthermore, SNARE complex protein SNAP25 was decreased. Overall, these novel data suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of E2 or T inhibit BDNF secretion in human ASM, suggesting a potential interaction of sex steroids with BDNF in the airway that is different from brain. The relevance of sex steroid-BDNF interactions may lie in their overall contribution to airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:26566264

  12. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma.

  13. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  14. Steroids and antihistamines synergize to inhibit rat's airway smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wu, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-06-01

    Both glucocorticoids and H1-antihistamines were widely used on patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and obstructive airway diseases. However, their direct effects on airway smooth muscle were not fully explored. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of prednisolone (Kidsolone) and levocetirizine (Xyzal) on isolated rat trachea submersed in Kreb's solution in a muscle bath. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured. The following assessments of the drug were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine; (3) effect of the drug on electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The result revealed sole use of Kidsolone or Xyzal elicited no significant effect or only a little relaxation response on tracheal tension after methacholine treatment. The tension was 90.5 ± 7.5 and 99.5 ± 0.8 % at 10(-4) M for Xyzal and 10(-5) M for Kidsolone, respectively. However, a dramatically spasmolytic effect was observed after co-administration of Kidsolone and Xyzal and the tension dropped to 67.5 ± 13.6 %, with statistical significance (p < 0.05). As for EFS-induced contractions, Kidsolone had no direct effect but Xyzal could inhibit it, with increasing basal tension. In conclusion, using glucocorticoids alone had no spasmolytic effect but they can be synergized with antihistamines to dramatically relax the trachea smooth muscle within minutes. Therefore, for AR patients with acute asthma attack, combined use of those two drugs is recommended. PMID:25115316

  15. The mechanisms of cachexia underlying muscle dysfunction in COPD.

    PubMed

    Remels, A H V; Gosker, H R; Langen, R C J; Schols, A M W J

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary cachexia is a prevalent, debilitating, and well-recognized feature of COPD associated with increased mortality and loss of peripheral and respiratory muscle function. The exact cause and underlying mechanisms of cachexia in COPD are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence, however, shows that pathological changes in intracellular mechanisms of muscle mass maintenance (i.e., protein turnover and myonuclear turnover) are likely involved. Potential factors triggering alterations in these mechanisms in COPD include oxidative stress, myostatin, and inflammation. In addition to muscle wasting, peripheral muscle in COPD is characterized by a fiber-type shift toward a more type II, glycolytic phenotype and an impaired oxidative capacity (collectively referred to as an impaired oxidative phenotype). Atrophied diaphragm muscle in COPD, however, displays an enhanced oxidative phenotype. Interestingly, intrinsic abnormalities in (lower limb) peripheral muscle seem more pronounced in either cachectic patients or weight loss-susceptible emphysema patients, suggesting that muscle wasting and intrinsic changes in peripheral muscle's oxidative phenotype are somehow intertwined. In this manuscript, we will review alterations in mechanisms of muscle mass maintenance in COPD and discuss the involvement of oxidative stress, inflammation, and myostatin as potential triggers of cachexia. Moreover, we postulate that an impaired muscle oxidative phenotype in COPD can accelerate the process of cachexia, as it renders muscle in COPD less energy efficient, thereby contributing to an energy deficit and weight loss when not dietary compensated. Furthermore, loss of peripheral muscle oxidative phenotype may increase the muscle's susceptibility to inflammation- and oxidative stress-induced muscle damage and wasting.

  16. Ovalbumin sensitization of guinea pig at birth prevents the ontogenetic decrease in airway smooth muscle responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, Pasquale; Wang, Lu; Degan, Simone; Worthington, Charles L.; Pozzato, Valeria; Hussaini, Syed H.; Turner, Wesley C.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.; Murphy, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Airway smooth muscle (ASM) displays a hyperresponsive phenotype at young age and becomes less responsive in adulthood. We hypothesized that allergic sensitization, which causes ASM hyperresponsiveness and typically occurs early in life, prevents the ontogenetic loss of the ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. We therefore studied whether neonatal allergic sensitization, not followed by later allergen challenges, alters the ontogenesis of ASM properties. We neonatally sensitized guinea pigs to ovalbumin and studied them at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months (adult). A Schultz‐Dale response in isolated tracheal rings confirmed sensitization. The occurrence of inflammation was evaluated in the blood and in the submucosa of large airways. We assessed ASM function in tracheal strips as ability to produce force and shortening. ASM content of vimentin was also studied. A Schultz‐Dale response was observed in all 3‐week or older sensitized animals. A mild inflammatory process was characterized by eosinophilia in the blood and in the airway submucosa. Early life sensitization had no effect on ASM force generation, but prevented the ontogenetic decline of shortening velocity and the increase in resistance to shortening. Vimentin increased with age in control but not in sensitized animals. Allergic sensitization at birth without subsequent allergen exposures is sufficient to prevent normal ASM ontogenesis, inducing persistence to adulthood of an ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. PMID:25501429

  17. Studying airway smooth muscle in vivo with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Villiger, Martin; Holz, Jasmin; Szabari, Margit V.; Bouma, Brett E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. We have developed novel techniques that we applied to Polarization Sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) in order to assess ASM, and validated our results with a substantial number of histological matches. In this work we employ our system in the study of ASM distributions in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways with data obtained in vivo from human volunteers. By isolating the ASM and performing volumetric analysis we obtain a variety of informative metrics such as ASM thickness and band width, and compare these quantities between subject types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the degree of birefringence of the ASM can be associated with contractility, allowing us to estimate pressure exerted by ASM during contraction. We apply this technique to in vivo datasets from human volunteers as well.

  18. RANTES expression induced by Toll-like receptor 4 ligand in rat airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, Kaori; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Takayama, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Sumi, Yuki; Inase, Naohiko; Yoshizawa, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) have been reported to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and take part in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation. Though TLRs were found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in airway epithelial cells, little is known about the association of TLR ligands with EGFR signaling pathways in ASMCs. Using primary cultured ASMCs from Brown Norway rats, TLR4, eotaxin, and RANTES mRNA were examined by real-time quantitative RT-PCR after stimulation with the TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The concentration of RANTES protein in culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. The effect of EGFR signaling inhibitors on RANTES expression was examined as well. Phosphorylation of EGFR after stimulation was examined by Western Blotting. Rat ASMCs expressed TLR4 and eotaxin, and LPS upregulated RANTES production. The EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor GM6001 inhibited RANTES expression induced by LPS. LPS phosphorylated EGFR. TLR4 activation can induce RANTES expression via EGFR transactivation and PI3K/Akt pathway in rat ASMCs. MMP-induced EGFR proligand cleavage and ligand binding to EGFR seem to be involved in this pathway. These findings may be critical in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation by airway infection. PMID:23896774

  19. Muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on causes and biological findings

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sergi; Casadevall, Carme; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and/or limb muscle dysfunction, which are frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contribute to their disease prognosis irrespective of the lung function. Muscle dysfunction is caused by the interaction of local and systemic factors. The key deleterious etiologic factors are pulmonary hyperinflation for the respiratory muscles and deconditioning secondary to reduced physical activity for limb muscles. Nonetheless, cigarette smoke, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exercise, exacerbations, anabolic insufficiency, drugs and comorbidities also seem to play a relevant role. All these factors modify the phenotype of the muscles, through the induction of several biological phenomena in patients with COPD. While respiratory muscles improve their aerobic phenotype (percentage of oxidative fibers, capillarization, mitochondrial density, enzyme activity in the aerobic pathways, etc.), limb muscles exhibit the opposite phenotype. In addition, both muscle groups show oxidative stress, signs of damage and epigenetic changes. However, fiber atrophy, increased number of inflammatory cells, altered regenerative capacity; signs of apoptosis and autophagy, and an imbalance between protein synthesis and breakdown are rather characteristic features of the limb muscles, mostly in patients with reduced body weight. Despite that significant progress has been achieved in the last decades, full elucidation of the specific roles of the target biological mechanisms involved in COPD muscle dysfunction is still required. Such an achievement will be crucial to adequately tackle with this relevant clinical problem of COPD patients in the near-future. PMID:26623119

  20. Muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on causes and biological findings.

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Pascual, Sergi; Casadevall, Carme; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and/or limb muscle dysfunction, which are frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contribute to their disease prognosis irrespective of the lung function. Muscle dysfunction is caused by the interaction of local and systemic factors. The key deleterious etiologic factors are pulmonary hyperinflation for the respiratory muscles and deconditioning secondary to reduced physical activity for limb muscles. Nonetheless, cigarette smoke, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exercise, exacerbations, anabolic insufficiency, drugs and comorbidities also seem to play a relevant role. All these factors modify the phenotype of the muscles, through the induction of several biological phenomena in patients with COPD. While respiratory muscles improve their aerobic phenotype (percentage of oxidative fibers, capillarization, mitochondrial density, enzyme activity in the aerobic pathways, etc.), limb muscles exhibit the opposite phenotype. In addition, both muscle groups show oxidative stress, signs of damage and epigenetic changes. However, fiber atrophy, increased number of inflammatory cells, altered regenerative capacity; signs of apoptosis and autophagy, and an imbalance between protein synthesis and breakdown are rather characteristic features of the limb muscles, mostly in patients with reduced body weight. Despite that significant progress has been achieved in the last decades, full elucidation of the specific roles of the target biological mechanisms involved in COPD muscle dysfunction is still required. Such an achievement will be crucial to adequately tackle with this relevant clinical problem of COPD patients in the near-future.

  1. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF FEMORAL FRACTURE REPAIR IN A PATIENT WITH CERVICAL MYELOPATHY, AUTONOMIC DYSFUNCTION, AND DIFFICULT AIRWAY.

    PubMed

    Vellore, Ajay R; Robards, Christopher B; Clendenen, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    Spinal stenosis is a potentially serious condition that can lead to myelopathies and autonomic instability, both of which, as a result, may complicate anesthetic management. Additionally, neuraxial anesthesia appears to increase the risk of worsened neurological outcomes in this population. A 56-year-old female with spinal stenosis, autonomic dysfunction, and known difficult airway who required anesthesia for repair of a femur fracture is presented. After pre-operative arterial line and femoral block placement, an ultrasound guided subarachnoid block was safely placed. This supports the notion that in the appropriate setting, a safe, successful neuraxial blockade can be performed when a general anesthetic may be fraught with more risk. PMID:27382821

  2. Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: a problem of limited smooth muscle relaxation with inspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Skloot, G; Permutt, S; Togias, A

    1995-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperresponsiveness in asthma is caused by an impairment in the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle. If the hypothesis was correct, we reasoned that the sensitivity to inhaled methacholine in normal and asthmatic subjects should be the same if the challenge was carried out under conditions where deep inspirations were prohibited. 10 asthmatic and 10 normal subjects received increasing concentrations of inhaled methacholine under conditions where forced expirations from a normal end-tidal inspiration were performed. When no deep inspirations were allowed, the response to methacholine was similar in the normal and asthmatic subjects, compatible with the hypothesis we propose. Completely contrary to our expectations, however, was the marked responsivity to methacholine that remained in the normal subjects after deep breaths were initiated. 6 of the 10 normal subjects had > 20% reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1) at doses of methacholine < 8 mg/ml, whereas there was < 15% reduction with 75 mg/ml during routine challenge. The ability of normal subjects to develop asthmatic responses when the modulating effects of increases in lung volume was voluntarily suppressed suggests that an intrinsic impairment of the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle is a major feature of asthma. PMID:7593627

  3. A Synthetic Chloride Channel Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Kwok-hei; Mak, Judith Choi-wo; Leung, Susan Wai-sum; Yang, Dan; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic ion channels may have potential therapeutic applications, provided they possess appropriate biological activities. The present study was designed to examine the ability of small molecule-based synthetic Cl– channels to modulate airway smooth muscle responsiveness. Changes in isometric tension were measured in rat tracheal rings. Relaxations to the synthetic chloride channel SCC-1 were obtained during sustained contractions to KCl. The anion dependency of the effect of SCC-1 was evaluated by ion substitution experiments. The sensitivity to conventional Cl– transport inhibitors was also tested. SCC-1 caused concentration-dependent relaxations during sustained contractions to potassium chloride. This relaxing effect was dependent on the presence of extracellular Cl– and HCO3−. It was insensitive to conventional Cl– channels/transport inhibitors that blocked the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated Cl– channels. SCC-1 did not inhibit contractions induced by carbachol, endothelin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. SCC-1 relaxes airway smooth muscle during contractions evoked by depolarizing solutions. The Cl– conductance conferred by this synthetic compound is distinct from the endogenous transport systems for chloride anions. PMID:23049786

  4. Guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Bustamante, Víctor; Cejudo, Pilar; Gáldiz, Juan B; Gea, Joaquim; de Lucas, Pilar; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Ortega, Francisco; Puente-Maestu, Luis; Roca, Josep; Rodríguez-González Moro, José Miguel

    2015-08-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), skeletal muscle dysfunction is a major comorbidity that negatively impacts their exercise capacity and quality of life. In the current guidelines, the most recent literature on the various aspects of COPD muscle dysfunction has been included. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) scale has been used to make evidence-based recommendations on the different features. Compared to a control population, one third of COPD patients exhibited a 25% decline in quadriceps muscle strength, even at early stages of their disease. Although both respiratory and limb muscles are altered, the latter are usually more severely affected. Numerous factors and biological mechanisms are involved in the etiology of COPD muscle dysfunction. Several tests are proposed in order to diagnose and evaluate the degree of muscle dysfunction of both respiratory and limb muscles (peripheral), as well as to identify the patients' exercise capacity (six-minute walking test and cycloergometry). Currently available therapeutic strategies including the different training modalities and pharmacological and nutritional support are also described. PMID:26072153

  5. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. PMID:23667744

  6. [Inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise and simulated airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Aleksandrova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can develop during simulated airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SM) and scalene (SC). 8 healthy untrained subjects participated in this study. To identify signs of inspiratory muscles fatigue development electromyographic activity of D, PS, SCM and SC was recorded during 5-min exercise with loaded breathing (40 cm H2O/L · s(-1)). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. Maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 12% after exercise test compared with control, whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM and SC during post-exercise Muller's maneuver was significantly greater than in pre-exercise test in all subjects. The extent ofinspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of PS, SCM and SC.fc of D was not changed. Diaphragm is more resistantto fatigue during obstructive breathing compared with PS, SCM and SC. The data suggest that the reduction of maximum inspiratory pressure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also caused primarily by the weakening of the accessory muscles, while the weakness of the diaphragm may occur in the later stages of the disease. The functional failure of accessory muscles is an additional factor, which, along with the additional breathing resistance increases the load on the diaphragm, promoting its fatigue and reduced respiratory reserve.

  7. Cholinergic neuromodulation by prostaglandin D2 in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Sekizawa, K; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, we studied bronchial segments from dogs under isometric conditions in vitro. PGD2 (10(-8)-10(-5) M) elicited dose-dependent muscle contraction, which was reduced after blockade of muscarinic receptors, so that 50% effective dose (ED50) increased from 1.3 +/- 0.3 X 10(-6) to 3.9 +/- 1.0 X 10(-6) M by atropine (10(-6) M) (mean +/- SE, P less than 0.05). Physostigmine, at a concentration insufficient to alter base-line tension (10(-8) M), enhanced the PGD2-induced contraction and decreased ED50 to 6.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M (P less than 0.05). When added at the highest doses that did not cause spontaneous contraction (1.9 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M), PGD2 increased the contractile response to electrical field stimulation (1-50 Hz) by 21.9 +/- 6.6% (P less than 0.001). In contrast to this effect, the response to administered acetylcholine was not affected by PGD2. On the other hand, PGD2-induced augmentation of the response to electrical field stimulation (5 Hz) was further increased from 23.6 +/- 3.0 to 70.4 +/- 8.8% in the presence of physostigmine (10(-8) M) and was abolished by atropine but not affected by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or the histamine H1-blocker pyrilamine. These results suggest that the contraction of airway smooth muscle induced by PGD2 is in in part mediated by a cholinergic action and that PGD2 prejunctionally augments the parasympathetic contractile response, likely involving the accelerated release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction.

  8. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis.

  9. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:26722436

  10. Upregulation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-33 by VEGF in human airway smooth muscle cells: Implications for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Li-Hong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)–33 has been identified as playing a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. ADAM-33 is expressed in ASM cells and is suggested to play a role in the function of these cells. However, the regulation of ADAM-33 is not fully understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodeling in asthmatics. Although VEGF was initially thought of as an endothelial-specific growth factor, recent reports have found that VEGF can promote proliferation of other cell types, including ASM cells. To investigate the precise mechanism of VEGF's effect on ASM cell proliferation, we tested the expression of ADAM-33, phospho-extracellularsignal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phospho-Akt in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. We found that VEGF up-regulates ADAM-33 mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. We also found that VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation is inhibited by both ADAM-33 knockdown and a selective VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) inhibitor (SU1498). Furthermore, VEGF-induced ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation were suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 activity, but not by inhibiting Akt activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that VEGF enhances ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation by activating the VEGFR2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations might help develop therapeutic strategies for airway diseases associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia such as asthma. PMID:27579513

  11. Upregulation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-33 by VEGF in human airway smooth muscle cells: Implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Li-Hong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-10-17

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-33 has been identified as playing a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. ADAM-33 is expressed in ASM cells and is suggested to play a role in the function of these cells. However, the regulation of ADAM-33 is not fully understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodeling in asthmatics. Although VEGF was initially thought of as an endothelial-specific growth factor, recent reports have found that VEGF can promote proliferation of other cell types, including ASM cells. To investigate the precise mechanism of VEGF's effect on ASM cell proliferation, we tested the expression of ADAM-33, phospho-extracellularsignal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phospho-Akt in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. We found that VEGF up-regulates ADAM-33 mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. We also found that VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation is inhibited by both ADAM-33 knockdown and a selective VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) inhibitor (SU1498). Furthermore, VEGF-induced ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation were suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 activity, but not by inhibiting Akt activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that VEGF enhances ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation by activating the VEGFR2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations might help develop therapeutic strategies for airway diseases associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia such as asthma. PMID:27579513

  12. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  13. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  14. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  15. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  16. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-12-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions.

  17. Effect of different bronchodilators on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to contractile agents.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B; Persson, C G

    1991-05-01

    "Functional antagonism" is often used to describe the general relaxant effect of beta 2 agonists and xanthines and their ability to protect the airways against bronchoconstrictor stimuli. This study in guinea pig isolated trachea addresses the question of whether the capacity of these drugs to protect against constrictor stimuli is related to smooth muscle relaxation. Three antimuscarinic drugs were also examined to determine whether antagonism of mediators other than muscarinic agonists might contribute to bronchodilatation by these antimuscarinic drugs. Terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7), 2.2 x 10(-7) M), theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4), 4.4 x 10(-4) M), and enprofylline (5.2 x 10(-5), 1.0 x 10(-4) M) relaxed the tracheal tension that remained after indomethacin treatment. They did not, however, alter the carbachol concentration-response curve significantly. In addition, neither theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4) M) nor terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7) M) altered histamine induced contraction. Atropine sulphate, glycopyrrolate, and ipratropium bromide had EC50 values of 10(-9) - 10(-8) M for relaxation of carbachol induced contractions, whereas concentrations of 10(-6) - 10(-3) M or greater were required to relax contractions induced by allergen and nine other non-muscarinic mediators. It is suggested that bronchodilatation by antimuscarinic drugs in vivo is due to inhibition of acetylcholine induced bronchoconstriction alone and that beta 2 agonists and xanthines have poor ability to protect airway smooth muscle against constrictor stimuli. Hence mechanisms other than bronchodilatation and "functional antagonism" should be considered to explain the protection against constrictor stimuli in asthma seen with beta 2 agonists and xanthines. PMID:2068693

  18. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, P.; Park, C. Y.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Tsuda, A.; Sager, T. M.; Molina, R. M.; Donaghey, T. C.; Alencar, A. M.; Kasahara, D. I.; Ericsson, T.; Millet, E. J.; Swenson, J.; Tschumperlin, D. J.; Butler, J. P.; Brain, J. D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Gehr, P.; Zhou, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40–100 nm and less than 44 μm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 μm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 μM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  19. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  20. Roxithromycin inhibits VEGF-induced human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: Opportunities for the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodelling, which is associated with increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. Roxithromycin (RXM) has been widely used in asthma treatment; however, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodelling in patients with asthma, and shown to promote ASM cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the effect of RXM on VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. We tested the effect of RXM on proliferation and cell cycle progression, as well as on the expression of phospho-VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), phospho-Akt, and caveolin-1 in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. RXM inhibited VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Additionally, VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation was suppressed by inhibiting the activity of ERK1/2, but not that of Akt. Furthermore, RXM treatment inhibits VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and ERK and downregulation of caveolin-1 in a dose-dependent manner. RXM also inhibited TGF-β-induced VEGF secretion by ASM cells and BEAS-2B cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that RXM inhibits VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation by suppression of VEGFR2 and ERK1/2 activation and caveolin-1 down-regulation, which may be involved in airway remodelling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations should enable the development of treatments for smooth muscle hyperplasia-associated diseases of the airway such as asthma. PMID:27587274

  1. Functional expression of γ-amino butyric acid transporter 2 in human and guinea pig airway epithelium and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sarah; Gallos, George; Yim, Peter D; Xu, Dingbang; Sonett, Joshua R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Gerthoffer, William; Emala, Charles W

    2011-08-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is classically released by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane or by egress via GABA transporters (GATs). Recently, a GABAergic system comprised of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors has been identified on airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells that regulate mucus secretion and contractile tone of airway smooth muscle (ASM). In addition, the enzyme that synthesizes GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase, has been identified in airway epithelial cells; however, the mechanism(s) by which this synthesized GABA is released from epithelial intracellular stores is unknown. We questioned whether any of the four known isoforms of GATs are functionally expressed in ASM or epithelial cells. We detected mRNA and protein expression of GAT2 and -4, and isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in native and cultured human ASM and epithelial cells. In contrast, mRNA encoding vesicular GAT (VGAT), the neuronal GABA transporter, was not detected. Functional inhibition of (3)H-GABA uptake was demonstrated using GAT2 and GAT4/betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) inhibitors in both human ASM and epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of GATs, but not VGAT, are expressed in both airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. They also provide a mechanism by which locally synthesized GABA can be released from these cells into the airway to activate GABA(A) channels and GABA(B) receptors, with subsequent autocrine and/or paracrine signaling effects on airway epithelium and ASM. PMID:21057105

  2. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF‐β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Rachel E.; Shaw, Nicole C.; Berry, Luke J.; Hart, Prue H.; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D‐deficient or ‐replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five‐micron sections from formalin‐fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)‐β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D‐deficient and ‐replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF‐β signaling pathway molecules. Eight‐week‐old adult vitamin D‐deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D‐deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D‐deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF‐β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D‐deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D‐deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D‐deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease. PMID:24760528

  3. CD4+ T cells enhance the unloaded shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle by altering the contractile protein expression.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Nakada, Emily M; Kachmar, Linda; Fixman, Elizabeth D; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-07-15

    Abundant data indicate that pathogenesis in allergic airways disease is orchestrated by an aberrant T-helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response. CD4(+) T cells have been localized to airway smooth muscle (ASM) in both human asthmatics and in rodent models of allergic airways disease, where they have been implicated in proliferative responses of ASM. Whether CD4(+) T cells also alter ASM contractility has not been addressed. We established an in vitro system to assess the ability of antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells to modify contractile responses of the Brown Norway rat trachealis muscle. Our data demonstrated that the unloaded velocity of shortening (Vmax) of ASM was significantly increased upon 24 h co-incubation with antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells, while stress did not change. Enhanced Vmax was dependent upon contact between the CD4(+) T cells and the ASM and correlated with increased levels of the fast (+)insert smooth muscle myosin heavy chain isoform. The levels of myosin light chain kinase and myosin light chain phosphorylation were also increased within the muscle. The alterations in mechanics and in the levels of contractile proteins were transient, both declining to control levels after 48 h of co-incubation. More permanent alterations in muscle phenotype might be attainable when several inflammatory cells and mediators interact together or after repeated antigenic challenges. Further studies will await new tissue culture methodologies that preserve the muscle properties over longer periods of time. In conclusion, our data suggest that inflammatory cells promote ASM hypercontractility in airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma.

  4. Functional evaluation of paratubal muscles using electromyography in patients with chronic unilateral tubal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ki-Hong; Jun, Beom-Cho; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Park, Yong-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Eustachian tube dysfunction is closely related to the development of otitis media and result from several factors including inflammation within the nasal cavity and nasopharynx, adenoid hypertrophy, cleft palate and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To some extent, eustachian tube dysfunction may be related to weakness of the paratubal muscles, such as the tensor veli palatini and levator veli palatini muscles. The aim of the study is to find out myogenic factors in eustachian tube dysfunction using electromyography (EMG), and to evaluate the clinical feasibility of EMG. Ten patients with unilateral eustachian tube dysfunction were included in this study. The healthy side of each patient was used as a control. EMG tests on paratubal muscles were conducted under the view of a 30° endoscope or fiberoptic laryngoscope. EMG on the tensor veli palatini showed decreased amplitudes on the affected side in one patient during phonation. EMG on the levator veli palatini showed decreased amplitudes on the affected side in two patients during both deglutition and phonation, one patient during phonation only, and two patients during deglutition only. The only patient who had decreased amplitude on EMG of the tensor veli palatini also had decreased amplitude on EMG of the levator veli palatini. In conclusion, although it is generally accepted that the tensor veli palatini plays a major role in opening the eustachian tube, reduced activity of the levator veli palatini may be related to eustachian tube dysfunction. When assessing eustachian tube function, EMG is useful for evaluating myogenic factors.

  5. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P < 0.01) twitch and tetanus contraction times compared with BEH+/+ mice, but only EDL displayed lower (P < 0.05) specific force. SOL and EDL of age-matched but not younger BEH mice showed greater exercise-induced CK efflux compared with BEH+/+ mice. In summary, myostatin dysfunction leads to impairment in muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  6. Comparison of gel contraction mediated by airway smooth muscle cells from patients with and without asthma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hisako; Moir, Lyn M; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L; McParland, Brent E

    2007-01-01

    Backgrounds Exaggerated bronchial constriction is the most significant and life threatening response of patients with asthma to inhaled stimuli. However, few studies have investigated the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from these patients. The purpose of this study was to establish a method to measure contraction of ASM cells by embedding them into a collagen gel, and to compare the contraction between subjects with and without asthma. Methods Gel contraction to histamine was examined in floating gels containing cultured ASM cells from subjects with and without asthma following overnight incubation while unattached (method 1) or attached (method 2) to casting plates. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase protein levels were also examined. Results Collagen gels containing ASM cells reduced in size when stimulated with histamine in a concentration‐dependent manner and reached a maximum at a mean (SE) of 15.7 (1.2) min. This gel contraction was decreased by inhibitors for phospholipase C (U73122), myosin light chain kinase (ML‐7) and Rho kinase (Y27632). When comparing the two patient groups, the maximal decreased area of gels containing ASM cells from patients with asthma was 19 (2)% (n = 8) using method 1 and 22 (3)% (n = 6) using method 2, both of which were greater than that of cells from patients without asthma: 13 (2)% (n = 9, p = 0.05) and 10 (4)% (n = 5, p = 0.024), respectively. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase levels were not different between the two groups. Conclusion The increased contraction of asthmatic ASM cells may be responsible for exaggerated bronchial constriction in asthma. PMID:17412779

  7. GM-CSF production from human airway smooth muscle cells is potentiated by human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Sukkar, M B; Hughes, J M; Johnson, P R; Armour, C L

    2000-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) actively participate in the airway inflammatory process in asthma. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induce ASMC to release inflammatory mediators in vitro. ASMC mediator release in vivo, however, may be influenced by features of the allergic asthmatic phenotype. We determined whether; (1) allergic asthmatic serum (AAS) modulates ASMC mediator release in response to IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, and (2) IL-1beta/TNF-alpha prime ASMC to release mediators in response to AAS. IL-5 and GM-CSF were quantified by ELISA in culture supernatants of; (1) ASMC pre-incubated with either AAS, nonallergic non-asthmatic serum (NAS) or Monomed (a serum substitute) and subsequently stimulated with IL-1beta and TNF-alpha and (2) ASMC stimulated with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and subsequently exposed to either AAS, NAS or Monomed. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha induced GM-CSF release in ASMC pre-incubated with AAS was not greater than that in ASMC pre-incubated with NAS or Monomed. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, however, primed ASMC to release GM-CSF in response to human serum. GM-CSF production following IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and serum exposure (AAS or NAS) was significantly greater than that following IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and Monomed exposure or IL-1beta/TNF-alpha exposure only. Whilst the potentiating effects of human serum were not specific to allergic asthma, these findings suggest that the secretory capacity of ASMC may be up-regulated during exacerbations of asthma, where there is evidence of vascular leakage. PMID:11132773

  8. Attenuation of airway smooth muscle contractility via flavonol-mediated inhibition of phospholipase-Cβ.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy; Danielsson, Jennifer; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F; Emala, Charles W; Gallos, George

    2016-04-15

    Enhanced contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a major pathophysiological characteristic of asthma. Expanding the therapeutic armamentarium beyond β-agonists that target ASM hypercontractility would substantially improve treatment options. Recent studies have identified naturally occurring phytochemicals as candidates for acute ASM relaxation. Several flavonoids were evaluated for their ability to acutely relax human and murine ASM ex vivo and murine airways in vivo and were evaluated for their ability to inhibit procontractile signaling pathways in human ASM (hASM) cells. Two members of the flavonol subfamily, galangin and fisetin, significantly relaxed acetylcholine-precontracted murine tracheal rings ex vivo (n = 4 and n = 5, respectively, P < 0.001). Galangin and fisetin also relaxed acetylcholine-precontracted hASM strips ex vivo (n = 6-8, P < 0.001). Functional respiratory in vivo murine studies demonstrated that inhaled galangin attenuated the increase in lung resistance induced by inhaled methacholine (n = 6, P < 0.01). Both flavonols, galangin and fisetin, significantly inhibited purified phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) (n = 7, P < 0.05; n = 7, P < 0.05, respectively), and PLCβ enzymes (n = 6, P < 0.001 and n = 6, P < 0.001, respectively) attenuated procontractile Gq agonists' increase in intracellular calcium (n = 11, P < 0.001), acetylcholine-induced increases in inositol phosphates, and CPI-17 phosphorylation (n = 9, P < 0.01) in hASM cells. The prorelaxant effect retained in these structurally similar flavonols provides a novel pharmacological method for dual inhibition of PLCβ and PDE4 and therefore may serve as a potential treatment option for acute ASM constriction.

  9. Airway smooth muscle inflammation is regulated by microRNA-145 in COPD.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Lawrence; Sevinç, Kenan; Papazoglou, Ilektra M; Tildy, Bernadett; Detillieux, Karen; Halayko, Andrew J; Chung, Kian Fan; Perry, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, highly debilitating disease of the airways, primarily caused by smoking. Chronic inflammation and structural remodelling are key pathological features of this disease, in part caused by the aberrant function of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells under the regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. miRNA are short, noncoding gene transcripts involved in the negative regulation of specific target genes, through their interactions with mRNA. Previous studies have proposed that mRNA-145 (miR-145) may interact with SMAD3, an important downstream signalling molecule of the TGF-β pathway. TGF-β was used to stimulate primary human ASM cells isolated from healthy nonsmokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. This resulted in a TGF-β-dependent increase in CXCL8 and IL-6 release, most notably in the cells from COPD patients. TGF-β stimulation increased SMAD3 expression, only in cells from COPD patients, with a concurrent increased miR-145 expression. Regulation of miR-145 was found to be negatively controlled by pathways involving the MAP kinases, MEK-1/2 and p38 MAPK. Subsequent, overexpression of miR-145 (using synthetic mimics) in ASM cells from patients with COPD suppressed IL-6 and CXCL8 release, to levels comparable to the nonsmoker controls. Therefore, this study suggests that miR-145 negatively regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release from ASM cells in COPD by targeting SMAD3. PMID:27060571

  10. IL-17A mediates a selective gene expression profile in asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Hirst, Stuart J; Lee, Tak H; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2014-06-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma by orchestrating and perpetuating airway inflammation and remodeling responses. In this study, we evaluated the IL-17RA signal transduction and gene expression profile in ASM cells from subjects with mild asthma and healthy individuals. Human primary ASM cells were treated with IL-17A and probed by the Affymetrix GeneChip array, and gene targets were validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Genomic analysis underlined the proinflammatory nature of IL-17A, as multiple NF-κB regulatory factors and chemokines were induced in ASM cells. Transcriptional regulators consisting of primary response genes were overrepresented and displayed dynamic expression profiles. IL-17A poorly enhanced IL-1β or IL-22 gene responses in ASM cells from both subjects with mild asthma and healthy donors. Interestingly, protein modifications to the NF-κB regulatory network were not observed after IL-17A stimulation, although oscillations in IκBε expression were detected. ASM cells from subjects with mild asthma up-regulated more genes with greater overall variability in response to IL-17A than from healthy donors. Finally, in response to IL-17A, ASM cells displayed rapid activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/ribosomal S6 kinase signaling pathway and increased nuclear levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-17A mediated modest gene expression response, which, in cooperation with the NF-κB signaling network, may regulate the gene expression profile in ASM cells.

  11. Nocturnal nasal continuous positive airway pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Influence on waking respiratory muscle function.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; Fox, A M; Ballard, R D; White, D P

    1994-10-01

    Patients with COPD often have reduced inspiratory muscle strength and endurance as well as poor exercise tolerance. Increased inspiratory work during sleep (probably due to increased upper airway resistance) may further strain these compromised respiratory muscles in COPD patients. We hypothesized that nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) might reduce respiratory work during sleep in COPD patients and thereby improve waking inspiratory muscle function. To test this hypothesis, eight male COPD patients were treated with sustained nocturnal nasal CPAP. Inspiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory pressure) and endurance (sustained inspiratory pressure) as well as clinical performance (12-min walk) were assessed before and after therapy. We observed that compared with matched controls, COPD patients treated with nocturnal nasal CPAP had significant and substantial improvement in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance as well as functional ability as assessed by the 12-min walk. In addition, CPAP did not significantly alter sleep quality or oxygenation in the patients studied. We conclude that nocturnal nasal CPAP improves inspiratory muscle performance during wakefulness in COPD patients, which is very likely a product of the reduced work of breathing during sleep while these individuals received CPAP.

  12. Mechanisms of action of endothelin 1 in maturing rabbit airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Grunstein, M M; Rosenberg, S M; Schramm, C M; Pawlowski, N A

    1991-06-01

    Maturational differences in the effects and mechanisms of action of endothelin 1 (ET-1) on airway contractility were investigated in tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) segments isolated from 2-wk-old and adult rabbits. In TSM under passive tension, ET-1 elicited dose-dependent contractions, with a potency of action that was significantly greater (P less than 0.001) in the 2-wk-old vs. adult tissues (i.e., mean +/- SE - log 50% of maximal response values: 8.59 +/- 0.17 vs. 7.79 +/- 0.15 - log M, respectively). In TSM half-maximally contracted with acetylcholine (ACh), however, ET-1 elicited dual and opposing dose-dependent effects. At lower doses (less than or equal to 10(-9) M), ET-1 induced TSM relaxation that was significantly greater in the adult vs. 2-wk-old TSM segments (i.e., approximately 100 vs. 26.5% decrease in active tension, respectively). The relaxant responses were associated with significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) ET-1-induced release of prostaglandins E2 and I2 in the adult tissues. At higher doses (greater than 10(-9) M), ET-1 induced TSM contractions that were 1) attenuated to a relatively greater extent by the Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine (10(-5) M) in the 2-wk-old tissues and 2) associated with significantly (P less than 0.001) enhanced ET-1-stimulated accumulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] in the immature TSM. Moreover, the TSM contractions were inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist, H-7, and the latter effect was more potent in the immature TSM. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that ET-1 exerts a potent duality of action in rabbit TSM which varies significantly with maturation, wherein 1) age-dependent differences in airway relaxation are associated with changes in the evoked release of bronchodilatory prostaglandins and 2) maturational differences in airway contraction are associated with changes in Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation and extracellular Ca2+ mobilization, coupled to differences in PKC

  13. The Expression of NOX4 in Smooth Muscles of Small Airway Correlates with the Disease Severity of COPD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is a hallmark in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in COPD pathogenesis. In the present study, the expression of NOX4 and its correlation with the ASM hypertrophy/hyperplasia, clinical pulmonary functions, and the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the ASM of COPD small airways were investigated by semiquantitative morphological and/or immunohistochemistry staining methods. The results showed that an elevated expression of NOX4 and TGF-β, along with an increased volume of ASM mass, was found in the ASM of small airways in COPD patients. The abundance of NOX4 protein in the ASM was increased with disease severity and inversely correlated with the pulmonary functions in COPD patients. In addition, the expression of NOX4 and ASM marker α-SMA was colocalized, and the increased NOX4 expression was found to accompany an upregulated expression of TGF-β in the ASM of small airways of COPD lung. These results indicate that NOX4 may be a key regulator in ASM remodeling of small airway, in part through a mechanism interacting with TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of COPD, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27656649

  14. Exploiting the relationship between birefringence and force to measure airway smooth muscle contraction with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to observe airway dynamics is fundamental to forming a complete understanding of pulmonary diseases such as asthma. We have previously demonstrated that Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used to observe structural changes in the airway during bronchoconstriction, but standard OCT lacks the contrast to discriminate airway smooth muscle (ASM) bands- ASM being responsible for generating the force that drives airway constriction- from the surrounding tissue. Since ASM in general exhibits a greater degree of birefringence than the surrounding tissue, a potential solution to this problem lies in the implementation of polarization sensitivity (PS) to the OCT system. By modifying the OCT system so that it is sensitive to the birefringence of tissue under inspection, we can visualize the ASM with much greater clarity and definition. In this presentation we show that the force of contraction can be indirectly measured by an associated increase in the birefringence signal of the ASM. We validate this approach by attaching segments of swine trachea to an isometric force transducer and stimulating contraction, while simultaneously measuring the exerted force and imaging the segment with PS-OCT. We then show how our results may be used to extrapolate the force of contraction of closed airways in absence of additional measurement devices. We apply this technique to assess ASM contractility volumetrically and in vivo, in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers.

  15. The Expression of NOX4 in Smooth Muscles of Small Airway Correlates with the Disease Severity of COPD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is a hallmark in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in COPD pathogenesis. In the present study, the expression of NOX4 and its correlation with the ASM hypertrophy/hyperplasia, clinical pulmonary functions, and the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the ASM of COPD small airways were investigated by semiquantitative morphological and/or immunohistochemistry staining methods. The results showed that an elevated expression of NOX4 and TGF-β, along with an increased volume of ASM mass, was found in the ASM of small airways in COPD patients. The abundance of NOX4 protein in the ASM was increased with disease severity and inversely correlated with the pulmonary functions in COPD patients. In addition, the expression of NOX4 and ASM marker α-SMA was colocalized, and the increased NOX4 expression was found to accompany an upregulated expression of TGF-β in the ASM of small airways of COPD lung. These results indicate that NOX4 may be a key regulator in ASM remodeling of small airway, in part through a mechanism interacting with TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of COPD, which warrants further investigation.

  16. TRPC3-mediated Ca(2+) entry contributes to mouse airway smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Xu; Zhang, Jia-Hua; Pan, Bin-Hua; Ren, Hui-Li; Feng, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Jia-Ling; Xiao, Jun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Airway remodeling is a histopathological hallmark of chronic respiratory diseases that includes airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. Canonical transient receptor potential channel-3 (TRPC3)-encoded nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) are important native constitutively active channels that play significant roles in physiological and pathological conditions in ASMCs. Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), known as lipoglycans and endotoxin, have been proven to be inducers of airway remodeling, though the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that TRPC3 is important in LPS-induced airway remodeling by regulating ASMC proliferation. To test this hypothesis, mouse ASMCs were cultured with or without LPS for 48h. Cell viability, TRPC3 protein expression, NSCC currents and changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were then analyzed using an MTT assay, western blotting, whole-cell patch clamp and calcium imaging, respectively. The results showed that LPS treatment significantly induced ASMC proliferation, up-regulation of TRPC3 protein expression and enhancement of NSCC currents, resting [Ca(2+)]i and ACh-elicited changes in [Ca(2+)]i. TRPC3 blocker Gd(3+), TRPC3 blocking antibody or TRPC3 gene silencing by siRNA significantly inhibited LPS-induced up-regulation of TRPC3 protein, enhancement of NSCC currents, resting [Ca(2+)]i and ACh-elicited changes in [Ca(2+)]i, eventually inhibiting LPS-induced ASMCproliferation. These results demonstrated that TRPC3-mediated Ca(2+) entry contributed to LPS-induced ASMC proliferation and identified TRPC3 as a possible key target in airway remodeling intervention.

  17. The effect of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel inhibitors on the vagal control of guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Alice E; Robusto, Jed; Rakoczy, Joanna; Simmons, David G; Phipps, Simon; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Subtypes of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) family of cation channels are widely expressed on nerves and smooth muscle cells in many organ systems, where they serve to regulate membrane excitability. Here we have assessed whether HCN channel inhibitors alter the function of airway smooth muscle or the neurons that regulate airway smooth muscle tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of the HCN channel inhibitors ZD7288, zatebradine and Cs+ were assessed on agonist and nerve stimulation-evoked changes in guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone using tracheal strips in vitro, an innervated tracheal tube preparation ex vivo or in anaesthetized mechanically ventilated guinea pigs in vivo. HCN channel expression in airway nerves was assessed using immunohistochemistry, PCR and in situ hybridization. KEY RESULTS HCN channel inhibition did not alter airway smooth muscle reactivity in vitro to exogenously administered smooth muscle spasmogens, but significantly potentiated smooth muscle contraction evoked by the sensory nerve stimulant capsaicin and electrical field stimulation of parasympathetic cholinergic postganglionic neurons. Sensory nerve hyperresponsiveness was also evident in in vivo following HCN channel blockade. Cs+, but not ZD7288, potentiated preganglionic nerve-dependent airway contractions and over time induced autorhythmic preganglionic nerve activity, which was not mimicked by inhibitors of potassium channels. HCN channel expression was most evident in vagal sensory ganglia and airway nerve fibres. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS HCN channel inhibitors had a previously unrecognized effect on the neural regulation of airway smooth muscle tone, which may have implications for some patients receiving HCN channel inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24762027

  18. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  19. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID

  20. Differential contribution of clinical amounts of acetaldehyde to skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction in alcoholic myopathy.

    PubMed

    Oba, Toshiharu; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Ishida, Kazuto

    2005-01-01

    Acute intoxication due to alcohol consumption has been known to elicit reversible skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction, or "alcoholic myopathy and cardiomyopathy". Sometimes, irreversible muscle damage can be induced after heavy alcohol drinking. Many researchers have proposed that acetaldehyde, the major oxidised product of alcohol, may be a primary factor underlying alcohol-induced muscle dysfunction. Because acetaldehyde is rapidly metabolised to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mainly in the liver, blood concentration of acetaldehyde is maintained at a low level even after heavy alcohol intoxication. In alcoholics, blood acetaldehyde level is relatively high, probably due to hepatic inhibition of ALDH activity. Several mM of acetaldehyde have been used for studies of cardiac muscle contraction, the intracellular calcium transient, and the L-type calcium channel. In skeletal muscle, the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor activity has been reported to be inhibited by exposure to 1 mM acetaldehyde. However, these observations were made using potentially lethal concentrations of acetaldehyde, so the hypothesis that acetaldehyde plays a crucial role on alcoholic myopathy is questionable. In this review, we will summarise the effect of alcohol and its major oxidised product, acetaldehyde, on skeletal and heart muscles and propose a toxic contribution of clinical concentrations of acetaldehyde to alcoholic myopathy. In addition, this review will include briefly the effect of acetaldehyde on diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  1. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting. PMID:24657703

  2. Molecular insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-related muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Diana; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Maciel, Elisabete; Santinha, Deolinda; Oliveira, Paula; Vitorino, Rui; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Nunes, Cláudia; Santos, Lúcio L; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics during cancer cachexia were previously suggested; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. So, the goal of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial phospholipid remodeling in cancer-related muscle wasting and its repercussions to respiratory chain activity and fiber susceptibility to apoptosis. An animal model of urothelial carcinoma induced by exposition to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) and characterized by significant body weight loss due to skeletal muscle mass decrease was used. Morphological evidences of muscle atrophy were associated to decreased respiratory chain activity and increased expression of mitochondrial UCP3, which altogether highlight the lower ability of wasted muscle to produce ATP. Lipidomic analysis of isolated mitochondria revealed a significant decrease of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin in BBN mitochondria, counteracted by increased phosphatidylcholine levels. Besides the impact on membrane fluidity, this phospholipid remodeling seems to justify, at least in part, the lower oxidative phosphorylation activity observed in mitochondria from wasted muscle and their increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Curiously, no evidences of lipid peroxidation were observed but proteins from BBN mitochondria, particularly the metabolic ones, seem more prone to carbonylation with the consequent implications in mitochondria functionality. Overall, data suggest that bladder cancer negatively impacts skeletal muscle activity specifically by affecting mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics and its interaction with proteins, ultimately leading to the dysfunction of this organelle. The regulation of phospholipid biosynthetic pathways might be seen as potential therapeutic targets for the management of cancer-related muscle wasting.

  3. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  4. Common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus during inspiratory loading.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael J; Nicholas, Christian L; Semmler, John G; Chan, Julia K M; Jordan, Amy S; Trinder, John

    2015-11-01

    Common drive is thought to constitute a central mechanism by which the efficiency of a motor neuron pool is increased. This study tested the hypothesis that common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus (GG) would increase with increased respiratory drive in response to an inspiratory load. Respiration, GG electromyographic (EMG) activity, single-motor unit activity, and coherence in the 0-5 Hz range between pairs of GG motor units were assessed for the 30 s before an inspiratory load, the first and second 30 s of the load, and the 30 s after the load. Twelve of twenty young, healthy male subjects provided usable data, yielding 77 pairs of motor units: 2 Inspiratory Phasic, 39 Inspiratory Tonic, 15 Expiratory Tonic, and 21 Tonic. Respiratory and GG inspiratory activity significantly increased during the loads and returned to preload levels during the postload periods (all showed significant quadratic functions over load trials, P < 0.05). As hypothesized, common drive increased during the load in inspiratory modulated motor units to a greater extent than in expiratory/tonic motor units (significant load × discharge pattern interaction, P < 0.05). Furthermore, this effect persisted during the postload period. In conclusion, common drive to inspiratory modulated motor units was elevated in response to increased respiratory drive. The postload elevation in common drive was suggestive of a poststimulus activation effect.

  5. A small volatile bacterial molecule triggers mitochondrial dysfunction in murine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Constantinou, Caterina; Bandyopadhaya, Arunava; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Lee, Sangseok; Mindrinos, Michael; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald G; Rahme, Laurence G

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria integrate distinct signals that reflect specific threats to the host, including infection, tissue damage, and metabolic dysfunction; and play a key role in insulin resistance. We have found that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing infochemical, 2-amino acetophenone (2-AA), produced during acute and chronic infection in human tissues, including in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, acts as an interkingdom immunomodulatory signal that facilitates pathogen persistence, and host tolerance to infection. Transcriptome results have led to the hypothesis that 2-AA causes further harm to the host by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. As normal skeletal muscle function is essential to survival, and is compromised in many chronic illnesses, including infections and CF-associated muscle wasting, we here determine the global effects of 2-AA on skeletal muscle using high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), proton ((1)H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics, in vivo (31)P NMR, whole-genome expression analysis and functional studies. Our results show that 2-AA when injected into mice, induced a biological signature of insulin resistance as determined by (1)H NMR analysis-, and dramatically altered insulin signaling, glucose transport, and mitochondrial function. Genes including Glut4, IRS1, PPAR-γ, PGC1 and Sirt1 were downregulated, whereas uncoupling protein UCP3 was up-regulated, in accordance with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although 2-AA did not alter high-energy phosphates or pH by in vivo (31)P NMR analysis, it significantly reduced the rate of ATP synthesis. This affect was corroborated by results demonstrating down-regulation of the expression of genes involved in energy production and muscle function, and was further validated by muscle function studies. Together, these results further demonstrate that 2-AA, acts as a mediator of interkingdom modulation, and likely effects insulin resistance associated with a

  6. Does smooth muscle in an intact airway undergo length adaptation during a sustained change in transmural pressure?

    PubMed

    Ansell, Thomas K; McFawn, Peter K; McLaughlin, Robert A; Sampson, David D; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Mitchell, Howard W; Noble, Peter B

    2015-03-01

    In isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) strips, an increase or decrease in ASM length away from its current optimum length causes an immediate reduction in force production followed by a gradual time-dependent recovery in force, a phenomenon termed length adaptation. In situ, length adaptation may be initiated by a change in transmural pressure (Ptm), which is a primary physiological determinant of ASM length. The present study sought to determine the effect of sustained changes in Ptm and therefore, ASM perimeter, on airway function. We measured contractile responses in whole porcine bronchial segments in vitro before and after a sustained inflation from a baseline Ptm of 5 cmH2O to 25 cmH2O, or deflation to -5 cmH2O, for ∼50 min in each case. In one group of airways, lumen narrowing and stiffening in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were assessed from volume and pressure signals using a servo-controlled syringe pump with pressure feedback. In a second group of airways, lumen narrowing and the perimeter of the ASM in situ were determined by anatomical optical coherence tomography. In a third group of airways, active tension was determined under isovolumic conditions. Both inflation and deflation reduced the contractile response to EFS. Sustained Ptm change resulted in a further decrease in contractile response, which returned to baseline levels upon return to the baseline Ptm. These findings reaffirm the importance of Ptm in regulating airway narrowing. However, they do not support a role for ASM length adaptation in situ under physiological levels of ASM lengthening and shortening. PMID:25729015

  7. Functional expression of the TMEM16 family of calcium-activated chloride channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Kenneth E.; Danielsson, Jennifer; Funayama, Hiromi; Fu, Xiao Wen; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Yim, Peter; Xu, Dingbang; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness is a key component in the pathophysiology of asthma. Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) flux has been described in many cell types, including human airway smooth muscle (HASM), the true molecular identity of the channels responsible for this chloride conductance remains controversial. Recently, a new family of proteins thought to represent the true CaCCs was identified as the TMEM16 family. This led us to question whether members of this family are functionally expressed in native and cultured HASM. We further questioned whether expression of these channels contributes to the contractile function of HASM. We identified the mRNA expression of eight members of the TMEM16 family in HASM cells and show immunohistochemical evidence of TMEM16A in both cultured and native HASM. Functionally, we demonstrate that the classic chloride channel inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), inhibited halide flux in cultured HASM cells. Moreover, HASM cells displayed classical electrophysiological properties of CaCCs during whole cell electrophysiological recordings, which were blocked by using an antibody selective for TMEM16A. Furthermore, two distinct TMEM16A antagonists (tannic acid and benzbromarone) impaired a substance P-induced contraction in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. These findings demonstrate that multiple members of this recently described family of CaCCs are expressed in HASM cells, they display classic electrophysiological properties of CaCCs, and they modulate contractile tone in airway smooth muscle. The TMEM16 family may provide a novel therapeutic target for limiting airway constriction in asthma. PMID:23997176

  8. In vivo adenosine A(2B) receptor desensitization in guinea-pig airway smooth muscle: implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Breschi, Maria Cristina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fogli, Stefano; Martinelli, Cinzia; Adinolfi, Barbara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Camici, Marcella; Martinotti, Enrica; Nieri, Paola

    2007-12-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the role of adenosine receptor subtypes in the contractility modulation of guinea-pig airway smooth muscle in normal and pathological settings. In vitro and in vivo experiments were performed by testing selective agonists and antagonists on isolated tracheal smooth muscle preparations and pulmonary inflation pressure, respectively, under normal conditions or following ovalbumin-induced allergic sensitization. In normal and sensitized animals, the adenosine A(2A)/A(2B) receptor agonist, NECA, evoked relaxing responses of isolated tracheal preparations precontracted with histamine, and such an effect was reversed by the adenosine A(2B) antagonist, MRS 1706, in the presence or in the absence of epithelium. The expression of mRNA coding for adenosine A(2B) receptors was demonstrated in tracheal specimens. In vitro desensitization with 100 microM NECA markedly reduced the relaxing effect of the agonist. In vivo NECA or adenosine administration to normal animals inhibited histamine-mediated bronchoconstriction, while these inhibitory effects no longer occurred in sensitized guinea-pigs. Adenosine plasma levels were significantly higher in sensitized than normal animals. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that: (i) adenosine A(2B) receptors are responsible for the relaxing effects of adenosine on guinea-pig airways; (ii) these receptors can undergo rapid adaptive changes that may affect airway smooth muscle responsiveness to adenosine; (iii) ovalbumin-induced sensitization promotes a reversible inactivation of adenosine A(2B) receptors which can be ascribed to homologous desensitization. These findings can be relevant to better understand adenosine functions in airways as well as mechanisms of action of asthma therapies targeting the adenosine system.

  9. Unusual fatal petrositis presenting as myofascial pain and dysfunction of the temporal muscle.

    PubMed

    Loretan, Stefan; Duvoisin, Bernard; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    Petrositis is a rare and severe complication of acute otitis media and mastoiditis. Although the extension of the inflammatory process from the petrous apex to the adjacent Meckel cave can lead to trigeminal pain, an irritation of the trigeminal nerve roots resulting in acute or chronic hyperactivity of masticatory muscles has never been reported. We report here the unusual case of an 86-year-old man who presented with a handicapping myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome of the right temporal muscle as a heralding manifestation of an unusual form of petrositis. The patient progressively developed a retropharyngeal abscess, a right sphenoid sinusitis, and fatal meningitis. This case demonstrated that (1) myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome that does not respond to conventional treatments may suggest an unusual etiology and warrant further medical investigations and a detailed medical history and that (2) petrositis can manifest itself with atypical clinical symptoms and radiologic signs.

  10. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  11. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:23669061

  12. Screening for muscle wasting and dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan J; Johansen, Kirsten L; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Cuppari, Lilian; Avesani, Carla M

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and muscle function are negatively affected by a variety of conditions inherent to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to dialysis treatment. Skeletal muscle mass and function serve as indicators of the nutritional and clinical state of CKD patients, and low values or derangements over time are strong predictors of poor patient outcomes. However, muscle size and function can be affected by different factors, may decline at different rates, and may have different patient implications. Therefore, operational definitions of frailty and sarcopenia have emerged to encompass these 2 dimensions of muscle health, i.e., size and functionality. The aim of this review is to appraise available methods for assessment of muscle mass and functionality, with an emphasis on their accuracy in the setting of CKD patients. We then discuss the selection of reference cutoffs for defining conditions of muscle wasting and dysfunction. Finally, we review definitions applied in studies addressing sarcopenia and frailty in CKD patients and discuss their applicability for diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:27157695

  13. Screening for muscle wasting and dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan J; Johansen, Kirsten L; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Cuppari, Lilian; Avesani, Carla M

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and muscle function are negatively affected by a variety of conditions inherent to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to dialysis treatment. Skeletal muscle mass and function serve as indicators of the nutritional and clinical state of CKD patients, and low values or derangements over time are strong predictors of poor patient outcomes. However, muscle size and function can be affected by different factors, may decline at different rates, and may have different patient implications. Therefore, operational definitions of frailty and sarcopenia have emerged to encompass these 2 dimensions of muscle health, i.e., size and functionality. The aim of this review is to appraise available methods for assessment of muscle mass and functionality, with an emphasis on their accuracy in the setting of CKD patients. We then discuss the selection of reference cutoffs for defining conditions of muscle wasting and dysfunction. Finally, we review definitions applied in studies addressing sarcopenia and frailty in CKD patients and discuss their applicability for diagnosis and monitoring.

  14. Fructose induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells by provoking oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Natasha; Maurya, Chandan K; Arha, Deepti; Avisetti, Deepa R; Prathapan, Ayyappan; Raj, Palayyan S; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G; Kalivendi, Shasi V; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that oxidative stress results from the increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, tissue damage, insulin resistance, and other complications observed in type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that intake of high fructose contributes to insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances. However, there is limited information about the direct effect of fructose on the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle, the major metabolic determinant of whole body insulin activity. Here, we assessed the effect of fructose exposure on mitochondria-mediated mechanisms in skeletal muscle cells. Exposure of L6 myotubes to high fructose stimulated the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO), and the expression of inducible NO synthase. Fructose-induced oxidative stress was associated with increased translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 to the nucleus, decreases in mitochondrial DNA content and mitochondrial dysfunctions, as evidenced by decreased activities of citrate synthase and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased activity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism. Furthermore, positive Annexin-propidium iodide staining and altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and caspases in L6 myotubes indicated that the cells progressively became apoptotic upon fructose exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that exposure of skeletal muscle cells to fructose induced oxidative stress that decreased mitochondrial DNA content and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, which caused apoptosis.

  15. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-09

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%-99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G₁/G₀ cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  16. 17β-Aminoestrogens induce guinea pig airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness through L-type Ca(2+) channels activation.

    PubMed

    Flores-Soto, Edgar; Martínez-Villa, Inocencio; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Lemini, Cristina; Montaño, Luis M

    2015-09-01

    Therapy with estrogens is frequently used in menopausal women and as hormonal contraception. Because of its thrombotic effects, long term estrogen administration used in hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and contraception could represent a health hazard. In this regard, 17β-aminoestrogens such as aminoestrol, butolame and pentolame have shown promising HRT potential, because they have a weak agonist estrogenic action and antithrombotic activity. Additionally, estrogens play a protective role in airway smooth muscle, but the effect of 17β-aminoestrogens on the airway smooth muscle has not been tested yet. In guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle pentolame and butolame induced hyperresponsiveness to histamine (His), carbachol (Cch) and KCl. Interestingly, aminoestrol did not show this effect at the highest concentration studied, it even lowered the contraction induced by Cch. The hyperresponsiveness induced by pentolame to His was abolished by nifedipine. In single tracheal myocytes, KCl induced an increment in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)]i, pentolame also showed an increase in [Ca(2+)]i and the addition of KCl in the plateau of this rise further significantly augmented the [Ca(2+)]i response. Additionally, in patch clamp experiments pentolame increased the L-type Ca(2+) currents. Thus, 17β-aminoestrogens such as pentolame and butolame, but not aminoestrol, activate L-type Ca(2+) channel to induced hyperresponsiveness to Cch, His and KCl in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle. Due to its lack of effect on airways and to its anticoagulant characteristics, aminoestrol seems to be the best alternative in the HRT among the 17β-aminoestrogens studied.

  17. Muscle Disuse as a Pivotal Problem in Sarcopenia-related Muscle Loss and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bell, K E; von Allmen, M T; Devries, M C; Phillips, S M

    2016-01-01

    An age-associated loss of muscle mass and strength--sarcopenia--begins at around the fifth decade of life, with mass being lost at ~0.5-1.2% per year and strength at ~3% per year. Sarcopenia can contribute to a variety of negative health outcomes, including an increased risk for falls and fractures, the development of metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increase the chance of requiring assisted living. Linear sarcopenic declines in muscle mass and strength are, however, punctuated by transient periods of muscle disuse that can accelerate losses of muscle and strength, which could result in increased risk for the aforementioned conditions. Muscle disuse is recognizable with bed rest or immobilization (for example, due to surgery or acute illness requiring hospitalization); however, recent work has shown that even a relative reduction in ambulation (reduced daily steps) results in significant reductions in muscle mass, strength and possibly an increase in disease risk. Although reduced ambulation is a seemingly "benign" form of disuse, compared to bed rest and immobilization, reports have documented that 2-3 weeks of reduced daily steps may induce: negative changes in body composition, reductions in muscle strength and quality, anabolic resistance, and decrements in glycemic control in older adults. Importantly, periods of reduced ambulation likely occur fairly frequently and appear more difficult to fully recover from, in older adults. Here we explore the consequences of muscle disuse due to reduced ambulatory activity in older adults, with frequent comparisons to established models of disuse: bed rest and immobilization. PMID:26980367

  18. Vitamin D Modulates Expression of the Airway Smooth Muscle Transcriptome in Fatal Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin; Nikolos, Christina; Jester, William; Klanderman, Barbara; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Truskowski, Kevin; MacDonald, Kevin; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, asthma is a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease affecting over 300 million people. Some asthma patients remain poorly controlled by conventional therapies and experience more life-threatening exacerbations. Vitamin D, as an adjunct therapy, may improve disease control in severe asthma patients since vitamin D enhances glucocorticoid responsiveness and mitigates airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperplasia. We sought to characterize differences in transcriptome responsiveness to vitamin D between fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM by using RNA-Seq to measure ASM transcript expression in five donors with fatal asthma and ten non-asthma-derived donors at baseline and with vitamin D treatment. Based on a Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p-value <0.05, 838 genes were differentially expressed in fatal asthma vs. non-asthma-derived ASM at baseline, and vitamin D treatment compared to baseline conditions induced differential expression of 711 and 867 genes in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM, respectively. Functional gene categories that were highly represented in all groups included extracellular matrix, and responses to steroid hormone stimuli and wounding. Genes differentially expressed by vitamin D also included cytokine and chemokine activity categories. Follow-up qPCR and individual analyte ELISA experiments were conducted for four cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL13, CXCL12, IL8) to measure TNFα-induced changes by asthma status and vitamin D treatment. Vitamin D inhibited TNFα-induced IL8 protein secretion levels to a comparable degree in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM even though IL8 had significantly higher baseline levels in fatal asthma-derived ASM. Our findings identify vitamin D-specific gene targets and provide transcriptomic data to explore differences in the ASM of fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived donors. PMID:26207385

  19. Technical and physiological determinants of airway smooth muscle mass in endobronchial biopsy samples of asthmatic horses.

    PubMed

    Bullone, Michela; Chevigny, Mylène; Allano, Marion; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Morphometric analyses of endobronchial biopsies are commonly performed in asthma research but little is known about the technical and physiological parameters contributing to measurement variability. We investigated factors potentially affecting biopsy size, quality, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) content in heaves, an asthma-like disease of horses. Horses with heaves in clinical exacerbation (n = 6) or remission (n = 6) from the disease and six controls were studied using a crossover design. The effect of disease status, age, bronchodilation, biopsy forceps type, and carina size on total biopsy area (Atot), ASM area (AASM), ASM% (AASM/Atot), and histologic quality were assessed. Concordance among different measuring techniques was also assessed. Compared with other groups, horses with heaves in exacerbation yielded larger biopsies (P < 0.05). Better quality biopsies were obtained from carinae of small size compared with large ones (P = 0.02), and carina size and forceps type significantly affected the ASM content of the biopsy (interaction, P < 0.05). AASM increased with age only in heaves-affected horses (r = 0.9, P < 0.05), and ASM% was negatively correlated with pulmonary resistance at 5 Hz in heaves-affected horses (r = -0.74, P = 0.01), likely because of the increased thickness of the extracellular matrix layer in this group (P = 0.01). In conclusion, disease status, carina thickness, and the forceps used may significantly affect biopsy size, quality, and ASM content. Endobronchial biopsies are not appropriate samples for ASM quantification in heaves, and studies measuring ASM mass should not be compared when measuring techniques differ. PMID:25103978

  20. Bidirectional counter-regulation of human lung mast cell and airway smooth muscle β2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesised that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at tyrosine 350 (Tyr350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC co-culture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC co-culture. These effects were reversed by neutralisation of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr350 occurred within 5 minutes in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were co-cultured, and was inhibited by neutralising SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  1. Molecular cloning of magnesium-independent type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatases from airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tate, R J; Tolan, D; Pyne, S

    1999-07-01

    Members of the type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP2) family catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA), lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a Mg(2+)-independent and N-ethymaleimide-insensitive PAP2 activity in cultured guinea-pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Two PAP2 cDNAs of 923 and 926 base pairs were identified and subsequently cloned from these cells. The ORF of the 923 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 285 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa), which had 94% homology with human PAP2a (hPAP2a) and which probably represents a guinea-pig specific PAP2a (gpPAP2a1). The ORF of the 926 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 286 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa) which had 84% and 91% homology with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1, respectively. This protein, termed gpPAP2a2, has two regions (aa 21-33 and 51-74) of marked divergence and altered hydrophobicity compared with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1. This occurs in the predicted first and second transmembrane domains and at the extremes of the first outer loop. Other significant differences between gpPAP2a1/2 and hPAP2a, hPAP2b and hPAP2c occur at the cytoplasmic C-terminal. Transient expression of gpPAP2a2 in Cos-7 cells resulted in an approx. 4-fold increase in Mg(2+)-independent PAP activity, thereby confirming that gpPAP2a2 is another catalytically active member of an extended PAP2 family.

  2. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  3. Computational simulation of human upper airway collapse using a pressure-/state-dependent model of genioglossal muscle contraction under laminar flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqi; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P.

    2012-01-01

    A three-element, pressure- and state (sleep and wake) -dependent contraction model of the genioglossal muscle was developed based on the microstructure of skeletal muscle and the cross-bridge theory. This model establishes a direct connection between the contractile forces generated in muscle fibers and the measured electromyogram signals during various upper airway conditions. This effectively avoids the difficulty of determining muscle shortening velocity during complex pharyngeal conditions when modeling the muscle’s contractile behaviors. The activation of the genioglossal muscle under different conditions was then simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of varying each modeled parameter on the muscle’s contractile behaviors. This muscle contraction model was then incorporated into our anatomically correct, two-dimensional computational model of the pharyngeal airway to perform a finite-element analysis of air flow, tissue deformation, and airway collapse. The model-predicted muscle deformations are consistent with previous observations regarding upper airway behavior in normal subjects. PMID:15831800

  4. Sirtuin3 Dysfunction Is the Key Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Longaretti, Lorena; Morigi, Marina; Cassis, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance. The mechanism underlying this abnormality, however, is still poorly defined. In a different setting, skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling are regulated by Sirtuin3. Objective Here, we investigate whether angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is associated with Sirtuin3 dysregulation and whether pharmacological manipulation of Sirtuin3 confers protection. Study Design Parental and GLUT4-myc L6 rat skeletal muscle cells exposed to angiotensin II are used as in vitro models of insulin resistance. GLUT4 translocation, glucose uptake, intracellular molecular signals such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, Sirtuin3 protein expression and activity, along with its downstream targets and upstream regulators, are analyzed both in the absence and presence of acetyl-L-carnitine. The role of Sirtuin3 in GLUT4 translocation and intracellular molecular signaling is also studied in Sirtuin3-silenced as well as over-expressing cells. Results Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells via mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in a two-fold increase in superoxide generation. In this context, reactive oxygen species open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and significantly lower Sirtuin3 levels and activity impairing the cell antioxidant defense. Angiotensin II-induced Sirtuin3 dysfunction leads to the impairment of AMP-activated protein kinase/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase signaling. Acetyl-L-carnitine, by lowering angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial superoxide formation, prevents Sirtuin3 dysfunction. This phenomenon implies the restoration of manganese superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Acetyl-L-carnitine protection is abrogated by specific Sirtuin3 siRNA. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance fosters mitochondrial superoxide generation, in

  5. Complex I dysfunction underlies the glycolytic switch in pulmonary hypertensive smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary Louise; Desai, Ankit A; Khalpey, Zain; Yuan, Jason X-J; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    ATP is essential for cellular function and is usually produced through oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial dysfunction is now being recognized as an important contributing factor in the development cardiovascular diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). In PH there is a metabolic change from oxidative phosphorylation to mainly glycolysis for energy production. However, the mechanisms underlying this glycolytic switch are only poorly understood. In particular the role of the respiratory Complexes in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PH is unresolved and was the focus of our investigations. We report that smooth muscle cells isolated from the pulmonary vessels of rats with PH (PH-PASMC), induced by a single injection of monocrotaline, have attenuated mitochondrial function and enhanced glycolysis. Further, utilizing a novel live cell assay, we were able to demonstrate that the mitochondrial dysfunction in PH-PASMC correlates with deficiencies in the activities of Complexes I-III. Further, we observed that there was an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in the PASMC isolated from rats with PH. We further found that the defect in Complex I activity was due to a loss of Complex I assembly, although the assembly of Complexes II and III were both maintained. Thus, we conclude that loss of Complex I assembly may be involved in the switch of energy metabolism in smooth muscle cells to glycolysis and that maintaining Complex I activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of PH. PMID:26298201

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction-associated OPA1 cleavage contributes to muscle degeneration: preventative effect of hydroxytyrosol acetate.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Li, H; Zheng, A; Yang, L; Liu, J; Chen, C; Tang, Y; Zou, X; Li, Y; Long, J; Liu, J; Zhang, Y; Feng, Z

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the development of muscle disorders, including muscle wasting, muscle atrophy and degeneration. Despite the knowledge that oxidative stress closely interacts with mitochondrial dysfunction, the detailed mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) was used to induce oxidative stress on differentiated C2C12 myotubes. t-BHP induced significant mitochondrial dysfunction in a time-dependent manner, accompanied by decreased myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Consistently, endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction triggered by carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, was accompanied by decreased membrane potential and decreased MyHC protein content. However, the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) efficiently reduced the ROS level and restored MyHC content, suggesting a close association between ROS and MyHC expression. Meanwhile, we found that both t-BHP and FCCP promoted the cleavage of optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) from the long form into short form during the early stages. In addition, the ATPase family gene 3-like 2, a mitochondrial inner membrane protease, was also markedly increased. Moreover, OPA1 knockdown in myotubes was accompanied by decreased MyHC content, whereas NAC failed to prevent FCCP-induced MyHC decrease with OPA1 knockdown, suggesting that ROS might affect MyHC content by modulating OPA1 cleavage. In addition, hydroxytyrosol acetate (HT-AC), an important compound in virgin olive oil, could significantly prevent t-BHP-induced mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability loss in myotubes. Specifically, HT-AC inhibited t-BHP-induced OPA1 cleavage and mitochondrial morphology changes, accompanied by improvement on mitochondrial oxygen consumption capacity, ATP productive potential and activities of mitochondrial complex I, II and V. Moreover, both

  7. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  8. Active and passive characteristics of muscle tone and their relationship to models of subluxation/joint dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Gary A; Owens, Edward F

    2003-01-01

    The relationship of muscles to the causes and effects of the pathophysiologic entity referred to as chiropractic subluxation or joint dysfunction is critical. Part I of this paper reviews complexities of skeletal muscle in regards to anatomy, active and passive tone, detection of muscle tone, neurophysiology, and how muscle function fits into a variety of subluxation/joint dysfunction models. The review culminates in Part II with a hypothesis to describe and explain varying degrees of muscle tone that may be encountered clinically. It is hoped that knowledge of the differing levels of muscle tone and their causes will help the clinician to better determine the underlying cause of a neuro-musculoskeletal problem allowing application of necessary and proper intervention. Imagesp179-a

  9. Active and passive characteristics of muscle tone and their relationship to models of subluxation/joint dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Gary A.; Owens, Edward F.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship of muscles to the causes and effects of the pathophysiologic entity referred to as chiropractic subluxation or joint dysfunction is critical. Part I of this paper reviewed the complexities of skeletal muscle in regards to anatomy, active and passive tone, detection of muscle tone, neurophysiology, and how muscle function fits into a variety of subluxation/joint dysfunction models. The concluding part of the review culminates in a hypothesis to describe and explain varying degrees of muscle tone that may be encountered clinically. It is hoped that knowledge of the differing levels of muscle tone and their causes will help the clinician to better determine the underlying cause of a neuromusculoskeletal problem allowing application of necessary and proper intervention.

  10. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels.

  11. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Brook, Bindi S

    2014-04-15

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of "force transmission pathways"; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior.

  12. Bisulfite and sulfite as derivatives of sulfur dioxide alters biomechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijing; Lin, Feng; Li, Jianming; Liao, Qingfeng; Liu, Enmei; Jiang, Xuemei; Deng, Linhong

    2014-02-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a common air pollutant that triggers asthmatic symptoms, but its toxicological mechanisms are not fully understood. Specifically, it is unclear how SO2 in vivo affects airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells of which the mechanics is known to ultimately mediate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) - a hallmark feature of asthma. To this end, we investigated the effects of bisulfite/sulfite (1:3 M/M in neutral fluid to simulate the in vivo derivatives of inhaled SO2 in the airways), on the viability, migration, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells cultured in vitro. The results showed that bisulfite/sulfite consistently increased viability, migration, F-actin intensity and stiffness of ASM cells in similar fashion as concentration increasing from 10(-4) to 10(-1) mmol/L. However, bisulfite/sulfite increased the ASM cell contractility induced by KCl only at the concentration between 10(-4) and 10(-3) mmol/L (p < 0.05), while having no consistent effect on that induced by histamine. At the concentration of 10(0) mmol/L, bisulfite/sulfite became acutely toxic to the ASM cells. Taken together, the data suggest that SO2 derivatives at low levels in vivo may directly increase the mass, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells, which may help understand the mechanism in which specific air pollutants contribute in vivo to the pathogenesis of asthma.

  13. Top-Down Targeted Proteomics Reveals Decrease in Myosin Regulatory Light-Chain Phosphorylation That Contributes to Sarcopenic Muscle Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gregorich, Zachery R; Peng, Ying; Cai, Wenxuan; Jin, Yutong; Wei, Liming; Chen, Albert J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Moss, Richard L; Diffee, Gary M; Ge, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with advancing age, is a significant cause of disability and loss of independence in the elderly and thus, represents a formidable challenge for the aging population. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying sarcopenia-associated muscle dysfunction remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed an integrated approach combining top-down targeted proteomics with mechanical measurements to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) in age-related muscle dysfunction. Top-down targeted proteomic analysis uncovered a progressive age-related decline in the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), a critical protein involved in the modulation of muscle contractility, in the skeletal muscle of aging rats. Top-down tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified a previously unreported bis-phosphorylated proteoform of fast skeletal RLC and localized the sites of decreasing phosphorylation to Ser14/15. Of these sites, Ser14 phosphorylation represents a previously unidentified site of phosphorylation in RLC from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Subsequent mechanical analysis of single fast-twitch fibers isolated from the muscles of rats of different ages revealed that the observed decline in RLC phosphorylation can account for age-related decreases in the contractile properties of sarcopenic fast-twitch muscles. These results strongly support a role for decreasing RLC phosphorylation in sarcopenia-associated muscle dysfunction and suggest that therapeutic modulation of RLC phosphorylation may represent a new avenue for the treatment of sarcopenia. PMID:27362462

  14. Maturational regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate metabolism in rabbit airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, S M; Berry, G T; Yandrasitz, J R; Grunstein, M M

    1991-01-01

    Airway reactivity has been shown to vary with age; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this process remain unidentified. To elucidate the role of ontogenetic changes in phosphoinositide-linked signal transduction, we examined whether age-related differences in tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) contractility to carbachol (CCh) are associated with developmental changes in the production and metabolism of the second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins (1,4,5)P3). In TSM segments isolated from 2-wk-old and adult rabbits, both the maximal isometric contractile force and sensitivity (i.e., -logED50) to CCh (10(-10)-10(-4) M) were significantly greater in the immature vs. adult tissues (P less than 0.001). Similarly, Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation elicited by either receptor-coupled stimulation with CCh (10(-10)-10(-4) M) or post-receptor-mediated guanine nucleotide binding protein activation of permeabilized TSM with GTP gamma S (100 microM) was also significantly enhanced in 2-wk-old vs. adult TSM. Measurement of the activities of the degradative enzymes for Ins(1,4,5)P3 demonstrated that: (a) mean +/- SE maximal Ins(1,4,5)P3 3'-kinase activity was significantly reduced in the immature vs. adult TSM (i.e., approximately 71.7 +/- 6.0 vs. 137.8 +/- 10.0 pmol/min per mg protein, respectively; P less than 0.005); (b) by contrast, maximal Ins(1,4,5)P3 5'-phosphatase activity was significantly increased in the immature vs. adult TSM (i.e., 27.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 15.6 +/- 1.5 nmol/min per mg protein, respectively; P less than 0.001); and (c) the Km values for Ins(1,4,5)P3 5'-phosphatase were 14- and 19-fold greater than those for Ins(1,4,5)P3 3'-kinase in the 2-wk-old and adult TSM, respectively. Collectively, the findings suggest that the age-related decrease in agonist-induced rabbit TSM contractility is associated with a diminution in Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation which is attributed, at least in part, to ontogenetic changes in the relative activities of the degradative enzymes for

  15. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  16. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma.

  17. Effects of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists on anti-IgE-induced contraction and smooth muscle reactivity in human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Gorenne, I; Labat, C; Norel, X; De Montpreville, V; Guillet, M C; Cavero, I; Brink, C

    1995-01-01

    1. The beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, salbutamol, salmeterol and RP 58802 relaxed basal tone of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. Salmeterol- and RP 58802-induced relaxations persisted for more than 4 h when the medium was constantly renewed after treatment. 2. Salbutamol, salmeterol and RP 58802 reversed histamine-induced contractions in human airways (pD2 values: 6.15 +/- 0.21, 6.00 +/- 0.19 and 6.56 +/- 0.12, respectively). 3. Anti-IgE-induced contractions were significantly inhibited immediately after pretreatment of preparations with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists (10 microM). However, when tissues were treated with beta 2-agonists and then washed for a period of 4 h, salmeterol was the only agonist which significantly inhibited the anti-IgE response. 4. Histamine response curves were shifted to the right immediately after pretreatment of tissues with the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists (10 microM; 20 min), but maximal contractions were not affected. After a 4 h washing period, the histamine curves were not significantly different from controls. Concentration-effect curves to acetylcholine (ACh) or leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were not significantly modified after beta 2-agonist pretreatment. 5. These results suggest that beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists may prevent anti-IgE-induced contraction by inhibition of mediator release rather than alterations of those mechanisms involved in airway smooth muscle contraction. PMID:7780648

  18. Airway smooth muscle cells synthesize hyaluronan cable structures independent of inter-alpha-inhibitor heavy chain attachment.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mark E; Fulop, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Durba; Comhair, Suzy; Erzurum, Serpil C; Hascall, Vincent C

    2009-02-20

    The covalent association of inter-alpha-inhibitor-derived heavy chains (HCs) with hyaluronan was first described in synovial fluid from arthritic patients and later described as a structural and functional component of hyaluronan "cable" structures produced by many different cells and stimuli. HC transfer has been shown to be mediated by the protein product of TSG-6 (tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6). Considering the accumulation of hyaluronan in airways following asthmatic attacks and the subsequent infiltration of leukocytes, we sought to characterize HC substitution of hyaluronan "cables" in primary mouse airway smooth muscle cells (MASM) and primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM). We found that cells derived from mice lacking TSG-6 had no defect in hyaluronan production or hyaluronan-mediated leukocyte adhesion when treated with the viral mimic poly(I,C). Functional hyaluronan cables were induced by cycloheximide in the confirmed absence of protein synthesis, with or without simultaneous treatment with poly(I,C). We characterized the species specificity of the antibody other investigators used to describe the HC-hyaluronan complex of hyaluronan cables and found minimal affinity to bovine-derived HCs in contrast to HCs from mouse and human sera. Thus, we cultured MASM and HASM cells in serum from these three sources and analyzed hyaluronan extracts for HCs and other hyaluronan-binding proteins, using parallel cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC) extracts as positive controls. We conclude that, if hyaluronan cables derived from MASM and HASM cells are substituted with HCs, the amount of substitution is significantly below the limit of detection when compared with COC extracts of similar hyaluronan mass.

  19. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  20. Role of KCNQ channels in skeletal muscle arteries and periadventitial vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zavaritskaya, Olga; Zhuravleva, Nadezda; Schleifenbaum, Johanna; Gloe, Torsten; Devermann, Lena; Kluge, Reinhart; Mladenov, Mitko; Frey, Manfred; Gagov, Hristo; Fésüs, Gabor; Gollasch, Maik; Schubert, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    KCNQ channels have been identified in arterial smooth muscle. However, their role in vasoregulation and chronic vascular diseases remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that KCNQ channels contribute to periadventitial vasoregulation in peripheral skeletal muscle arteries by perivascular adipose tissue and that they represent novel targets to rescue periadventitial vascular dysfunction. Two models, spontaneously hypertensive rats and New Zealand obese mice, were studied using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the patch-clamp technique, membrane potential measurements, myography of isolated vessels, and blood pressure telemetry. In rat Gracilis muscle arteries, anticontractile effects of perivascular fat were inhibited by the KCNQ channel blockers XE991 and linopirdine but not by other selective K(+) channel inhibitors. Accordingly, XE991 and linopirdine blocked noninactivating K(+) currents in freshly isolated Gracilis artery smooth muscle cells. mRNAs of several KCNQ channel subtypes were detected in those arteries, with KCNQ4 channels being dominant. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, the anticontractile effect of perivascular fat in Gracilis muscle arteries was largely reduced compared with Wistar rats. However, the vasodilator effects of KCNQ channel openers and mRNA expression of KCNQ channels were normal. Furthermore, KCNQ channel openers restored the diminished anticontractile effects of perivascular fat in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Moreover, KCNQ channel openers reduced arterial blood pressure in both models of hypertension independent of ganglionic blockade. Thus, our data suggest that KCNQ channels play a pivotal role in periadventitial vasoregulation of peripheral skeletal muscle arteries, and KCNQ channel opening may be an effective mechanism to improve impaired periadventitial vasoregulation and associated hypertension.

  1. The effect of sleep on reflex genioglossus muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R L; Innes, J A; Morrell, M J; Shea, S A; Guz, A

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of sleep on reflex pharyngeal dilator muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure in human subjects. Intra-oral bipolar surface electrodes were used to record genioglossus electromyogram (EMG) responses to 500 ms duration pressure stimuli of 0 and -25 cmH2O applied, via a face-mask, in four normal subjects. Stimuli were applied during early inspiration in wakefulness and in periods of non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep, defined by electroencephalographic (EEG) criteria. The rectified and integrated EMG responses to repeated interventions were bin averaged for the 0 and -25 cmH2O stimuli applied in wakefulness and sleep. Response latency was defined as the time when the EMG activity significantly increased above prestimulus levels. Response magnitude was quantified as the in ratio of the EMG activity for an 80 ms post-stimulus period to an 80 ms prestimulus period; data from after the subject's voluntary reaction time for tongue protrusion (range, 150-230 ms) were not analysed. Application of the -25 cmH2O stimuli caused genioglossus muscle activation in wakefulness and sleep, but in all subjects response magnitude was reduced in sleep (mean decrease, 61%; range, 52-82%; P = 0.011, Student's paired t test). In addition, response latency was increased in sleep in each subject (mean latency awake, 38 ms; range, 30-50 ms; mean latency asleep, 75 ms; range, 40-110 ms; P = 0.072, Student's paired t test). Application of the -25 cmH2O stimuli caused arousal from sleep on 90% occasions, but in all cases the reflex genioglossus muscle responses (maximum latency, 110 ms) always proceeded any sign of EEG arousal (mean time to arousal, 643 ms; range, 424-760 ms). These results show that non-REM sleep attenuates reflex genioglossus muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure. Attenuation of this reflex by sleep may impair the ability of the upper airway to defend itself from suction collapse by

  2. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  3. Effect of subchronic in vivo exposure to nitrogen dioxide on lung tissue inflammation, airway microvascular leakage, and in vitro bronchial muscle responsiveness in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, P; Rado, V; Di Stefano, A; Papi, A; Boniotti, A; Zancuoghi, G; Boschetto, P; Romano, M; Salmona, M; Ciaccia, A; Fabbri, L M; Mapp, C E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a previous study on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats exposed in vivo for seven days to 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2), it has been shown that there is an influx of macrophages into the airways. The present study investigated the effect of seven day exposure to 10 ppm NO2, on: (a) lung tissue inflammation and morphology; (b) airway microvascular leakage; (c) in vitro contractile response of main bronchi. METHODS: Lung tissue was studied by light microscopy, after fixing the lungs by inflation with 4% formalin at a pressure of 20 cm H2O. Microvascular leakage was measured by extravasation of Evans blue dye in the larynx, trachea, main bronchi, and intrapulmonary airways. Smooth muscle responsiveness was evaluated by concentration-responses curves to acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-3) M), serotonin (10(-9)-10(-4) M), and voltage-response curves (12-28 V) to electrical field stimulation. RESULTS: Histology showed an increased total inflammation at the level of respiratory bronchioles and alveoli. No influx of inflammatory cells was found in the main bronchi. A loss of cilia in the epithelium of small airways and ectasia of alveolar capillaries was also found. By contrast, no alterations to microvascular permeability or modification of bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness was found. CONCLUSIONS: Subchronic exposure to 10 ppm NO2 causes airway inflammation and structural damage, but does not cause any persistent alteration to microvascular permeability or bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness in rats. Images Figure 1 PMID:8758032

  4. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu L.; Saboisky, Julian P.; Jordan, Amy S.; White, David P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (−0.68 ± 1.0 vs. −0.80 ± 2.0 cmH2O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  5. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins Mitigates Ventilator Induced Diaphragm Muscle Dysfunction in an Age-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Cacciani, Nicola; Akkad, Hazem; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp) activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7–8 months) and old (28–32 months) rats to 5-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane–permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences. PMID:27729867

  6. Differential effects of inhaled methacholine on circumferential wall and vascular smooth muscle of third-generation airways in awake sheep.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Damian; Parsons, Gibbe; Gunther, Robert; Quail, Anthony; Cottee, David; White, Saxon

    2012-10-15

    Evolution and natural selection ensure that specific mechanisms exist for selective airway absorption of inhaled atmospheric molecules. Indeed, nebulized cholinoceptor agonists used in asthma-challenge tests may or may not enter the systemic circulation. We examined the hypothesis that inhaled cholinoceptor agonists have selective access. Six sheep were instrumented under general anesthesia (propofol 5 mg/kg iv, 2-3% isoflurane-oxygen), each with pulsed-Doppler blood flow transducers mounted on the single bronchial artery and sonomicrometer probes mounted on the intrapulmonary third-generation lingula lobe bronchus. Continuous measurements were made of bronchial blood flow (Q(br)), Q(br) conductance (C(br)), bronchial hemicircumference (CIRC(br)), and bronchial wall thickness (WALL TH(br)) in recovered, standing, awake sheep. Methacholine (MCh; 0.125-2.0 μg/kg iv), at the highest dose, caused a 233% rise in Q(br) (P < 0.05) and a 286% rise in C(br) (P < 0.05). CIRC(br) fell to 90% (P < 0.05); WALL TH(br) did not change. In contrast, nebulized MCh (1-32 mg/ml), inhaled through a mask at the highest dose, caused a rise in ventilation and a rise in Q(br) proportional to aortic pressure without change in C(br). CIRC(br) fell to 91% (P < 0.01), and WALL TH(br) did not change. Thus inhaled MCh has access to cholinoceptors of bronchial circumferential smooth muscle to cause airway lumen narrowing but effectively not to those of the systemic bronchovascular circulation. It is speculated that the mechanism is selective neuroparacrine inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M3 bronchovascular cholinoceptors) by prostanoids released by intense MCh activation of epithelial and mucosal cells lining the airway. PMID:22898550

  7. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwen; Cruz, Tina; Irion, Uwe; Moussian, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them) are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila. PMID:26621831

  8. The effect of Shenmai injection on the proliferation of Rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma and underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-proliferation of airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) is one of the important contributors to airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Shenmai injection (SMI) on the proliferation of the rat ASMC in asthma. Methods Rats were randomly divided into three groups: the control group, the asthma group, and the SMI treatment group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry staining were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in rat ASMC respectively. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ( [Ca2+]i ) in rat ASMC were measured with Fluo-3/AM by confocal microscopy. The proliferation was detected by MTT assay. Results Compared with the control group, the asthma group showed an increased expression of TRPV1 and [Ca2+]i in rat ASMC. The expression of PCNA and absorbance of MTT assay in asthma rat ASMC was also significantly increased. SMI could significantly decrease the expression of TRPV1 channel and [Ca2+]i in the asthmatic rat ASMC. Furthermore, the expression of PCNA and absorbance of MTT assay in asthmatic rat ASMC was significantly reduced after SMI treatment. Conclusions SMI may prevent asthma-induced ASMC over-proliferation probably by inhibiting the expression of TRPV1 channel, which regulates the intracellular calcium concentration. PMID:24010863

  9. [Role of bronchodilators in therapy for COPD-mechanisms of LABA and LAMA on airway smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Kume, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABAs) and anticholinergics (LAMAs) are widely used clinically as therpy for COPD. Clinical reports have demonstrated that LABAs (salmeterol, formoterol, indacaterol, olodaterol, vilanterol) and LAMAs (tiotropium, glycopyrronium, umeclidinium, aclidinium) are useful to improving symptoms and lung function, and to reducing exacerbation and hospitarization. LABAs expect salmeterol are strong partial agonists, and LAMAs are non-specific antagonists. Ca2+ dynamics and Ca2+ sensitization contribute to relaxation of airway smooth muscle in these bronchodilators. LABAs act on orthosteric and allosteric sites on the β2-adrenergic receptors. In contrast, LAMAs act not only on orthosteric site on the muscarinic receptors, but also allosteric site on the β2-adrenergic receptors, leading to enhancing β2-adrenergic action. Allosteric GPCR modulation is involved in the synergistic effects between LABAs and LAMAs. PMID:27254952

  10. Arousal from Sleep Does Not Lead to Reduced Dilator Muscle Activity or Elevated Upper Airway Resistance on Return to Sleep in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S.; Cori, Jennifer M.; Dawson, Andrew; Nicholas, Christian L.; O'Donoghue, Fergal J.; Catcheside, Peter G.; Eckert, Danny J.; McEvoy, R. Doug; Trinder, John

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare changes in end-tidal CO2, genioglossus muscle activity and upper airway resistance following tone-induced arousal and the return to sleep in healthy individuals with small and large ventilatory responses to arousal. Design: Observational study. Setting: Two sleep physiology laboratories. Patients or Participants: 35 men and 25 women with no medical or sleep disorders. Interventions: Auditory tones to induce 3-s to 15-s cortical arousals from sleep. Measurements and Results: During arousal from sleep, subjects with large ventilatory responses to arousal had higher ventilation (by analytical design) and tidal volume, and more marked reductions in the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 compared to subjects with small ventilatory responses to arousal. However, following the return to sleep, ventilation, genioglossus muscle activity, and upper airway resistance did not differ between high and low ventilatory response groups (Breath 1 on return to sleep: ventilation 6.7 ± 0.4 and 5.5 ± 0.3 L/min, peak genioglossus activity 3.4% ± 1.0% and 4.8% ± 1.0% maximum, upper airway resistance 4.7 ± 0.7 and 5.5 ± 1.0 cm H2O/L/s, respectively). Furthermore, dilator muscle activity did not fall below the pre-arousal sleeping level and upper airway resistance did not rise above the pre-arousal sleeping level in either group for 10 breaths following the return to sleep. Conclusions: Regardless of the magnitude of the ventilatory response to arousal from sleep and subsequent reduction in PETCO2, healthy individuals did not develop reduced dilator muscle activity nor increased upper airway resistance, indicative of partial airway collapse, on the return to sleep. These findings challenge the commonly stated notion that arousals predispose to upper airway obstruction. Citation: Jordan AS, Cori JM, Dawson A, Nicholas CL, O'Donoghue FJ, Catcheside PG, Eckert DJ, McEvoy RD, Trinder J. Arousal from sleep does not lead to reduced dilator muscle activity or

  11. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Y.S.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known roles in the nervous system, there is increasing recognition that neurotrophins such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as their receptors are expressed in peripheral tissues including the lung, and can thus potentially contribute to both normal physiology and pathophysiology of several diseases. The relevance of this family of growth factors lies in emerging clinical data indicating altered neurotrophin levels and function in a range of diseases including neonatal and adult asthma, sinusitis, influenza, and lung cancer. The current review focuses on 1) the importance of BDNF expression and signaling mechanisms in early airway and lung development, critical to both normal neonatal lung function and also its disruption in prematurity and insults such as inflammation and infection; 2) how BDNF, potentially derived from airway nerves modulate neurogenic control of airway tone, a key aspect of airway reflexes as well as dysfunctional responses to allergic inflammation; 3) the emerging idea that local BDNF production by resident airway cells such as epithelium and airway smooth muscle can contribute to normal airway structure and function, and to airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in diseases such as asthma. Furthermore, given its pleiotropic effects in the airway, BDNF may be a novel and appealing therapeutic target. PMID:24560686

  12. Muscle endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction in adulthood due to early postnatal overnutrition.

    PubMed

    Leite, Richard Diego; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme; Boa, Beatriz Costa da Silva; Cyrino, Fatima Z G A; Nivoit, Pierre; Bouskela, Eliete

    2012-07-01

    The aims of our study were to investigate effects of postnatal overnutrition, obtained by restricting the number of pups per litter, on microcirculatory reactivity, fat depots, its total percentage and lipid profile. Microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the cremaster muscle of 24 hamsters divided into four groups, with 6 animals in each one: normal (NL) and restricted (RL) litter groups, both at 6th and 21st weeks of age. The NL group had 8-9 pups and the RL 3 pups per litter and to avoid the litter effect, only one animal was used per litter. The results have shown that the RL group had higher velocity of weight, body mass and fat gain compared to the NL one at weeks 6 and 21. Significant differences were also observed on urogenital fat depot, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein between groups. At the lowest concentration of Ach, the RL group showed smaller arteriolar dilatation at the 21st than at the 6th week [5(3-13) vs 19(8-40)%, p<0.01] while the NL one did not show any difference within the group. The highest concentration of Ach at the 21th week pointed to endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction in RL compared to NL [3(8-26) vs. 13(8-26)%, p<0.05]. Endothelial-independent microvascular reactivity was similar between groups. Our data suggest that postnatal overnutrition is associated to muscle endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction, greater body mass and total percentage of fat and impaired the lipid profile. In conclusion, the imprinting promoted by this experimental model of obesity was able to influence microvascular reactivity later in life.

  13. Pleiotropic Effects of Bitter Taste Receptors on [Ca2+]i Mobilization, Hyperpolarization, and Relaxation of Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Pauer, Susan H; Yong, Hwan Mee; Smith, Dan'elle C; Deshpande, Deepak A; An, Steven S; Liggett, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation and airflow obstruction from human airway smooth muscle (HASM) constriction due to increased local bronchoconstrictive substances. We have recently found bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on HASM, which increase [Ca2+]i and relax the muscle. We report here that some, but not all, TAS2R agonists decrease [Ca2+]i and relax HASM contracted by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that stimulate [Ca2+]i. This suggests both a second pathway by which TAS2Rs relax, and, a heterogeneity of the response phenotype. We utilized eight TAS2R agonists and five procontractile GPCR agonists in cultured HASM cells. We find that heterogeneity in the inhibitory response hinges on which procontractile GPCR is activated. For example, chloroquine inhibits [Ca2+]i increases from histamine, but failed to inhibit [Ca2+]i increases from endothelin-1. Conversely, aristolochic acid inhibited [Ca2+]i increases from endothelin-1 but not histamine. Other dichotomous responses were found when [Ca2+]i was stimulated by bradykinin, angiotensin, and acetylcholine. There was no association between [Ca2+]i inhibition and TAS2R subtype, nor whether [Ca2+]i was increased by Gq- or Gi-coupled GPCRs. Selected studies revealed a correlation between [Ca2+]i inhibition and HASM cell-membrane hyperpolarization. To demonstrate physiologic correlates, ferromagnetic beads were attached to HASM cells and cell stiffness measured by magnetic twisting cytometry. Consistent with the [Ca2+]i inhibition results, chloroquine abolished the cell stiffening response (contraction) evoked by histamine but not by endothelin-1, while aristolochic acid inhibited cell stiffening from endothelin-1, but not from histamine. In studies using intact human bronchi, these same differential responses were found. Those TAS2R agonists that decreased [Ca2+]i, promoted hyperpolarization, and decreased HASM stiffness, caused relaxation of human airways. Thus TAS2Rs relax HASM in two ways: a low

  14. Contribution of SRF, Elk-1, and myocardin to airway smooth muscle remodeling in heaves, an asthma-like disease of horses.

    PubMed

    Chevigny, Mylène; Guérin-Montpetit, Karine; Vargas, Amandine; Lefebvre-Lavoie, Josiane; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Myocyte hyperplasia and hypertrophy contribute to the increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM) in asthma. Serum-response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates myocyte differentiation in vitro in vascular and intestinal smooth muscles. When SRF is associated with phosphorylated (p)Elk-1, it promotes ASM proliferation while binding to myocardin (MYOCD) leading to the expression of contractile elements in these tissues. The objective of this study was therefore to characterize the expression of SRF, pElk-1, and MYOCD in ASM cells from central and peripheral airways in heaves, a spontaneously occurring asthma-like disease of horses, and in controls. Six horses with heaves and five aged-matched controls kept in the same environment were studied. Nuclear protein expression of SRF, pElk-1, and MYOCD was evaluated in peripheral airways and endobronchial biopsies obtained during disease remission and after 1 and 30 days of naturally occurring antigenic exposure using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques. Nuclear expression of SRF (P = 0.03, remission vs. 30 days) and MYOCD (P = 0.05, controls vs. heaves at 30 days) increased in the peripheral airways of horses with heaves during disease exacerbation, while MYOCD (P = 0.04, remission vs. 30 days) decreased in the central airways of control horses. No changes were observed in the expression of pElk-1 protein in either tissue. In conclusion, SRF and its cofactor MYOCD likely contribute to the hypertrophy of peripheral ASM observed in equine asthmatic airways, while the remodeling of the central airways is more static or involves different transcription factors.

  15. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction in acromegaly: evidence for a specific disease of heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, E A; Caruana, M P; Lahiri, A; Nabarro, J D; Jacobs, H S; Raftery, E B

    1989-09-01

    Acromegaly is associated with an increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, but it is not clear whether this is the result of increased incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease or of a specific disease of heart muscle. Thirty four acromegalic patients were studied by non-invasive techniques. Seven of these patients had raised plasma concentrations of growth hormone at the time of study; three were newly diagnosed and had not received any treatment. Hypertension was present in nine (26%) but only three (9%) had electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography showed ventricular hypertrophy in 12 (48%) and increased left ventricular mass in 17 (68%) patients. Holter monitoring detected important ventricular arrhythmias in 14 patients. Thallium-201 scanning showed evidence for coronary heart disease in eight patients. Systolic time intervals were normal except when there was coexistent ischaemic heart disease. A comparison between 19 acromegalic patients with no other detectable cause of heart disease and 22 age matched controls showed appreciably abnormal left ventricular diastolic function in the group with acromegaly. The abnormalities shown did not correlate with left ventricular mass or wall thickness. There was no difference in diastolic function between patients with active acromegaly and those with treated acromegaly. Hypertensive acromegalic patients had worse diastolic function than hypertensive controls, suggesting that hypertension may further impair the left ventricular diastolic abnormality in acromegaly. This is the first study to find evidence of subclinical cardiac diastolic dysfunction in acromegaly and it supports the suggestion that there is a specific disease of heart muscle in acromegaly.

  16. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlie K; Gowda, Alpana; Barad, Meredith; Mackey, Sean C; Carroll, Ian R

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  17. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  18. Effects of OXPHOS complex deficiencies and ESA dysfunction in working intact skeletal muscle: implications for mitochondrial myopathies.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    The effects of inborn oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex deficiencies or possible each-step activation (ESA) dysfunction on the bioenergetic system in working intact skeletal muscle are studied using a computer model of OXPHOS published previously. The curves representing the dependencies of V˙O2 and metabolite concentrations on single complex activity, entire OXPHOS activity or ESA intensity exhibit a characteristic threshold at some OXPHOS complex activity/ESA intensity. This threshold for V˙O2 of single complex activities is significantly lower in intact muscle during moderate and heavy work, than in isolated mitochondria in state 3. Metabolite concentrations and pH in working muscle start to change significantly at much higher OXPHOS complex activities/ESA intensities than V˙O2. The effect of entire OXPHOS deficiency or ESA dysfunction is potentially much stronger than the effect of a single complex deficiency. Implications of these findings for the genesis of mitochondrial myopathies are discussed. It is concluded that V˙O2 in state 3 and its dependence on complex activity in isolated mitochondria is not a universal quantitative determinant of the effect of mitochondrial dysfunctions in vivo. Moderate and severe mitochondria dysfunctions are defined: the former affect significantly only metabolite concentrations and pH, while the latter also decrease significantly V˙O2 in intact skeletal muscle during work. The dysfunction-caused decrease in V˙O2/oxidative ATP synthesis flux, disturbance of metabolite homeostasis, elevated ROS production and anaerobic glycolysis recruitment can account for such mitochondrial myopathy symptoms as muscle weakness, exercise intolerance (exertional fatigue) and lactic acidosis.

  19. Skeletal muscle dysfunction is associated with derangements in mitochondrial bioenergetics (but not UCP3) in a rodent model of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Carré, Jane E.; Parker, Nadeene; Curtin, Nancy A.; Duchen, Michael R.; Singer, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Muscle dysfunction is a common feature of severe sepsis and multiorgan failure. Recent evidence implicates bioenergetic dysfunction and oxidative damage as important underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Increased abundance of uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) in sepsis suggests increased mitochondrial proton leak, which may reduce mitochondrial coupling efficiency but limit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Using a murine model, we examined metabolic, cardiovascular, and skeletal muscle contractile changes following induction of peritoneal sepsis in wild-type and Ucp3−/− mice. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was measured using two-photon microscopy in living diaphragm, and contractile function was measured in diaphragm muscle strips. The kinetic relationship between membrane potential and oxygen consumption was determined using a modular kinetic approach in isolated mitochondria. Sepsis was associated with significant whole body metabolic suppression, hypothermia, and cardiovascular dysfunction. Maximal force generation was reduced and fatigue accelerated in ex vivo diaphragm muscle strips from septic mice. Δψm was lower in the isolated diaphragm from septic mice despite normal substrate oxidation kinetics and proton leak in skeletal muscle mitochondria. Even though wild-type mice exhibited an absolute 26 ± 6% higher UCP3 protein abundance at 24 h, no differences were seen in whole animal or diaphragm physiology, nor in survival rates, between wild-type and Ucp3−/− mice. In conclusion, this murine sepsis model shows a hypometabolic phenotype with evidence of significant cardiovascular and muscle dysfunction. This was associated with lower Δψm and alterations in mitochondrial ATP turnover and the phosphorylation pathway. However, UCP3 does not play an important functional role, despite its upregulation. PMID:25714676

  20. L-thyroxine promotes a proliferative airway smooth muscle phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Naeimi, Saeideh; Bos, I Sophie T; Menzen, Mark H; Halayko, Andrew J; Hashjin, Goudarz Sadeghi; Meurs, Herman

    2015-02-01

    Hypothyroidism may reduce, whereas hyperthyroidism may aggravate, asthma symptoms. The mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. Since thyroid hormones have central roles in cell growth and differentiation, we hypothesized that airway remodeling, in particular increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, may be involved. To address this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and l-thyroxine (T4) in the absence and presence of the profibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on human ASM cell phenotype switching. T3 (1-100 nM) and T4 (1-100 nM) did not affect basal ASM proliferation. However, when combined with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml), T4 synergistically increased the proliferative response, whereas only a minor effect was observed for T3. In line with a switch from a contractile to a proliferative ASM phenotype, T4 reduced the TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼50%. Cotreatment with T3 reduced TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼25%. The synergistic increase in proliferation was almost fully inhibited by the integrin αvβ3 antagonist tetrac (100 nM), whereas no significant effects of the thyroid receptor antagonist 1-850 (3 μM) were observed. Inhibition of MEK1/2, downstream of the integrin αvβ3, also inhibited the T4- and TGF-β1-induced proliferative responses. Collectively, the results indicate that T4, and to a lesser extent T3, promotes a proliferative ASM phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1, which is predominantly mediated by the membrane-bound T4 receptor αvβ3. These results indicate that thyroid hormones may enhance ASM remodeling in asthma, which could be of relevance for hyperthyroid patients with this disease. PMID:25480330

  1. L-thyroxine promotes a proliferative airway smooth muscle phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Naeimi, Saeideh; Bos, I Sophie T; Menzen, Mark H; Halayko, Andrew J; Hashjin, Goudarz Sadeghi; Meurs, Herman

    2015-02-01

    Hypothyroidism may reduce, whereas hyperthyroidism may aggravate, asthma symptoms. The mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. Since thyroid hormones have central roles in cell growth and differentiation, we hypothesized that airway remodeling, in particular increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, may be involved. To address this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and l-thyroxine (T4) in the absence and presence of the profibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on human ASM cell phenotype switching. T3 (1-100 nM) and T4 (1-100 nM) did not affect basal ASM proliferation. However, when combined with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml), T4 synergistically increased the proliferative response, whereas only a minor effect was observed for T3. In line with a switch from a contractile to a proliferative ASM phenotype, T4 reduced the TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼50%. Cotreatment with T3 reduced TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼25%. The synergistic increase in proliferation was almost fully inhibited by the integrin αvβ3 antagonist tetrac (100 nM), whereas no significant effects of the thyroid receptor antagonist 1-850 (3 μM) were observed. Inhibition of MEK1/2, downstream of the integrin αvβ3, also inhibited the T4- and TGF-β1-induced proliferative responses. Collectively, the results indicate that T4, and to a lesser extent T3, promotes a proliferative ASM phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1, which is predominantly mediated by the membrane-bound T4 receptor αvβ3. These results indicate that thyroid hormones may enhance ASM remodeling in asthma, which could be of relevance for hyperthyroid patients with this disease.

  2. Comparative Study of Protective Effects of Salbutamol and Beclomethasone against Insulin Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity on Isolated Tracheal Smooth Muscle of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mahjabeen; Tayyaba Khan, Bushra; Bakhtiar, Salman; Anwar, Mohammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational insulin was withdrawn from the market due to its potential to produce airway hyper-reactivity and bronchoconstriction. So the present study was designed to explore the acute effects of insulin on airway reactivity of guinea pigs and protective effects of salbutamol and beclomethasone against insulin induced airway hyper-responsiveness on isolated tracheal smooth muscle of guinea pig. Effects of varying concentrations of insulin (10-7 to 10-3 M), insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol (10-7 M) and beclomethasone (10-6 M) were studied on isolated tracheal tissue of guinea pig by constructing cumulative concentration response curves. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle contractions were recorded on four channel oscillograph. The mean ± SEM of maximum amplitudes of contraction with increasing concentrations of insulin, insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol and beclomethasone were 35 ± 1.13 mm, 14.55 ± 0.62 mm and 22 ± 1.154 mm respectively. Although salbutamol and beclomethasone both had a profound inhibitory effect on insulin induced airway hyper-reactivity, yet salbutamol is more efficacious than beclomethasone. So we suggest that pretreatment of inhaled insulin with salbutamol may be preferred over beclomethasone in amelioration of its potential respiratory adverse effects such as bronchoconstriction. PMID:25901165

  3. Role of potassium ion channels in detrusor smooth muscle function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Georgi V.

    2013-01-01

    Contraction and relaxation of the detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), which makes up the wall of the urinary bladder, facilitates the storage and voiding of urine. Several families of K+ channels, including voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, inward-rectifying ATP-sensitive K+ (Kir, KATP) channels, and two-pore-domain K+ (K2P) channels, are expressed and functional in DSM. They control DSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the action potentials that determine the phasic nature of contractility in this tissue. Defects in DSM K+ channel proteins or in the molecules involved in their regulatory pathways may underlie certain forms of bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder. K+ channels represent an opportunity for novel pharmacological manipulation and therapeutic intervention in human DSM. Modulation of DSM K+ channels directly or indirectly by targeting their regulatory mechanisms has the potential to control urinary bladder function. This Review summarizes our current state of knowledge of the functional role of K+ channels in DSM in health and disease, with special emphasis on current advancements in the field. PMID:22158596

  4. Characterization of neural control and contractile function in airway smooth muscle of the ferret.

    PubMed

    Maize, D F; Fedan, J S; Dey, R D

    1998-02-01

    Several recent studies have characterized neuroanatomical and neurophysiological aspects of ferret airways, but regional differences in reactivity and cholinergic, adrenergic and non-adrenergic-non-cholinergic (NANC) neural responses have not been examined. The aim of this study was to characterize the contractile and relaxant response elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS), and the contractions induced by cholinergic agonists in isolated ferret tracheal and bronchial preparations. EFS produced frequency-dependent contractions and relaxations. Contractions in both the trachea and bronchi were inhibited by atropine and potentiated by neostigmine. Tracheal relaxations were found to be entirely adrenergic, but bronchial relaxations were mediated by a combination of adrenergic and inhibitory NANC (i-NANC) innervations. Trachea and bronchi were more sensitive to methacholine (MCh) and carbachol than to acetylcholine (ACh); middle tracheal segments being more sensitive to ACh than distal segments, however, in the presence of neostigmine ACh potency was equal in both segments. The results suggest that regional differences exist in cholinergic responsiveness of ferret trachea and bronchi, resulting from differences in ACh degradation.

  5. Selective targeting of the α5-subunit of GABAA receptors relaxes airway smooth muscle and inhibits cellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, Gene T.; Siviski, Matthew E.; Yim, Peter D.; Fu, Xiao Wen; Poe, Michael M.; Cook, James M.; Harrison, Neil; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical need for novel bronchodilators for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive diseases remains a major medical issue. Modulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) chloride via GABAA receptor activation to achieve relaxation of precontracted ASM represents a potentially beneficial therapeutic option. Since human ASM GABAA receptors express only the α4- and α5-subunits, there is an opportunity to selectively target ASM GABAA receptors to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Recently, a novel compound (R)-ethyl8-ethynyl-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-4-methyl-4H-benzo[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepine-3-carboxylate (SH-053-2′F-R-CH3) with allosteric selectivity for α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors has become available. We questioned whether this novel GABAA α5-selective ligand relaxes ASM and affects intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) regulation. Immunohistochemical staining localized the GABAA α5-subunit to human ASM. The selective GABAA α5 ligand SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 relaxes precontracted intact ASM; increases GABA-activated chloride currents in human ASM cells in voltage-clamp electrophysiology studies; and attenuates bradykinin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, store-operated Ca2+ entry, and methacholine-induced Ca2+ oscillations in peripheral murine lung slices. In conclusion, selective subunit targeting of endogenous α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors on ASM may represent a novel therapeutic option to treat severe bronchospasm. PMID:25659897

  6. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Nezih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Kanat, Ayhan; Batcik, Osman Ersagun; Yazar, Ugur; Zorba, Orhan Unal

    2014-01-01

    Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD) in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW) Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was counteracted by a trend

  7. Activation of protein kinase C accelerates contraction kinetics of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Peiper, U; Knipp, S C; Thies, B; Henke, R

    1996-01-01

    Contraction kinetics of isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle were studied by analysing the increase of force subsequent to force-inhibiting passive length changes lasting 1 s (100 Hz, sinus, 5% of muscle length). Compared with carbachol activation, phorboldibutyrate (PDBu)-induced stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) demonstrated no significant difference in the extent of force development in the polarized preparation [mean peak force 9.16 +/- 0.37 mN (carbachol) vs. 9.12 +/- 0.37 mN (PDBu)]. However, the time constant calculated for the slow component of post-vibration force recovery was 6.40 +/- 0.29 s after addition of PDBu vs. 22.39 +/- 1.40 s during carbachol activation, indicating a significant phorbol ester-induced acceleration of the cross-bridge cycling rate. In the K-depolarized preparation, treatment with 26.4 microM indolactam (IL) to activate PKC produced muscle relaxation (9.94 +/- 0.16 mN measured 0-30 min after the onset of depolarization vs. 4.13 +/- 0.05 mN measured during 30-60 min of IL treatment). Again, even in the presence of high sarcoplasmic Ca2+ resulting from tonic depolarization, PKC activation was associated with a distinct diminution of the time constant (25.99 +/- 0.79 s during the first 30 min of depolarization vs. 10.32 +/- 0.21 s during 30-60 min of IL treatment). In contrast, addition of 0.035 microM verapamil, 1.5 microM isoproterenol, and 32 microM dibutyryl-cAMP to the bathing medium induced relaxation without affecting the rate of post-vibration force recovery. The results suggest that the calcium-dependent signal cascade (agonist receptor/inositol trisphosphate/ Ca(2+)-calmodulin/myosin light chain kinase) hardly affects the regulation of contraction kinetics in the tonically activated intact smooth muscle preparation. PKC stimulation, however, accelerates actin/myosin interaction kinetics, possibly by inhibition of phosphatase(s).

  8. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  9. Epithelial expression of profibrotic mediators in a model of allergen-induced airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Margaret M; Leigh, Richard; Bonniaud, Philippe; Ellis, Russ; Wattie, Jennifer; Smith, Mary Jo; Martin, Gail; Panju, Mohammed; Inman, Mark D; Gauldie, Jack

    2005-02-01

    Airway remodeling, including subepithelial fibrosis, is a characteristic feature of asthma and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. We examined expression of genes related to airway wall fibrosis in a model of chronic allergen-induced airway dysfunction using laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time PCR. BALB/c mice were sensitized and subjected to chronic ovalbumin exposure over a 12-wk period, after which they were rested and then harvested 2 and 8 wk after the last exposure. Chronic allergen-exposed mice had significantly increased indices of airway remodeling and airway hyperreactivity at all time points, although no difference in expression of fibrosis-related genes was found when mRNA extracted from whole lung was examined. In contrast, fibrosis-related gene expression was significantly upregulated in mRNA obtained from microdissected bronchial wall at 2 wk after chronic allergen exposure. In addition, when bronchial wall epithelium and smooth muscle were separately microdissected, gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 and plasminogen activating inhibitor-1 were significantly upregulated only in the airway epithelium. These data suggest that transforming growth factor-beta1 and other profibrotic mediators produced by airway wall, and specifically, airway epithelium, play an important role in the pathophysiology of airway remodeling.

  10. Sepsis induces long-term metabolic and mitochondrial muscle stem cell dysfunction amenable by mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocheteau, P.; Chatre, L.; Briand, D.; Mebarki, M.; Jouvion, G.; Bardon, J.; Crochemore, C.; Serrani, P.; Lecci, P. P.; Latil, M.; Matot, B.; Carlier, P. G.; Latronico, N.; Huchet, C.; Lafoux, A.; Sharshar, T.; Ricchetti, M.; Chrétien, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, or systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is the major cause of critical illness resulting in admission to intensive care units. Sepsis is caused by severe infection and is associated with mortality in 60% of cases. Morbidity due to sepsis is complicated by neuromyopathy, and patients face long-term disability due to muscle weakness, energetic dysfunction, proteolysis and muscle wasting. These processes are triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines and metabolic imbalances and are aggravated by malnutrition and drugs. Skeletal muscle regeneration depends on stem (satellite) cells. Herein we show that mitochondrial and metabolic alterations underlie the sepsis-induced long-term impairment of satellite cells and lead to inefficient muscle regeneration. Engrafting mesenchymal stem cells improves the septic status by decreasing cytokine levels, restoring mitochondrial and metabolic function in satellite cells, and improving muscle strength. These findings indicate that sepsis affects quiescent muscle stem cells and that mesenchymal stem cells might act as a preventive therapeutic approach for sepsis-related morbidity. PMID:26666572

  11. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) regulates actin polymerization and contraction in airway smooth muscle by a vinculin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-05-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) can catalyze actin polymerization by elongating actin filaments. The elongation mechanism involves VASP oligomerization and its binding to profilin, a G-actin chaperone. Actin polymerization is required for tension generation during the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, the role of VASP in regulating actin dynamics in ASM is not known. We stimulated ASM cells and tissues with the contractile agonist acetylcholine (ACh) or the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin (FSK), a dilatory agent. ACh and FSK stimulated VASP Ser(157) phosphorylation by different kinases. Inhibition of VASP Ser(157) phosphorylation by expression of the mutant VASP S157A in ASM tissues suppressed VASP phosphorylation and membrane localization in response to ACh, and also inhibited contraction and actin polymerization. ACh but not FSK triggered the formation of VASP-VASP complexes as well as VASP-vinculin and VASP-profilin complexes at membrane sites. VASP-VASP complex formation and the interaction of VASP with vinculin and profilin were inhibited by expression of the inactive vinculin mutant, vinculin Y1065F, but VASP phosphorylation and membrane localization were unaffected. We conclude that VASP phosphorylation at Ser(157) mediates its localization at the membrane, but that VASP Ser(157) phosphorylation and membrane localization are not sufficient to activate its actin catalytic activity. The interaction of VASP with activated vinculin at membrane adhesion sites is a necessary prerequisite for VASP-mediated molecular processes necessary for actin polymerization. Our results show that VASP is a critical regulator of actin dynamics and tension generation during the contractile activation of ASM.

  12. Effect of changing lumbar stiffness by single facet joint dysfunction on the responsiveness of lumbar muscle spindles to vertebral movement

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Pickar, Joel G.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Individuals experiencing low back pain often present clinically with intervertebral joint dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether relative changes in stiffness at a single spinal joint alters neural responsiveness of lumbar muscle spindles to either vertebral movement or position. Methods: Muscle spindle discharge was recorded in response to 1mm L6 ramp and hold movements (0.5mm/s) in the same animal for lumbar laminectomy-only (n=23), laminectomy & L5/6 facet screw (n=19), laminectomy & L5/6 facetectomy (n=5) conditions. Mean instantaneous frequency (MIF) was calculated for the ramp-up, hold, ramp-down and post-ramp phases during each joint condition. Results: Mean MIFs were not significantly different between the laminectomy-only and the other two types of joint dysfunction for the ramp-up, hold, ramp-down, or post-ramp phases. Conclusion: Stiffness changes caused by single facet joint dysfunction failed to alter spindle responses during slow 1mm ramp and hold movements of the L6 vertebra. PMID:24932020

  13. SIRT1 attenuates high glucose-induced insulin resistance via reducing mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Li-Na; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Shao, Ming-Wei; Liu, Fei; Li, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is often characterized as the most critical factor contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sustained high glucose is an important extracellular environment that induces insulin resistance. Acquired insulin resistance is associated with reduced insulin-stimulated mitochondrial activity as a result of increased mitochondrial dysfunction. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is one member of the SIRT2 (Sir2)-like family of proteins involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in mammals. Although SIRT1 has a therapeutic effect on metabolic deterioration in insulin resistance, it is still not clear how SIRT1 is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that pcDNA3.1 vector-mediated overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates insulin resistance in the high glucose-induced insulin-resistant skeleton muscle cells. These beneficial effects were associated with ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction. Further studies have demonstrated that SIRT1 restores mitochondrial complex I activity leading to decreased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, SIRT1 significantly elevated the level of another SIRT which is named SIRT3, and SIRT3 siRNA-suppressed SIRT1-induced mitochondria complex activity increments. Taken together, these results showed that SIRT1 improves insulin sensitivity via the amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction, and this is achieved through the SIRT1–SIRT3–mitochondrial complex I pathway. PMID:25710929

  14. Hyperinsulinemia Potentiates Airway Responsiveness to Parasympathetic Nerve Stimulation in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, David B.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a substantial risk factor for developing asthma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. We tested the role of insulin in airway responsiveness to nerve stimulation using rats genetically prone or resistant to diet-induced obesity. Airway response to vagus nerve stimulation and airway M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor function were measured in obese-prone and -resistant rats with high or low circulating insulin. The effects of insulin on nerve-mediated human airway smooth muscle contraction and human M2 muscarinic receptor function were tested in vitro. Our data show that increased vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in obesity is associated with hyperinsulinemia and loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor function on parasympathetic nerves. Obesity did not induce airway inflammation or increase airway wall thickness. Smooth muscle contraction to acetylcholine was not increased, indicating that hyperresponsiveness is mediated at the level of airway nerves. Reducing serum insulin with streptozotocin protected neuronal M2 receptor function and prevented airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese rats. Replacing insulin restored dysfunction of neuronal M2 receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in streptozotocin-treated obese rats. Treatment with insulin caused loss of M2 receptor function, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese-resistant rats, and inhibited human neuronal M2 receptor function in vitro. This study shows that it is not obesity per se but hyperinsulinemia accompanying obesity that potentiates vagally induced bronchoconstriction by inhibiting neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors and increasing acetylcholine release from airway parasympathetic nerves. PMID:24605871

  15. Age-Dependent Biochemical Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle of Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer`s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Cardoso, Vera F.; Castro, Marisa; Oliveira, M.M.; Moreira, Paula I.; Peixoto, Francisco; A.Videira, Romeu

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Alzheimer`s disease as a systemic pathology shifted the research paradigm toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease considering the pathophysiological changes in both brain and peripheral tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of disease progression on physiological relevant features of skeletal muscle obtained from 3, 6 and 12 month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a model of Alzheimer`s disease, and respective agematched nonTg mice. Our results showed that skeletal muscle functionality is already affected in 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice as evidenced by deficient acetylcholinesterase and catalase activities as well as by alterations in fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Additionally, an age-dependent accumulation of amyloid-β1-40 peptide occurred in skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice, an effect that preceded bioenergetics mitochondrial dysfunction, which was only detected at 12 months of age, characterized by decreased respiratory control ratio and ADP/O index and by an impairment of complex I activity. HPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed significant changes in phospholipid composition of skeletal muscle tissues from 3xTg-AD mice with 12 months of age when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Increased levels of lyso-phosphatidylcholine associated with a decrease of phosphatidylcholine molecular species containing arachidonic acid were detected in 3xTg-AD mice, indicating an enhancement of phospholipase A2 activity and skeletal muscle inflammation. Additionally, a decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens content and an increase in phosphatidylinositol levels was observed in 3xTg-AD mice when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Altogether, these observations suggest that the skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice are more prone to oxidative and inflammatory events. PMID:25654504

  16. Calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells-coupled vanilliod transient receptor potential channel 4 ca2+ sparklets stimulate airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Limin; Sullivan, Michelle N; Chase, Marlee; Gonzales, Albert L; Earley, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) contributes to the remodeling and irreversible obstruction of airways during severe asthma, but the mechanisms underlying this disease process are poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+) influx through the vanilliod transient receptor potential channel (TRPV) 4 stimulates ASMC proliferation. We found that synthetic and endogenous TRPV4 agonists increase proliferation of primary ASMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx through individual TRPV4 channels produces Ca(2+) microdomains in ASMCs, called "TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets." We also show that TRPV4 channels colocalize with the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in ASMCs. Activated calcineurin dephosphorylates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors cytosolic (c) to allow nuclear translocation and activation of synthetic transcriptional pathways. We show that ASMC proliferation in response to TRPV4 activity is associated with calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of the NFATc3 isoform tagged with green florescent protein. Our findings suggest that Ca(2+) microdomains created by TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets activate calcineurin to stimulate nuclear translocation of NFAT and ASMC proliferation. These findings further suggest that inhibition of TRPV4 could diminish asthma-induced airway remodeling.

  17. Exogenous S100A8 protein inhibits PDGF-induced migration of airway smooth muscle cells in a RAGE-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Dong; Wei, Ying; Wang, Yu; Yin, Lei-Miao; Park, Gyoung-Hee; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2016-03-25

    S100A8 is an important member of the S100 protein family, which is involved in intracellular and extracellular regulatory activities. We previously reported that the S100A8 protein was differentially expressed in the asthmatic respiratory tracts. To understand the potential role of S100A8 in asthma, we investigated the effect of recombinant S100A8 protein on the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism by using multiple methods, such as impedance-based xCELLigence migration assay, transwell migration assays and wound-healing assays. We found that exogenous S100A8 protein significantly inhibited PDGF-induced ASMC migration. Furthermore, the migration inhibition effect of S100A8 was blocked by neutralizing antibody against the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), a potential receptor for the S100A8 protein. These findings provide direct evidence that exogenous S100A8 protein inhibits the PDGF-induced migration of ASMCs through the membrane receptor RAGE. Our study highlights a novel role of S100A8 as a potential means of counteracting airway remodeling in chronic airway diseases.

  18. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E.; Noll, Elisa M.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.; Rankin, Sara M.; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  19. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E; Noll, Elisa M; Walker, Simone A; Lloyd, Clare M; Rankin, Sara M; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-04-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  20. Long-term skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with hypermetabolism in severely burned children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long-term impact of burn trauma on skeletal muscle bioenergetics remains unknown. Here, we determined respiratory capacity and function of skeletal muscle mitochondria in healthy individuals and in burn victims for up to two years post-injury. Biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis...

  1. Huntington disease skeletal muscle is hyperexcitable owing to chloride and potassium channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher W; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Talmadge, Robert J; Voss, Andrew A

    2013-05-28

    Huntington disease is a progressive and fatal genetic disorder with debilitating motor and cognitive defects. Chorea, rigidity, dystonia, and muscle weakness are characteristic motor defects of the disease that are commonly attributed to central neurodegeneration. However, no previous study has examined the membrane properties that control contraction in Huntington disease muscle. We show primary defects in ex vivo adult skeletal muscle from the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington disease. Action potentials in diseased fibers are more easily triggered and prolonged than in fibers from WT littermates. Furthermore, some action potentials in the diseased fibers self-trigger. These defects occur because of decreases in the resting chloride and potassium conductances. Consistent with this, the expression of the muscle chloride channel, ClC-1, in Huntington disease muscle was compromised by improper splicing and a corresponding reduction in total Clcn1 (gene for ClC-1) mRNA. Additionally, the total Kcnj2 (gene for the Kir2.1 potassium channel) mRNA was reduced in disease muscle. The resulting muscle hyperexcitability causes involuntary and prolonged contractions that may contribute to the chorea, rigidity, and dystonia that characterize Huntington disease.

  2. Ageing in relation to skeletal muscle dysfunction: redox homoeostasis to regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; McDonagh, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Ageing is associated with a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality and function-sarcopenia, associated with reduced independence and quality of life in older generations. A better understanding of the mechanisms, both genetic and epigenetic, underlying this process would help develop therapeutic interventions to prevent, slow down or reverse muscle wasting associated with ageing. Currently, exercise is the only known effective intervention to delay the progression of sarcopenia. The cellular responses that occur in muscle fibres following exercise provide valuable clues to the molecular mechanisms regulating muscle homoeostasis and potentially the progression of sarcopenia. Redox signalling, as a result of endogenous generation of ROS/RNS in response to muscle contractions, has been identified as a crucial regulator for the adaptive responses to exercise, highlighting the redox environment as a potentially core therapeutic approach to maintain muscle homoeostasis during ageing. Further novel and attractive candidates include the manipulation of microRNA expression. MicroRNAs are potent gene regulators involved in the control of healthy and disease-associated biological processes and their therapeutic potential has been researched in the context of various disorders, including ageing-associated muscle wasting. Finally, we discuss the impact of the circadian clock on the regulation of gene expression in skeletal muscle and whether disruption of the peripheral muscle clock affects sarcopenia and altered responses to exercise. Interventions that include modifying altered redox signalling with age and incorporating genetic mechanisms such as circadian- and microRNA-based gene regulation, may offer potential effective treatments against age-associated sarcopenia. PMID:27215643

  3. Ageing in relation to skeletal muscle dysfunction: redox homoeostasis to regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; McDonagh, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Ageing is associated with a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality and function-sarcopenia, associated with reduced independence and quality of life in older generations. A better understanding of the mechanisms, both genetic and epigenetic, underlying this process would help develop therapeutic interventions to prevent, slow down or reverse muscle wasting associated with ageing. Currently, exercise is the only known effective intervention to delay the progression of sarcopenia. The cellular responses that occur in muscle fibres following exercise provide valuable clues to the molecular mechanisms regulating muscle homoeostasis and potentially the progression of sarcopenia. Redox signalling, as a result of endogenous generation of ROS/RNS in response to muscle contractions, has been identified as a crucial regulator for the adaptive responses to exercise, highlighting the redox environment as a potentially core therapeutic approach to maintain muscle homoeostasis during ageing. Further novel and attractive candidates include the manipulation of microRNA expression. MicroRNAs are potent gene regulators involved in the control of healthy and disease-associated biological processes and their therapeutic potential has been researched in the context of various disorders, including ageing-associated muscle wasting. Finally, we discuss the impact of the circadian clock on the regulation of gene expression in skeletal muscle and whether disruption of the peripheral muscle clock affects sarcopenia and altered responses to exercise. Interventions that include modifying altered redox signalling with age and incorporating genetic mechanisms such as circadian- and microRNA-based gene regulation, may offer potential effective treatments against age-associated sarcopenia.

  4. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  5. Sphingomyelinase promotes oxidant production and skeletal muscle contractile dysfunction through activation of NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, James A.; Abo-Zahrah, Reem; Pal, Rituraj; Rodney, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of sphingomyelinase (SMase) have been detected in a variety of diseases. SMase has been shown to increase muscle derived oxidants and decrease skeletal muscle force; however, the sub-cellular site of oxidant production has not been elucidated. Using redox sensitive biosensors targeted to the mitochondria and NADPH oxidase (Nox2), we demonstrate that SMase increased Nox2-dependent ROS and had no effect on mitochondrial ROS in isolated FDB fibers. Pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown of Nox2 activity prevented SMase induced ROS production and provided protection against decreased force production in the diaphragm. In contrast, genetic overexpression of superoxide dismutase within the mitochondria did not prevent increased ROS production and offered no protection against decreased diaphragm function in response to SMase. Our study shows that SMase induced ROS production occurs in specific sub-cellular regions of skeletal muscle; however, the increased ROS does not completely account for the decrease in muscle function. PMID:25653619

  6. Muscle dysfunction caused by a KATP channel mutation in neonatal diabetes is neuronal in origin.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rebecca H; McTaggart, James S; Webster, Richard; Mannikko, Roope; Iberl, Michaela; Sim, Xiu Li; Rorsman, Patrik; Glitsch, Maike; Beeson, David; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2010-07-23

    Gain-of-function mutations in Kir6.2 (KCNJ11), the pore-forming subunit of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, cause neonatal diabetes. Many patients also suffer from hypotonia (weak and flaccid muscles) and balance problems. The diabetes arises from suppressed insulin secretion by overactive KATP channels in pancreatic beta-cells, but the source of the motor phenotype is unknown. By using mice carrying a human Kir6.2 mutation (Val59-->Met59) targeted to either muscle or nerve, we show that analogous motor impairments originate in the central nervous system rather than in muscle or peripheral nerves. We also identify locomotor hyperactivity as a feature of KATP channel overactivity. These findings suggest that drugs targeted against neuronal, rather than muscle, KATP channels are needed to treat the motor deficits and that such drugs require high blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:20595581

  7. Preventive effects of electrical stimulation on inflammation-induced muscle mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Tanaka, Minoru; Takegaki, Junya; Fujino, Hidemi

    2016-06-01

    Cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying chronic diseases and is characterized by the overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which impair muscle oxidative metabolism. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation (ES) would prevent decrement in muscle oxidative metabolism by suppressing the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, a critical regulator of inflammatory response. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to verify the effects of ES on inflammatory-induced decrement of oxidative metabolism in mice tibialis anterior muscles. ICR mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection for 4days, and LPS injection plus ES (LPS+ES). Cachexia was induced in the animals in the LPS groups via LPS injection (10mg/kg body weight/day, i.p.) during the intervention period. The animals in the LPS+ES group were stimulated electrically (carrier frequency, 2500Hz; modulation frequency, 100Hz; duration, 240s/day; type of contraction, isometric) during the intervention period. LPS injection resulted in decreased body and muscle wet weight and increased expression of TNF-α in plasma and skeletal muscle. In addition, LPS injection decreased indicators of mitochondrial function such as succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and citrate synthase (CS) activity as well as the expression of PGC-1ɑ, and increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. On the other hand, the intervention of ES attenuated the changes in muscle wet weight, SDH activity, CS activity, p38 MAPK, and PGC-1ɑ. These results suggest that ES could prevent decrement in muscle oxidative metabolism induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in cachexia. PMID:27209425

  8. Contribution of the Mitochondria to Locomotor Muscle Dysfunction in Patients With COPD.

    PubMed

    Taivassalo, Tanja; Hussain, Sabah N A

    2016-05-01

    COPD is a significant public health challenge, notably set to become the third leading cause of death and fifth leading cause of chronic disability worldwide by the next decade. Skeletal muscle impairment is now recognized as a disabling, extrapulmonary consequence of COPD that is associated with reduced quality of life and premature mortality. Because COPD typically manifests in older individuals, these clinical features may overlie normal age-associated declines in muscle function and performance. Although physical inactivity, oxidative stress, inflammation, hypoxia, malnutrition, and medications all likely contribute to this comorbidity, a better understanding of the underlying mechanism is needed to develop effective therapies. Mitochondrial alterations have been described; these alterations include reductions in density and oxidative enzyme activity, increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, and induction of muscle proteolysis including autophagy. This review focuses on the perspective that mitochondrial alterations contribute to impaired locomotor muscle performance in patients with COPD by reducing oxidative capacity and thus endurance, as well as by triggering proteolysis and thus contributing to atrophy and weakness. We discuss how the potential underlying mechanisms converge on mitochondria by targeting the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator-1α signaling pathway (thereby reducing mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity and potentially increasing fiber atrophy) and how taking advantage of normal muscle plasticity and mitochondrial biogenesis may reverse this pathophysiology. We propose recent therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator-1α levels, such as endurance training and exercise mimetic drugs, with the strong rationale for increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function and thus improving the muscle phenotype in COPD. PMID:26836890

  9. β2-Adrenoceptor agonist-mediated inhibition of human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: importance of the duration of β2-adrenoceptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alastair G; Tomlinson, Paul R; Wilson, John W

    1997-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma has been ascribed to airway wall thickening as a result of smooth muscle proliferation and hypertrophy. We have previously shown that continuous exposure to the β2-adrenoceptor agonist, salbutamol inhibits mitogen-induced proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells. In the present study, the effects of variable durations and repeated periods of exposure to β2-adrenoceptor agonists on DNA synthesis in human cultured airway smooth muscle have been investigated to model some of the possible pharmacokinetic profiles of these agents following inhalation. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Shorter periods of exposure (up to 2.5 h) of airway smooth muscle cells to salbutamol (100 nM) commencing 30 min before thrombin (0.3 u ml−1) stimulation had no effect on the subsequent increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation. However, inhibition by salbutamol was evident with a 4.5 h exposure and was maximal after an 8.5 h exposure. Similar patterns of results were observed when fenoterol (100 nM) was used in place of salbutamol as the β2-adrenoceptor agonist or when epidermal growth factor (300 pM) was used in place of thrombin as the mitogen. Salbutamol had no effect on thrombin-stimulated [3H]-leucine incorporation after 8.5 h of exposure, but a statistically significant effect was observed after 48 h of exposure. Experiments in which DNA synthesis was measured up to 52 h after the addition of thrombin indicated that exposure to salbutamol during the first 8 h of mitogen stimulation delayed rather than inhibited the DNA synthesis. Addition of salbutamol (100 nM) at different times either before or up to 24 h after the addition of thrombin indicated that [3H]-thymidine incorporation (measured between 24 and 28 h after thrombin) could be significantly attenuated when salbutamol was added as late as 18 h after the addition of thrombin. The effects of more prolonged exposure to

  10. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  11. Measurement of muscle strength in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Edward A; Martyn, Jeevendra A; George, Edward; Frontera, Walter R; Eikermann, Matthias

    2009-10-01

    Traditional (indirect) techniques, such as electromyography and nerve conduction velocity measurement, do not reliably predict intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness and its clinical consequences. Therefore, quantitative assessment of skeletal muscle force is important for diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired motor dysfunction. There are a number of ways for assessing objectively muscle strength, which can be categorized as techniques that quantify maximum voluntary contraction force and those that assess evoked (stimulated) muscle force. Important factors that limit the repetitive evaluation of maximum voluntary contraction force in intensive care unit patients are learning effects, pain during muscular contraction, and alteration of consciousness.The selection of the appropriate muscle is crucial for making adequate predictions of a patient's outcome. The upper airway dilators are much more susceptible to a decrease in muscle strength than the diaphragm, and impairment of upper airway patency is a key mechanism of extubation failure in intensive care unit patients. Data suggest that the adductor pollicis muscle is an appropriate reference muscle to predict weakness of muscles that are typically affected by intensive care unit-acquired weakness, i.e., upper airway as well as extremity muscles. Stimulated (evoked) force of skeletal muscles, such as the adductor pollicis, can be assessed repetitively, independent of brain function, even in heavily sedated patients during high acuity of their disease. PMID:20046117

  12. Stereoselectivity of tradinterol's inhibition on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells induced by acetylcholine through suppressing Ca(2+) signalling.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Wen, H; Zhao, C; Lan, Y; Pan, L; Zhang, C; Cheng, M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the inhibition of tradinterol (SPFF) against acetylcholine (ACh)-induced proliferation is mediated by Ca(2+) signaling in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and whether stereoselectivity of the drug exists. Guinea pig ASMCs were primarily prepared with the method described and treated with ACh combined to SPFF isomers for 24 or 48 hours, respectively. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the proliferation of the guinea pig ASMCs. Ca(2+) fluorescent intensity in the guinea pig ASMCs, expressed with percentage increase in fluorescence when the intensity was determined with varioskan flash or shown with percentage increase in Geo Mean (GM) measured with flow cytometry, was recorded. Images of the intensity were obtained with fluorescent microscope. 2-APB, an (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor) IP3R blocker, and NiCl2, a store-operated channel (SOC) inhibitor, were used to investigate the mechanism of SPFF isomers regulating intracellular Ca(2+) via IP3R on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and/or SOC on plasma membrane. (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF, treated for 48 hours, showed significant inhibition against ACh-induced proliferation. The Ca(2+) elevation induced by ACh was concentration-dependently suppressed by SPFF isomers. (-)SPFF is the most effective but the potency of (±)SPFF is less than that of the former and stronger than that of (+)SPFF based on the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value. No significant additive effect was observed when (-)SPFF/(±)SPFF was used alone and combined with NiCl2/2-APB. As far as (+)SPFF is concerned, no similar phenomenon was observed. (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF but (+)SPFF showed significant inhibition against the percentage increase in fluorescence induced by CaCl2. It is likely that the influence of IP2RSOC-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in ASMCs helps (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF contribute to the suppression of ASMCs

  13. Interference with PPARγ Function in Smooth Muscle Causes Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Keen, Henry L.; Baumbach, Gary L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand activated transcription factor playing a critical role in metabolism. Thiazolidinediones, high affinity PPARγ ligands used clinically to treat type-II diabetes, have been reported to lower blood pressure and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Some mutations in PPARγ cause type-II diabetes and severe hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that PPARγ in vascular muscle plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutations in PPARγ under the control of a smooth muscle-specific promoter exhibit a loss of responsiveness to nitric oxide and striking alterations in contractility in the aorta, hypertrophy and inward remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation, and systolic hypertension. These results identify PPARγ as pivotal in vascular muscle as a regulator of vascular structure, vascular function and blood pressure, potentially explaining some of the cardioprotective effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:18316027

  14. X-ray recordings reveal how a human disease-linked skeletal muscle α-actin mutation leads to contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McNamara, Elyshia; Nowak, Kristen J; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    In humans, mutant skeletal muscle α-actin proteins are associated with contractile dysfunction, skeletal muscle weakness and a wide range of primarily skeletal muscle diseases. Despite this knowledge, the exact molecular mechanisms triggering the contractile dysfunction remain unknown. Here, we aimed to unravel these. Hence, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing a well-described D286G mutant skeletal muscle α-actin protein and recapitulating the human condition of contractile deregulation and severe skeletal muscle weakness. We then recorded and analyzed the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of isolated membrane-permeabilized myofibers. Results showed that upon addition of Ca(2+), the intensity changes of the second (1/19 nm(-1)) and sixth (1/5.9 nm(-1)) actin layer lines and of the first myosin meridional reflection (1/14.3 nm(-1)) were disrupted when the thin-thick filament overlap was optimal (sarcomere length of 2.5-2.6 μm). However these reflections were normal when the thin and thick filaments were not interacting (sarcomere length>3.6 μm). These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the replacement of just one amino acid in the skeletal muscle α-actin protein partly prevents actin conformational changes during activation, disrupting the strong binding of myosin molecules. This leads to a limited myosin-related tropomyosin movement over the thin filaments, further affecting the amount of cross-bridges, explaining the contractile dysfunction. PMID:26407659

  15. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials.

  16. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials. PMID:27634843

  17. TREATMENT OF MUSCLE MECHANOREFLEX DYSFUNCTION IN HYPERTENSION: EFFECTS OF L-ARGININE DIALYSIS IN THE NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Anna K.; Mitchell, Jere H.; Smith, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The blood pressure response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension. Recent evidence suggests that an overactive skeletal muscle mechanoreflex contributes significantly to this augmented circulatory responsiveness. Sensory information from the mechanoreflex is processed within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of the medulla oblongata. Normally, endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) within the NTS attenuates the increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) induced by mechanoreflex stimulation. Thus, it has been suggested that decreases in NTS-NO production underlie the generation of mechanoreflex dysfunction in hypertension. Supporting this postulate, it has been shown that blocking NO production within the NTS of normotensive rats reproduces the exaggerated pressor response elicited by mechanoreflex activation in hypertensive animals. What is not known is whether increasing NO production within the NTS of hypertensive rats mitigates mechanoreflex overactivity. In this study, the mechanoreflex was selectively activated by passively stretching hindlimb muscle before and after the dialysis of 1 and 10 μM L-arginine (a NO precursor) within the NTS of decerebrate normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Stretch induced larger elevations in MAP in SHR compared to WKY. In both groups, dialysis of 1 μM L-arginine significantly attenuated the pressor response to stretch. However, at the 10 μM dose, L-arginine had no effect on the MAP response to stretch in WKY while it enhanced the response in SHR. The data demonstrate that increasing NO availability within the NTS using lower doses of L-arginine partially normalizes mechanoreflex dysfunction in hypertension whereas higher doses do not. The findings could prove valuable in the development of treatment options for mechanoreflex overactivity in this disease. PMID:23771911

  18. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9–14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9–14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study

  19. Interaction between endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress (ER/SR stress), mitochondrial signaling and Ca(2+) regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM).

    PubMed

    Delmotte, Philippe; Sieck, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    Airway inflammation is a key aspect of diseases such as asthma. Several inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IL-13) increase cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) responses to agonist stimulation and Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation, thereby enhancing airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility (hyper-reactive state). Inflammation also induces ASM proliferation and remodeling (synthetic state). In normal ASM, the transient elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonists leads to a transient increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]mito) that may be important in matching ATP production with ATP consumption. In human ASM (hASM) exposed to TNFα and IL-13, the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]mito is blunted despite enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt responses. We also found that TNFα and IL-13 induce reactive oxidant species (ROS) formation and endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress (unfolded protein response) in hASM. ER/SR stress in hASM is associated with disruption of mitochondrial coupling with the ER/SR membrane, which relates to reduced mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression. Thus, in hASM it appears that TNFα and IL-13 result in ROS formation leading to ER/SR stress, reduced Mfn2 expression, disruption of mitochondrion-ER/SR coupling, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering, mitochondrial fragmentation, and increased cell proliferation.

  20. Undernutrition during pregnancy in mice leads to dysfunctional cardiac muscle respiration in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Thrush, A. Brianne; Quizi, Jessica; Antoun, Ghadi; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, its effect on energetics in heart remains unknown. In the present study, we examined respiration in cardiac muscle and liver from adult mice that were undernourished in utero. We report that in utero undernutrition is associated with impaired cardiac muscle energetics, including decreased fatty acid oxidative capacity, decreased maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate and decreased proton leak respiration. No differences in oxidative characteristics were detected in liver. We also measured plasma acylcarnitine levels and found that short-chain acylcarnitines are increased with in utero undernutrition. Results reveal the negative impact of suboptimal maternal nutrition on adult offspring cardiac energy metabolism, which may have life-long implications for cardiovascular function and disease risk. PMID:26182362

  1. Long-Term Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction is Associated with Hypermetabolism in Severely Burned Children.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Herndon, David N; Børsheim, Elisabet; Bhattarai, Nisha; Chao, Tony; Reidy, Paul T; Rasmussen, Blake B; Andersen, Clark R; Suman, Oscar E; Sidossis, Labros S

    2016-01-01

    The long-term impact of burn trauma on skeletal muscle bioenergetics remains unknown. Here, the authors determined respiratory capacity and function of skeletal muscle mitochondria in healthy individuals and in burn victims for up to 2 years postinjury. Biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 healthy men (26 ± 4 years) and 69 children (8 ± 5 years) with burns encompassing ≥30% of their total BSA. Seventy-nine biopsies were collected from cohorts of burn victims at 2 weeks (n = 18), 6 months (n = 18), 12 months (n = 25), and 24 months (n = 18) postburn. Hypermetabolism was determined by the difference in predicted and measured metabolic rate. Mitochondrial respiration was determined in saponin-permeabilized myofiber bundles. Outcomes were modeled by analysis of variance, with differences in groups assessed by Tukey-adjusted contrasts. Burn patients were hypermetabolic for up to 2 years postinjury. Coupled mitochondrial respiration was lower at 2 weeks (17 [8] pmol/sec/mg; P < .001), 6 months (41 [30] pmol/sec/mg; P = .03), and 12 months (35 [14] pmol/sec/mg; P < .001) postburn compared with healthy controls (58 [13] pmol/sec/mg). Coupled respiration was greater at 6, 12, and 24 months postburn vs 2 weeks postburn (P < .001). Mitochondrial adenosine diphosphate and oligomycin sensitivity (measures of coupling control) were lower at all time-points postburn vs control (P < .05), but greater at 6, 12, and 24 months postburn vs 2 weeks postburn (P < .05). Muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity remains significantly lower in burn victims for 1-year postinjury. Mitochondrial coupling control is diminished for up to 2 years postinjury in burn victims, resulting in greater mitochondrial thermogenesis. These quantitative and qualitative derangements in skeletal muscle bioenergetics likely contribute to the long-term pathophysiological stress response to burn trauma.

  2. Non-surgically-induced disuse muscle atrophy and neuromuscular dysfunction upregulates alpha7 acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammed A. S.; Sahani, Nita; Neville, Kevin A.; Nagashima, Michio; Lee, Sangseok; Tomoki Sasakawa Masao, Kaneki; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra

    2014-01-01

    Previous models of disuse have invariably used surgical methods require repetitive plaster casts applications. A method of disuse atrophy that does not require repetitive application is described. A modified plastic pipette tubing was applied to one hindlimb from thigh to foot resulting in immobilization of knee in extension and ankle in plantar flexion position. This method resulted in loss of soleus muscle mass to 11, 22, 39, and 45% at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively, in association with a significant decrease of tibialis twitch (25%) and tetanic tensions (26%) at 21 days, compared to contralateral side and/or sham immobilized controls. Immunohistochemical analysis of soleus using fluorescent α-bungarotoxin revealed a significant increase in the number of synapses per unit area (818+31 vs 433+16/mm2) and increase in muscle fibers per unit area (117 vs 83/mm2) most likely related to atrophy of muscle fibers bringing synapses closer. A three fold increase in alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (α7AChR) protein expression along with increased expression of α1AChR subunit on immobilized vs contralateral side was observed. The physiology and pharmacology of the novel finding of upregulation of α7AChRs with disuse requires further study. PMID:24383867

  3. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Su; Wu, Hengfang; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  4. Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of aging and chronic diseases: from sarcopenic obesity to cachexia.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI.

  5. Upper airway function in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Robert L.; Eckert, Danny J.; Yeh, Susie Yim; Malhotra, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Obstructive sleep apnea is an increasingly prevalent disease, with a considerable societal burden. The disease is defined by recurrent intermittent collapse of the upper airway. Understanding of and treatment for the disease is largely confined to relief of the mechanical obstruction of the upper airway by application of continuous positive airway pressure, and less commonly weight loss or surgery. However, recent work has focused on the function, rather than structure alone, of the upper airway. Recent findings The following contributors to upper airway structure and function have been studied: traditional fixed anatomical abnormalities, dynamic anatomical changes, upper airway dilator muscle dysfunction, lung volumes, and instability in control of breathing. In each patient with obstructive sleep apnea, the relative contribution of each of these components may be quite variable. The studies reviewed here describe methods to evaluate these factors, and some attempts at treatment. Summary Ongoing studies are attempting to classify patients on the basis of the underlying pathophysiology. This work suggests that obstructive sleep apnea is a heterogeneous disease with multiple root causes. Ultimately, such a classification may allow more individualized treatment, not only relying on mechanical relief of the upper airway obstruction. PMID:18812828

  6. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  7. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  8. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  9. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles. PMID:27738508

  10. The importance of complete tissue homogenization for accurate stoichiometric measurement of myosin light chain phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-02-01

    The standard method for measuring the phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chain (MLC20) in smooth muscle is extraction of the light chain using a urea extraction buffer, urea-glycerol gel electrophoresis of the soluble portion of the extract (supernatant) and Western blot analysis. The undissolved portion of the tissue during extraction (the pellet) is usually discarded. Because the pellet contains a finite amount of MLC20, omission of the pellet could result in inaccurate measurement of MLC20 phosphorylation. In this study we compared the level of tracheal smooth muscle MLC20 phosphorylation in the supernatant alone, with that in the complete tissue homogenate (supernatant and pellet) using the standard method. The supernatant fraction showed the well-known double bands representing phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated MLC20. The dissolved pellet fraction showed varying amounts of un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated MLC20. There was a small but statistically significant overestimation of the percent MLC20 phosphorylation if the pellet was not taken into consideration. The overestimation was 7% ± 2% (mean ± SEM) (p < 0.05) in unstimulated muscle and 2% ± 1% (p < 0.05) in acetylcholine (10(-6) mol/L) stimulated muscle. This finding suggests that for accurate estimation of the stoichiometry of MLC20 phosphorylation it is necessary to consider the contribution from the pellet portion of the muscle tissue homogenate.

  11. Involvement of Interleukin-17A-Induced Hypercontractility of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Cells in Persistent Gut Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Akiho, Hirotada; Tokita, Yohei; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Satoh, Kazuko; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Tsuchiya, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ihara, Eikichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim The etiology of post-inflammatory gastrointestinal (GI) motility dysfunction, after resolution of acute symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and intestinal infection, is largely unknown, however, a possible involvement of T cells is suggested. Methods Using the mouse model of T cell activation-induced enteritis, we investigated whether enhancement of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction by interleukin (IL)-17A is involved in postinflammatory GI hypermotility. Results Activation of CD3 induces temporal enteritis with GI hypomotility in the midst of, and hypermotility after resolution of, intestinal inflammation. Prolonged upregulation of IL-17A was prominent and IL-17A injection directly enhanced GI transit and contractility of intestinal strips. Postinflammatory hypermotility was not observed in IL-17A-deficient mice. Incubation of a muscle strip and SMCs with IL-17A in vitro resulted in enhanced contractility with increased phosphorylation of Ser19 in myosin light chain 2 (p-MLC), a surrogate marker as well as a critical mechanistic factor of SMC contractility. Using primary cultured murine and human intestinal SMCs, IκBζ- and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK)-mediated downregulation of the regulator of G protein signaling 4 (RGS4), which suppresses muscarinic signaling of contraction by promoting inactivation/desensitization of Gαq/11 protein, has been suggested to be involved in IL-17A-induced hypercontractility. The opposite effect of L-1β was mediated by IκBζ and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Conclusions We propose and discuss the possible involvement of IL-17A and its downstream signaling cascade in SMCs in diarrheal hypermotility in various GI disorders. PMID:24796324

  12. Cigarette smoke and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes elicit VEGF release through the p38 MAPK pathway in human airway smooth muscle cells and lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Giorgia; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Moretto, Nadia; Civelli, Maurizio; Patacchini, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic factor known to be elevated in the sputum of asymptomatic smokers as well as smokers with bronchitis type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute exposure to cigarette smoke extract altered VEGF production in lung parenchymal cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We exposed human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) and small airways epithelial cells (SAEC) to aqueous cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in order to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke on VEGF expression and release. KEY RESULTS Vascular endothelial growth factor release was elevated by sub-toxic concentrations of CSE in both ASMC and NHLF, but not in SAEC. CSE-evoked VEGF release was mimicked by its component acrolein at concentrations (10–100 µM) found in CSE, and prevented by the antioxidant and α,β-unsaturated aldehyde scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Both CSE and acrolein (30 µM) induced VEGF mRNA expression in ASMC cultures, suggesting an effect at transcriptional level. Crotonaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, an endogenous α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, stimulated VEGF release, as did H2O2. CSE-evoked VEGF release was accompanied by rapid and lasting phosphorylation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), which was abolished by NAC and mimicked by acrolein. Both CSE- and acrolein-evoked VEGF release were blocked by selective inhibition of p38 MAPK signalling. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes and possibly reactive oxygen species contained in cigarette smoke stimulate VEGF expression and release from pulmonary cells through p38 MAPK signalling. PMID:21306579

  13. Upregulation of TRPM7 augments cell proliferation and interleukin-8 release in airway smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XIAOLING; YANG, CHENG; HUANG, LINJIE; CHEN, MING; SHI, JIANTING; OUYANG, LIHUA; TANG, TIANTIAN; ZHANG, WEI; LI, YIQUN; LIANG, RUIYUN; JIANG, SHANPING

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and synthetic function (i.e. the capacity to release numerous chemokines and cytokines) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) are important in airway remodeling induced by cigarette smoke exposure. However, the molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is expressed ubiquitously and is crucial for the cellular physiological function of many cell types. The present study aimed to detect the expression of TRPM7 in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and determine the importance of TRPM7 in proliferation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. ASMCs were isolated and cultured from smoke-exposed rats. Expression levels of TRPM7 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 was silenced with TRPM7-short hairpin RNA lentivirus vector. DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release of ASMCs induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay, hemocytometer and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. It was determined that mRNA and protein expression levels of TRPM7 were increased in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Stimulation with CSE or TNF-α elevated DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release were more marked in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Silencing of TRPM7 reduced DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release induced by CSE or TNF-α in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. In conclusion, expression of TRPM7 increased significantly in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and the upregulation of TRPM7 led to augmented cell proliferation and IL-8 release in ASMCs from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:27108806

  14. Propofol protects against opioid-induced hyperresponsiveness of airway smooth muscle in a horse model of target-controlled infusion anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Luigino; Soggiu, Alessio; Roncada, Paola; Bonizzi, Luigi; Pistocchini, Elena; Urbani, Andrea; Rinaldi, Barbara; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2015-10-15

    General anaesthesia in horses is associated with elevated mortality rate in subjects suffering of heaves. Target-controlled infusion (TCI) of sedative-hypnotic medications and opioids represents a total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) method validated in veterinary medicine. Since there are no data concerning the impact of these classes of drugs in inducing bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in horses, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect propofol and remifentanil on the contractile response of equine airway smooth muscle. The influence of propofol and remifentanil on the contractile response of equine isolated bronchi to electrical field stimulation (EFS) was assessed. The role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neurokinin 2 (NK2) receptor was also assessed. The interaction analysis was performed by Bliss Independence theory. Experiments were repeated in desensitized and passively sensitized airways. Remifentanil induced BHR in both non-sensitized and passively sensitized bronchi, (+56.33±8.01% and +99.10±14.52%, respectively; P<0.01 vs. control) and propofol significantly prevented this effect (P>0.05 vs. remifentanil). The inactivation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves via desensitization and blocking NK2 receptor inhibited the BHR remifentanil-induced (P>0.05 vs. controls). The inhibition of iNOS reverted the protective effect of propofol on the BHR induced by remifentanil (non-sensitized: +47.11±7.70%; passively sensitized: +70.51±11.39%; P<0.05 vs. control). Propofol synergistically interacted (overall ≈40%) in preventing the remifentanil-induced BHR. Remifentanil induces BHR via stimulating capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves that facilitate the cholinergic neurotransmission through the activation of NK2 receptor. The propofol/remifentanil combination may be safely administered in course of TCI-TIVA procedures also in heaves affected horses.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle training for erectile dysfunction and climacturia 1 year after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Geraerts, I; Van Poppel, H; Devoogdt, N; De Groef, A; Fieuws, S; Van Kampen, M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether patients with persistent erectile dysfunction (ED), minimum 12 months after radical prostatectomy (RP), experienced a better recovery of erectile function (EF) with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) compared with patients without this intervention. Second, we aimed to investigate the effect of PFMT on climacturia. All patients, who underwent RP, with persistent ED of minimum 1 year post operation were eligible. The treatment group started PFMT immediately at 12 months post operation and the control group started at 15 months after RP. All patients received PFMT during 3 months. The sample size needed to detect with 80% power a 6 points-difference regarding the EF-domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), was at least 12 subjects per group. Patients were evaluated using the IIEF and questioned regarding climacturia. Differences between groups at 15 months were evaluated with Mann-Whitney U-test and Fisher's exact test. As a result, the treatment group had a significantly better EF than the control group at 15 months after surgery (P=0.025). Other subdomains of the IIEF remained constant for both groups. The effect of PFMT was maintained during follow-up. At 15 months, a significantly higher percentage of patients in the treatment group showed an improvement regarding climacturia (P=0.004).

  16. The effect of intense interval cycle-training on unloading-induced dysfunction and atrophy in the human calf muscle.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Norio; Ishida, Koji; Sato, Kohei; Koike, Teruhiko; Katayama, Keisho; Akima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether intense interval training on a cycle ergometer would prevent loss of muscle strength and atrophy in the human calf during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). The present study involved 11 healthy men. We defined unloading leg and contralateral leg as ULLS-leg and CONT-leg, respectively. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: one with single-leg cycling training (Tr-UL, n=6); the other as a control (UL, n=5). The Tr-UL group performed an intense 25-min interval cycling training up to 80% of peak oxygen uptake on alternate days during 20-d ULLS. It was found that: 1) in maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and the cross-sectional area of the planter flexor, there was a significant time- (pre-ULLS and post-ULLS) by-leg (ULLS-leg and CONT-leg) interaction; 2) in voluntary activation during MVC evaluated by the twitch interpolation technique, no significant time-by-leg interaction was detected but the trend of change from before to after ULLS tended to be different between ULLS-leg and CONT-leg; and 3) regarding ULLS-leg, the change in any parameters was not significantly different between the Tr-UL and UL groups. These results suggest that unloading induces dysfunction and atrophy in the human calf and that high-intensity interval training on a cycle ergometer cannot significantly prevent unloading-induced deconditioning in the human calf.

  17. Indirect airway challenges.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; O'Connor, B; Anderson, S D; Chung, F; Cockcroft, D W; Dahlén, B; DiMaria, G; Foresi, A; Hargreave, F E; Holgate, S T; Inman, M; Lötvall, J; Magnussen, H; Polosa, R; Postma, D S; Riedler, J

    2003-06-01

    Indirect challenges act by causing the release of endogenous mediators that cause the airway smooth muscle to contract. This is in contrast to the direct challenges where agonists such as methacholine or histamine cause airflow limitation predominantly via a direct effect on airway smooth muscle. Direct airway challenges have been used widely and are well standardised. They are highly sensitive, but not specific to asthma and can be used to exclude current asthma in a clinic population. Indirect bronchial stimuli, in particular exercise, hyperventilation, hypertonic aerosols, as well as adenosine, may reflect more directly the ongoing airway inflammation and are therefore more specific to identify active asthma. They are increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and to assess specific problems in patients with known asthma, e.g. exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, evaluation before scuba diving. Direct bronchial responsiveness is only slowly and to a modest extent, influenced by repeated administration of inhaled steroids. Indirect challenges may reflect more closely acute changes in airway inflammation and a change in responsiveness to an indirect stimulus may be a clinically relevant marker to assess the clinical course of asthma. Moreover, some of the indirect challenges, e.g. hypertonic saline and mannitol, can be combined with the assessment of inflammatory cells by induction of sputum.

  18. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  19. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  20. Reloading functionally ameliorates disuse-induced muscle atrophy by reversing mitochondrial dysfunction, and similar benefits are gained by administering a combination of mitochondrial nutrients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Peng, Yunhua; Feng, Zhihui; Shi, Wen; Qu, Lina; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Jiankang; Long, Jiangang

    2014-04-01

    We previously found that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in disuse-induced muscle atrophy. However, the mitochondrial remodeling that occurs during reloading, an effective approach for rescuing unloading-induced atrophy, remains to be investigated. In this study, using a rat model of 3-week hindlimb unloading plus 7-day reloading, we found that reloading protected mitochondria against dysfunction, including mitochondrial loss, abnormal mitochondrial morphology, inhibited biogenesis, and activation of mitochondria-associated apoptotic signaling. Interestingly, a combination of nutrients, including α-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, hydroxytyrosol, and CoQ10, which we designed to target mitochondria, was able to efficiently rescue muscle atrophy via a reloading-like action. It is suggested that reloading ameliorates skeletal muscle atrophy through the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and the amelioration of oxidative stress. Nutrient administration acted similarly in unloaded rats. Here, the study of mitochondrial remodeling in rats during unloading and reloading provides a more detailed picture of the pathology of muscle atrophy. PMID:24418157

  1. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Hua, Chia-ho; Daw, Najat; Navid, Fariba; Davidoff, Andrew M.; McGregor, Lisa; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; McCrarey, Lola; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by the degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.

  2. Silver nanoparticles induce anti-proliferative effects on airway smooth muscle cells. Role of nitric oxide and muscarinic receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Lee, Manuel A; Rosas-Hernández, Héctor; Salazar-García, Samuel; Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; González, Francisco J; Ali, Syed F; González, Carmen

    2014-01-13

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used to manufacture materials with new properties and functions. However, little is known about their toxic or beneficial effects on human health, especially in the respiratory system, where its smooth muscle (ASM) regulates the airway contractility by different mediators, such as acetylcholine (ACh) and nitric oxide (NO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AgNPs on ASM cells. Exposure to AgNPs induced ACh-independent expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at 100 μg/mL, associated with excessive production of NO. AgNPs induced the muscarinic receptor activation, since its blockage with atropine and blockage of its downstream signaling pathway inhibited the NO production. AgNPs at 10 and 100 μg/mL induced ACh-independent prolonged cytotoxicity and decreased cellular proliferation mediated by the muscarinic receptor-iNOS pathway. However, the concentration of 100 μg/mL of AgNPs induced muscarinic receptor-independent apoptosis, suggesting the activation of multiple pathways. These data indicate that AgNPs induce prolonged cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on ASM cells, suggesting an activation of the muscarinic receptor-iNOS pathway. Further investigation is required to understand the full mechanisms of action of AgNPs on ASM under specific biological conditions.

  3. Long Term and Standard Incubations of WST-1 Reagent Reflect the Same Inhibitory Trend of Cell Viability in Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Wei, Yin; Wang, Yu; Xu, Yu-Dong; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The WST-1 assay is an efficient test for cell viability measurement and the standard incubation time is 2h. In order to test if one-time addition of WST-1 reagent can reflect the relative cell viability trend of the testing agents at different time points, the effects of 2h standard incubation time and long term incubation time (2h+24h, 2h+48h) of WST-1 were compared in the rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASM cells) after adding of the testing protein MRP-14. Our study demonstrated that the effect of different dosages of the protein after 2h WST-1 incubation on ASM cells showed a tendency of inhibition and achieved the maximal inhibition effect at 72h. The relative cell viability trend of the 2h+24h group was the same to that of the 2h WST-1 incubation, which means that 24h prolonged incubation time of WST-1 reagent could still reflect the relative cell viability trend. In conclusion, the study suggested that the WST-1 is a proper candidate reagent for continuous monitation of cell viability. PMID:23289007

  4. A new class of nitric oxide-releasing derivatives of cetirizine; pharmacological profile in vascular and airway smooth muscle preparations

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, A-K; Fumagalli, F; DiGennaro, A; Andersson, M; Lundberg, J; Edenius, C; Govoni, M; Monopoli, A; Sala, A; Dahlén, S-E; Folco, G C

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The pharmacological properties of compounds NCX 1512 and NCX 1514, synthesized by linking the histamine H1-receptor antagonist cetirizine to NO-releasing spacer groups, are reported. The aim was to establish if the compounds retained the antihistamine action of the parent compound, to assess their efficacy as NO donors and to test if they had broader antiallergic activity than cetirizine in the lung. Experimental approach: Antihistamine activity of NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 was investigated in vitro in the guinea pig ileum, in tracheal rings (GPTR) and lung parenchymal strips (GPLP) of the guinea-pig. The NO-releasing capacity was investigated in vascular preparations; the isolated rabbit and guinea-pig aorta and guinea-pig pulmonary artery. Kinetics of NO release were assessed in a rat whole blood assay. Key results: Both NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 retained activity as H1-receptor antagonists in the guinea pig ileum and airway preparations. The NO-releasing NCX compounds relaxed the rabbit aorta, an action prevented by the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 μM). NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 did not relax the antigen (ovalbumin) pre-contracted GPTR, whereas the NO donors NCX 2057 and DEA-NONOate relaxed guinea-pig pre-contracted vascular and tracheal preparations. Cetirizine (1–100 μM) and NCX 1512 (1–100 μM) reduced the cumulative (0.01–100 μg ml−1) ovalbumin-induced constriction in GPTR, but had no significant effect in GPLP. Conclusions and implications: NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 act as antihistamines and NO donors. However, there was no improved effect compared to cetirizine on antigen-induced constriction of the central and peripheral lung. PMID:17351654

  5. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles.

    PubMed

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Schultz, Eric J; Gearinger, Rachel L; Saad, Nancy S; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle functions, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  6. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Schultz, Eric J.; Gearinger, Rachel L.; Saad, Nancy S.; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A.E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle function, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  7. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  8. Clinical review: Biphasic positive airway pressure and airway pressure release ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on mechanical ventilation strategies that allow unsupported spontaneous breathing activity in any phase of the ventilatory cycle. By allowing patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome to breathe spontaneously, one can expect improvements in gas exchange and systemic blood flow, based on findings from both experimental and clinical trials. In addition, by increasing end-expiratory lung volume, as occurs when using biphasic positive airway pressure or airway pressure release ventilation, recruitment of collapsed or consolidated lung is likely to occur, especially in juxtadiaphragmatic lung legions. Traditional approaches to mechanical ventilatory support of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome require adaptation of the patient to the mechanical ventilator using heavy sedation and even muscle relaxation. Recent investigations have questioned the utility of sedation, muscle paralysis and mechanical control of ventilation. Furthermore, evidence exists that lowering sedation levels will decrease the duration of mechanical ventilatory support, length of stay in the intensive care unit, and overall costs of hospitalization. Based on currently available data, we suggest considering the use of techniques of mechanical ventilatory support that maintain, rather than suppress, spontaneous ventilatory effort, especially in patients with severe pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:15566621

  9. Effects of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-13 on stromal interaction molecule-1 aggregation in human airway smooth muscle intracellular Ca(2+) regulation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Delmotte, Philippe; Aravamudan, Bharathi; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S; Sieck, Gary C

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation elevates intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) concentrations in airway smooth muscle (ASM). Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is an important source of [Ca(2+)]i mediated by stromal interaction molecule-1 (STIM1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) protein. In transducing SR Ca(2+) depletion, STIM1 aggregates to form puncta, thereby activating SOCE via interactions with a Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channel protein (Orai1) in the plasma membrane. We hypothesized that STIM1 aggregation is enhanced by inflammatory cytokines, thereby augmenting SOCE in human ASM cells. We used real-time fluorescence microscopic imaging to assess the dynamics of STIM1 aggregation and SOCE after exposure to TNF-α or IL-13 in ASM cells overexpressing yellow fluorescent protein-tagged wild-type STIM1 (WT-STIM1) and STIM1 mutants lacking the Ca(2+)-sensing EF-hand (STIM1-D76A), or lacking the cytoplasmic membrane binding site (STIM1ΔK). STIM1 aggregation was analyzed by monitoring puncta size during the SR Ca(2+) depletion induced by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). We found that puncta size was increased in cells expressing WT-STIM1 after CPA. However, STIM1-D76A constitutively formed puncta, whereas STIM1ΔK failed to form puncta. Furthermore, cytokines increased basal WT-STIM1 puncta size, and the SOCE triggered by SR Ca(2+) depletion was increased in cells expressing WT-STIM1 or STIM1-D76A. Meanwhile, SOCE in cells expressing STIM1ΔK and STIM1 short, interfering RNA (siRNA) was decreased. Similarly, in cells overexpressing STIM1, the siRNA knockdown of Orai1 blunted SOCE. However, exposure to cytokines increased SOCE in all cells, increased basal [Ca(2+)]i, and decreased SR Ca(2+) content. These data suggest that cytokines induce a constitutive increase in STIM1 aggregation that contributes to enhanced SOCE in human ASM after inflammation. Such effects of inflammation on STIM1 aggregations may contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:23713409

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced prostaglandin synthesis in skeletal muscle of Group VIB Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2γ-deficient mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Emiko; Hachisu, Keiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Kotomi; Nakamura, Masanori; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Nakatani, Yoshihito; Kuwata, Hiroshi; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro; Hara, Shuntaro

    2010-01-01

    Group VIB Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) is a membrane-bound iPLA2 enzyme with unique features, such as the utilization of distinct translation initiation sites and the presence of mitochondrial and peroxisomal localization signals. Here we investigated the physiological functions of iPLA2γ by disrupting its gene in mice. iPLA2γ-knockout (KO) mice were born with an expected Mendelian ratio and appeared normal and healthy at the age of one month but began to show growth retardation from the age of two months as well as kyphosis and significant muscle weakness at the age of four months. Electron microscopy revealed swelling and reduced numbers of mitochondria and atrophy of myofilaments in iPLA2γ-KO skeletal muscles. Increased lipid peroxidation and the induction of several oxidative stress-related genes were also found in the iPLA2γ-KO muscles. These results provide evidence that impairment of iPLA2γ causes mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, leading to the loss of skeletal muscle structure and function. We further found that the compositions of cardiolipin and other phospholipid subclasses were altered and that the levels of myoprotective prostanoids were reduced in iPLA2γ-KO skeletal muscle. Thus, in addition to maintenance of homeostasis of the mitochondrial membrane, iPLA2γ may contribute to modulation of lipid mediator production in vivo. PMID:20625036

  11. Role of microRNAs in gastrointestinal smooth muscle fibrosis and dysfunction: novel molecular perspectives on the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Rattan, Satish

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a group of short noncoding RNA molecules with important roles in cellular biology. miRNAs regulate gene expression by repressing translation or degrading the target mRNA. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggests that miRNAs are implicated in many diseases and could be potential biomarkers. Fibrosis and/smooth muscle (SM) dysfunction contributes to the morbidity and mortality associated with several diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Currently available therapeutic modalities are unsuccessful in efficiently blocking or reversing fibrosis and/or SM dysfunction. Recent understanding of the role of miRNAs in signaling pathway of fibrogenesis and SM phenotype switch has provided a new insight into translational research. However, much is still unknown about the molecular targets and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the GIT. This review discusses miRNA biology, pathophysiology of fibrosis, and aging- associated SM dysfunction in relation to the deregulation of miRNAs in the GIT. We also highlight the role of selected miRNAs associated with fibrosis and SM dysfunction-related diseases of the GIT.

  12. Role of cyclo-oxygenase-2 induction in interleukin-1β induced attenuation of cultured human airway smooth muscle cell cyclic AMP generation in response to isoprenaline

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Linhua; Holland, Elaine; Knox, Alan J

    1998-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) in human asthma shows reduced relaxation and cyclic AMP generation in response to β-adrenoceptor agonists. IL-β attenuates cyclic AMP generation but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have reported that IL-1β induces cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human ASM cells and results in a marked increase in prostanoid generation with PGE2 and PGI2 as the major products.We investigated the role of COX-2 induction and prostanoid release (measured as PGE2) in IL-1β induced attenuation of cyclic AMP generation in response to the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline (ISO).Pre-treatment of human ASM cells with IL-1β significantly attenuated cyclic AMP generation in response to high concentrations of ISO (1.0–10.0 μM) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The effect was accompanied by a high concentration of PGE2 release. The non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin (Ind), the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide (CHX) and actinomycin D and the steroid dexamethasone (Dex) all abolished the PGE2 release and prevented the attenuated cyclic AMP generation.COX substrate arachidonic acid time- and concentration-dependently mimicked IL-1β induced attenuation and the effect was prevented by the non-selective COX inhibitors Ind and flurbiprofen, but not by NS-398, CHX and Dex.In contrast to IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ, which are ineffective in inducing COX-2 and releasing PGE2 from human ASM cells, did not affect the cyclic AMP formation.Our study demonstrates that COX-2 induction and the consequent release of prostanoids plays a crucial role in IL-1β induced attenuation of human ASM cell cyclic AMP response to ISO. PMID:9863663

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway.

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  16. LncRNAs BCYRN1 promoted the proliferation and migration of rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma via upregulating the expression of transient receptor potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Luo-Xian; Tian, Cui-Jie; Tang, Xue-Yi; Zhao, Li-Min; Guo, Ya-Li; Cheng, Dong-Jun; Chen, Xian-Liang; Ma, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhuo-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in several biological processes through regulating the expression of protein. However, the function of lncRNA BCYRN1 in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) has not been reported. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into control and asthma groups and the ovalbumin (OVA) model was constructed. The expression of BCYRN1 and transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) were detected in the ASMCs separated from these rats. Then 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-1) assay, Roche real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) DP assay and Transwell cell migration assay were performed to detect the effect of BCYRN1 on the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs. RNA pull-down assays and RNA immunoprecipitation assay were used to identify and verify the binding between BCYRN1 and TRPC1. Inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance were measured in OVA challenged rats with BCYRN1 knockdown. Results: We foundthe high expression of BCYRN1 and TRPC1 in asthma groups and ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. Overexpression of BCYRN1 greatly promoted the proliferation and migration of ASMCs. In addition,TRPC1 overexpression reversed the function of si-BCYRN1 indecreasing the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. BCYRN1 could up-regulate the protein level of TRPC1 through increasing the stability of TRPC1. Finally, we found that BCYRN1 knockdown reduced the inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance in OVA challenged rats. Conclusion: Our study indicated that BCYRN1 promotedthe proliferation and migration of rat ASMCs in asthma via upregulating the expression of TRPC1. PMID:27648131

  17. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  18. Plasminogen-stimulated airway smooth muscle cell proliferation is mediated by urokinase and annexin A2, involving plasmin-activated cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A G; Xia, Y C; Harris, T; Royce, S; Hamilton, J A; Schuliga, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The conversion of plasminogen into plasmin by interstitial urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is potentially important in asthma pathophysiology. In this study, the effect of uPA-mediated plasminogen activation on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human ASM cells were incubated with plasminogen (0.5–50 μg·mL−1) or plasmin (0.5–50 mU·mL−1) in the presence of pharmacological inhibitors, including UK122, an inhibitor of uPA. Proliferation was assessed by increases in cell number or MTT reduction after 48 h incubation with plasmin(ogen), and by earlier increases in [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cyclin D1 expression. KEY RESULTS Plasminogen (5 μg·mL−1)-stimulated increases in cell proliferation were attenuated by UK122 (10 μM) or by transfection with uPA gene-specific siRNA. Exogenous plasmin (5 mU·mL−1) also stimulated increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of plasmin-stimulated ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signalling attenuated plasmin-stimulated increases in ASM proliferation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of cell signalling mediated by the EGF receptor, a receptor trans-activated by plasmin, also reduced plasmin(ogen)-stimulated cell proliferation. Knock down of annexin A2, which has dual roles in both plasminogen activation and plasmin-signal transduction, also attenuated ASM cell proliferation following incubation with either plasminogen or plasmin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Plasminogen stimulates ASM cell proliferation in a manner mediated by uPA and involving multiple signalling pathways downstream of plasmin. Targeting mediators of plasminogen-evoked ASM responses, such as uPA or annexin A2, may be useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:24111848

  19. The small heat shock-related protein, HSP20, is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase substrate that is involved in airway smooth muscle relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Komalavilas, Padmini; Penn, Raymond B.; Flynn, Charles R.; Thresher, Jeffrey; Lopes, Luciana B.; Furnish, Elizabeth J.; Guo, Manhong; Pallero, Manuel A.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Brophy, Colleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the cAMP/cAMP-dependent PKA pathway leads to relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM). The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the small heat shock-related protein HSP20 in mediating PKA-dependent ASM relaxation. Human ASM cells were engineered to constitutively express a green fluorescent protein-PKA inhibitory fusion protein (PKI-GFP) or GFP alone. Activation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathways by isoproterenol (ISO) or forskolin led to increases in the phosphorylation of HSP20 in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells. Forskolin treatment in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells led to a loss of central actin stress fibers and decreases in the number of focal adhesion complexes. This loss of stress fibers was associated with dephosphorylation of the actin-depolymerizing protein cofilin in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells. To confirm that phosphorylated HSP20 plays a role in PKA-induced ASM relaxation, intact strips of bovine ASM were precontracted with serotonin followed by ISO. Activation of the PKA pathway led to relaxation of bovine ASM, which was associated with phosphorylation of HSP20 and dephosphorylation of cofilin. Finally, treatment with phosphopeptide mimetics of HSP20 possessing a protein transduction domain partially relaxed precontracted bovine ASM strips. In summary, ISO-induced phosphorylation of HSP20 or synthetic phosphopeptide analogs of HSP20 decreases phosphorylation of cofilin and disrupts actin in ASM, suggesting that one possible mechanism by which HSP20 mediates ASM relaxation is via regulation of actin filament dynamics. PMID:17993590

  20. LncRNAs BCYRN1 promoted the proliferation and migration of rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma via upregulating the expression of transient receptor potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Luo-Xian; Tian, Cui-Jie; Tang, Xue-Yi; Zhao, Li-Min; Guo, Ya-Li; Cheng, Dong-Jun; Chen, Xian-Liang; Ma, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhuo-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in several biological processes through regulating the expression of protein. However, the function of lncRNA BCYRN1 in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) has not been reported. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into control and asthma groups and the ovalbumin (OVA) model was constructed. The expression of BCYRN1 and transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) were detected in the ASMCs separated from these rats. Then 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-1) assay, Roche real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) DP assay and Transwell cell migration assay were performed to detect the effect of BCYRN1 on the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs. RNA pull-down assays and RNA immunoprecipitation assay were used to identify and verify the binding between BCYRN1 and TRPC1. Inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance were measured in OVA challenged rats with BCYRN1 knockdown. Results: We foundthe high expression of BCYRN1 and TRPC1 in asthma groups and ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. Overexpression of BCYRN1 greatly promoted the proliferation and migration of ASMCs. In addition,TRPC1 overexpression reversed the function of si-BCYRN1 indecreasing the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. BCYRN1 could up-regulate the protein level of TRPC1 through increasing the stability of TRPC1. Finally, we found that BCYRN1 knockdown reduced the inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance in OVA challenged rats. Conclusion: Our study indicated that BCYRN1 promotedthe proliferation and migration of rat ASMCs in asthma via upregulating the expression of TRPC1.

  1. Theophylline Represses IL-8 Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Independently of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition. Novel Role as a Protein Phosphatase 2A Activator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijeshkumar S; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Oliver, Brian G; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-06-01

    Theophylline is an old drug experiencing a renaissance owing to its beneficial antiinflammatory effects in chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multiple modes of antiinflammatory action have been reported, including inhibition of the enzymes that degrade cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Using primary cultures of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, we recently revealed that PDE4 inhibitors can potentiate the antiinflammatory action of β2-agonists by augmenting cAMP-dependent expression of the phosphatase that deactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-MAPK phosphatase (MKP)-1. Therefore, the aim of this study was to address whether theophylline repressed cytokine production in a similar, PDE-dependent, MKP-1-mediated manner. Notably, theophylline did not potentiate cAMP release from ASM cells treated with the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol. Moreover, theophylline (0.1-10 μM) did not increase formoterol-induced MKP-1 messenger RNA expression nor protein up-regulation, consistent with the lack of cAMP generation. However, theophylline (at 10 μM) was antiinflammatory and repressed secretion of the neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine IL-8, which is produced in response to TNF-α. Because theophylline's effects were independent of PDE4 inhibition or antiinflammatory MKP-1, we then wished to elucidate the novel mechanisms responsible. We investigated the impact of theophylline on protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, and show that theophylline increases TNF-α-induced PP2A activity in ASM cells. Confirmatory results were obtained in A549 lung epithelial cells. PP2A activators have beneficial effects in ex vivo and in vivo models of respiratory disease. Thus, our study is the first to link theophylline with PP2A activation as a novel mechanism to control respiratory inflammation.

  2. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  3. The effect of ozone on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, A.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to the development of exaggerated bronchoconstrictor responses since a persistent link has been noted between pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. In these studies guinea pigs were exposed to 2.0 ppm ozone for 4 hours, then immediately sacrificed or allowed to breathe filtered air for up to 14 days. Following ozone exposure there was an immediate massive neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophils in lung digest dropped to control values within 3-12 hours post-ozone but remained elevated in BAL fluid for 3 days. There was probable eosinophil degranulation within the first 24 hours post-ozone. Guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to vigal stimulation through 3 days post-ozone. Although they were also hyperresponsive to ACh, responses to MCh were unchanged. Neuronal M[sub 2] receptors were dysfunctional through 3 days post-ozone. There was resolution of inflammation, airway responsiveness, and neuronal M[sub 2] receptor function by 14 days post-exposure. This investigation has (1) confirmed an immediate lung inflammation following acute ozone exposure; (2) established that cells in BAL give a distorted reflection of inflammatory events in lung digest; (3) demonstrated that ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness is at least partially due to efferent cholinergic mechanisms without functional changes of muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle; (4) shown that ACh may not be an appropriate agent to test ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness; and (5) demonstrated that inhibitory neuronal M[sub 2] receptors are dysfunctional following ozone exposure. There was close linkage between these events, suggesting that they may be causally related. This investigation proposes a specific mechanism, dysfunction of neuronal M[sub 2] receptors, by which inflammatory cells could cause airway hyperresponsiveness following acute ozone exposure.

  4. Pilot study investigating the ability of an herbal composite to alleviate clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction in horses with recurrent airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Wendy; Charch, Armen; Brewer, Dyanne; Clarke, Andrew F.

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), known previously as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is a debilitating respiratory condition that significantly contributes to lost training days and illness in racehorses. Herbs are becoming increasingly popular for the prophylaxis or treatment of the clinical signs of RAO despite a paucity of research on efficacy and safety. We evaluated the ability of an herbal composite containing garlic, white horehound, boneset, aniseed, fennel, licorice, thyme, and hyssop to reduce the clinical signs of RAO, hypothesizing that the product would safely reduce signs and would improve the inflammatory cell profile within the lungs. The composite was fed to 6 horses with symptomatic RAO for 21 d in a crossover manner. Ventigraphs were used to record respiratory rate and intrapleural pressure; the proportion of inflammatory cells in fluid aspirated from the trachea was determined. Blood biochemical and hematologic screening was conducted to identify possible adverse effects. Treatment with the composite did not result in statistically significant changes in any of the parameters evaluated. A trend to a decrease in respiratory rate (P = 0.1) and an increase in the proportion of macrophages (P = 0.1) was observed in the horses receiving the herbal composite compared with placebo. These data indicate a potential for the herbal composite to safely reduce the elevated respiratory rate in horses with RAO. Future research with a greater number of horses is warranted to further characterize the effect of this product on horses with RAO. PMID:17479778

  5. Obesity and upper airway control during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Susheel P.; Squier, Samuel; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P.; Smith, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms linking obesity with upper airway dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea are reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is due to alterations in upper airway anatomy and neuromuscular control. Upper airway structural alterations in obesity are related to adipose deposition around the pharynx, which can increase its collapsibility or critical pressure (Pcrit). In addition, obesity and, particularly, central adiposity lead to reductions in resting lung volume, resulting in loss of caudal traction on upper airway structures and parallel increases in pharyngeal collapsibility. Metabolic and humoral factors that promote central adiposity may contribute to these alterations in upper airway mechanical function and increase sleep apnea susceptibility. In contrast, neural responses to upper airway obstruction can mitigate these mechanical loads and restore pharyngeal patency during sleep. Current evidence suggests that these responses can improve with weight loss. Improvements in these neural responses with weight loss may be related to a decline in systemic and local pharyngeal concentrations of specific inflammatory mediators with somnogenic effects. PMID:19875707

  6. Electrical Stimulation Improves Rat Muscle Dysfunction Caused by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Hypercapnia via Regulation of miRNA-Related Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lu-Lu; Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Zhao, Cui-Cui; Huang, Shi-Yuan; Shen, Jie; Jiang, Xian-Xun; Wang, Xiao-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) is a powerful exercise training that may relieve muscle dysfunction in COPD. This study investigated whether electrical stimulation may have atypical adaptations via activation of miRNA related pathways in counteracting COPD muscle dysfunction. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups. With the exception of the rats in the control group, the experimental rats were exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) (9∼11%O2,5.5∼6.5%CO2) for 2 or 4 weeks. Electrical stimulation was performed immediately after each CIHH session. Following assessment of the running capacity, biopsy samples were obtained from the gastrocnemius of the rats. The miR-1, miR-133a and miR-133b levels were measured, as well as their related proteins: phosphorylation of Akt (p-AKT), PGC-1alpha (PGC-1α), histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and serum response factor (SRF). Myosin heavy chainIIa (MHCIIa) and myosin heavy chainIIb (MHCIIb) were also measured to assess fiber type changes. After 2 weeks, compared with the controls, only miR-1 and miR-133a were significantly increased (p<0.05) in the exposure group. After 4 weeks, the exposure group exhibited a decreased running distance (p = 0.054) and MHCIIa-to-MHCIIb shift (p<0.05). PGC-1α (p = 0.051), nuclear HDAC4 (p = 0.058), HDAC4, p-AKT, PGC-1α and SRF was also significantly decreased (p<0.05). In contrast, miR-1 and miR-133a were significantly increased (p<0.05). Four weeks of electrical stimulation can partly reversed those changes, and miR-133b exhibited a transient increase after 2 weeks electrical stimulation. Our study indicate miRNAs may have roles in the response of CIHH-impaired muscle to changes during electrical stimulation. PMID:27023369

  7. [Bilateral dysfunction of the quadriceps muscle after unilateral cruciate ligament rupture with concomitant injury central activation deficit].

    PubMed

    Urbach, D; Nebelung, W; Röpke, M; Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the ability to activate the quadriceps femoris muscle voluntarily in patients after severe knee injuries and it's influence on muscle function. 33 male patients after ACL-rupture with concomitant injuries were investigated with a twitch-interpolation-method to determine the maximal voluntary contraction force (MVC) and the ability to activate the quadriceps muscle voluntarily. The results were compared to a previously investigated group of patients after isolated ACL-rupture and to an aged-matched control group. The patients with extensive knee injuries presented a significant higher deficit of voluntary quadriceps muscle activation on the injured (78.8 +/- 2.09%, mean +/- SEM) and equally on the uninjured side (78.9 +/- 1.91%) compared to the patients after isolated ACL-rupture and to controls. A minor MVC-deficit of the patients quadriceps muscle of the uninjured side could be explained by the voluntary activation deficit alone, the major MVC deficit of the injured side by muscle atrophy and a voluntary activation deficit. The activation deficit is probably the underlying reason for persisting muscle wasting and [not readable: see text

  8. Acute administration of ivacaftor to people with cystic fibrosis and a G551D-CFTR mutation reveals smooth muscle abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L.; Barnes, Janel K.; Gallagher, Charles G.; Sieren, Jered P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Fischer, Anthony J.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Welsh, Michael J.; McKone, Edward F.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Airflow obstruction is common in cystic fibrosis (CF), yet the underlying pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. People with CF often exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness, CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in airway smooth muscle (ASM), and ASM from newborn CF pigs has increased contractile tone, suggesting that loss of CFTR causes a primary defect in ASM function. We hypothesized that restoring CFTR activity would decrease smooth muscle tone in people with CF. METHODS. To increase or potentiate CFTR function, we administered ivacaftor to 12 adults with CF with the G551D-CFTR mutation; ivacaftor stimulates G551D-CFTR function. We studied people before and immediately after initiation of ivacaftor (48 hours) to minimize secondary consequences of CFTR restoration. We tested smooth muscle function by investigating spirometry, airway distensibility, and vascular tone. RESULTS. Ivacaftor rapidly restored CFTR function, indicated by reduced sweat chloride concentration. Airflow obstruction and air trapping also improved. Airway distensibility increased in airways less than 4.5 mm but not in larger-sized airways. To assess smooth muscle function in a tissue outside the lung, we measured vascular pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index, which both decreased following CFTR potentiation. Finally, change in distensibility of <4.5-mm airways correlated with changes in PWV. CONCLUSIONS. Acute CFTR potentiation provided a unique opportunity to investigate CFTR-dependent mechanisms of CF pathogenesis. The rapid effects of ivacaftor on airway distensibility and vascular tone suggest that CFTR dysfunction may directly cause increased smooth muscle tone in people with CF and that ivacaftor may relax smooth muscle. FUNDING. This work was funded in part from an unrestricted grant from the Vertex Investigator-Initiated Studies Program. PMID:27158673

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  10. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K

    1994-12-01

    The parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes secondary to several known causative agents, and parkinsonian syndromes associated with more widespread CNS lesions and extensive neurologic deficits. They constitute movement disorders with a similar constellation of symptoms: rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia, gait impairment, and postural instability. All of the parkinsonian syndromes are associated with excess morbidity and mortality from respiratory causes, and all can produce the pattern of pulmonary function impairment consistent with neuromuscular disease. In addition, the parkinsonian syndromes can produce upper airway obstruction and abnormalities of ventilatory control, both of which can be life-threatening in those with MSA. The medications used to treat these disorders can also produce respiratory disease. A syndrome of L-dopa-induced respiratory dysfunction has been described, which may be a heterogeneic disorder of choreiform movements of the respiratory muscles, rigidity-akinesis of the respiratory muscles, or abnormal central control of ventilation, all related to the drug. In addition, the ergot-derived dopamine agonists can cause pleural and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:7867286

  11. Dietary enrichment with fish oil prevents high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Philp, Lisa K; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Janovska, Alena; Wittert, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    High saturated fat (HF-S) diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO) diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus) and white (extensor digitorum longus) muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group). Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic and gene

  12. Cytokine-Induced S-Nitrosylation of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Expression of Phosphodiesterase 1A Contribute to Dysfunction of Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Hu, Wenhui; Mahavadi, Sunila; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-09-01

    The following manuscript was published as a Fast Forward article on September 9, 2014: Rajagopal S, Nalli AD, Kumar DP, Bhattacharya S, Hu W, Mahavadi S, Grider JR, and Murthy KS, Cytokine-Induced S-Nitrosylation of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Expression of Phosphodiesterase 1A Contribute to Dysfunction of Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Relaxation. J Pharmacol Exp Ther jpet.114.218156; doi:10.1124/jpet.114.218156. It was later found that the chemical identity of IC86340 was not sufficiently disclosed. The authors are unable, at this time, to provide this information in accordance with the editorial policies of The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. As a result, the manuscript has been withdrawn from publication. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause JPET's readers. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD.

    PubMed

    Bidan, Cécile M; Veldsink, Annemiek C; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD.

  14. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  15. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juciane Maria de Andrade; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Florsheim, Esther; Albuquerque, Layra Lucy; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Gomes, Eliane; Tavares de Lima, Wothan; de Franco, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Orlando Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh), which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic) and allergen-induced (extrinsic) airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax) or minimally (AIRmin) to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation. PMID:23691511

  16. In vitro effect of medicinal plants used to treat erectile dysfunction on smooth muscle relaxation and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Rakuambo, N C; Meyer, J J M; Hussein, A; Huyser, C; Mdlalose, S P; Raidani, T G

    2006-04-21

    Chloroform and ethanol extracts of root bark of Securidaca longepedunculata, Wrightia natalensis and Rhoicissus tridentata were investigated for their in vitro activity on the contraction of corpus cavernosal smooth muscle of white New Zealand rabbits. Some of the extracts of these plants relaxed the corpus cavernosal smooth muscle at low concentrations. The highest activity was obtained from Securidaca longepedunculata chloroform extracts at a concentration of 13.0 mg/ml, which induced 66.6% relaxation. Viagra was used as a positive control in this study. Extracts of Securidaca longepedunculata added to human spermatozoa affected certain sperm parameters negatively at 6.5 mg/ml and higher whilst there was no effect at 1.0 mg/ml. PMID:16309865

  17. TNFα and IFNγ Synergistically Enhance Transcriptional Activation of CXCL10 in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells via STAT-1, NF-κB, and the Transcriptional Coactivator CREB-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Deborah L.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Jindarat, Sarawut; Proud, David; Pang, Linhua; Belvisi, Maria; Knox, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Asthmatic airway smooth muscle (ASM) expresses interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (CXCL10), a chemokine known to mediate mast cell migration into ASM bundles that has been reported in the airways of asthmatic patients. CXCL10 is elevated in patients suffering from viral exacerbations of asthma and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diseases in which corticosteroids are largely ineffective. IFNγ and TNFα synergistically induce CXCL10 release from human ASM cells in a steroid-insensitive manner, via an as yet undefined mechanism. We report that TNFα activates the classical NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) pathway, whereas IFNγ activates JAK2/STAT-1α and that inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway is more effective in abrogating CXCL10 release than the steroid fluticasone. The synergy observed with TNFα and IFNγ together, however, did not lie at the level of NF-κB activation, STAT-1α phosphorylation, or in vivo binding of these transcription factors to the CXCL10 promoter. Stimulation of human ASM cells with TNFα and IFNγ induced histone H4 but not histone H3 acetylation at the CXCL10 promoter, although no synergism was observed when both cytokines were combined. We show, however, that TNFα and IFNγ exert a synergistic effect on the recruitment of CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the CXCL10, which is accompanied by increased RNA polymerase II. Our results provide evidence that synergism between TNFα and IFNγ lies at the level of coactivator recruitment in human ASM and suggest that inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling may be of therapeutic benefit in steroid-resistant airway disease. PMID:20833730

  18. TNFα and IFNγ synergistically enhance transcriptional activation of CXCL10 in human airway smooth muscle cells via STAT-1, NF-κB, and the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Deborah L; Clifford, Rachel L; Jindarat, Sarawut; Proud, David; Pang, Linhua; Belvisi, Maria; Knox, Alan J

    2010-09-17

    Asthmatic airway smooth muscle (ASM) expresses interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (CXCL10), a chemokine known to mediate mast cell migration into ASM bundles that has been reported in the airways of asthmatic patients. CXCL10 is elevated in patients suffering from viral exacerbations of asthma and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diseases in which corticosteroids are largely ineffective. IFNγ and TNFα synergistically induce CXCL10 release from human ASM cells in a steroid-insensitive manner, via an as yet undefined mechanism. We report that TNFα activates the classical NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) pathway, whereas IFNγ activates JAK2/STAT-1α and that inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway is more effective in abrogating CXCL10 release than the steroid fluticasone. The synergy observed with TNFα and IFNγ together, however, did not lie at the level of NF-κB activation, STAT-1α phosphorylation, or in vivo binding of these transcription factors to the CXCL10 promoter. Stimulation of human ASM cells with TNFα and IFNγ induced histone H4 but not histone H3 acetylation at the CXCL10 promoter, although no synergism was observed when both cytokines were combined. We show, however, that TNFα and IFNγ exert a synergistic effect on the recruitment of CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the CXCL10, which is accompanied by increased RNA polymerase II. Our results provide evidence that synergism between TNFα and IFNγ lies at the level of coactivator recruitment in human ASM and suggest that inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling may be of therapeutic benefit in steroid-resistant airway disease.

  19. State-dependent and reflex drives to the upper airway: basic physiology with clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stuart W.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The root cause of the most common and serious of the sleep disorders is impairment of breathing, and a number of factors predispose a particular individual to hypoventilation during sleep. In turn, obstructive hypopneas and apneas are the most common of the sleep-related respiratory problems and are caused by dysfunction of the upper airway as a conduit for airflow. The overarching principle that underpins the full spectrum of clinical sleep-related breathing disorders is that the sleeping brain modifies respiratory muscle activity and control mechanisms and diminishes the ability to respond to respiratory distress. Depression of upper airway muscle activity and reflex responses, and suppression of arousal (i.e., “waking-up”) responses to respiratory disturbance, can also occur with commonly used sedating agents (e.g., hypnotics and anesthetics). Growing evidence indicates that the sometimes critical problems of sleep and sedation-induced depression of breathing and arousal responses may be working through common brain pathways acting on common cellular mechanisms. To identify these state-dependent pathways and reflex mechanisms, as they affect the upper airway, is the focus of this paper. Major emphasis is on the synthesis of established and recent findings. In particular, we specifically focus on 1) the recently defined mechanism of genioglossus muscle inhibition in rapid-eye-movement sleep; 2) convergence of diverse neurotransmitters and signaling pathways onto one root mechanism that may explain pharyngeal motor suppression in sleep and drug-induced brain sedation; 3) the lateral reticular formation as a key hub of respiratory and reflex drives to the upper airway. PMID:23970535

  20. Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition during exercise with painful muscles in patients with shoulder myalgia and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Lannersten, Lisa; Kosek, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise influenced endogenous pain modulation in healthy controls, shoulder myalgia patients and fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Twenty-one healthy subjects, 20 shoulder myalgia patients and 20 FM patients, all females, participated. They performed standardized static contractions, that is, outward shoulder rotation (m. infraspinatus) and knee extension (m. quadriceps). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were determined bilaterally at m. infraspinatus and m. quadriceps. During contractions PPTs were assessed at the contracting muscle, the resting homologous contralateral muscle and contralaterally at a distant site (m. infraspinatus during contraction of m. quadriceps and vice versa). Myalgia patients had lower PPTs compared to healthy controls at m. infraspinatus bilaterally (p<0.01), but not at m. quadriceps. FM patients had lower PPTs at all sites compared to healthy controls (p<0.001) and myalgia patients (p<0.001). During contraction of m. infraspinatus PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.003), but not in myalgia or FM patients. During contraction of m. quadriceps PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.001) and myalgia patients (all sites: p<0.02), but not in FM patients. In conclusion, we found a normal activation of endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms in myalgia patients during contraction of the non-afflicted m. quadriceps, but a lack of pain inhibition during contraction of the painful m. infraspinatus. FM patients failed to activate their pain inhibitory mechanisms during all contractions.

  1. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  2. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and dysfunctional breathing (DB) disorders may mimic or coexist with asthma, leading to overtreatment with corticosteroids with consequent morbidity. Iatrogenic complications can be averted by early and correct diagnosis. VCD, also termed paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD), is characterized by intermittent paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, mainly during inspiration, leading to airflow obstruction and dyspnea. Patients with VCD may have repetitive emergency room visits due to acute dyspnea (mimicking exacerbations of asthma). In the seminal descriptions of VCD, young women (often with psychiatric issues) predominated; however, other groups at increased risk for developing VCD include elite athletes, military recruits, and individuals exposed to irritants (inhaled or aspirated). Chronic postnasal drip, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may lead to laryngeal hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of VCD may be difficult because physical exam and spirometry may be normal between episodes. During symptomatic episodes, spirometry typically reveals variable extrathoracic airway obstruction (truncated inspiratory flow volume loop). The gold standard for identifying VCD is flexible fiberoptic rhinolaryngoscopy. Management of VCD includes identification and treatment of underlying disorders (eg, chronic postnasal drip, LPR, GER, anxiety, depression) and a multidisciplinary approach (including highly trained speech therapists). Speech therapy and biofeedback play a critical role in teaching techniques to override various dysfunctional breathing habits. When postnasal drip, LPR, or GER coexist, these disorders should be aggressively treated. With successful therapy, corticosteroids can often be discontinued. During severe, acute episodes of VCD, therapeutic strategies include heliox (80% helium/20% oxygen), topical lidocaine, anxiolytics, and superior laryngeal blocks with Clostridium botulinum toxin

  3. Breathtaking TRP Channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in Airway Chemosensation and Reflex Control

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-01-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  4. Breathtaking TRP channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in airway chemosensation and reflex control.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Bret F; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-12-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  5. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  6. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  7. Treatment with a combination of ginger, L-citrulline, muira puama and Paullinia cupana can reverse the progression of corporal smooth muscle loss, fibrosis and veno-occlusive dysfunction in the aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, Monica G.; Hlaing, Su M.; Chan, Andre; Artaza, Jorge N.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Aging associated erectile dysfunction is characterized within the corpora by a progressive apoptosis of the smooth muscle cells and their replacement by collagen. Nitric oxide from iNOS has been shown to inhibit these histological changes in the corpora while PDE5 inhibitors as well as certain nutraceuticals such as ginger, paullinia cupana, muira puama and L-citrulline are known to enhance the effects of NO. We evaluated whether the daily oral administration for 2 months with a combination of ginger, paullinia cupana, muira puama and L-citrulline (COMP-4) can effectively delay the ongoing corporal fibrosis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis and cavernosal veno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD) seen in middle aged rats similar to that seen with tadalafil. Methods 10 Month old Fisher 344 rats were treated or not for two months with COMP-4, tadalafil or a combination of tadalafil plus COMP-4. CVOD was determined by dynamic infusion cavernosometry. Penile sections of the corpora cavernosa were subjected to Masson trichrome staining to evaluate fibrosis and immunohistochemistry for desmin as a marker of smooth muscle content and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by image analysis. Oxidative stress levels were determined by GSH/GSSG ratio in whole blood. Results a decline in the non-treated rat's erectile function is evident by 10-12 months of age and is accompanied by a decrease in the corporal smooth muscle content determined by desmin expression and an increase in corporal fibrosis. The daily treatment for two months with COMP-4 reverses this process by reducing systemic oxidative stress and increasing desmin and iNOS expression, similar to that seen with tadalafil or the combination of COMP-4 plus tadalafil. Conclusion An oral combination of ginger, muira puama, Paullinia cupana and L-citrulline seems to be as effective as daily PDE5 inhibitor therapy in either delaying or reversing the onset of the histological and functional characteristics of aging

  8. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype‑3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hua; Wu, Song-Ze; Wang, Gang; Huang, Ni-Wen; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-06-01

    The persistent administration of β2‑adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long‑acting β2‑adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti‑α‑smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C‑β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5‑trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol‑induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR‑cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol‑induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  9. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  10. beta-hexosaminidase-induced activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase is dependent on p21Ras and protein kinase C and mediates bovine airway smooth-muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lew, D B; Dempsey, B K; Zhao, Y; Muthalif, M; Fatima, S; Malik, K U

    1999-07-01

    Late-phase and sustained activation of p44/42(MAPK) has been reported to be a critical factor in cell mitogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that p44/42(MAPK) is involved in mannosyl-rich glycoprotein-induced mitogenesis in bovine airway smooth-muscle cells (ASMC). Treatment of adherent ASMC with beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A, 50 nM), an endogenous mannosyl-rich glycoprotein, resulted in a late-onset (30-min) activation of p44/42(MAPK) that lasted for 4 h. Activation of p44/42(MAPK) induced by Hex A was inhibited by an 18-mer phosphorothioate-derivatized antisense oligonucleotide (1-5 microM) directed to human p44(MAPK); the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor PD98059 (5 microM); the p42(MAPK) inhibitor Tyrphostin AG-126 (0.2 microM); the farnesyl transferase inhibitors SCH-56582 (10 microM) and FPT III (10 miroM), which inhibit p21Ras activation; and Calphostin C (0.2 microM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C. These agents also inhibited Hex A-induced cell proliferation in bovine ASMC. These data suggest that Hex A activates p44/42(MAPK) in a p21Ras- and PKC-dependent manner and that this activation mediates Hex A- induced mitogenesis in bovine ASMC.

  11. Long-term effects of acupuncture treatment on airway smooth muscle in a rat model of smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Wu, Song; Tang, Hongtu; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lushan; Zhou, Huanjiao; Zhou, Miao; Wang, Hua; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases. It is a chronic inflammatory process characterised by airway obstruction and progressive lung inflammation, associated with difficulty breathing and insensitivity to corticosteroid therapy. Although there is some preliminary evidence to suggest a beneficial effect of acupuncture on COPD, its mechanism of action has not been investigated. Our aim was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture in a rat model of COPD induced by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Methods Sixty Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to the smoke of 15 cigarettes for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for 3 months to induce COPD and treated with acupuncture at BL13 (Feishu), BL23 (Shenshu) and Dingchuan (COPD+Acupuncture, n=15), sham acupuncture (COPD+Sham, n=15) or left untreated (n=15). Exposed rats were compared with controls not exposed to CS (control, n=15). Pulmonary function was measured, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by ELISA. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) protein and mRNA expression were examined in lung tissue and in bronchus. Results Acupuncture treatment appeared to protect pulmonary function and reduce the COPD-induced inflammatory response by decreasing cell inflammation and the production of TNF-α and IL-8. Acupuncture also enhanced HDAC2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting a possible direct effect on protein structure through post-translational modifications. Conclusions Our results suggest that acupuncture regulates inflammatory cytokines and contributes to lung protection in a rat model of smoke-induced COPD by modulating HDAC2. PMID:26345700

  12. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... efforts to assist with breathing have failed. A hollow needle or tube can be inserted into the ...

  13. Dietary Intervention Restored Menses in Female Athletes with Exercise-Associated Menstrual Dysfunction with Limited Impact on Bone and Muscle Health

    PubMed Central

    Cialdella-Kam, Lynn; Guebels, Charlotte P.; Maddalozzo, Gianni F.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-related menstrual dysfunction (ExMD) is associated with low energy availability (EA), decreased bone mineral density (BMD), and increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. We investigated whether a 6-month carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PRO) supplement (360 kcal/day, 54 g CHO/day, 20 g PRO/day) intervention would improve energy status and musculoskeletal health and restore menses in female athletes (n = 8) with ExMD. At pre/post-intervention, reproductive and thyroid hormones, bone health (BMD, bone mineral content, bone markers), muscle strength/power and protein metabolism markers, profile of mood state (POMS), and energy intake (EI)/energy expenditure (7 day food/activity records) were measured. Eumenorrheic athlete controls with normal menses (Eumen); n = 10) were measured at baseline. Multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate differences between groups and pre/post-intervention blocking on participants. Improvements in EI (+382 kcal/day; p = 0.12), EA (+417 kcal/day; p = 0.17) and energy balance (EB; +466 kcal/day; p = 0.14) were observed with the intervention but were not statistically significant. ExMD resumed menses (2.6 ± 2.2-months to first menses; 3.5 ± 1.9 cycles); one remaining anovulatory with menses. Female athletes with ExMD for >8 months took longer to resume menses/ovulation and had lower BMD (low spine (ExMD = 3; Eumen = 1); low hip (ExMD = 2)) than those with ExMD for <8 months; for 2 ExMD the intervention improved spinal BMD. POMS fatigue scores were 15% lower in ExMD vs. Eumen (p = 0.17); POMS depression scores improved by 8% in ExMD (p = 0.12). EI, EA, and EB were similar between groups, but the intervention (+360 kcal/day) improved energy status enough to reverse ExMD despite no statistically significant changes in EI. Similar baseline EA and EB between groups suggests that some ExMD athletes are more sensitive to EA and EB fluctuations. PMID:25090245

  14. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  15. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  16. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  17. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  18. Dietary Salba (Salvia hispanica L) seed rich in α-linolenic acid improves adipose tissue dysfunction and the altered skeletal muscle glucose and lipid metabolism in dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M E; Ferreira, M R; Chicco, A; Lombardo, Y B

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the effect of dietary Salba (chia) seed rich in n-3 α-linolenic acid on the morphological and metabolic aspects involved in adipose tissue dysfunction and the mechanisms underlying the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD). Rats were fed a SRD for 3 months. Thereafter, half the rats continued with SRD while in the other half, corn oil (CO) was replaced by chia seed for 3 months (SRD+chia). In control group, corn starch replaced sucrose. The replacement of CO by chia seed in the SRD reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, cell volume and size distribution, improved lipogenic enzyme activities, lipolysis and the anti-lipolytic action of insulin. In the skeletal muscle lipid storage, glucose phosphorylation and oxidation were normalized. Chia seed reversed the impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthase activity, glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate and GLUT-4 protein levels as well as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia.

  19. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Kentaro; Kume, Hiroaki; Oguma, Tetsuya; Shigemori, Wataru; Tohda, Yuji; Ogawa, Emiko; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs) play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM), a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM)-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors. PMID:27657061

  20. Determination of mass changes in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and evidence for agonist-stimulated metabolism of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, E R; Batty, I H; Challiss, R A; Barnes, P J; Nahorski, S R

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of muscarinic receptors in bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) causes a sustained increase in muscle tone, but a transient increase in the second messenger Ins(1,4,5)P3. To examine whether this brief increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 mass results from transient formation or is due to agonist-stimulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 metabolism, we have studied the relationship between mass changes in PtdIns(4,5)P2 and Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation, and changes in [3H]InsP3, [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP1 and [3H]PtdInsP2 in carbachol-stimulated myo-[3H]inositol-prelabelled BTSM slices. Carbachol (0.1 mM) caused a rapid transient increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 concentration (basal, 12.9 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg of protein; 5 s carbachol treatment, 27.1 +/- 1.5 pmol/mg of protein), with values returning to basal levels by 30 s, but a sustained accumulation of total [3H]InsP3s, with [3H]Ins(1,3,4)P3 being the predominant isomer present at later time points. In contrast, PtdIns(4,5)P2 mass, determined by radioreceptor assay of Ins(1,4,5)P3 in desalted alkaline hydrolysates of acidified chloroform/methanol tissue extracts, declined rapidly (basal, 941 +/- 22 pmol/mg of protein; 120 s carbachol, 365 +/- 22 pmol/mg of protein; t1/2 14 s) and remained at this new steady-state level for at least 20 min in the continued presence of carbachol. Addition of 10 microM-atropine 2 min after carbachol caused a prompt return of PtdIns(4,5)P2 concentration to prestimulated values (t1/2 210 s). Ongoing resynthesis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 after carbachol stimulation was demonstrated in [3H]inositol-labelled tissue by observing a persistent increase in the specific radioactivity of [3H]PtdInsP2, shown to be exclusively [3H]PtdIns(4,5)P2, over a 10 min period. These findings strongly suggest the occurrence of persistent receptor-mediated increases in PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis and Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation which, in conjunction with the transient accumulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 observed, provide evidence that regulation of the

  1. FTO Is Increased in Muscle During Type 2 Diabetes, and Its Overexpression in Myotubes Alters Insulin Signaling, Enhances Lipogenesis and ROS Production, and Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bravard, Amélie; Lefai, Etienne; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Pesenti, Sandra; Disse, Emmanuel; Vouillarmet, Julien; Peretti, Nöel; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Laville, Martine; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A strong association between genetic variants and obesity was found for the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO). However, few details are known concerning the expression and function of FTO in skeletal muscle of patients with metabolic diseases. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated basal FTO expression in skeletal muscle from obese nondiabetic subjects and type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, compared with age-matched control subjects, and its regulation in vivo by insulin, glucose, or rosiglitazone. The function of FTO was further studied in myotubes by overexpression experiments. RESULTS We found a significant increase of FTO mRNA and protein levels in muscle from type 2 diabetic patients, whereas its expression was unchanged in obese or type 1 diabetic patients. Moreover, insulin or glucose infusion during specific clamps did not regulate FTO expression in skeletal muscle from control or type 2 diabetic patients. Interestingly, rosiglitazone treatment improved insulin sensitivity and reduced FTO expression in muscle from type 2 diabetic patients. In myotubes, adenoviral FTO overexpression increased basal protein kinase B phosphorylation, enhanced lipogenesis and oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial oxidative function, a cluster of metabolic defects associated with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates increased FTO expression in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic patients, which can be normalized by thiazolidinedione treatment. Furthermore, in vitro data support a potential implication of FTO in oxidative metabolism, lipogenesis and oxidative stress in muscle, suggesting that it could be involved in the muscle defects that characterize type 2 diabetes. PMID:20943749

  2. The emergency airway.

    PubMed

    Goon, Serena S H; Stephens, Robert C M; Smith, Helen

    2009-12-01

    The 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario is a nightmare for all clinicians who manage airways. Cricothyroidotomy is one of several emergency airway management techniques. Cricothyroidotomy is a short-term solution which provides oxygenation, not ventilation, and is not a definitive airway. Although there are tests which can help predict whether an intubation will be difficult, they are not always good predictors. As the can't intubate, can't ventilate scenario is rare, cricothyroidotomy is an unfamiliar procedure to many. In this situation, expert help must be called for early on. In the meantime, it is vital that all other simple airway manoeuvres have been attempted, such as good positioning of the patient with head tilt and chin lift, and use of airway adjuncts like the oral (Guedel) airway or nasopharyngeal airway, and the laryngeal mask airway. However, if attempts to secure the airway are unsuccessful, there may be no other option than to perform a cricothyroidotomy. It is a difficult decision to make, but with increasing hypoxia, it is essential that one oxygenates the patient. Cricothyroidotomy provides an opening in the pace between the anterior inferior border of the thyroid cartilage and the anterior superior border of the cricoid cartilage, allowing access to the airway below the glottis. The anatomical considerations are important when performing this procedure (Ellis, 2009), and there are other scenarios when it is used. It is not without consequence, as with any procedure.

  3. Modeling Upper Airway Collapse by a Finite Element Model with Regional Tissue Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun; Brennick, Michael J.; Dougherty, Lawrence; Wootton, David M.

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a new computational system for modeling the upper airway in rats that combines tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with tissue material properties to predict three-dimensional (3D) airway motion. The model is capable of predicting airway wall and tissue deformation under airway pressure loading up to airway collapse. The model demonstrates that oropharynx collapse pressure depends primarily on ventral wall (tongue muscle) elastic modulus and airway architecture. An iterative approach that involves substituting alternative possible tissue elastic moduli was used to improve model precision. The proposed 3D model accounts for stress-strain relationships in the complex upper airway that should present new opportunities for understanding pathogenesis of airway collapse, improving diagnosis and developing treatments. PMID:19747871

  4. Viral bronchiolitis in young rats causes small airway lesions that correlate with reduced lung function.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, Ronald L; Szakaly, Renee J; Rosenthal, Louis A; Sullivan, Ruth; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Sun, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Viral illness with wheezing during infancy is associated with the inception of childhood asthma. Small airway dysfunction is a component of childhood asthma, but little is known about how viral illness at an early age may affect the structure and function of small airways. We used a well-characterized rat model of postbronchiolitis chronic airway dysfunction to address how postinfectious small airway lesions affect airway physiological function and if the structure/function correlates persist into maturity. Brown Norway rats were sham- or virus inoculated at 3 to 4 weeks of age and allowed to recover from the acute illness. At 3 to 14 months of age, physiology (respiratory system resistance, Newtonian resistance, tissue damping, and static lung volumes) was assessed in anesthetized, intubated rats. Serial lung sections revealed lesions in the terminal bronchioles that reduced luminal area and interrupted further branching, affecting 26% (range, 13-39%) of the small airways at 3 months of age and 22% (range, 6-40%) at 12 to 14 months of age. At 3 months of age (n = 29 virus; n = 7 sham), small airway lesions correlated with tissue damping (rs = 0.69) but not with Newtonian resistance (rs = 0.23), and Newtonian resistance was not elevated compared with control rats, indicating that distal airways were primarily responsible for the airflow obstruction. Older rats (n = 7 virus; n = 6 sham) had persistent small airway dysfunction and significantly increased Newtonian resistance in the postbronchiolitis group. We conclude that viral airway injury at an early age may induce small airway lesions that are associated quantitatively with small airway physiological dysfunction early on and that these defects persist into maturity.

  5. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  6. Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Richard B; Cohen, Mitchell; Gordon, Terry; Nadziejko, Christine; Zelikoff, Judith T; Sisco, Maureen; Regal, Jean F; Ménache, Margaret G

    2002-06-01

    Although acute exposure to ozone (03*) has been shown to influence the severity and prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, information has been lacking on effects due to long-term exposure at relatively low exposure concentrations. The goals of this study were to determine whether long-term repeated ozone exposures could induce nonspecific hyperresponsiveness in normal, nonatopic (nonsensitized) animals, whether such exposure could exacerbate the preexisting hyperresponsive state in atopic (sensitized) animals, or both. The study was also designed to determine whether gender modulated airway responsiveness related to ozone exposure. Airway responsiveness was measured during and after exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 ppm ozone for 4 hours/day, 4 days/week for 24 weeks in normal, nonsensitized guinea pigs, in guinea pigs sensitized to an allergen (ovalbumin) prior to initiation of ozone exposures, and in animals sensitized concurrently with ozone exposures. Both male and female animals were studied. Ozone exposure did not produce airway hyperresponsiveness in nonsensitized animals. Ozone exposure did exacerbate airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific bronchoprovocation in both groups of sensitized animals, and this effect persisted at least 4 weeks after the end of the exposures. Although the overall degree of airway responsiveness did differ between genders (males had more responsive airways than did females), the airway response to ozone exposure did not differ between the two groups. Ozone-induced effects upon airway responsiveness were not associated with the number of pulmonary eosinophils or with any chronic pulmonary inflammatory response. Levels of antigen-specific antibodies increased in sensitized animals, and a significant correlation was observed between airway responsiveness and antibody levels. The results of this study provide support for a role of ambient ozone exposure in exacerbation of airway dysfunction in persons with atopy.

  7. Airway contractility and remodeling: links to asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    West, Adrian R; Syyong, Harley T; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D; Murphy, Thomas M; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are initially responsible for ASM activation. However, the extent of narrowing of the airway lumen due to ASM shortening can be influenced by many factors and it remains a real challenge to decipher the exact role of ASM in causing asthmatic symptoms. Innovative tools, such as the forced oscillation technique, continue to develop and have been proven useful to assess some features of ASM function in vivo. Despite these technologic advances, it is still not clear whether excessive narrowing in asthma is driven by ASM abnormalities, by other alterations in non-muscle factors or simply because of the overexpression of spasmogens. This is because a multitude of forces are acting on the airway wall, and because not only are these forces constantly changing but they are also intricately interconnected. To counteract these limitations, investigators have utilized in vitro and ex vivo systems to assess and compare asthmatic and non-asthmatic ASM contractility. This review describes: 1- some muscle and non-muscle factors that are altered in asthma that may lead to airway narrowing and asthma symptoms; 2- some technologies such as the forced oscillation technique that have the potential to unveil the role of ASM in airway narrowing in vivo; and 3- some data from ex vivo and in vitro methods that probe the possibility that airway hyperresponsiveness is due to the altered environment surrounding the ASM or, alternatively, to a hypercontractile ASM phenotype that can be either innate or acquired.

  8. Recent advances in understanding inflammation and remodeling in the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Ward, Chris; Danial, Wan; Wood-Baker, Richard; Walters, Eugene Haydn

    2013-06-01

    The authors have reviewed the current literature on airway inflammation and remodeling in smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Detailed data on airway remodeling in COPD are especially sparse and how these changes lead to decline in lung function is not well understood. Small airway fibrosis and obliteration are likely to be the main contributors to physiological airway dysfunction and occur earlier than any subsequent development of emphysema. One potential mechanism contributing to small airway fibrosis/obliteration and change in extracellular matrix is epithelial-mesenchymal transition. When associated with angiogenesis (so-called epithelial-mesenchymal transition type 3) it may well also be the link with the development of cancer, which is closely associated with COPD, predominantly in large airways. The authors have focused on our recent publications in these areas. Further investigations teasing out these mechanisms will help improve our understanding of key airway disease processes in COPD, which may have major therapeutic implications.

  9. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  10. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  11. [A case of rupture of the left ventricle free wall with papillary muscle dysfunction following acute myocardial infarction, operated on successfully].

    PubMed

    de Lima, R; Perdigão, C; Neves, L; Cravino, J; Dantas, M; Bordalo, A; Pais, F; Diogo, A N; Ferreira, R; Ribeiro, C

    1990-09-01

    The authors present a case of left ventricular free wall rupture post acute myocardial infarction, associated with mitral papillary posterior muscle necrosis, operated by infartectomy and mitral valvular protesis replacement. They refer the various complications occurred during the hospital staying, and discuss its medical and surgical approach. The patient was discharged alive and six months after the infarction keeps a moderate activity. PMID:2257157

  12. [A case of rupture of the left ventricle free wall with papillary muscle dysfunction following acute myocardial infarction, operated on successfully].

    PubMed

    de Lima, R; Perdigão, C; Neves, L; Cravino, J; Dantas, M; Bordalo, A; Pais, F; Diogo, A N; Ferreira, R; Ribeiro, C

    1990-09-01

    The authors present a case of left ventricular free wall rupture post acute myocardial infarction, associated with mitral papillary posterior muscle necrosis, operated by infartectomy and mitral valvular protesis replacement. They refer the various complications occurred during the hospital staying, and discuss its medical and surgical approach. The patient was discharged alive and six months after the infarction keeps a moderate activity.

  13. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  14. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boentert, Matthias; Prigent, Hélène; Várdi, Katalin; Jones, Harrison N.; Mellies, Uwe; Simonds, Anita K.; Wenninger, Stephan; Barrot Cortés, Emilia; Confalonieri, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only). In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors’ own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease. PMID:27763517

  15. The relationship between early reversibility test and maximal inspiratory pressure in patients with airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Sevket; Dirican, Adem; Kaya, Sule Ozbay; Karanfil, Rabia C; Bayrak, Merve G; Bostancı, Ozgür; Ece, Ferah

    2014-01-01

    Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) is a marker for assessing the degree of respiratory muscle dysfunction. Muscle dysfunction represents a pathophysiological feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We aimed to determinate the MIP value in patients with airway obstruction, to evaluate the change in MIP with bronchodilator drug, and to show the relationship between the changes in MIP and disease characteristics. We evaluated 21 patients with airway obstruction at the Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Samsun Medicalpark Hospital, Samsun, Turkey. We performed pulmonary function tests, measurement of MIP values, and reversibility tests with salbutamol. The baseline spirometry results were: mean forced vital capacity (FVC), 3,017±1,020 mL and 75.8%±20.8%; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 1,892±701 mL and 59.2%±18.2%; FEV1/FVC, 62.9%±5.5%; peak expiratory flow, 53%±19%. The pre-bronchodilator MIP value was 62.1±36.9 cmH2O. The reversibility test was found to be positive in 61.9% of patients with salbutamol. The absolute change and percentage of change in FEV1 were 318±223 mL and 19.8%±16.7%, respectively. The MIP value was increased by 5.5 cmH2O (8.8%) and was 67.7±30.3 cmH2O after bronchodilation. There was no significant relationship between age, FEV1, reversibility, and change in MIP with bronchodilator. However, the increase in MIP with bronchodilator drug was higher in patients with low body mass index (<25 kg/m(2)). We noted a 13.1% increase in FVC, a 19.8% increase in FEV1, a 20.2% increase in peak expiratory flow, and an 8.8% increase in MIP with salbutamol. In conclusion; MIP increases with bronchodilator therapy, regardless of changes in lung function, in patients with airway obstruction. The reversibilty test can be used to evaluate change in MIP with salbutamol.

  16. Mitochondrial Transplantation Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Inhibition of Cholinergic Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Liping; Yu, Xiangyuan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yankai; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Tongfei; Li, Jiansha; Xia, Jingyan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholinergic activity has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness, and alternations of mitochondrial structure and function appear to be involved in many lung diseases including airway hyperresponsiveness. It is crucial to clarify the cause-effect association between mitochondrial dysfunction and cholinergic hyperactivity in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. Male SD rats and cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide administration; mitochondria isolated from airway epithelium were delivered into epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-induced cholinergic hyperactivity in vitro and the airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in vivo were reversed by the transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. The rescue effects of exogenous mitochondria were imitated by the elimination of excessive reactive oxygen species or blockage of muscarinic M3 receptor, but inhibited by M receptor enhancer. Mitochondrial transplantation effectively attenuates cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-stimulated airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of ROS-enhanced epithelial cholinergic hyperactivity. PMID:27279915

  17. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Robert A; Noordhoek, Roseanna

    2010-03-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon frequently encounters and manages difficult airways. Knowledge of and calm progression by practitioner and staff through different means to ventilate and manage a difficult airway are crucial. Practitioners should become comfortable with different types of alternative or rescue airways in order to intervene quickly in case of emergent or unanticipated airway compromise.

  18. Multiple exposures to swine barn air induce lung inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Janardhan, Kyathanahalli S; Townsend, Hugh G; Willson, Philip; Singh, Baljit

    2005-01-01

    Background Swine farmers repeatedly exposed to the barn air suffer from respiratory diseases. However the mechanisms of lung dysfunction following repeated exposures to the barn air are still largely unknown. Therefore, we tested a hypothesis in a rat model that multiple interrupted exposures to the barn air will cause chronic lung inflammation and decline in lung function. Methods Rats were exposed either to swine barn (8 hours/day for either one or five or 20 days) or ambient air. After the exposure periods, airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) to methacholine (Mch) was measured and rats were euthanized to collect bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), blood and lung tissues. Barn air was sampled to determine endotoxin levels and microbial load. Results The air in the barn used in this study had a very high concentration of endotoxin (15361.75 ± 7712.16 EU/m3). Rats exposed to barn air for one and five days showed increase in AHR compared to the 20-day exposed and controls. Lungs from the exposed groups were inflamed as indicated by recruitment of neutrophils in all three exposed groups and eosinophils and an increase in numbers of airway epithelial goblet cells in 5- and 20-day exposure groups. Rats exposed to the barn air for one day or 20 days had more total leukocytes in the BALF and 20-day exposed rats had more airway epithelial goblet cells compared to the controls and those subjected to 1 and 5 exposures (P < 0.05). Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in the lungs of rats exposed for 20 days contained germinal centers and mitotic cells suggesting activation. There were no differences in the airway smooth muscle cell volume or septal macrophage recruitment among the groups. Conclusion We conclude that multiple exposures to endotoxin-containing swine barn air induce AHR, increase in mucus-containing airway epithelial cells and lung inflammation. The data also show that prolonged multiple exposures may also induce adaptation in AHR response in the exposed

  19. Biomechanical properties of the human upper airway and their effect on its behavior during breathing and in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Bilston, Lynne E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2014-02-01

    The upper airway is a complex, multifunctional, dynamic neuromechanical system. Its patency during breathing requires moment-to-moment coordination of neural and mechanical behavior and varies with posture. Failure to continuously recruit and coordinate dilator muscles to counterbalance the forces that act to close the airway results in hypopneas or apneas. Repeated failures lead to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Obesity and anatomical variations, such as retrognathia, increase the likelihood of upper airway collapse by altering the passive mechanical behavior of the upper airway. This behavior depends on the mechanical properties of each upper airway tissue in isolation, their geometrical arrangements, and their physiological interactions. Recent measurements of respiratory-related deformation of the airway wall have shown that there are different patterns of airway soft tissue movement during the respiratory cycle. In OSA patients, airway dilation appears less coordinated compared with that in healthy subjects (matched for body mass index). Intrinsic mechanical properties of airway tissues are altered in OSA patients, but the factors underlying these changes have yet to be elucidated. How neural drive to the airway dilators relates to the biomechanical behavior of the upper airway (movement and stiffness) is still poorly understood. Recent studies have highlighted that the biomechanical behavior of the upper airway cannot be simply predicted from electromyographic activity (electromyogram) of its muscles. PMID:23823151

  20. [Gonadal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tahara, R; Toma, Y; Yanaihara, T

    1997-11-01

    Function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is an essential factor for the maintenance of regular cycles in mature women. The disturbance of function of those organs causes gonadal dysfunction such as anovulation, amenorrhea and menstrual disorders. Therefore, the correct diagnosis for the assessment of CNS and ovarian function is clinically important to treat the patients those who have an menstrual disorders. In this review, the mechanism of normal gonadal cycles and the diagnostic method and the treatment of gonadal dysfunction are described.

  1. Rapamycin decreases airway remodeling and hyperreactivity in a transgenic model of noninflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Hardie, William D; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Acciani, Thomas H; Pastura, Patricia A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and remodeling are cardinal features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New therapeutic targets are needed as some patients are refractory to current therapies and develop progressive airway remodeling and worsening AHR. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cellular proliferation and survival. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibits inflammation and AHR in allergic asthma models, but it is unclear if rapamycin can directly inhibit airway remodeling and AHR, or whether its therapeutic effects are entirely mediated through immunosuppression. To address this question, we utilized transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) transgenic mice null for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) (TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice). These mice develop airway smooth muscle thickening and AHR in the absence of altered lung inflammation, as previously reported. In this study, TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice lost body weight and developed severe AHR after 3 wk of lung-specific TGF-α induction. Rapamycin treatment prevented body weight loss, airway wall thickening, abnormal lung mechanics, and increases in airway resistance to methacholine after 3 wk of TGF-α induction. Increases in tissue damping and airway elastance were also attenuated in transgenic mice treated with rapamycin. TGF-α/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice on doxycycline for 8 wk developed severe airway remodeling. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and morphometric analysis showed that rapamycin treatment prevented airway smooth muscle thickening around small airways. Pentachrome staining, assessments of lung collagen and fibronectin mRNA levels, indicated that rapamycin also attenuated fibrotic pathways induced by TGF-α expression for 8 wk. Thus rapamycin reduced airway remodeling and AHR, demonstrating an important role for mTOR signaling in TGF-α-induced/EGF receptor-mediated reactive airway disease. PMID:21903885

  2. Rapamycin decreases airway remodeling and hyperreactivity in a transgenic model of noninflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Hardie, William D; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Acciani, Thomas H; Pastura, Patricia A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and remodeling are cardinal features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New therapeutic targets are needed as some patients are refractory to current therapies and develop progressive airway remodeling and worsening AHR. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cellular proliferation and survival. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibits inflammation and AHR in allergic asthma models, but it is unclear if rapamycin can directly inhibit airway remodeling and AHR, or whether its therapeutic effects are entirely mediated through immunosuppression. To address this question, we utilized transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) transgenic mice null for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) (TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice). These mice develop airway smooth muscle thickening and AHR in the absence of altered lung inflammation, as previously reported. In this study, TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice lost body weight and developed severe AHR after 3 wk of lung-specific TGF-α induction. Rapamycin treatment prevented body weight loss, airway wall thickening, abnormal lung mechanics, and increases in airway resistance to methacholine after 3 wk of TGF-α induction. Increases in tissue damping and airway elastance were also attenuated in transgenic mice treated with rapamycin. TGF-α/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice on doxycycline for 8 wk developed severe airway remodeling. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and morphometric analysis showed that rapamycin treatment prevented airway smooth muscle thickening around small airways. Pentachrome staining, assessments of lung collagen and fibronectin mRNA levels, indicated that rapamycin also attenuated fibrotic pathways induced by TGF-α expression for 8 wk. Thus rapamycin reduced airway remodeling and AHR, demonstrating an important role for mTOR signaling in TGF-α-induced/EGF receptor-mediated reactive airway disease.

  3. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  4. MOEBIUS SYNDROME: CHALLENGES OF AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Budić, Ivana; Šurdilović, Dušan; Slavković, Anđelka; Marjanović, Vesna; Stević, Marija; Simić, Dušica

    2016-03-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes. PMID:27276780

  5. Structure-Activity Relationship of Selected Meta- and Para-Hydroxylated Non–Dioxin Like Polychlorinated Biphenyls: From Single RyR1 Channels to Muscle Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.

    2013-01-01

    Non–dioxin like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL-PCBs) are legacy environmental contaminants with contemporary unintentional sources. NDL-PCBs interact with ryanodine receptors (RyRs), Ca2+ channels of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) that regulate excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) and Ca2+-dependent cell signaling in muscle. Activities of 4 chiral congeners PCB91, 95, 132, and 149 and their respective 4- and 5-hydroxy (-OH) derivatives toward rabbit skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) are investigated using [3H]ryanodine binding and SR Ca2+ flux analyses. Although 5-OH metabolites have comparable activity to their respective parent in both assays, 4-OH derivatives are unable to trigger Ca2+ release from SR microsomes in the presence of Ca2+-ATPase activity. PCB95 and derivatives are investigated using single channel voltage-clamp and primary murine embryonic muscle cells (myotubes). Like PCB95, 5-OH-PCB95 quickly and persistently increases channel open probability (p o > .9) by stabilizing the full-open channel state, whereas 4-OH-PCB95 transiently enhances p o. Ca2+ imaging of myotubes loaded with Fluo-4 show that acute exposure to PCB95 (5µM) potentiates ECC and caffeine responses and partially depletes SR Ca2+ stores. Exposure to 5-OH-PCB95 (5 µM) increases cytoplasmic Ca2+, leading to rapid ECC failure in 50% of myotubes with the remainder retaining negligible responses. 4-OH-PCB95 neither increases baseline Ca2+ nor causes ECC failure but depresses ECC and caffeine responses by 50%. With longer (3h) exposure to 300nM PCB95, 5-OH-PCB95, or 4-OH-PCB95 decreases the number of ECC responsive myotubes by 22%, 81%, and 51% compared with control by depleting SR Ca2+ and/or uncoupling ECC. NDL-PCBs and their 5-OH and 4-OH metabolites differentially influence RyR1 channel activity and ECC in embryonic skeletal muscle. PMID:24014653

  6. The VO(2)-on kinetics in constant load exercise sub-anaerobic threshold reflects endothelial function and dysfunction in muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Maione, D; Cicero, A Fg; Bacchelli, S; Cosentino, E R; Degli Esposti, D; Manners, D N; Rinaldi, E R; Rosticci, M; Senaldi, R; Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    2015-01-01

    To propose a test to evaluate endothelial function, based on VO(2) on-transition kinetics in sub-anaerobic threshold (AT) constant load exercise, we tested healthy subjects and patients with ischemic-hypertensive cardiopathy by two cardiopulmonary tests on a cycle ergometer endowed with an electric motor to overcome initial inertia: a pre-test and, after at least 24 h, one 6 min constant load exercise at 90 % AT. We measured net phase 3 VO(2)-on kinetics and, by phase 2 time constant (tau), valued endothelial dysfunction. We found shorter tau in repeated tests, shorter time between first and second test, by persisting endothelium-dependent arteriolar vasodilatation and/or several other mechanisms. Reducing load to 80 % and 90 % AT did not produce significant changes in tau of healthy volunteers, while in heart patients an AT load of 70 %, compared to 80 % AT, shortened tau (delta=4.38+/-1.65 s, p=0.013). In heart patients, no correlation was found between NYHA class, ejection fraction (EF), and the two variables derived from incremental cycle cardio-pulmonary exercise, as well as between EF and tau; while NYHA class groups were well correlated with tau duration (r=0.92, p=0.0001). Doxazosin and tadalafil also significantly reduced tau. In conclusion, the O(2) consumption kinetics during the on-transition of constant load exercise below the anaerobic threshold are highly sensitive to endothelial function in muscular microcirculation, and constitute a marker for the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Rehabilitation of the crippled larynx: application of the Tucker technique for muscle-nerve reinnervation.

    PubMed

    May, M; Lavorato, A S; Bleyaert, A L

    1980-01-01

    Interruption of laryngeal innervation may partially or totally impair respiration, deglutition and phonation--the three basic laryngeal functions. Tucker has developed a principle of muscle-nerve pedicle transfer for laryngeal reinnervation to relieve airway obstruction following bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. We have applied the principle of reinnervation proposed by Tucker to treat patients not only with airway obstruction, but also with aspiration and impaired phonation due to interruption of laryngeal innervation. There were 23 patients in this study. The functional defects included: voice alteration in 10 patients, airway obstruction in 8 and aspiration, as well as a voice change, in 5. The causes of injury were surgery in 9 patients, trauma in 5, tumor in 3, polio in 1 and a birth defect in 1 patient. No cause of nerve injury could be determined in 4 patients. The technique employed involved selective reinnervation of the laryngeal nerve branches to one or more laryngeal muscle groups; the muscle groups reinnervated were selected so as to overcome the functional defect of each particular patient. The patients have been followed for 6 mo. or longer. The results have been independently evaluated by a speech pathologist and documented by indirect and direct endoscopic observations, as well as by audio and audio-video recordings. In some cases, there was further documentation by cine-fluoro-audio tape recordings, laryngo-pharyngography, laryngeal tomography and pulmonary function studies. The muscle-pedicle transfer technique described by Tucker was found to be useful to correct laryngeal dysfunction in carefully selected cases.

  8. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  9. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future.

  10. Small airways involvement in coal mine dust lung disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Joshua; Stansbury, Robert C; Petsonk, Edward L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation of coal mine dust results in a spectrum of symptoms, dysfunction, and pathological changes in the respiratory tract that collectively have been labeled coal mine dust lung disease. Recent reports from periodic health surveillance among underground and surface coal miners in the United States have demonstrated an increasing prevalence and severity of dust diseases, and have also documented that some miners experience rapid disease progression. The coal macule is an inflammatory lesion associated with deposited dust, and occurs in the region of the most distal conducting airways and proximal respiratory bronchioles. Inflammatory changes in the small airways have long been recognized as the signature lung pathology among coal miners. Human and laboratory studies have suggested oxidant injury, and increased recruitment and activity of macrophages play important roles in dust-induced lung injury. However, the functional importance of the small airway changes was debated for many years. We reviewed published literature that documents a pervasive occurrence of both physiologic and structural abnormalities in small airways among coal miners and other workers exposed to airborne particulates. There is increasing evidence supporting an important association of abnormalities in the small peripheral airways with the development of respiratory symptoms, deficits in spirometry values, and accelerated declines in ventilatory lung function. Pathologic changes associated with mineral dust deposition in the small airways may be of particular importance in contemporary miners with rapidly progressive respiratory impairment.

  11. Deep dry needling of trigger points located in the lateral pterygoid muscle: Efficacy and safety of treatment for management of myofascial pain and temporomandibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Granados-Nunez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco-Javier; Lopez-Martos, Ricardo; Ruiz-Canela-Mendez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine whether deep dry needling (DDN) of trigger points (TPs) in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) would significantly reduce pain and improve function, compared with methocarbamol/paracetamol medication. Material and Methods Forty-eight patients with chronic myofascial pain located in the LPM were selected and randomly assigned to one of two groups (DDN test group, n=24; drug-treated control group, n=24). The test group received three applications of needling of the LPM once per week for three weeks, while control group patients were given two tablets of a methocarbamol/paracetamol combination every six hours for three weeks. Assessments were carried out pretreatment, 2 and 8 weeks after finishing the treatment. Results A statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was detected for both groups with respect to pain reduction at rest and with mastication, but the DDN test group had significantly better levels of pain reduction. Moreover, statistically significant differences (p<0.05) up to day 70 in the test group were seen with respect to maximum mouth opening, laterality and protrusion movements compared with pretreatment values. Pain reduction in the test group was greater as a function of pain intensity at baseline. The evaluation of efficacy as assessed both by patients/investigators was better for the test group. 41% of the patients receiving the combination drug treatment described unpleasant side effects (mostly drowsiness). Conclusions DDN of TPs in the LPM showed better efficacy in reducing pain and improving maximum mouth opening, laterality, and protrusion movements compared with methocarbamol/paracetamol treatment. No adverse events were observed with respect to DDN. Key words: Myofascial pain syndrome, myofascial trigger points, deep dry needling, lateral pterygoid muscle, randomized controlled trial, temporomandibular disorders. PMID:25662558

  12. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor as a key inducer of angiogenesis in the asthmatic airways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Norbert; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by structural airway changes, which are known as airway remodeling, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Vascular remodeling in asthmatic lungs results from increased angiogenesis, which is mainly mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF is a key regulator of blood vessel growth in the airways of asthma patients by promoting proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and inducing vascular leakage and permeability. In addition, VEGF induces allergic inflammation, enhances allergic sensitization, and has a role in Th2 type inflammatory responses. Specific inhibitors of VEGF and blockers of its receptors might be useful to control chronic airway inflammation and vascular remodeling, and might be a new therapeutic approach for chronic inflammatory airway disease like asthma.

  14. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  15. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  16. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  17. Airway statuses and nasopharyngeal airway use for airway obstruction in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Kouga, Takeshi; Tanoue, Koji; Matsui, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is associated with a high rate of respiratory difficulty, due mainly to midfacial hypoplasia. Nasopharyngeal airway establishment has been reported as the first-line approach to airway obstruction and may obviate the need for a highly invasive tracheotomy. No previous studies have compared airway obstruction status in syndromic craniosynostosis between cases requiring and not requiring airway managements. We focus on nasopharyngeal airway use and airway status outcomes to assess respiratory difficulty in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. A retrospective data analysis of 51 cases with syndromic craniosynostosis was carried out. We divided 30 of the 51 cases with lateral pharyngeal x-rays taken before operations affecting airway diameters into 2 groups, one with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and the other with one or both of these interventions, and the mean diameters for 8 indices related to the pharyngeal space were compared. Cases with respiratory difficulty due to nasopharyngeal stenosis and requiring airway managements comprised a significantly higher proportion of those with Pfeiffer syndrome than patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Comparative examination of lateral x-ray cephalometry between cases with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and cases with one or both revealed oropharyngeal diameters tended to be smaller in those with interventions. Cases requiring nasopharyngeal airway insertion were able to continue nasopharyngeal airway use for more than 1 year and a considerable number avoided tracheotomy. It may be worth considering an oropharyngeal-bypass nasopharyngeal airway before performing a tracheotomy. PMID:24820706

  18. Computed Tomography-Guided Tissue Engineering of Upper Airway Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan N.; Siebenlist, Nicholas J.; Cheetham, Jonathan; Ducharme, Norm G.; Rawlinson, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Normal laryngeal function has a large impact on quality of life, and dysfunction can be life threatening. In general, airway obstructions arise from a reduction in neuromuscular function or a decrease in mechanical stiffness of the structures of the upper airway. These reductions decrease the ability of the airway to resist inspiratory or expiratory pressures, causing laryngeal collapse. We propose to restore airway patency through methods that replace damaged tissue and improve the stiffness of airway structures. A number of recent studies have utilized image-guided approaches to create cell-seeded constructs that reproduce the shape and size of the tissue of interest with high geometric fidelity. The objective of the present study was to establish a tissue engineering approach to the creation of viable constructs that approximate the shape and size of equine airway structures, in particular the epiglottis. Computed tomography images were used to create three-dimensional computer models of the cartilaginous structures of the larynx. Anatomically shaped injection molds were created from the three-dimensional models and were seeded with bovine auricular chondrocytes that were suspended within alginate before static culture. Constructs were then cultured for approximately 4 weeks post-seeding and evaluated for biochemical content, biomechanical properties, and histologic architecture. Results showed that the three-dimensional molded constructs had the approximate size and shape of the equine epiglottis and that it is possible to seed such constructs while maintaining 75%+ cell viability. Extracellular matrix content was observed to increase with time in culture and was accompanied by an increase in the mechanical stiffness of the construct. If successful, such an approach may represent a significant improvement on the currently available treatments for damaged airway cartilage and may provide clinical options for replacement of damaged tissue during treatment of

  19. The effect of asthma on the perimeter of the airway basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliot, John G; Budgeon, Charley A; Harji, Salima; Jones, Robyn L; James, Alan L; Green, Francis H

    2015-11-15

    When comparing the pathology of airways in individuals with and without asthma, the perimeter of the basement membrane (Pbm) is used as a marker of airway size, as it is independent of airway smooth muscle shortening or airway collapse. The extent to which the Pbm is itself altered in asthma has not been quantified. The aim of this study was to compare the Pbm from the same anatomical sites in postmortem lungs from subjects with (n = 55) and without (n = 30) asthma (nonfatal or fatal). Large and small airways were systematically sampled at equidistant "levels" from the apical segment of the left upper lobes and anterior and basal segments of the left lower lobes of lungs fixed in inflation. The length of the Pbm was estimated from cross sections of airway at each relative level. Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationships between Pbm and sex, age, height, smoking status, airway level, and asthma group. The final model showed significant interactions between Pbm and airway level in small (<3 mm) airways, in subjects having asthma (P < 0.0001), and by sex (P < 0.0001). No significant interactions for Pbm between asthma groups were observed for larger airways (equivalent to a diameter of ∼3 mm and greater) or smoking status. Asthma is not associated with remodeling of the Pbm in large airways. In medium and small airways, the decrease in Pbm in asthma (≤20%) would not account for the published differences in wall area or area of smooth muscle observed in cases of severe asthma.

  20. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  1. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  2. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  3. Compliance Measurements of the Upper Airway in Pediatric Down Syndrome Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J; Shott, Sally R; Amin, Raouf S; Gutmark, Ephraim J

    2016-04-01

    Compliance of soft tissue and muscle supporting the upper airway are two of several factors contributing to pharyngeal airway collapse. We present a novel, minimally invasive method of estimating regional variations in pharyngeal elasticity. Magnetic resonance images for pediatric sleep apnea patients with Down syndrome [9.5 ± 4.3 years (mean age ± standard deviation)] were analyzed to segment airways corresponding to baseline (no mask pressure) and two positive pressures. A three dimensional map was created to evaluate axial and circumferential variation in radial displacements of the airway, dilated by the positive pressures. The displacements were then normalized with respect to the appropriate transmural pressure and radius of an equivalent circle to obtain a measure of airway compliance. The resulting elasticity maps indicated the least and most compliant regions of the pharynx. Airway stiffness of the most compliant region [403 ± 204 (mean ± standard deviation) Pa] decreased with severity of obstructive sleep apnea. The non-linear response of the airway wall to continuous positive airway pressure was patient specific and varied between anatomical locations. We identified two distinct elasticity phenotypes. Patient phenotyping based on airway elasticity can potentially assist clinical practitioners in decision making on the treatments needed to improve airway patency.

  4. Airway Defense Control Mediated via Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Kocmalova, M; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Banovcin, P; Sutovska, M

    2016-01-01

    Expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) takes place in the airways and the role of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 in the control of airway's defense reflexes has been confirmed. The activation of Nav channels is crucial for cough initiation and airway smooth muscle reactivity, but it is unknown whether these channels regulate ciliary beating. This study evaluated the involvement of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 channels in the airway defense mechanisms using their pharmacological blockers in healthy guinea pigs and in the experimental allergic asthma model. Asthma was modeled by ovalbumin sensitization over a period of 21 days. Blockade of Nav1.7 channels significantly decreased airway smooth muscle reactivity in vivo, the number of cough efforts, and the cilia beat frequency in healthy animals. In the allergic asthma model, blockade of Nav1.8 efficiently relieved symptoms of asthma, without adversely affecting cilia beat frequency. The study demonstrates that Nav1.8 channel antagonism has a potential to alleviate cough and bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma. PMID:27161110

  5. New insights into upper airway innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Protecting the upper airway from microbial infection is an important function of the immune system. Proper detection of these pathogens is paramount for sinonasal epithelial cells to be able to prepare a defensive response. Toll-like receptors and, more recently, bitter taste receptors and sweet taste receptors have been implicated as sensors able to detect the presence of these pathogens and certain compounds that they secrete. Activation of these receptors also triggers innate immune responses to prevent or counteract infection, including mucociliary clearance and the production and secretion of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., defensins). Objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the upper airway, the mechanisms by which it is carried out, and its clinical relevance. Methods: A literature review of the existing knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the human sinonasal cavity was performed. Results: Clinical and basic science studies have shown that the physical epithelial cell barrier, mucociliary clearance, and antimicrobial compound secretion play pivotal innate immune roles in defending the sinonasal cavity from infection. Clinical findings have also linked dysfunction of these defense mechanisms with diseases, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. Recent discoveries have elucidated the significance of bitter and sweet taste receptors in modulating immune responses in the upper airway. Conclusion: Numerous innate immune mechanisms seem to work in a concerted fashion to keep the sinonasal cavity free of infection. Understanding sinonasal innate immune function and dysfunction in health and disease has important implications for patients with respiratory ailments, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis.

  6. New insights into upper airway innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Protecting the upper airway from microbial infection is an important function of the immune system. Proper detection of these pathogens is paramount for sinonasal epithelial cells to be able to prepare a defensive response. Toll-like receptors and, more recently, bitter taste receptors and sweet taste receptors have been implicated as sensors able to detect the presence of these pathogens and certain compounds that they secrete. Activation of these receptors also triggers innate immune responses to prevent or counteract infection, including mucociliary clearance and the production and secretion of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., defensins). Objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the upper airway, the mechanisms by which it is carried out, and its clinical relevance. Methods: A literature review of the existing knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the human sinonasal cavity was performed. Results: Clinical and basic science studies have shown that the physical epithelial cell barrier, mucociliary clearance, and antimicrobial compound secretion play pivotal innate immune roles in defending the sinonasal cavity from infection. Clinical findings have also linked dysfunction of these defense mechanisms with diseases, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. Recent discoveries have elucidated the significance of bitter and sweet taste receptors in modulating immune responses in the upper airway. Conclusion: Numerous innate immune mechanisms seem to work in a concerted fashion to keep the sinonasal cavity free of infection. Understanding sinonasal innate immune function and dysfunction in health and disease has important implications for patients with respiratory ailments, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27657896

  7. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  8. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Boyer, Laurent; Taillé, Camille; Delclaux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93) and after (n = 78) methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw), reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3), an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20). Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66) and Slope3 (SC = 0.35). By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8) but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways. PMID:26599006

  9. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Boyer, Laurent; Taillé, Camille; Delclaux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93) and after (n = 78) methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw), reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3), an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20). Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66) and Slope3 (SC = 0.35). By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8) but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways.

  10. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure

    PubMed Central

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Boyer, Laurent; Taillé, Camille; Delclaux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93) and after (n = 78) methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw), reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3), an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20). Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66) and Slope3 (SC = 0.35). By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8) but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways. PMID:26599006

  11. Endothelins & erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Robert; Sullivan, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common and a significant contributor to poor quality of life and psychosocial morbidity in men. Normal erectile function requires effective co-ordination between a number of complex neural pathways. Penile tumescence occurs in response to rapid arterial inflow to the corpora cavernosa with simultaneous venous outflow restriction due to expansion of the lacunar spaces. This process is under both central and local neuromediation. Endothelins are potent vasoconstrictor peptides that cause strong, slowly developing but sustained contraction of trabecular smooth muscles cells of the corpora cavernosa. Multiple mechanisms of action are proposed, including transmembrane calcium flux, mobilisation of inositol triphosphate sensitive intracellular calcium stores and calcium sensitisation through the Rho-Rho kinase pathway. The exact role of endothelins in the pathogenesis of ED currently remains unclear. Elevated endothelin-1 levels are found in patients with diabetes mellitus and this alone may be sufficient to cause ED. However, this is not borne out in clinical studies. The resultant elevated intracellular calcium may, however, modulate gene expression sufficiently to cause smooth muscle proliferation. Alternatively, alterations in endothelin receptor sensitivity in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension may enhance vasoconstrictor processes. Currently there is contradictory evidence for the role of endothelin receptor antagonists in ED. Animals studies suggest they inhibit corporal vasoconstriction, improve erectile function and protect against diabetes-induced smooth muscle apoptosis. However, the results of clinical studies in ED have been less promising. Uncertainty regarding the exact role of endothelin in penile erection hampers progress in this area. It is possible that the endothelin system may only be relevant to ED in certain conditions where global endothelial dysfunction exists (e.g. diabetes mellitus, systemic sclerosis) and

  12. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry.

  13. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction.

  14. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization. PMID:25410225

  15. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  16. Review of the upper airway, including olfaction, as mediator of symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Shusterman, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The upper airway serves as air conditioner, filter, and warning device. Two neurological modalities, olfaction and trigeminal chemoreception, inform us of the chemical qualities of the air we breathe. A number of poorly understood conditions, including nonallergic rhinitis, irritant-induced rhinitis, odor-triggered asthma, odor-triggered panic attacks, chemical-induced olfactory dysfunction, and irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction, involve induction of symptoms by odorant and/or irritant chemicals in the upper airway. This article is a summary of the knowledge and theories about these various conditions, and highlights those aspects of nasal anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology relevant to their understanding. PMID:12194901

  17. TRP channels and temperature in airway disease-clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Temperatures above and below what is generally regarded as "comfortable" for the human being have long been known to induce various airway symptoms, especially in combination with exercise in cold climate with temperatures below 0°C, which is naturally since exercise is followed by enhanced ventilation and thus greater amounts of inhaled cold air. The aim was to highlight the knowledge we have today on symptoms from the airways (here also including the eyes) arisen from various temperatures; the mechanisms, the pathophysiology and their clinical significance. The most common eye and airway conditions related to temperature changes are dry eye disease, rhinitis, laryngeal dysfunction, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic cough. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are probably involved in all temperature induced airway symptoms but via different pathways, which are now beginning to be mapped out. In asthma, the most persuasive hypothesis today is that cold-induced asthmatic bronchoconstriction is induced by dehydration of the airway mucosa, from which it follows that provocations with osmotic stimuli like hypertonic saline and mannitol can be used as a surrogate for exercise provocation as well as dry air inhalation. In chronic unexplained cough there seems to be a direct influence of cold air on the TRP ion channels followed by coughing and increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin. Revelations in the last decades of the ability of several airway TRP ion channels to sense and react to ambient air temperature have opened new windows for the understanding of the pathogenesis in a diversity of airway reactions appearing in many common respiratory diseases. PMID:27227021

  18. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  19. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  20. Orthogonal arrays in normal and injured respiratory airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E

    1985-02-01

    Orthogonal arrays are found on plasma membranes of glial cells, in the central nervous system, on muscle plasma membranes at neuromuscular junctions, and on a variety of epithelial cells. These structures have been correlated with ion flux. With the aid of freeze fracture technique, orthogonal particle arrays were found on plasma membranes on airway epithelial cells of rats and hamsters. They have been found in abundance at the base of secretory cells throughout normal airway epithelium. These structures were found to increase in number during regeneration in response to injury and they were found in great numbers on plasma membranes of all airway cells in response to acute and chronic NO2 exposure. The lateral and basal plasma membranes of the respiratory epithelium are a new source for studying orthogonal arrays. The normal number and distribution of these arrays can be perturbed in response to mechanical and chemical injury. PMID:3968185

  1. Managing upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Innes, M H

    A complete respiratory obstruction can lead to death in 3 minutes. The first and constant duty of the nurse aider is to check that the person is breathing by looking, listening and feeling. Partial obstruction is no less serious than complete obstruction. The nurse aider, in any situation, should assess the problem and attempt to overcome the airway obstruction using the measures described. PMID:1490067

  2. Airway gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jane C; Alton, Eric W F W

    2005-01-01

    Given both the accessibility and the genetic basis of several pulmonary diseases, the lungs and airways initially seemed ideal candidates for gene therapy. Several routes of access are available, many of which have been refined and optimized for nongene drug delivery. Two respiratory diseases, cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency, are relatively common; the single gene responsible has been identified and current treatment strategies are not curative. This type of inherited disease was the obvious initial target for gene therapy, but it has become clear that nongenetic and acquired diseases, including cancer, may also be amenable to this approach. The majority of preclinical and clinical studies in the airway have involved viral vectors, although for diseases such as CF, likely to require repeated application, non-viral delivery systems have clear advantages. However, with both approaches a range of barriers to gene expression have been identified that are limiting success in the airway and alveolar region. This chapter reviews these issues, strategies aimed at overcoming them, and progress into clinical trials with non-viral vectors in a variety of pulmonary diseases.

  3. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  4. Causes of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway.

  5. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  6. Difficult Airway Due to an Undiagnosed Subglottic Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Kohji; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Kunitaro; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-04-01

    The "cannot ventilate, cannot intubate" scenario during anesthesia induction can be lethal. We present a patient with an undiagnosed subglottic tumor who developed the "cannot ventilate, cannot intubate" situation after induction of general anesthesia, due to the presence of an undiagnosed subglottic tumor. A 93-year-old woman was brought to the operating room for repair of a femoral neck fracture. Both ventilation and intubation could not be accomplished, and the patient was awakened without complications after trials of maintaining the airway. In order to reverse muscle relaxation, sugammadex was useful to allow resumption of spontaneous breathing. A difficult airway can be caused by an undiagnosed subglottic tumor. Subglottic tumors can be misdiagnosed as asthma, because the clinical presentation can be very similar. If cricothyrotomy had been performed based on airway management algorithms, the airway may not have been controlled with a possibly fatal outcome. Ultrasound examination of the trachea may be useful to diagnose obstructive lesions in the airway. PMID:27082606

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: The Role of Upper Airway and Facial Skeletal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Sanchez, Ruston; King, Timothy W

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea represents a large burden of disease to the general population and may compromise patient quality of life; workplace and automotive safety; and metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurocognitive health. The disease is characterized by repetitive cycles of upper airway collapse resulting from a lack of pharyngeal airway structural support and loss of muscle tone among upper airway dilators. Polysomnography serves as the gold standard for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea and the apnea-hypopnea index is the most commonly used metric for quantifying disease severity. Conservative treatments include lifestyle modification, continuous positive airway pressure treatment, and dental appliance therapy. Surgical treatment options include pharyngeal and facial skeletal surgery. Maxillomandibular advancement has been shown to be the most effective surgical approach for multilevel expansion of the upper airway and may significantly reduce an obstructive sleep apnea patient's apnea-hypopnea index. Patient age, obesity, and the degree of maxillary advancement may be key factors contributing to treatment success. PMID:27673521

  8. CGRP induction in cystic fibrosis airways alters the submucosal gland progenitor cell niche in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weiliang; Fisher, John T.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Luo, Meihui; Evans, Turan I.A.; Neff, Traci L.; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Yulong; Ou, Yi; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Russo, Andrew F.; Goodheart, Michael J.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.; Liu, Xiaoming; Engelhardt, John F.

    2011-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a lack of functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels causes defective secretion by submucosal glands (SMGs), leading to persistent bacterial infection that damages airways and necessitates tissue repair. SMGs are also important niches for slow-cycling progenitor cells (SCPCs) in the proximal airways, which may be involved in disease-related airway repair. Here, we report that calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) activates CFTR-dependent SMG secretions and that this signaling pathway is hyperactivated in CF human, pig, ferret, and mouse SMGs. Since CGRP-expressing neuroendocrine cells reside in bronchiolar SCPC niches, we hypothesized that the glandular SCPC niche may be dysfunctional in CF. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR-deficient mice failed to maintain glandular SCPCs following airway injury. In wild-type mice, CGRP levels increased following airway injury and functioned as an injury-induced mitogen that stimulated SMG progenitor cell proliferation in vivo and altered the proliferative potential of airway progenitors in vitro. Components of the receptor for CGRP (RAMP1 and CLR) were expressed in a very small subset of SCPCs, suggesting that CGRP indirectly stimulates SCPC proliferation in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These findings demonstrate that CGRP-dependent pathways for CFTR activation are abnormally upregulated in CF SMGs and that this sustained mitogenic signal alters properties of the SMG progenitor cell niche in CF airways. This discovery may have important implications for injury/repair mechanisms in the CF airway. PMID:21765217

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  11. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulates the development of airway remodeling in patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyun Jung; Park, Dong Won; Seo, Ji-Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Tae Hyung; Sohn, Jang Won; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoon, Ho Joo; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang-Heon

    2015-12-11

    Airway remodeling is a key characteristic of chronic asthma, particularly in patients with a fixed airflow limitation. The mechanisms underlying airway remodeling are poorly understood, and no therapeutic option is available. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and smooth muscle hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in airway remodeling in patients with asthma. Wnt7a mRNA expression was prominent in induced sputum from patients with asthma compared with that from healthy controls. Next, we induced a chronic asthma mouse model with airway remodeling features, including subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia. Higher expression of Wnt family proteins and β-catenin was detected in the lung tissue of mice with chronic asthma compared to control mice. Blocking β-catenin expression with a specific siRNA attenuated airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Decreased subepithelial fibrosis and collagen accumulation in the β-catenin siRNA-treated mice was accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor-β. We further showed that suppressing β-catenin in the chronic asthma model inhibited smooth muscle hyperplasia by downregulating the tenascin C/platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is highly expressed and regulates the development of airway remodeling in chronic asthma.

  12. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulates the development of airway remodeling in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun Jung; Park, Dong Won; Seo, Ji-Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Tae Hyung; Sohn, Jang Won; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoon, Ho Joo; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a key characteristic of chronic asthma, particularly in patients with a fixed airflow limitation. The mechanisms underlying airway remodeling are poorly understood, and no therapeutic option is available. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and smooth muscle hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in airway remodeling in patients with asthma. Wnt7a mRNA expression was prominent in induced sputum from patients with asthma compared with that from healthy controls. Next, we induced a chronic asthma mouse model with airway remodeling features, including subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia. Higher expression of Wnt family proteins and β-catenin was detected in the lung tissue of mice with chronic asthma compared to control mice. Blocking β-catenin expression with a specific siRNA attenuated airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Decreased subepithelial fibrosis and collagen accumulation in the β-catenin siRNA-treated mice was accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor-β. We further showed that suppressing β-catenin in the chronic asthma model inhibited smooth muscle hyperplasia by downregulating the tenascin C/platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is highly expressed and regulates the development of airway remodeling in chronic asthma. PMID:26655831

  13. Ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness: roles of ROCK isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lambert, James A; Song, Weifeng

    2015-12-15

    Acute ozone (O3) inhalation has been shown to cause airway and pulmonary epithelial injury with accompanying inflammation responses. Robust evidence exists that O3 induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in humans and in animal models. Several pathways exist that culminate in airway smooth muscle contraction, but the mechanism(s) by which O3 elicits AHR are unclear. Here, we review the recent report by Kasahara et al. (Kasahara DI, Mathews JA, Park CY, Cho Y, Hunt G, Wurmbrand AP, Liao JK, Shore SA. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 309: L736-L746, 2015.) describing the role of two Rho kinase (ROCK) isoforms in O3-induced AHR utilizing a murine haploinsufficiency model. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, the authors report that ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice exhibited significantly reduced AHR following acute exposure to O3. Additionally, WT mice treated with fasudil, an FDA-approved ROCK1/2 inhibitor, recapitulated reduction in AHR as seen in ROCK haplotypes. It was suggested that, although the two ROCK isoforms are both induced by Rho, they have different mechanisms by which they mediate O3-induced AHR: ROCK1 via hyaluronan signaling vs. ROCK2 acting downstream of inflammation at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction. These observations provide an important framework to develop novel ROCK-targeting therapies for acute O3-induced AHR.

  14. Difficult airway in a patient with Marshall-Smith syndrome.

    PubMed

    Antila, H; Laitio, T; Aantaa, R; Silvoniemi, P; Pakkanen, A

    1998-01-01

    Marshall-Smith syndrome is a rare clinical disorder characterized by accelerated bone maturation, dysmorphic facial features, airway abnormalities and death in early infancy because of respiratory complications. Although patients with Marshall-Smith syndrome have several features with potential anaesthetic problems, previous reports about anaesthetic management of these patients do not exist. We present a case, in which severe hypoxia developed rapidly after routine anaesthesia induction in an eight-month-old male infant with this syndrome. After several unsuccessful attempts the airway was finally secured by blind oral intubation. After 2 weeks, laryngeal anatomy was examined with fibreoptic laryngoscopy which revealed significant laryngomalacia. Laryngoscopy was performed without problems with ketamine anaesthesia and spontaneous breathing. The possibility of a compromised airway should always be borne in mind when anaesthetizing patients with Marshall-Smith syndrome. Anaesthesia maintaining spontaneous breathing is safest for children with this syndrome. If tracheal intubation or muscle relaxation is required, precautions are needed to maintain a patent airway. Muscle relaxants should possibly be avoided before intubation.

  15. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  16. Expression and function of a novel variant of estrogen receptor-α36 in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuping; Zhang, Xintian; He, David Z Z; Segal, Manav; Berro, Abdo; Gerson, Trevor; Wang, Zhaoyi; Casale, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen signaling is involved in sex differences in the prevalence rates and control of asthma, but the expression patterns of estrogen receptor variants and estrogen function in the lung are not well established. We investigated the expression of major estrogen receptor variants occurring naturally and after the development of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic asthma, along with the role of estrogen signaling in small-airway ciliary motion and smooth muscle contraction. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin, and estrogen receptor expression patterns were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Time-lapse video and photodiode-based displacement measurement systems were used to assess the effects of estrogen signaling on airway ciliary beat frequency and smooth muscle contraction. We found that a novel variant of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-α36, is expressed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. ER-α36 was predominately localized on the plasma membranes of airway cells. After sensitization to allergen, the expression levels of ER-α36 increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of ER-β and ER-α66 did not significantly change. Estrogen treatment in vitro resulted in a rapid increase in airway cilia motion in a dose-dependent fashion, but did not exert any effect on airway smooth muscle contraction. We speculate that the up-regulation of estrogen receptor expression associated with allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may constitute a protective mechanism to facilitate the clearance of mucus. The identification and localization of specific estrogen receptor subtypes in the lung could lead to newer therapeutic avenues aimed at addressing sex differences of asthma susceptibility. PMID:21642591

  17. Cardiovascular and airway relaxant activities of peony root extract.

    PubMed

    Ghayur, Muhammad N; Gilani, Anwarul H; Rasheed, Huma; Khan, Abdullah; Iqbal, Zafar; Ismail, Muhammad; Saeed, Sheikh A; Janssen, Luke J

    2008-11-01

    Paeonia emodi (peony) is a well known plant used medicinally to treat hypertension, palpitations, and asthma. Despite its popularity, there are few reports in the scientific literature examining its use in such conditions. We prepared a 70% ethanolic extract of peony root (Pe.Cr) and applied it to segments of guinea pig atria and trachea and rat aorta suspended separately in tissue baths. Activity against arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation was measured in human platelet-rich plasma. Airway relaxant effect was evaluated against acetylcholine (ACh)-induced airway contraction in mouse lung slices loaded with fluo-4. Pe.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) showed an atropine-resistant negative inotropic effect in atria. In rat aorta, an endothelium-independent vasodilatory effect (0.3-10 mg/mL) was seen in phenylephrine- and high-K+-induced contractions. Pe.Cr (0.01-1 mg/mL) also inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation. In isolated trachea, Pe.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) relaxed carbachol- and histamine-induced contractions independently of beta-adrenergic receptors. In mouse lung slices, Pe.Cr (0.3-1 mg/mL) inhibited ACh-induced airway narrowing and oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ in airway smooth muscle cells. The results showed cardiosuppressant, vasodilatory, antiplatelet, and tracheal and airway relaxant activities of peony, providing potential justification for its medicinal use in different hyperactive cardiovascular and respiratory disorders.

  18. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann, M.; Eckert, D.J.; Chamberlin, N.L.; Jordan, A.S.; Zaremba, S.; Smith, S.; Rosow, C.; Malhotra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (Pcrit). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO2 concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and Pcrit was unaffected (pentobarbital mean±sd -11.7±4.5 versus placebo -10.25±3.6 cmH2O; p=0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297±63s versus 232±67 s; p<0.05), at which time phasic genioglossus EMG was higher (6.2±4.8% maximal versus 3.1±3%; p<0.05) as were CO2 levels. The increase in genioglossus EMG after CO2 administration was greater after pentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep. PMID:20032012

  19. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep.

    PubMed

    Eikermann, M; Eckert, D J; Chamberlin, N L; Jordan, A S; Zaremba, S; Smith, S; Rosow, C; Malhotra, A

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (P(crit)). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO(2) concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and P(crit) was unaffected (pentobarbital mean ± SD -11.7 ± 4.5 versus placebo -10.25 ± 3.6 cmH(2)O; p = 0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297 ± 63s versus 232 ± 67 s; p<0.05), at which time phasic genioglossus EMG was higher (6.2 ± 4.8% maximal versus 3.1 ± 3%; p<0.05) as were CO(2) levels. The increase in genioglossus EMG after CO(2) administration was greater after pentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep.

  20. Airway Injury from Initiating Ventilation in Preterm Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Pillow, J. Jane; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Nitsos, Ilias; Jobe, Alan H.

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants exposed to ventilation are at risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and persistent lung disease in childhood. We report where injury occurred within the lung following brief ventilation at birth. Preterm sheep (129d gestation) were ventilated with an escalating VT to 15mL/kg by 15 min to injure the lungs, with the placental circulation intact (Fetal) or after delivery (Newborn). Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for 2h 45min, while Newborn lambs were maintained with gentle ventilatory support for the same period. The control group was not ventilated. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were analysed. In both Fetal and Newborn lambs, ventilation caused bronchial epithelial disruption in medium-sized airways. Egr-1, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1β mRNA increased in lung tissue from Fetal and Newborn lambs. Egr-1, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNA were induced in mesenchymal cells surrounding small airways, whereas IL-1β mRNA localized to the epithelium of medium/small airways. Ventilation caused loss of HSP70 mRNA from the bronchial epithelium, but induced mRNA in smooth muscle surrounding large airways. HSP70 protein decreased in lung tissue and increased in BALF with ventilation. Initiation of ventilation induced a stress response and inflammatory cytokines in small and medium-sized airways. PMID:19816239

  1. A difficult airway in a patient with nephrogenic sclerosing fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gist, Richard S; Miller, David W; Warren, Ty

    2010-02-01

    Nephrogenic sclerosing fibrosis (dermopathy) is a relatively rare complication of long-term renal dialysis. The syndrome includes marked thickening of the skin and diffuse fibrosis of fascia, muscle, heart, and lungs, leading to contractures of the joints and limbs and cardiopulmonary compromise. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman who required emergent intubation because of respiratory compromise, and who had had normal airway examinations and intubations before the onset of nephrogenic sclerosing fibrosis symptoms.

  2. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  3. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  4. The mechanics of airway closure.

    PubMed

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2008-11-30

    We describe how surface-tension-driven instabilities of the lung's liquid lining may lead to pulmonary airway closure via the formation of liquid bridges that occlude the airway lumen. Using simple theoretical models, we demonstrate that this process may occur via a purely fluid-mechanical "film collapse" or through a coupled, fluid-elastic "compliant collapse" mechanism. Both mechanisms can lead to airway closure in times comparable with the breathing cycle, suggesting that surface tension is the primary mechanical effect responsible for the closure observed in peripheral regions of the human lungs. We conclude by discussing the influence of additional effects not included in the simple models, such as gravity, the presence of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory flow and wall motion, the airways' geometry, and the mechanical structure of the airway walls. PMID:18595784

  5. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  6. Impact of different orthodontic treatment modalities on Airway: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Qahtani, Nasser D. Al

    2016-01-01

    This review focused on airway dysfunctions and orthodontic treatment modalities. A systematic search of the dental literature was performed using PubMed and Web of Science library database. Different combinations of search terms related to airway and orthodontic treatment were used. Any Non-English articles were excluded. Among titles found, abstract and full articles were reviewed. References from all the relevant articles were hand-searched to include more articles. Forty articles which were found relevant were included in the review. Surgical, orthopedic and fixed appliance therapy has been advocated by clinicians to treat patients with airway dysfunctions. These treatment modalities differ from patient to patient and have to be considered based on lot of criterion. The reviewed studies were not convincing in providing information about the orthodontic treatment modalities; further research regarding the same could be encouraging. PMID:27022385

  7. Morphometric changes during the early airway response to allergen challenge in the rat.

    PubMed

    Du, T; Xu, L J; Lei, M; Wang, N S; Eidelman, D H; Ghezzo, H; Martin, J G

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of airway wall edema and smooth muscle contraction to the early response (ER) of allergic bronchoconstriction. Brown Norway rats, 6 to 7 wk old, were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA). Anesthetized rats were challenged with either OA or saline 2 wk later. Pulmonary resistance (RL) was measured every minute until either it increased to 150% of the baseline, defined as a significant ER, or until 15 min elapsed. Eight OA-challenged test rats with a significant ER and eight saline-challenged control rats were used for morphometric studies. The lungs were quick-frozen with liquid nitrogen, processed with freeze substitution, and sagittal sections (5 microns) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The airway lumen subtended by the epithelial basement membrane (LuB) and cross sectional airway wall area (AW) of all airways were measured by camera lucida and digitization. The LuB and AW of each airway was standardized for size by dividing by the ideal airway lumen (LuBideal), which was calculated from the length of basement membrane, assuming a perfect circle in the unconstricted state. The cumulative frequency distribution of the LuB/LuBideal for the airways from test rats was shifted to the left compared with the control rats (p less than 0.01), indicating airway narrowing after challenge. Airway narrowing increased as a function of airway size. Cumulative frequency distributions of AW/LuBideal showed that there was a significant increase in the wall thickness of only the small airways of test animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1416393

  8. [Anaesthesia for patients with obstructive airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Groeben, H; Keller, V; Silvanus, M T

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive lung diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive lung diseases have a high prevalence and are one of the four most frequent causes of death. Obstructive lung diseases can be significantly influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques and anesthetic agents. Basically, the severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity will determine the perioperative anesthetic risk. This risk has to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation and will give the rationale on which to decide for the adequate anaesthetic technique. In particular, airway instrumentation can cause severe reflex bronchoconstriction. The use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia can help to avoid airway irritation and leads to reduced postoperative complications. Prophylactic antiobstructive treatment, volatile anesthetics, propofol, opioids, and an adequate choice of muscle relaxants minimize the anesthetic risk, when general anesthesia is required In case, despite all precautions intra-operative bronchospasm occurs, deepening of anaesthesia, repeated administration of beta2-adrenergic agents and parasympatholytics, and a single systemic dose of corticosteroids represent the main treatment options. PMID:24749300

  9. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Bradley W.; Brucker, Robert M.; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E.; Bordenstein, Seth R.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR−/−) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR−/− mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR−/− mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  10. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Bradley W; Brucker, Robert M; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E; Bordenstein, Seth R; Blackwell, Timothy S; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR(-/-)) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR(-/-) mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR(-/-) mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  11. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  12. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  13. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  14. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  15. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  16. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  17. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  18. Chronic exposure to high levels of particulate air pollution and small airway remodeling.

    PubMed Central

    Churg, Andrew; Brauer, Michael; del Carmen Avila-Casado, Maria; Fortoul, Teresa I; Wright, Joanne L

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that chronic exposure to high levels of ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with decreased pulmonary function and the development of chronic airflow obstruction. To investigate the possible role of PM-induced abnormalities in the small airways in these functional changes, we examined histologic sections from the lungs of 20 women from Mexico City, a high PM locale. All subjects were lifelong residents of Mexico City, were never-smokers, never had occupational dust exposure, and never used biomass fuel for cooking. Twenty never-smoking, non-dust-exposed subjects from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, a low PM region, were used as a control. By light microscopy, abnormal small airways with fibrotic walls and excess muscle, many containing visible dust, were present in the Mexico City lungs. Formal grading analysis confirmed the presence of significantly greater amounts of fibrous tissue and muscle in the walls of the airways in the Mexico City compared with the Vancouver lungs. Electron microscopic particle burden measurements on four cases from Mexico City showed that carbonaceous aggregates of ultrafine particles, aggregates likely to be combustion products, were present in the airway mucosa. We conclude that PM penetrates into and is retained in the walls of small airways, and that, even in nonsmokers, long-term exposure to high levels of ambient particulate pollutants is associated with small airway remodeling. This process may produce chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:12727599

  19. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  20. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  1. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  2. Dynamic Visco-elastic Buckling Analysis for Airway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Kenkichi; Yamanoi, Yuta

    In order to clarify the mechanism by which the lung airway narrows during an asthma attack, dynamic buckling analysis of the wall was conducted. The wall was modeled using a visco-elastic thin-walled circular cylinder of the Voigt model for the planestress state. A governing equation for dynamic buckling was derived, and in the equation, the contraction of smooth muscle was replaced by uniform inward transmural pressure. The non-dimensional parameters for the buckling wave number n were nondimensional retardation time τ, non-dimensional increasing velocity of inward transmural pressure β, thickness radius ratio α2, radius length ratio η, density ratio ζ, and Poisson's ratio ν. The validity of the theoretical model was confirmed by comparing the calculated wave number with that obtained from the experiment, in which a silicone rubber tube blended with silicone potting gel was used as the in vitro airway model. In addition, the wave number n increased with β. It was necessary to consider the damping effect of the tube model or the airway wall, and n increased by 1.5 to 2 due to the additional mass effect of surrounding tissues of the basement membrane in the airway wall.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of methacholine-induced airway obstruction in man.

    PubMed

    Sharman, J E; Johns, D P; Marrone, J; Walls, J; Wood-Baker, R; Walters, E H

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most frequent cause of death in people with chronic respiratory disease. The cause of this association has been attributed to airway obstruction leading to cardiovascular dysfunction (increased central blood pressure (BP) and aortic stiffness). However, this has never been experimentally tested. Methacholine is routinely used to stimulate airway function changes that mimic airway pathology. This study aimed to determine the cardiovascular effects of methacholine-induced airway obstruction. Fifteen healthy young adults (aged 22.9±2.5 years; 4 male; mean±S.D.) underwent a bronchial challenge test (randomized, blinded, cross-over design) in which they received nebulized methacholine inhalation in serially increasing concentrations (from 0.39 to 25 mg/ml) or saline (0.9%; control) on two separate days. Bronchoconstriction was assessed by forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) and cardiovascular effects by augmentation index, brachial BP, central BP, heart rate and aortic stiffness. Methacholine significantly decreased FEV1 from baseline to peak inhaled concentration compared with saline (-0.48±0.34 vs. -0.07±0.16 L; p<0.001), but there was no between-group change in augmentation index (1.6±7.0 vs. 3.7±10.2% p=0.49), brachial systolic BP (-3.3±7.6 vs. -4.7±5.7 mmHg; p=0.59), central systolic BP (-1.1±5.2 vs. -0.3±5.5 mmHg; p=0.73), heart rate (0.4±7.1 vs. -0.8±6.6 bpm; p=0.45) or aortic stiffness (0.2±1.3 vs. 0.8±1.8 m/s; p=0.20; n=12). Thus, methacholine induced airway obstruction does not acutely change brachial BP or central haemodynamics. This finding refutes the notion that airway obstruction per se leads to cardiovascular dysfunction, at least in healthy individuals in the acute setting.

  4. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  5. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction.

  6. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  7. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  8. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  9. Origins of and implementation concepts for upper airway stimulation therapy for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl M D, Kingman P; Baskin M D, Jonathan; Lance M D, Colleen; Ponsky M D, Diana; Weidenbecher M D, Mark; Strohl B A, Madeleine; Yamauchi M D, Motoo

    2016-07-01

    Upper airway stimulation, specifically hypoglossal (CN XII) nerve stimulation, is a new, alternative therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome who cannot tolerate positive airway pressure, the first-line therapy for symptomatic patients. Stimulation therapy addresses the cause of inadequate upper airway muscle activation for nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this report is to outline the development of this first-in-class therapy and its clinical implementation. Another practical theme is assessment of the features for considering a surgically implanted device and the insight as to how both clinical and endoscopic criteria increase the likelihood of safe and durable outcomes for an implant and how to more generally plan for management of CPAP-intolerant patients. A third theme is the team building required among sleep medicine and surgical specialties in the provision of individualized neurostimulation therapy. PMID:27424823

  10. Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Exercise capacity is lowered in patients with heart failure, which limits their daily activities and also reduces their quality of life. Furthermore, lowered exercise capacity has been well demonstrated to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Skeletal muscle abnormalities including abnormal energy metabolism, transition of myofibers from type I to type II, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduction in muscular strength, and muscle atrophy have been shown to play a central role in lowered exercise capacity. The skeletal muscle abnormalities can be classified into the following main types: 1) low endurance due to mitochondrial dysfunction; and 2) low muscle mass and muscle strength due to imbalance of protein synthesis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms of these skeletal muscle abnormalities have been studied mainly using animal models. The current review including our recent study will focus upon the skeletal muscle abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:26346520

  11. Pelvic floor and sexual male dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pischedda, Antonella; Fusco, Ferdinando; Curreli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Giovanni; Pirozzi Farina, Furio

    2013-04-19

    The pelvic floor is a complex multifunctional structure that corresponds to the genito-urinary-anal area and consists of muscle and connective tissue. It supports the urinary, fecal, sexual and reproductive functions and pelvic statics. The symptoms caused by pelvic floor dysfunction often affect the quality of life of those who are afflicted, worsening significantly more aspects of daily life. In fact, in addition to providing support to the pelvic organs, the deep floor muscles support urinary continence and intestinal emptying whereas the superficial floor muscles are involved in the mechanism of erection and ejaculation. So, conditions of muscle hypotonia or hypertonicity may affect the efficiency of the pelvic floor, altering both the functionality of the deep and superficial floor muscles. In this evolution of knowledge it is possible imagine how the rehabilitation techniques of pelvic floor muscles, if altered and able to support a voiding or evacuative or sexual dysfunction, may have a role in improving the health and the quality of life.

  12. Snoring-Induced Nerve Lesions in the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Poothrikovil, Rajesh P; Al Abri, Mohammed A

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of habitual snoring is extremely high in the general population, and is reported to be roughly 40% in men and 20% in women. The low-frequency vibrations of snoring may cause physical trauma and, more specifically, peripheral nerve injuries, just as jobs which require workers to use vibrating tools over the course of many years result in local nerve lesions in the hands. Histopathological analysis of upper airway (UA) muscles have shown strong evidence of a varying severity of neurological lesions in groups of snoring patients. Neurophysiological assessment shows evidence of active and chronic denervation and re-innervation in the palatopharyngeal muscles of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients. Neurogenic lesions of UA muscles induced by vibration trauma impair the reflex dilation abilities of the UA, leading to an increase in the possibility of UA collapse. The neurological factors which are partly responsible for the progressive nature of OSAS warrant the necessity of early assessment in habitual snorers. PMID:22548134

  13. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  14. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  15. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  16. [Obstruction of the upper airways in humans and animal models].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R

    2010-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by repetitive collapse of a narrow upper airway during sleep with the main risk factor being obesity. Apneas are followed by hypoxia, sympathetic activation, intrathoracic pressure swings and arousals. In most animal studies, only the cyclical pattern of hypoxia characteristic of OSA is simulated, however, more complex models have also been developed which additionally reflect the other pathophysiological changes associated with sleep-disordered breathing. These models have contributed to a deeper understanding of the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of OSA. From other experiments the concept of the pharynx behaving like a collapsible tube, i. e. a Starling resistor, has emerged. Finally, the neurotransmitter modulation of upper airway muscle tone has been elucidated by using IN VIVO microdialysis of the caudal medulla of rats. It is hoped that findings from animal studies will in the future impact on the management of patients with OSA, in particular if they are non-compliant with CPAP therapy. PMID:20632239

  17. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  18. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  19. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  20. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  1. Mucociliary dysfunction in HIV and smoked substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapaiyan, Srinivasan; Unwalla, Hoshang J.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC) is a hallmark of acquired chronic airway diseases like chronic bronchitis associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. This manifests as microbial colonization of the lung consequently leading to recurrent respiratory infections. People living with HIV demonstrate increased incidence of these chronic airway diseases. Bacterial pneumonia continues to be an important comorbidity in people living with HIV even though anti-retroviral therapy has succeeded in restoring CD4+ cell counts. People living with HIV demonstrate increased microbial colonization of the lower airways. The microbial flora is similar to that observed in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD suggesting that mucociliary dysfunction could be a contributing factor to the increased incidence of chronic airway diseases in people living with HIV. The three principal components of the MCC apparatus are, a mucus layer, ciliary beating, and a periciliary airway surface liquid (ASL) layer that facilitates ciliary beating. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a pivotal role in regulating the periciliary ASL. HIV proteins can suppress all the components of the MCC apparatus by increasing mucus secretion and suppressing CFTR function. This can decrease ASL height leading to suppressed ciliary beating. The effects of HIV on MCC are exacerbated when combined with other aggravating factors like smoking or inhaled substance abuse, which by themselves can suppress one or more components of the MCC system. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to MCC suppression in people living with HIV who also smoke tobacco or abuse illicit drugs. PMID:26528246

  2. Mucociliary dysfunction in HIV and smoked substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Chinnapaiyan, Srinivasan; Unwalla, Hoshang J

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC) is a hallmark of acquired chronic airway diseases like chronic bronchitis associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. This manifests as microbial colonization of the lung consequently leading to recurrent respiratory infections. People living with HIV demonstrate increased incidence of these chronic airway diseases. Bacterial pneumonia continues to be an important comorbidity in people living with HIV even though anti-retroviral therapy has succeeded in restoring CD4+ cell counts. People living with HIV demonstrate increased microbial colonization of the lower airways. The microbial flora is similar to that observed in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD suggesting that mucociliary dysfunction could be a contributing factor to the increased incidence of chronic airway diseases in people living with HIV. The three principal components of the MCC apparatus are, a mucus layer, ciliary beating, and a periciliary airway surface liquid (ASL) layer that facilitates ciliary beating. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a pivotal role in regulating the periciliary ASL. HIV proteins can suppress all the components of the MCC apparatus by increasing mucus secretion and suppressing CFTR function. This can decrease ASL height leading to suppressed ciliary beating. The effects of HIV on MCC are exacerbated when combined with other aggravating factors like smoking or inhaled substance abuse, which by themselves can suppress one or more components of the MCC system. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to MCC suppression in people living with HIV who also smoke tobacco or abuse illicit drugs. PMID:26528246

  3. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  4. Airway hyperresponsiveness in a rat model of chronic bronchitis: role of C fibers.

    PubMed

    Long, N C; Martin, J G; Pantano, R; Shore, S A

    1997-04-01

    We evaluated the role of C fibers in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in a rat model of chronic bronchitis. Neonatal rats were treated with capsaicin (50 mg/kg, subcutaneously), a procedure which results in permanent depletion of tachykinins from the lungs and airways as well as degeneration of C fibers. Control rats were treated with the vehicle used to dissolve capsaicin. Three months later, rats from both groups were exposed either to SO2 gas (250 ppm, 5 h/d, 5 d/wk for 4 wk) or to filtered air for the same period of time. One day after the last exposure, rats were anesthetized and instrumented for the measurement of pulmonary resistance (R(L)), dynamic compliance (Cdyn), and airway responsiveness to inhaled aerosolized methacholine. There was a small (30%) but significant increase in R(L) in neonatal capsaicin- but not vehicle-treated rats exposed to SO2. Chronic exposure to SO2 resulted in increased airway responsiveness in both groups of rats, but the effect was more pronounced in the neonatal capsaicin-treated animals in which the doses of methacholine required to double R(L) or decrease Cdyn by 50% decreased 6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively, compared with only 2.2- and 1.3-fold decreases in vehicle-treated rats. Morphometric analysis of histologic sections of airways demonstrated that the average area of smooth muscle in the airway wall, normalized by the length of basement membrane, was significantly greater in SO2 compared with air-exposed capsaicin-treated rats, but not in vehicle-treated control rats (p < 0.012). The maximal tension generated by tracheal rings in response to cholinergic agonists was also significantly increased by SO2 exposure in neonatal capsaicin-treated, but not vehicle-treated rats (p < 0.002). These results support the hypothesis that rather than contributing to the pathophysiologic manifestations of bronchitis, C fibers limit the development of airway obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness during induction of

  5. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  6. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...