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Sample records for airway surface epithelium

  1. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  2. Liquid Movement Across the Surface Epithelium of Large Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Lucy A.; Rollins, Brett M.; Tarran, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis conductance regulator CFTR gene is found on chromosome 7 (Kerem et al., 1989; Riordan et al., 1989) and encodes for a 1,480 amino acid protein which is present in the plasma membrane of epithelial cells (Anderson et al., 1992). This protein appears to have many functions, but a unifying theme is that it acts as a protein kinase C- and cyclic AMP-regulated Cl- channel (Winpenny et al., 1995; Jia et al., 1997). In the superficial epithelium of the conducting airways, CFTR is involved in Cl- secretion (Boucher, 2003) and also acts as a regulator of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and hence Na+ absorption (Boucher et al., 1986; Stutts et al., 1995). In this chapter, we will discuss the regulation of these two ion channels, and how they can influence liquid movement across the superficial airway epithelium. PMID:17692578

  3. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  4. Airway surface liquid volume expansion induces rapid changes in amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport across upper airway epithelium-Implications concerning the resolution of pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Fouad; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-01-01

    During airway inflammation, airway surface liquid volume (ASLV) expansion may result from the movement of plasma proteins and excess liquid into the airway lumen due to extravasation and elevation of subepithelial hydrostatic pressure. We previously demonstrated that elevation of submucosal hydrostatic pressure increases airway epithelium permeability resulting in ASLV expansion by 500 μL cm−2 h−1. Liquid reabsorption by healthy airway epithelium is regulated by active Na+ transport at a rate of 5 μL cm−2 h−1. Thus, during inflammation the airway epithelium may be submerged by a large volume of luminal liquid. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which ASLV expansion alters active epithelial Na+ transport, and we have characterized the time course of the change. We used primary cultures of tracheal airway epithelium maintained under air interface (basal ASLV, depth is 7 ± 0.5 μm). To mimic airway flooding, ASLV was expanded to a depth of 5 mm. On switching from basal to expanded ASLV conditions, short-circuit current (Isc, a measure of total transepithelial active ion transport) declined by 90% with a half-time (t1/2) of 1 h. 24 h after the switch, there was no significant change in ATP concentration nor in the number of functional sodium pumps as revealed by [3H]-ouabain binding. However, amiloride-sensitive uptake of 22Na+ was reduced by 70% upon ASLV expansion. This process is reversible since after returning cells back to air interface, Isc recovered with a t1/2 of 5–10 h. These results may have important clinical implications concerning the development of Na+ channels activators and resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:26333829

  5. Resveratrol Enhances Airway Surface Liquid Depth in Sinonasal Epithelium by Increasing Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Open Probability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoyan; Blount, Angela C.; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Skinner, Daniel F.; Chestnut, Michael; Kappes, John C.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis engenders enormous morbidity in the general population, and is often refractory to medical intervention. Compounds that augment mucociliary clearance in airway epithelia represent a novel treatment strategy for diseases of mucus stasis. A dominant fluid and electrolyte secretory pathway in the nasal airways is governed by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The objectives of the present study were to test resveratrol, a strong potentiator of CFTR channel open probability, in preparation for a clinical trial of mucociliary activators in human sinus disease. Methods Primary sinonasal epithelial cells, immortalized bronchoepithelial cells (wild type and F508del CFTR), and HEK293 cells expressing exogenous human CFTR were investigated by Ussing chamber as well as patch clamp technique under non-phosphorylating conditions. Effects on airway surface liquid depth were measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Impact on CFTR gene expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results Resveratrol is a robust CFTR channel potentiator in numerous mammalian species. The compound also activated temperature corrected F508del CFTR and enhanced CFTR-dependent chloride secretion in human sinus epithelium ex vivo to an extent comparable to the recently approved CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor. Using inside out patches from apical membranes of murine cells, resveratrol stimulated an ~8 picosiemens chloride channel consistent with CFTR. This observation was confirmed in HEK293 cells expressing exogenous CFTR. Treatment of sinonasal epithelium resulted in a significant increase in airway surface liquid depth (in µm: 8.08+/-1.68 vs. 6.11+/-0.47,control,p<0.05). There was no increase CFTR mRNA. Conclusion Resveratrol is a potent chloride secretagogue from the mucosal surface of sinonasal epithelium, and hydrates airway surface liquid by increasing CFTR channel open probability

  6. Non-Genomic Estrogen Regulation of Ion Transport and Airway Surface Liquid Dynamics in Cystic Fibrosis Bronchial Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Harvey, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Male cystic fibrosis (CF) patients survive longer than females and lung exacerbations in CF females vary during the estrous cycle. Estrogen has been reported to reduce the height of the airway surface liquid (ASL) in female CF bronchial epithelium. Here we investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on the airway surface liquid height and ion transport in normal (NuLi-1) and CF (CuFi-1) bronchial epithelial monolayers. Live cell imaging using confocal microscopy revealed that airway surface liquid height was significantly higher in the non-CF cells compared to the CF cells. 17β-estradiol (0.1–10 nM) reduced the airway surface liquid height in non-CF and CF cells after 30 min treatment. Treatment with the nuclear-impeded Estrogen Dendrimer Conjugate mimicked the effect of free estrogen by reducing significantly the airway surface liquid height in CF and non-CF cells. Inhibition of chloride transport or basolateral potassium recycling decreased the airway surface liquid height and 17β-estradiol had no additive effect in the presence of these ion transporter inhibitors. 17β-estradiol decreased bumetanide-sensitive transepithelial short-circuit current in non-CF cells and prevented the forskolin-induced increase in ASL height. 17β-estradiol stimulated an amiloride-sensitive transepithelial current and increased ouabain-sensitive basolateral short-circuit current in CF cells. 17β-estradiol increased PKCδ activity in CF and non-CF cells. These results demonstrate that estrogen dehydrates CF and non-CF ASL, and these responses to 17β-estradiol are non-genomic rather than involving the classical nuclear estrogen receptor pathway. 17β-estradiol acts on the airway surface liquid by inhibiting cAMP-mediated chloride secretion in non-CF cells and increasing sodium absorption via the stimulation of PKCδ, ENaC and the Na+/K+ATPase in CF cells. PMID:24223826

  7. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  8. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  9. Biomechanics of liquid-epithelium interactions in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Ghadiali, Samir N; Gaver, Donald P

    2008-11-30

    The delicate structure of the lung epithelium makes it susceptible to surface tension induced injury. For example, the cyclic reopening of collapsed and/or fluid-filled airways during the ventilation of injured lungs generates hydrodynamic forces that further damage the epithelium and exacerbate lung injury. The interactions responsible for epithelial injury during airway reopening are fundamentally multiscale, since air-liquid interfacial dynamics affect global lung mechanics, while surface tension forces operate at the molecular and cellular scales. This article will review the current state-of-knowledge regarding the effect of surface tension forces on (a) the mechanics of airway reopening and (b) epithelial cell injury. Due to the complex nature of the liquid-epithelium system, a combination of computational and experimental techniques are being used to elucidate the mechanisms of surface-tension induced lung injury. Continued research is leading to an integrated understanding of the biomechanical and biological interactions responsible for cellular injury during airway reopening. This information may lead to novel therapies that minimize ventilation induced lung injury. PMID:18511356

  10. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pili and Flagella Mediate Distinct Binding and Signaling Events at the Apical and Basolateral Surface of Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bucior, Iwona; Pielage, Julia F.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen of man, exploits numerous factors for initial attachment to the host, an event required to establish bacterial infection. In this paper, we rigorously explore the role of two major bacterial adhesins, type IV pili (Tfp) and flagella, in bacterial adherence to distinct host receptors at the apical (AP) and basolateral (BL) surfaces of polarized lung epithelial cells and induction of subsequent host signaling and pathogenic events. Using an isogenic mutant of P. aeruginosa that lacks flagella or utilizing beads coated with purified Tfp, we establish that Tfp are necessary and sufficient for maximal binding to host N-glycans at the AP surface of polarized epithelium. In contrast, experiments utilizing a P. aeruginosa isogenic mutant that lacks Tfp or using beads coated with purified flagella demonstrate that flagella are necessary and sufficient for maximal binding to heparan sulfate (HS) chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) at the BL surface of polarized epithelium. Using two different cell-free systems, we demonstrate that Tfp-coated beads show highest binding affinity to complex N-glycan chains coated onto plastic plates and preferentially aggregate with beads coated with N-glycans, but not with single sugars or HS. In contrast, flagella-coated beads bind to or aggregate preferentially with HS or HSPGs, but demonstrate little binding to N-glycans. We further show that Tfp-mediated binding to host N-glycans results in activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and bacterial entry at the AP surface. At the BL surface, flagella-mediated binding to HS activates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adaptor protein Shc, and PI3K/Akt, and induces bacterial entry. Remarkably, flagella-coated beads alone can activate EGFR and Shc. Together, this work provides new insights into the intricate interactions between P. aeruginosa and lung epithelium that may be potentially useful

  12. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  13. Characterization of side population cells from human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Jacoby, David B; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M; Knight, Darryl A

    2008-10-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45(-) SP, CD45(+) SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45(-) SP cells made up 0.12% +/- 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% +/- 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45(-) SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45(-) SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45(-) SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and long-term proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18653771

  14. The role of the epithelium in airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Davies, Donna E

    2009-12-01

    The bronchial epithelium is the barrier to the external environment and plays a vital role in protection of the internal milieu of the lung. It functions within the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit to control the local microenvironment and help maintain tissue homeostasis. However, in asthma, chronic perturbation of these homeostatic mechanisms leads to alterations in the structure of the airways, termed remodeling. Damage to the epithelium is now recognized to play a key role in driving airway remodeling. We have postulated that epithelial susceptibility to environmental stress and injury together with impaired repair responses results in generation of signals that act on the underlying mesenchyme to propagate and amplify inflammatory and remodeling responses in the submucosa. Many types of challenges to the epithelium, including pathogens, allergens, environmental pollutants, cigarette smoke, and even mechanical forces, can elicit production of mediators by the epithelium, which can be translated into remodeling responses by the mesenchyme. Several important mediators of remodeling have been identified, most notably transforming growth factor-beta, which is released from damaged/repairing epithelium or in response to inflammatory mediators, such as IL-13. The cross talk between the epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to drive remodeling responses is considered in the context of subepithelial fibrosis and potential pathogenetic mechanisms linked to the asthma susceptibility gene, a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)33. PMID:20008875

  15. Transcriptional Regionalization of the Fruit Fly’s Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Muhammad N.; Hoffmann, Julia; El-Kholy, Samar; Kallsen, Kimberley; Wagner, Christina; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although airway epithelia are primarily devoted to gas exchange, they have to fulfil a number of different tasks including organ maintenance and the epithelial immune response to fight airborne pathogens. These different tasks are at least partially accomplished by specialized cell types in the epithelium. In addition, a proximal to distal gradient mirroring the transition from airflow conduction to real gas exchange, is also operative. We analysed the airway system of larval Drosophila melanogaster with respect to region-specific expression in the proximal to distal axis. The larval airway system is made of epithelial cells only. We found differential expression between major trunks of the airways and more distal ones comprising primary, secondary and terminal ones. A more detailed analysis was performed using DNA-microarray analysis to identify cohorts of genes that are either predominantly expressed in the dorsal trunks or in the primary/secondary/terminal branches of the airways. Among these differentially expressed genes are especially those involved in signal transduction. Wnt-signalling associated genes for example are predominantly found in secondary/terminal airways. In addition, some G-protein coupled receptors are differentially expressed between both regions of the airways, exemplified by those activated by octopamine or tyramine, the invertebrate counterparts of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Whereas the OAMB is predominantly found in terminal airway regions, the oct3βR has higher expression levels in dorsal trunks. In addition, we observed a significant association of both, genes predominantly expressed in dorsal trunks or in primary to terminal branches branches with those regulated by hypoxia. Taken together, this observed differential expression is indicative for a proximal to distal transcriptional regionalization presumably reflecting functional differences in these parts of the fly’s airway system. PMID:25020150

  16. Transcriptional regionalization of the fruit fly's airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Muhammad N; Hoffmann, Julia; El-Kholy, Samar; Kallsen, Kimberley; Wagner, Christina; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although airway epithelia are primarily devoted to gas exchange, they have to fulfil a number of different tasks including organ maintenance and the epithelial immune response to fight airborne pathogens. These different tasks are at least partially accomplished by specialized cell types in the epithelium. In addition, a proximal to distal gradient mirroring the transition from airflow conduction to real gas exchange, is also operative. We analysed the airway system of larval Drosophila melanogaster with respect to region-specific expression in the proximal to distal axis. The larval airway system is made of epithelial cells only. We found differential expression between major trunks of the airways and more distal ones comprising primary, secondary and terminal ones. A more detailed analysis was performed using DNA-microarray analysis to identify cohorts of genes that are either predominantly expressed in the dorsal trunks or in the primary/secondary/terminal branches of the airways. Among these differentially expressed genes are especially those involved in signal transduction. Wnt-signalling associated genes for example are predominantly found in secondary/terminal airways. In addition, some G-protein coupled receptors are differentially expressed between both regions of the airways, exemplified by those activated by octopamine or tyramine, the invertebrate counterparts of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Whereas the OAMB is predominantly found in terminal airway regions, the oct3βR has higher expression levels in dorsal trunks. In addition, we observed a significant association of both, genes predominantly expressed in dorsal trunks or in primary to terminal branches branches with those regulated by hypoxia. Taken together, this observed differential expression is indicative for a proximal to distal transcriptional regionalization presumably reflecting functional differences in these parts of the fly's airway system. PMID:25020150

  17. Mechanical strain inhibits repair of airway epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Savla, U; Waters, C M

    1998-06-01

    The repair of airway epithelium after injury is crucial in restoring epithelial barrier integrity. Although the airway epithelium is stretched and compressed due to changes in both circumferential and longitudinal dimensions during respiration and may be overdistended during mechanical ventilation, the effect of cyclic strain on the repair of epithelial wounds is unknown. Human and cat airway epithelial cells were cultured on flexible membranes, wounded by scraping with a metal spatula, and subjected to cyclic strain using the Flexercell Strain Unit. Because the radial strain profile in the wells was nonuniform, we compared closure in regions of elongation and compression within the same well. Both cyclic elongation and cyclic compression significantly slowed repair, with compression having the greatest effect. This attenuation was dependent upon the time of relaxation (TR) during the cycle. When wells were stretched at 10 cycles/min (6 s/cycle) with TR = 5 s, wounds closed similarly to wounds in static wells, whereas in wells with TR = 1 s, significant inhibition was observed. As the TR during cycles increased (higher TR), wounds closed faster. We measured the effect of strain at various TRs on cell area and centroid-centroid distance (CD) as a measure of spreading and migration. While cell area and CD in static wells significantly increased over time, the area and CD of cells in the elongated regions did not change. Cells in compressed regions were significantly smaller, with significantly lower CD. Cell area and CD became progressively larger with increasing TR. These results suggest that mechanical strain inhibits epithelial repair. PMID:9609726

  18. Innate Immune Response to LPS in Airway Epithelium Is Dependent on Chronological Age and Antecedent Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Maniar-Hew, Kinjal; Clay, Candice C.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Evans, Michael J.; Fontaine, Justin H.

    2013-01-01

    The immune mechanisms for neonatal susceptibility to respiratory pathogens are poorly understood. Given that mucosal surfaces serve as a first line of host defense, we hypothesized that the innate immune response to infectious agents may be developmentally regulated in airway epithelium. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 in airway epithelium after LPS exposure is dependent on chronological age. Tracheas from infant, juvenile, and adult rhesus monkeys were first exposed to LPS ex vivo, and then processed for air–liquid interface primary airway epithelial cell cultures and secondary LPS treatment in vitro. Compared with adult cultures, infant and juvenile cultures expressed significantly reduced concentrations of IL-8 after LPS treatment. IL-8 protein in cultures increased with animal age, whereas LPS-induced IL-6 protein was predominantly associated with juvenile cultures. Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway RT-PCR arrays showed differential expressions of multiple mRNAs in infant cultures relative to adult cultures, including IL-1α, TLR10, and the peptidoglycan recognition protein PGLYRP2. To determine whether the age-dependent cytokine response to LPS is reflective of antecedent exposures, we assessed primary airway epithelial cell cultures established from juvenile monkeys housed in filtered air since birth. Filtered air–housed animal cultures exhibited LPS-induced IL-8 and IL-6 expression that was discordant with age-matched ambient air–housed animals. A single LPS aerosol in vivo also affected this cytokine profile. Cumulatively, our findings demonstrate that the innate immune response to LPS in airway epithelium is variable with age, and may be modulated by previous environmental exposures. PMID:23600597

  19. Identification of transcripts overexpressed during airway epithelium differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chhin, B; Pham, J T; El Zein, L; Kaiser, K; Merrot, O; Bouvagnet, P

    2008-07-01

    Human airway epithelium, the defence at the forefront of protecting the respiratory tract, evacuates inhaled particles by a permanent beating of epithelial cell cilia. When deficient, this organelle causes primary ciliary dyskinesia, and, despite numerous studies, data regarding ciliated cell gene expression remain incomplete. The aim of the present study was to identify genes specifically expressed in human ciliated respiratory cells via transcriptional analysis. The transcriptome of dedifferentiated epithelial cells was subtracted from that of fully redifferentiated cells using complementary DNA representational difference analysis. In order to validate the results, gene overexpression in ciliated cells was confirmed by real-time PCR, and by comparing the present list of genes overexpressed in ciliated cells to lists obtained in previous studies. A total of 53 known and 12 unknown genes overexpressed in ciliated cells were identified. The majority (66%) of known genes had never previously been reported as being involved in ciliogenesis, and the unknown genes represent hypothetical novel transcript isoforms or new genes not yet reported in databases. Finally, several genes identified here were located in genomic regions involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia by linkage analysis. In conclusion, the present study revealed sequences of new cilia-related genes, new transcript isoforms and novel genes which should be further characterised to aid understanding of their function(s) and their probable disorder-related involvement. PMID:18321927

  20. Immunolocalization of NLRP3 Inflammasome in Normal Murine Airway Epithelium and Changes following Induction of Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai B; Lewis, Martin D; Tan, Lor Wai; Lester, Susan E; Baker, Leonie M; Ng, Jia; Hamilton-Bruce, Monica A; Hill, Catherine L; Koblar, Simon A; Rischmueller, Maureen; Ruffin, Richard E; Wormald, Peter J; Zalewski, Peter D; Lang, Carol J

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about innate immunity and components of inflammasomes in airway epithelium. This study evaluated immunohistological evidence for NLRP3 inflammasomes in normal and inflamed murine (Balb/c) airway epithelium in a model of ovalbumin (OVA) induced allergic airway inflammation. The airway epithelium of control mice exhibited strong cytoplasmic staining for total caspase-1, ASC, and NLRP3, whereas the OVA mice exhibited strong staining for active caspase-1, with redistribution of caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18, indicating possible activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Active caspase-1, NLRP3, and other inflammasome components were also detected in tissue eosinophils from OVA mice, and may potentially contribute to IL-1β and IL-18 production. In whole lung, inRNA expression of NAIP and procaspase-1 was increased in OVA mice, whereas NLRP3, IL-1β and IL-18 decreased. Some OVA-treated mice also had significantly elevated and tightly correlated serum levels of IL-1β and TNFα. In cultured normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LPS priming resulted in a significant increase in NLRP3 and II-lp protein expression. This study is the first to demonstrate NLRP3 inflammasome components in normal airway epithelium and changes with inflammation. We propose activation and/or luminal release of the inflammasome is a feature of allergic airway inflammation which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:22523501

  1. In Vitro Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Colonization of Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Oliver A.; Krunkosky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important cause of respiratory disease, especially in school-age children and young adults. We employed normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in air-liquid interface culture to study the interaction of M. pneumoniae with differentiated airway epithelium. These airway cells, when grown in air-liquid interface culture, polarize, form tight junctions, produce mucus, and develop ciliary function. We examined both qualitatively and quantitatively the role of mycoplasma gliding motility in the colonization pattern of developing airway cells, comparing wild-type M. pneumoniae and mutants thereof with moderate to severe defects in gliding motility. Adherence assays with radiolabeled mycoplasmas demonstrated a dramatic reduction in binding for all strains with airway cell polarization, independent of acquisition of mucociliary function. Adherence levels dropped further once NHBE cells achieved terminal differentiation, with mucociliary activity strongly selecting for full gliding competence. Analysis over time by confocal microscopy demonstrated a distinct colonization pattern that appeared to originate primarily with ciliated cells, but lateral spread from the base of the cilia was slower than expected. The data support a model in which the mucociliary apparatus impairs colonization yet cilia provide a conduit for mycoplasma access to the host cell surface and suggest acquisition of a barrier function, perhaps associated with tethered mucin levels, with NHBE cell polarization. PMID:24478073

  2. Chronic inflammatory airway diseases: the central role of the epithelium revisited.

    PubMed

    Gohy, S T; Hupin, C; Pilette, C; Ladjemi, M Z

    2016-04-01

    The respiratory epithelium plays a critical role for the maintenance of airway integrity and defense against inhaled particles. Physical barrier provided by apical junctions and mucociliary clearance clears inhaled pathogens, allergens or toxics, to prevent continuous stimulation of adaptive immune responses. The "chemical barrier", consisting of several anti-microbial factors such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, constitutes another protective mechanism of the mucosae against external aggressions before adaptive immune response starts. The reconstruction of damaged respiratory epithelium is crucial to restore this barrier. This review examines the role of the airway epithelium through recent advances in health and chronic inflammatory diseases in the lower conducting airways (in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Better understanding of normal and altered epithelial functions continuously provides new insights into the physiopathology of chronic airway diseases and should help to identify new epithelial-targeted therapies. PMID:27021118

  3. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A; Morrisey, Edward E

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  4. Effects of acidity and ozone on airway epithelium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, D.; Wang, A.; Cone, R.; Cohen, S.

    1991-12-01

    The study examined the in vitro effects of acidity and/or ozone on primary cultures of guinea pig airway epithelial cells. Surface acidification to pH 6 or pH 5, reduced protein synthesis and induced the synthesis of two stress proteins: hsp 72 and grp 78. No such effect was produced by nitric acid vapor (50 to 18,000 micrograms/cum). Acid exposure did not affect cytotoxicity or glycoconjugate, fibronectin or TGF(beta) synthesis or secretion. Exposure of these cells to ozone (0.05 - 0.2 ppm) caused concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and decreased protein synthesis, but produced no other detectable effects on cellular metabolism.

  5. Effect of epithelium ATP release on cyclic pressure-induced airway mucus secretion

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jin; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M.; Kolosov, Victor P.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic mechanical effect of airflow during breathing creates the optimal airway hydration state. MUC (mucin) 5AC is an important component of the airway mucus. The formation of MUC5AC is related to ATP and intracellular calcium in the epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ATP release from intracellular calcium in epithelial cells on cyclic pressure-induced mucus secretion in the airway. 16HBE (human bronchial epithelial cells) were cultured in vitro on cyclically tilted cultured plates and divided into five groups: control, tilt, tilt and BAPTA–AM (1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid–acetoxymethyl ester), tilt and EGTA and tilt and RB-2 (reactive blue-2). The shear stress and compressive stress were induced by the surface tension of the liquid, atmospheric pressure and liquid gravity. Cell activity, MUC5AC mRNA expression level, MUC5AC protein expression level and ATP release and intracellular calcium changes were measured with the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, RT–PCR (reverse transcription–PCR), HPLC and inverted fluorescence microscope, respectively. We detected that cyclic pressure significantly increased MUC5AC secretion and ATP release. The enhanced ATP release could be inhibited by both BAPTA–AM and RB-2, while EGTA did not have a suppressive effect. BAPTA–AM, EGTA and RB-2 did not obviously inhibit MUC5AC mRNA expression. Cyclic pressure did not induce MUC5AC secretion in the airway mucus epithelium via Ca2+-dependent ATP release, and nearly all Ca2+ was provided by stored intracellular Ca2+. PMID:24329423

  6. Effect of epithelium ATP release on cyclic pressure-induced airway mucus secretion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jin; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Perelman, Juliy M; Kolosov, Victor P

    2013-12-16

    The cyclic mechanical effect of airflow during breathing creates the optimal airway hydration state. Mucin (MUC) 5AC is an impotent component of the airway mucus. The formation of MUC5AC is related to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and intracellular calciumin the epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ATP release from and intracellular calcium in epithelial cells on cyclic pressure-induced mucus secretion in the airway. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were cultured in vitro on cyclically tilted cultured plates and divided into 5 groups: control, tilt, tilt and BAPTA-AM, tilt and EGTA, and tilt and RB-2. The shear stress and compressive stress were induced by the surface tension of the liquid, atmospheric pressure and liquid gravity. Cell activity, MUC5AC mRNA expression level, MUC5AC protein expression level and ATP release, and intracellular calcium changes were measured with the MTT assay, RT-PCR, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and inverted fluorescence microscope, respectively. We detected that cyclic pressure significantly increased MUC5AC secretion and ATP release. The enhanced ATP release could be inhibited by both BAPTA-AM and RB-2, while EGTA did not have a suppressive effect. BAPTA-AM, EGTA, and RB-2 did not obviously inhibit MUC5AC mRNA expression.Cyclic pressure did not induce MUC5AC secretion in the airway mucus epithelium via Ca2+-dependent ATP release, and nearly all Ca2+ was provided by stored intracellular Ca2+. PMID:24329423

  7. Strain-dependent activation of NF-kappaB in the airway epithelium and its role in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, John F; Ckless, Karina; Brown, Amy L; Guala, Amy S; Kolls, Jay K; Poynter, Matthew E; Irvin, Charles G; van der Vliet, Albert; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W

    2010-01-01

    NF-kappaB activation in the airway epithelium has been established as a critical pathway in ovalbumin (Ova)-induced airway inflammation in BALB/c mice (Poynter ME, Cloots R, van Woerkom T, Butnor KJ, Vacek P, Taatjes DJ, Irvin CG, Janssen-Heininger YM. J Immunol 173: 7003-7009, 2004). BALB/c mice are susceptible to the development of allergic airway disease, whereas other strains of mice, such as C57BL/6, are considered more resistant. The goal of the present study was to determine the proximal signals required for NF-kappaB activation in the airway epithelium in allergic airway disease and to unravel whether these signals are strain-dependent. Our previous studies, conducted in the BALB/c mouse background, demonstrated that transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative version of IkappaBalpha in the airway epithelium (CC10-IkappaBalpha(SR)) were protected from Ova-induced inflammation. In contrast to these earlier observations, we demonstrate here that CC10-IkappaBalpha(SR) transgenic mice on the C57BL/6 background were not protected from Ova-induced allergic airway inflammation. Consistent with this finding, Ova-induced nuclear localization of the RelA subunit of NF-kappaB was not observed in C57BL/6 mice, in contrast to the marked nuclear presence of RelA in BALB/c mice. Evaluation of cytokine profiles in bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated elevated expression of TNF-alpha in BALB/c mice compared with C57BL/6 mice after an acute challenge with Ova. Finally, neutralization of TNF-alpha by a blocking antibody prevented nuclear localization of RelA in BALB/c mice after Ova challenge. These data suggest that the mechanism of response of the airway epithelium of immunized C57BL/6 mice to antigen challenge is fundamentally different from that of immunized BALB/c mice and highlight the potential importance of TNF-alpha in regulating epithelial NF-kappaB activation in allergic airway disease. PMID:19897746

  8. Cyclic stretch of airway epithelium inhibits prostanoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Savla, U; Sporn, P H; Waters, C M

    1997-11-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to biologically active eicosanoids, which contribute to regulation of airway smooth muscle tone and inflammatory responses. Although in vivo the airways undergo cyclical stretching during ventilation, the effect of cyclic stretch on airway epithelial AA metabolism is unknown. In this study, cat and human AEC were grown on flexible membranes and were subjected to cyclic stretch using the Flexercell strain unit. Cyclic stretch downregulated synthesis of prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGI2, and thromboxane A2 by both cell types in a frequency-dependent manner. The percent inhibition of prostanoid synthesis in both cell types ranged from 53 +/- 7 to 75 +/- 8% (SE; n = 4 and 5, respectively). Treatment of cat AEC with exogenous AA (10 micrograms/ml) had no effect on the stretch-induced inhibition of PGE2 synthesis, whereas treatment with exogenous PGH2 (10 micrograms/ml) overcame the stretch-induced decrease in PGE2 production. These results indicate that stretch inhibits prostanoid synthesis by inactivating cyclooxygenase. When cells were pretreated with the antioxidants catalase (100 micrograms/ml, 150 U/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1 mM), there was a partial recovery of eicosanoid production, suggesting that cyclic stretch-induced inactivation of cyclooxygenase is oxidant mediated. These results may have important implications for inflammatory diseases in which airway mechanics are altered. PMID:9374729

  9. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  10. RNA-Seq quantification of the human small airway epithelium transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The small airway epithelium (SAE), the cell population that covers the human airway surface from the 6th generation of airway branching to the alveoli, is the major site of lung disease caused by smoking. The focus of this study is to provide quantitative assessment of the SAE transcriptome in the resting state and in response to chronic cigarette smoking using massive parallel mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Results The data demonstrate that 48% of SAE expressed genes are ubiquitous, shared with many tissues, with 52% enriched in this cell population. The most highly expressed gene, SCGB1A1, is characteristic of Clara cells, the cell type unique to the human SAE. Among other genes expressed by the SAE are those related to Clara cell differentiation, secretory mucosal defense, and mucociliary differentiation. The high sensitivity of RNA-Seq permitted quantification of gene expression related to infrequent cell populations such as neuroendocrine cells and epithelial stem/progenitor cells. Quantification of the absolute smoking-induced changes in SAE gene expression revealed that, compared to ubiquitous genes, more SAE-enriched genes responded to smoking with up-regulation, and those with the highest basal expression levels showed most dramatic changes. Smoking had no effect on SAE gene splicing, but was associated with a shift in molecular pattern from Clara cell-associated towards the mucus-secreting cell differentiation pathway with multiple features of cancer-associated molecular phenotype. Conclusions These observations provide insights into the unique biology of human SAE by providing quantit-ative assessment of the global transcriptome under physiological conditions and in response to the stress of chronic cigarette smoking. PMID:22375630

  11. Limited entry of adenovirus vectors into well-differentiated airway epithelium is responsible for inefficient gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Pickles, R J; McCarty, D; Matsui, H; Hart, P J; Randell, S H; Boucher, R C

    1998-07-01

    Investigations of the efficiency and safety of human adenovirus vector (AdV)-mediated gene transfer in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in vivo have demonstrated little success in correcting the CF bioelectrical functional defect, reflecting the inefficiency of AdV-mediated gene transfer to the epithelial cells that line the airway luminal surface. In this study, we demonstrate that low AdV-mediated gene transfer efficiency to well-differentiated (WD) cultured airway epithelial cells is due to three distinct steps in the apical membrane of the airway epithelial cells: (i) the absence of specific adenovirus fiber-knob protein attachment receptors; (ii) the absence of alphavbeta3/5 integrins, reported to partially mediate the internalization of AdV into the cell cytoplasm; and (iii) the low rate of apical plasma membrane uptake pathways of WD airway epithelial cells. Attempts to increase gene transfer efficiency by increasing nonspecific attachment of AdV were unsuccessful, reflecting the inability of the attached vector to enter (penetrate) WD cells via nonspecific entry paths. Strategies to improve the efficiency of AdV for the treatment of CF lung disease will require methods to increase the attachment of AdV to and promote its internalization into the WD respiratory epithelium. PMID:9621064

  12. Limited Entry of Adenovirus Vectors into Well-Differentiated Airway Epithelium Is Responsible for Inefficient Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, Raymond J.; McCarty, Douglas; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Hart, Pádraig J.; Randell, Scott H.; Boucher, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations of the efficiency and safety of human adenovirus vector (AdV)-mediated gene transfer in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in vivo have demonstrated little success in correcting the CF bioelectrical functional defect, reflecting the inefficiency of AdV-mediated gene transfer to the epithelial cells that line the airway luminal surface. In this study, we demonstrate that low AdV-mediated gene transfer efficiency to well-differentiated (WD) cultured airway epithelial cells is due to three distinct steps in the apical membrane of the airway epithelial cells: (i) the absence of specific adenovirus fiber-knob protein attachment receptors; (ii) the absence of αvβ3/5 integrins, reported to partially mediate the internalization of AdV into the cell cytoplasm; and (iii) the low rate of apical plasma membrane uptake pathways of WD airway epithelial cells. Attempts to increase gene transfer efficiency by increasing nonspecific attachment of AdV were unsuccessful, reflecting the inability of the attached vector to enter (penetrate) WD cells via nonspecific entry paths. Strategies to improve the efficiency of AdV for the treatment of CF lung disease will require methods to increase the attachment of AdV to and promote its internalization into the WD respiratory epithelium. PMID:9621064

  13. Airway surface liquid depth imaged by surface laser reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Song, Yuanlin; Derichs, Nico; Verkman, A S

    2010-09-01

    The thin layer of liquid at the surface of airway epithelium, the airway surface liquid (ASL), is important in normal airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. At present, the best method to measure ASL depth involves scanning confocal microscopy after staining with an aqueous-phase fluorescent dye. We describe here a simple, noninvasive imaging method to measure ASL depth by reflectance imaging of an epithelial mucosa in which the surface is illuminated at a 45-degree angle by an elongated 13-microm wide rectangular beam produced by a 670-nm micro-focus laser. The principle of the method is that air-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-cell interfaces produce distinct specular or diffuse reflections that can be imaged to give a micron-resolution replica of the mucosal surface. The method was validated using fluid layers of specified thicknesses and applied to measure ASL depth in cell cultures and ex vivo fragments of pig trachea. In addition, the method was adapted to measure transepithelial fluid transport from the dynamics of fluid layer depth. Compared with confocal imaging, ASL depth measurement by surface laser reflectance microscopy does not require dye staining or costly instrumentation, and can potentially be adapted for in vivo measurements using fiberoptics. PMID:20713545

  14. Keratinocyte growth factor accelerates wound closure in airway epithelium during cyclic mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Waters, C M; Savla, U

    1999-12-01

    The airway epithelium may be damaged by inhalation of noxious agents, in response to pathogens, or during endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Maintenance of an intact epithelium is important for lung fluid balance, and the loss of epithelium may stimulate inflammatory responses. Epithelial repair in the airways following injury must occur on a substrate that undergoes cyclic elongation and compression during respiration. We have previously shown that cyclic mechanical strain inhibits wound closure in the airway epithelium (Savla and Waters, 1998b). In this study, we investigated the stimulation of epithelial wound closure by keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in vitro and the mechanisms by which KGF overcomes the inhibition due to mechanical strain. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) and a cell line of human airway epithelial cells, Calu 3, were grown on Silastic membranes, and a wound was scraped across the well. The wells were then exposed to cyclic strain using the Flexercell Strain Unit, and wound closure was measured. While cyclic elongation (20% maximum) and cyclic compression (approximately 2%) both inhibited wound closure in untreated wells, treatment with KGF (50 ng/ml) significantly accelerated wound closure and overcame the inhibition due to cyclic strain. Since wound closure involves cell spreading, migration, and proliferation, we investigated the effect of cyclic strain on cell area, cell-cell distance, and cell velocity at the wound edge. While the cell area increased in unstretched monolayers, the cell area of monolayers in compressed regions decreased significantly. Treatment with KGF increased the cell area in both cyclically elongated and compressed cells. Also, when cells were treated with KGF, cell velocity was significantly increased in both static and cyclically strained monolayers, and cyclic strain did not inhibit cell migration. These results suggest that KGF is an important factor in

  15. Airway epithelium interactions with aeroallergens: role of secreted cytokines and chemokines in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Vivek D; Vliagoftis, Harissios

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against the constituents of the inhaled air, which include allergens, pathogens, pollutants, and toxic compounds. The epithelium not only prevents the penetration of these foreign substances into the interstitium, but also senses their presence and informs the organism's immune system of the impending assault. The epithelium accomplishes the latter through the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that recruit and activate innate immune cells at the site of assault. These epithelial responses aim to eliminate the inhaled foreign substances and minimize their detrimental effects to the organism. Quite frequently, however, the innate immune responses of the epithelium to inhaled substances lead to chronic and high level release of pro-inflammatory mediators that may mediate the lung pathology seen in asthma. The interactions of airway epithelial cells with allergens will be discussed with particular focus on interactions-mediated epithelial release of cytokines and chemokines and their role in the immune response. As pollutants are other major constituents of inhaled air, we will also discuss how pollutants may alter the responses of airway epithelial cells to allergens. PMID:25883597

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells for repair of the airway epithelium in asthma.

    PubMed

    Knight, Darryl A; Rossi, Fabio M; Hackett, Tillie-Louise

    2010-12-01

    The airway epithelium is constantly faced with inflammatory and potentially injurious stimuli. Following damage, rapid repair mechanisms involving proliferation and differentiation of resident progenitor and stem cell pools are necessary in order to maintain a protective barrier. In asthma, evidence pointing to a compromised ability of the epithelium to properly repair and regenerate is rapidly accumulating. The consequences of this are presently unknown but are likely to have a significant impact on lung function. Mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to serve as a universal source for replacement of specific cells in several diseases and thus offer hope as a potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of the chronic remodeling changes that occur in the asthmatic epithelium. However, controversy exists regarding whether these cells can actually home to and engraft within the airways and contribute to tissue function or whether this mechanism is necessary, since they can have potent paracrine immunomodulatory effects. This article focuses on the current knowledge about specific stem cell populations that may contribute to airway epithelial regeneration and discusses the use of mesenchymal stem cells as a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:21128750

  17. Airway Epithelium Interactions with Aeroallergens: Role of Secreted Cytokines and Chemokines in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Vivek D.; Vliagoftis, Harissios

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against the constituents of the inhaled air, which include allergens, pathogens, pollutants, and toxic compounds. The epithelium not only prevents the penetration of these foreign substances into the interstitium, but also senses their presence and informs the organism’s immune system of the impending assault. The epithelium accomplishes the latter through the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that recruit and activate innate immune cells at the site of assault. These epithelial responses aim to eliminate the inhaled foreign substances and minimize their detrimental effects to the organism. Quite frequently, however, the innate immune responses of the epithelium to inhaled substances lead to chronic and high level release of pro-inflammatory mediators that may mediate the lung pathology seen in asthma. The interactions of airway epithelial cells with allergens will be discussed with particular focus on interactions-mediated epithelial release of cytokines and chemokines and their role in the immune response. As pollutants are other major constituents of inhaled air, we will also discuss how pollutants may alter the responses of airway epithelial cells to allergens. PMID:25883597

  18. Effect of ozone treatment on airway reactivity and epithelium-derived relaxing factor in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Millecchia, L L; Johnston, R A; Rengasamy, A; Hubbs, A; Dey, R D; Yuan, L X; Watson, D; Goldsmith, W T; Reynolds, J S; Orsini, L; Dortch-Carnes, J; Cutler, D; Frazer, D G

    2000-06-01

    Ozone (O(3)) is toxic to respiratory epithelium and causes airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. To evaluate the role of the epithelium in the development of hyperreactivity, we examined in guinea pigs the effects of inhaled O(3) (3 ppm for 1 h; 0-24 h after exposure) on 1) reactivity to inhaled methacholine (MCh), 2) reactivity of the isolated, perfused trachea (IPT) to MCh, 3) epithelium-derived relaxing factor (EpDRF)-mediated relaxations of IPT induced by mucosal hyperosmolar solutions, 4) neurogenic contraction and relaxation responses, 5) transepithelial potential difference, and 6) microscopic analysis of nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence, substance P fiber density, and tracheal morphology. At 0 h, O(3) caused hyperreactivity to inhaled MCh and mucosally but not serosally applied MCh in IPT (only in the presence of the epithelium) and a decrease in transepithelial potential difference. Inhibition of EpDRF-induced relaxation responses occurred at 2 h. All of these changes returned to control by 12 to 18 h. O(3) had no effect on neurogenic responses. Nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence appeared in the trachea at 0 h in detached epithelial cell ghosts and in intrapulmonary airways by 6 h. Substance P fiber density was elevated in smooth muscle at 0 and 18 h but not in epithelium or lamina propria of intrapulmonary and extrapulmonary bronchi. Loss of cilia and mucosubstances in the mucosa occurred at 0 h; the epithelium became markedly attenuated over 12 to 24 h. A reversible increase in epithelial permeability and a decrease in EpDRF production may contribute to O(3)-induced hyperreactivity to MCh. PMID:10869370

  19. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-08-01

    Tropospheric ozone is the major oxidizing component in photochemical smog and is one of the most pervasive problems to human health of the criteria air pollutants for which the National Ambient Air Quality Standards have been designated by the Clean Air Act. Although many adverse health effects of ozone exposure have been documented in both humans and laboratory animals, controversy surrounds the establishment and implementation of ozone standards set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Because people are commonly exposed to more than one air pollutant at a time, studies that examine coexposures to airborne materials may be more relevant for assessing their risks to human health. Airborne biogenic substances such as pollens, spores, and bacterial products are ubiquitous in the environment, and when inhaled can cause adverse respiratory symptoms. One such biogenic agent, bacterial endotoxin, is a potent stimulus of airway inflammation and is a ubiquitous airborne contaminant commonly found in domestic, agricultural, and industrial settings. Little is known about the interaction of exposures to biogenic substances and criteria air pollutants such as ozone. In the last few years we have performed a series of studies in rodents that examined the biologic responses of the respiratory epithelium after airway exposures to both endotoxin and ozone. When exposed to ozone (0.5 ppm 8 hr/day for 3 days), Fischer rats develop lesions in the nasal transitional epithelium, whereas intranasal instillation of endotoxin (20 microg) elicits epithelial lesions in the respiratory epithelium of the nose and conducting airways. Our studies were designed to examine how exposure to one toxicant may affect the airway epithelial lesions induced by the other toxicant. We investigated the potential role of acute inflammation in the enhancement of airway epithelial lesions after exposure of these two toxicants in neutrophil-sufficient and neutrophil-deficient rodents. A summary

  20. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is the major oxidizing component in photochemical smog and is one of the most pervasive problems to human health of the criteria air pollutants for which the National Ambient Air Quality Standards have been designated by the Clean Air Act. Although many adverse health effects of ozone exposure have been documented in both humans and laboratory animals, controversy surrounds the establishment and implementation of ozone standards set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Because people are commonly exposed to more than one air pollutant at a time, studies that examine coexposures to airborne materials may be more relevant for assessing their risks to human health. Airborne biogenic substances such as pollens, spores, and bacterial products are ubiquitous in the environment, and when inhaled can cause adverse respiratory symptoms. One such biogenic agent, bacterial endotoxin, is a potent stimulus of airway inflammation and is a ubiquitous airborne contaminant commonly found in domestic, agricultural, and industrial settings. Little is known about the interaction of exposures to biogenic substances and criteria air pollutants such as ozone. In the last few years we have performed a series of studies in rodents that examined the biologic responses of the respiratory epithelium after airway exposures to both endotoxin and ozone. When exposed to ozone (0.5 ppm 8 hr/day for 3 days), Fischer rats develop lesions in the nasal transitional epithelium, whereas intranasal instillation of endotoxin (20 microg) elicits epithelial lesions in the respiratory epithelium of the nose and conducting airways. Our studies were designed to examine how exposure to one toxicant may affect the airway epithelial lesions induced by the other toxicant. We investigated the potential role of acute inflammation in the enhancement of airway epithelial lesions after exposure of these two toxicants in neutrophil-sufficient and neutrophil-deficient rodents. A summary

  1. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V; Komarova, Natalia L

    2016-07-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  2. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  3. Matriptase Proteolytically Activates Influenza Virus and Promotes Multicycle Replication in the Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Alexandre; Gravel, Émilie; Cloutier, Alexandre; Marois, Isabelle; Colombo, Éloïc; Désilets, Antoine; Verreault, Catherine; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses do not encode any proteases and must rely on host proteases for the proteolytic activation of their surface hemagglutinin proteins in order to fuse with the infected host cells. Recent progress in the understanding of human proteases responsible for influenza virus hemagglutinin activation has led to the identification of members of the type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 and human airway trypsin-like protease; however, none has proved to be the sole enzyme responsible for hemagglutinin cleavage. In this study, we identify and characterize matriptase as an influenza virus-activating protease capable of supporting multicycle viral replication in the human respiratory epithelium. Using confocal microscopy, we found matriptase to colocalize with hemagglutinin at the apical surface of human epithelial cells and within endosomes, and we showed that the soluble form of the protease was able to specifically cleave hemagglutinins from H1 virus, but not from H2 and H3 viruses, in a broad pH range. We showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of matriptase in human bronchial epithelial cells significantly blocked influenza virus replication in these cells. Lastly, we provide a selective, slow, tight-binding inhibitor of matriptase that significantly reduces viral replication (by 1.5 log) of H1N1 influenza virus, including the 2009 pandemic virus. Our study establishes a three-pronged model for the action of matriptase: activation of incoming viruses in the extracellular space in its shed form, upon viral attachment or exit in its membrane-bound and/or shed forms at the apical surface of epithelial cells, and within endosomes by its membrane-bound form where viral fusion takes place. PMID:23365447

  4. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make ... Epithelium. In: Kierszenbaum AL, Tres LL. Histology and Cell Biology - An Introduction to Pathology , 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. A microfluidic device to apply shear stresses to polarizing ciliated airway epithelium using air flow

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of airway epithelium determines ciliary beat direction and coordination for proper mucociliary clearance. Fluidic shear stresses have the potential to influence ciliary organization. Here, an in vitro fluidic flow system was developed for inducing long-term airflow shear stresses on airway epithelium with a view to influencing epithelial organization. Our system consists of a fluidic device for cell culture, integrated into a humidified airflow circuit. The fluidic device has a modular design and is made from a combination of polystyrene and adhesive components incorporated into a 6-well filter membrane insert. We demonstrate the system operates within physiologically relevant shear and pressure ranges and estimate the shear stress exerted on the epithelial cell layer as a result of air flow using a computational model. For both the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS2B and primary human tracheal airway epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cells remain viable within the device when exposed to airflow for 24 h and that normal differentiation and cilia formation occurs. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of our device for exploring the impact of exposing cells to airflow: our tool enables quantification of cytoskeletal organization, and is compatible with in situ bead assays to assess the orientation of cilia beating. PMID:25553181

  6. Neuroepithelial bodies as mechanotransducers in the intrapulmonary airway epithelium: involvement of TRPC5.

    PubMed

    Lembrechts, Robrecht; Brouns, Inge; Schnorbusch, Kathy; Pintelon, Isabel; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2012-09-01

    In rodent lungs, a major part of the myelinated vagal airway afferents selectively contacts pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs). Because most myelinated vagal airway afferents concern physiologically characterized mechanoreceptors, the present study aimed at unraveling the potential involvement of NEB cells in transducing mechanosensory information from the airways to the central nervous system. Physiological studies were performed using confocal Ca(2+) imaging of airway epithelium in murine lung slices. Mechanical stimulation by short-term application of a mild hypoosmotic solution (230 mosmol) resulted in a selective, fast, reversible, and reproducible Ca(2+) rise in NEB cells. Other airway epithelial cells could only be activated using more severe hypoosmotic stimuli (< 200 mosmol). NEB cells selectively expressed the Ca(2+)-permeable osmo- and mechanosensitive transient receptor potential canonical channel 5 (TRPC5) in their apical membranes, whereas immunoreactivity for TRP vanilloid-4 and TRP melastatin-3 was abundant in virtually all other airway epithelial cells. Hypoosmotic activation of NEB cells was prevented by GsMTx-4, an inhibitor of mechanosensitive ion channels, and by SKF96365, an inhibitor of TRPC channels. Short application of gadolinium, reported to activate TRPC5 channels, evoked a transient Ca(2+) rise in NEB cells. Osmomechanical activation of NEB cells gave rise to a typical delayed activation of Clara-like cells due to the release of ATP from NEB cells. Because ATP may activate the NEB-associated P2X(2/3) ATP receptor expressing myelinated vagal afferents, the current observations strongly suggest that pulmonary NEB cells are fully equipped to initiate mechanosensory signal transduction to the central nervous system via a purinergic signaling pathway. PMID:22461428

  7. POU2AF1 Functions in the Human Airway Epithelium To Regulate Expression of Host Defense Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haixia; Brekman, Angelika; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Ou, Xuemei; Shaykhiev, Renat; Agosto-Perez, Francisco J; Wang, Rui; Walters, Matthew S; Salit, Jacqueline; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Staudt, Michelle R; Kaner, Robert J; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-04-01

    In the process of seeking novel lung host defense regulators by analyzing genome-wide RNA sequence data from normal human airway epithelium, we detected expression of POU domain class 2-associating factor 1 (POU2AF1), a known transcription cofactor previously thought to be expressed only in lymphocytes. Lymphocyte contamination of human airway epithelial samples obtained by bronchoscopy and brushing was excluded by immunohistochemistry staining, the observation of upregulation of POU2AF1 in purified airway basal stem/progenitor cells undergoing differentiation, and analysis of differentiating single basal cell clones. Lentivirus-mediated upregulation of POU2AF1 in airway basal cells induced upregulation of host defense genes, including MX1, IFIT3, IFITM, and known POU2AF1 downstream genes HLA-DRA, ID2, ID3, IL6, and BCL6. Interestingly, expression of these genes paralleled changes of POU2AF1 expression during airway epithelium differentiation in vitro, suggesting POU2AF1 helps to maintain a host defense tone even in pathogen-free condition. Cigarette smoke, a known risk factor for airway infection, suppressed POU2AF1 expression both in vivo in humans and in vitro in human airway epithelial cultures, accompanied by deregulation of POU2AF1 downstream genes. Finally, enhancing POU2AF1 expression in human airway epithelium attenuated the suppression of host defense genes by smoking. Together, these findings suggest a novel function of POU2AF1 as a potential regulator of host defense genes in the human airway epithelium. PMID:26927796

  8. Effect of azelastine on sulphur dioxide induced impairment of ciliary motility in airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Chiyotani, A; Sakai, N; Takeyama, K; Konno, K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The effect of azelastine on airway mucociliary transport function was studied by measuring ciliary motility of human bronchial epithelium in vitro with a photoelectric method. METHOD--Bronchial epithelial cells were obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, mounted in a Rose chamber, and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. The preparations were placed on a microscope stage equipped with an illuminator, and the variations of light intensity caused by ciliary beating were detected by a photometer. RESULTS--The addition of azelastine to the perfusate increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in a dose dependent manner without ciliary discoordination. The mean (SE) maximal increase from the baseline value and the concentration required to produce a half maximal effect were 27.0 (4.2)% and 9.2 x 10(-6) mol/l, respectively. Exposure of the cells to the perfusate containing 3 ppm sulphur dioxide rapidly decreased CBF by 59.2 (5.0)%, and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels from 38.1 (4.3) to 10.1 (2.4) pmol/mg protein. This effect was prevented by pretreatment of cells with azelastine in a dose dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS--Azelastine not only stimulates ciliary motility of airway epithelium and hence mucociliary transport function, but may also protect against sulphur dioxide induced ciliary dysfunction, probably by inhibiting intracellular cyclic AMP loss. PMID:8322244

  9. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits. PMID:23127499

  10. Physiological Impact of Abnormal Lipoxin A4 Production on Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelium and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation. PMID:25866809

  11. Regulation of human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, J H; Widdicombe, J G

    1995-01-01

    Human airways are lined with a film of liquid from 5-100 microns in depth, consisting of a periciliary sol around and a mucous gel above the cilia. Microscopical studies have shown the sol to be invariably the same depth as the length of the cilia, and we discuss possible reasons for this. The composition and sources of the airway surface liquid are also described. In addition the forces regulating its volume are analyzed. Several airway diseases are characterised by dramatic changes in the volume and composition of airway liquid. We review recent research suggesting that the accumulation of airway mucous secretions in cystic fibrosis is caused by alterations in active transport of ions and water across both the surface and gland epithelia. PMID:7740210

  12. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal. PMID:11571577

  13. Stochastic homeostasis in human airway epithelium is achieved by neutral competition of basal cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H; Nadarajan, Parthiban; Graham, Trevor A; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Brown, James M; Falzon, Mary; Nye, Emma; Poulsom, Richard; Lawrence, David; Wright, Nicholas A; McDonald, Stuart; Giangreco, Adam; Simons, Benjamin D; Janes, Sam M

    2013-01-01

    Lineage tracing approaches have provided new insights into the cellular mechanisms that support tissue homeostasis in mice. However, the relevance of these discoveries to human epithelial homeostasis and its alterations in disease is unknown. By developing a novel quantitative approach for the analysis of somatic mitochondrial mutations that are accumulated over time, we demonstrate that the human upper airway epithelium is maintained by an equipotent basal progenitor cell population, in which the chance loss of cells due to lineage commitment is perfectly compensated by the duplication of neighbours, leading to “neutral drift” of the clone population. Further, we show that this process is accelerated in the airways of smokers, leading to intensified clonal consolidation and providing a background for tumorigenesis. This study provides a benchmark to show how somatic mutations provide quantitative information on homeostatic growth in human tissues, and a platform to explore factors leading to dysregulation and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00966.001 PMID:24151545

  14. In vivo antioxidant gene expression in human airway epithelium of normal individuals exposed to 100% O2.

    PubMed

    Erzurum, S C; Danel, C; Gillissen, A; Chu, C S; Trapnell, B C; Crystal, R G

    1993-09-01

    Human bronchial epithelium is exquisitely sensitive to high O2 levels, with tracheobronchitis usually developing after 12 h of exposure to 100% O2. To evaluate whether this vulnerability results from inability of the bronchial epithelium to provide adequate antioxidant protection, we quantified antioxidant gene expression in bronchial epithelium of normal volunteers at baseline and after exposure to 100% O2 in vivo. After 14.8 +/- 0.2 h of 100% O2, 24 of 33 individuals had evidence of tracheobronchitis. Baseline gene expression of CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, and catalase in bronchial epithelium was very low (CuZnSOD 4.1 +/- 0.8 transcripts/cell, MnSOD 5.1 +/- 0.9, catalase 1.3 +/- 0.2), with control gamma-actin expression relatively abundant (50 +/- 6 transcripts/cell). Importantly, despite 100% O2 exposure sufficient to cause tracheobronchitis in most individuals, antioxidant mRNA transcripts/cell in bronchial epithelium did not increase (P > 0.5). Catalase activity in bronchial epithelium did not change after exposure to hyperoxia (P > 0.05). Total SOD activity increased mildly (P < 0.01) but not sufficiently to protect the epithelium. Together, the very low levels of expression of intracellular antioxidant enzymes and the inability to upregulate expression at the mRNA level with oxidant stress likely have a role in human airway epithelium susceptibility to hyperoxia. PMID:8226538

  15. Reconstituted Human Upper Airway Epithelium as 3-D In Vitro Model for Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    de Borja Callejas, Francisco; Martínez-Antón, Asunción; Alobid, Isam; Fuentes, Mireya; Cortijo, Julio; Picado, César

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary human airway epithelial cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) develop a well-differentiated epithelium. However, neither characterization of mucociliar differentiation overtime nor the inflammatory function of reconstituted nasal polyp (NP) epithelia have been described. Objectives 1st) To develop and characterize the mucociliar differentiation overtime of human epithelial cells of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) in ALI culture system; 2nd) To corroborate that 3D in vitro model of NP reconstituted epithelium maintains, compared to control nasal mucosa (NM), an inflammatory function. Methods Epithelial cells were obtained from 9 NP and 7 control NM, and differentiated in ALI culture for 28 days. Mucociliary differentiation was characterized at different times (0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days) using ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy; ΔNp63 (basal stem/progenitor cell), β-tubulin IV (cilia), and MUC5AC (goblet cell) expression by immunocytochemistry; and mucous (MUC5AC, MUC5B) and serous (Lactoferrin) secretion by ELISA. Inflammatory function of ALI cultures (at days 0, 14, and 28) through cytokine (IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) and chemokine (RANTES, MIG, MCP-1, IP-10, eotaxin-1, and GM-CSF) production was analysed by CBA (Cytometric Bead Array). Results In both NP and control NM ALI cultures, pseudostratified epithelium with ciliated, mucus-secreting, and basal cells were observed by electron microscopy at days 14 and 28. Displaying epithelial cell re-differentation, β-tubulin IV and MUC5AC positive cells increased, while ΔNp63 positive cells decreased overtime. No significant differences were found overtime in MUC5AC, MUC5B, and lactoferrin secretions between both ALI cultures. IL-8 and GM-CSF were significantly increased in NP compared to control NM regenerated epithelia. Conclusion Reconstituted epithelia from human NP epithelial cells cultured in ALI system provides a 3D in vitro model

  16. The role of p21 Waf1/Cip1 in large airway epithelium in smokers with and without COPD.

    PubMed

    Chiappara, Giuseppina; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Virzì, Alessia; Sciarrino, Serafina; Ferraro, Maria; Bruno, Andreina; Montalbano, Angela Marina; Vitulo, Patrizio; Minervini, Marta Ida; Pipitone, Loredana; Pace, Elisabetta

    2013-10-01

    Airway epithelium alterations, including squamous cell metaplasia, characterize smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The p21 regulates cell apoptosis and differentiation and its role in COPD is largely unknown. Molecules regulating apoptosis (cytoplasmic p21, caspase-3), cell cycle (nuclear p21), proliferation (Ki67/PCNA), and metaplasia (survivin) in central airways from smokers (S), smokers-COPD (s-COPD) and non-smokers (Controls) were studied. The role of cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) in p21, survivin, apoptosis (caspase-3 and annexin-V binding) and proliferation was assessed in a bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE). Immunohistochemistry, image analysis in surgical samples and flow-cytometry and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester proliferative assay in 16HBE with/without CSE were applied. Cytoplasmic and nuclear p21, survivin, and Ki67 expression significantly increased in large airway epithelium in S and in s-COPD in comparison to Controls. Caspase-3 was similar in all the studied groups. p21 correlated with epithelial metaplasia, PCNA, and Ki67 expression. CSE increased cytoplasmic p21 and survivin expression but not apoptosis and inhibited the cell proliferation in 16HBE. In large airway epithelium of smokers with and without COPD, the cytoplasmic p21 inhibits cell apoptosis, promotes cell proliferation and correlates with squamous cell metaplasia thus representing a potential pre-oncogenic hallmark. PMID:23639631

  17. Airway Surface Dehydration Aggravates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Hallmarks of COPD in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seys, Leen J. M.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Dupont, Lisa L.; Desauter, Elke; Duerr, Julia; Seyhan Agircan, Ayca; Conickx, Griet; Joos, Guy F.; Brusselle, Guy G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Airway surface dehydration, caused by an imbalance between secretion and absorption of ions and fluid across the epithelium and/or increased epithelial mucin secretion, impairs mucociliary clearance. Recent evidence suggests that this mechanism may be implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of airway surface dehydration in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD remains unknown. Objective We aimed to investigate in vivo the effect of airway surface dehydration on several CS-induced hallmarks of COPD in mice with airway-specific overexpression of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC). Methods βENaC-Tg mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were exposed to air or CS for 4 or 8 weeks. Pathological hallmarks of COPD, including goblet cell metaplasia, mucin expression, pulmonary inflammation, lymphoid follicles, emphysema and airway wall remodelling were determined and lung function was measured. Results Airway surface dehydration in βENaC-Tg mice aggravated CS-induced airway inflammation, mucin expression and destruction of alveolar walls and accelerated the formation of pulmonary lymphoid follicles. Moreover, lung function measurements demonstrated an increased compliance and total lung capacity and a lower resistance and hysteresis in βENaC-Tg mice, compared to WT mice. CS exposure further altered lung function measurements. Conclusions We conclude that airway surface dehydration is a risk factor that aggravates CS-induced hallmarks of COPD. PMID:26066648

  18. Transfection of airway epithelium by stable PEGylated poly-L-lysine DNA nanoparticles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ziady, Assem-Galal; Gedeon, Christopher R; Miller, Timothy; Quan, William; Payne, Jennifer M; Hyatt, Susannah L; Fink, Tamara L; Muhammad, Osman; Oette, Sharon; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Pasumarthy, Murali K; Moen, Robert C; Cooper, Mark J; Davis, Pamela B

    2003-12-01

    DNA can be compacted using polyethylene glycol-substituted poly-L-lysine into discrete unimolecular (with respect to DNA) nanoparticles with minor diameter < 20 nm that are stable in normal saline for at least 23 months at 4 degrees C. We compared the activity of firefly luciferase in lungs of C57BL/6 mice that received 100 microg compacted plasmid in 25 microl saline (shown to be the optimal dose) via intratracheal or intranasal instillation with levels in animals given 100 microg naked plasmid or in untreated mice. Mice dosed with compacted DNA nanoparticles had peak activity of luciferase in lung at 2 days postinstillation, which declined in log-linear fashion with a half-life of 1.4 days. Luciferase activity in animals dosed with naked DNA was 200-fold less. Addition of polyethylene glycol to the complex was necessary for efficient gene transfer and animals that received DNA compacted with unmodified poly-L-lysine did not exhibit luciferase activity above background. Immunohistochemical staining for bacterial beta-galactosidase 2 days after administration of a compacted lacZ expression plasmid (n = 8) revealed expression predominantly in the dependent portions of the right lungs of mice, in alveolar and airway epithelial cells, though macrophages and sometimes endothelial cells also were transfected. No staining for beta-galactosidase was observed in uninjected animals (n = 4) or those dosed with naked lacZ plasmid (n = 7). Tissue survey for transgene expression shows expression only in lung and trachea following intranasal administration. Stable compacted DNA nanoparticles transfer exogenous genes to airway epithelium and show promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:14664796

  19. REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN AIRWAY SURFACE LIQUID COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid from canine airway surfaces was absorbed onto filter paper strips and analyzed. In resting conditions, tracheal surface liquid was hyperosmolal (330 mosmol/kg H2O) compared to plasma with raised Na(+1) (158 meq/l), Cl(-1) (134 meq/l), K(-1) (28 meq/l), and HCO3(-1) (32 meq...

  20. Trichostatin A Inhibits Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Induced by TGF-β1 in Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Min; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Tissue remodeling is believed to cause recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a novel clinical therapeutic target in many chronic airway diseases related with tissue remodeling. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of trichostatin A (TSA) on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in airway epithelium and nasal tissue. Materials and Methods A549 cells, primary nasal epithelial cells (PNECs), or inferior nasal turbinate organ culture were exposed to TSA prior to stimulation with TGF-β1. Expression levels of E-cadherin, vimentin, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), and HDAC4 were determined by western blotting and/or immunofluorescent staining. Hyperacetylation of histone H2 and H4 by TSA was measured by western blotting. After siHDAC transfection, the effects of HDAC2 and HDAC4 silencing on expression of E-cadherin, vimentin, fibronectin, α-SMA, HDAC2, and HDAC4 in TGF-β1-induced A549 were determined by RT-PCR and/or western blotting. We assessed the change in migration capacity of A549 cells by using cell migration assay and transwell invasion assay. Results TGF-β1 altered mRNA and protein expression levels of EMT markers including E-cadherin, vimentin, fibronectin, α-SMA, slug, and snail in A549 cells. Inhibition and silencing of HDAC2 and HDAC4 by TSA and siRNA enhanced TGF-β1-induced EMT in A549 cells. TSA blocked the effect of TGF-β1 on the migratory ability of A549 cells. In experiments using PNECs and inferior turbinate organ cultures, TSA suppressed expression of EMT markers induced by TGF-β1. Conclusions We showed that EMT is induced by TGF-β1 in airway epithelial cells and nasal tissue via activation of HDAC2 and HDAC4, and that inhibition of HDAC2 and HDAC4 by TSA reduces TGF-β1-induced EMT. This observation indicates that histone deacetylase inhibitors such as TSA could be potential candidates for treatment of

  1. Generation of Distal Airway Epithelium from Multipotent Human Foregut Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Nicholas R F; Sampaziotis, Fotios; Segeritz, Charis-Patricia; Hanley, Neil A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2015-07-15

    Collectively, lung diseases are one of the largest causes of premature death worldwide and represent a major focus in the field of regenerative medicine. Despite significant progress, only few stem cell platforms are currently available for cell-based therapy, disease modeling, and drug screening in the context of pulmonary disorders. Human foregut stem cells (hFSCs) represent an advantageous progenitor cell type that can be used to amplify large quantities of cells for regenerative medicine applications and can be derived from any human pluripotent stem cell line. Here, we further demonstrate the application of hFSCs by generating a near homogeneous population of early pulmonary endoderm cells coexpressing NKX2.1 and FOXP2. These progenitors are then able to form cells that are representative of distal airway epithelium that express NKX2.1, GATA6, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and secrete SFTPC. This culture system can be applied to hFSCs carrying the CFTR mutation Δf508, enabling the development of an in vitro model for cystic fibrosis. This platform is compatible with drug screening and functional validations of small molecules, which can reverse the phenotype associated with CFTR mutation. This is the first demonstration that multipotent endoderm stem cells can differentiate not only into both liver and pancreatic cells but also into lung endoderm. Furthermore, our study establishes a new approach for the generation of functional lung cells that can be used for disease modeling as well as for drug screening and the study of lung development. PMID:25758640

  2. An FGFR1-SPRY2 Signaling Axis Limits Basal Cell Proliferation in the Steady-State Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Balasooriya, Gayan I.; Johnson, Jo-Anne; Basson, M. Albert; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The steady-state airway epithelium has a low rate of stem cell turnover but can nevertheless mount a rapid proliferative response following injury. This suggests a mechanism to restrain proliferation at steady state. One such mechanism has been identified in skeletal muscle in which pro-proliferative FGFR1 signaling is antagonized by SPRY1 to maintain satellite cell quiescence. Surprisingly, we found that deletion of Fgfr1 or Spry2 in basal cells of the adult mouse trachea caused an increase in steady-state proliferation. We show that in airway basal cells, SPRY2 is post-translationally modified in response to FGFR1 signaling. This allows SPRY2 to inhibit intracellular signaling downstream of other receptor tyrosine kinases and restrain basal cell proliferation. An FGFR1-SPRY2 signaling axis has previously been characterized in cell lines in vitro. We now demonstrate an in vivo biological function of this interaction and thus identify an active signaling mechanism that maintains quiescence in the airway epithelium. PMID:27046834

  3. Early Life Ozone Exposure Results in Dysregulated Innate Immune Function and Altered microRNA Expression in Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Gerriets, Joan E.; Wang, Theodore T.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Evans, Michael J.; Fontaine, Justin H.; Miller, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with increased incidence of respiratory morbidity in humans; however the mechanism(s) behind the enhancement of susceptibility are unclear. We have previously reported that exposure to episodic ozone during postnatal development results in an attenuated peripheral blood cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that persists with maturity. As the lung is closely interfaced with the external environment, we hypothesized that the conducting airway epithelium of neonates may also be a target of immunomodulation by ozone. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated primary airway epithelial cell cultures derived from juvenile rhesus macaque monkeys with a prior history of episodic postnatal ozone exposure. Innate immune function was measured by expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 in primary cultures established following in vivo LPS challenge or, in response to in vitro LPS treatment. Postnatal ozone exposure resulted in significantly attenuated IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in primary cultures from juvenile animals; IL-8 mRNA was also significantly reduced. The effect of antecedent ozone exposure was modulated by in vivo LPS challenge, as primary cultures exhibited enhanced cytokine expression upon secondary in vitro LPS treatment. Assessment of potential IL-6-targeting microRNAs miR-149, miR-202, and miR-410 showed differential expression in primary cultures based upon animal exposure history. Functional assays revealed that miR-149 is capable of binding to the IL-6 3′ UTR and decreasing IL-6 protein synthesis in airway epithelial cell lines. Cumulatively, our findings suggest that episodic ozone during early life contributes to the molecular programming of airway epithelium, such that memory from prior exposures is retained in the form of a dysregulated IL-6 and IL-8 response to LPS; differentially expressed microRNAs such as miR-149 may play a role in the persistent modulation of the epithelial innate

  4. Computational analysis of microbubble flows in bifurcating airways: role of gravity, inertia, and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zielinski, Rachel; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2014-10-01

    Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy for patients with severe lung disorders, the microbubble flows generated during ventilation generate hydrodynamic stresses, including pressure and shear stress gradients, which damage the pulmonary epithelium. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics to investigate how gravity, inertia, and surface tension influence both microbubble flow patterns in bifurcating airways and the magnitude/distribution of hydrodynamic stresses on the airway wall. Direct interface tracking and finite element techniques were used to simulate bubble propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled bifurcating airway. Computational solutions of the full incompressible Navier-Stokes equation were used to investigate how inertia, gravity, and surface tension forces as characterized by the Reynolds (Re), Bond (Bo), and Capillary (Ca) numbers influence pressure and shear stress gradients at the airway wall. Gravity had a significant impact on flow patterns and hydrodynamic stress magnitudes where Bo > 1 led to dramatic changes in bubble shape and increased pressure and shear stress gradients in the upper daughter airway. Interestingly, increased pressure gradients near the bifurcation point (i.e., carina) were only elevated during asymmetric bubble splitting. Although changes in pressure gradient magnitudes were generally more sensitive to Ca, under large Re conditions, both Re and Ca significantly altered the pressure gradient magnitude. We conclude that inertia, gravity, and surface tension can all have a significant impact on microbubble flow patterns and hydrodynamic stresses in bifurcating airways. PMID:25068642

  5. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  6. Coordinate Control of Expression of Nrf2-Modulated Genes in the Human Small Airway Epithelium Is Highly Responsive to Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Ralf-Harto; Schwartz, Jamie D; De Bishnu, P; Ferris, Barbara; Omberg, Larsson; Mezey, Jason G; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an oxidant-responsive transcription factor known to induce detoxifying and antioxidant genes. Cigarette smoke, with its large oxidant content, is a major stress on the cells of small airway epithelium, which are vulnerable to oxidant damage. We assessed the role of cigarette smoke in activation of Nrf2 in the human small airway epithelium in vivo. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was used to sample the small airway epithelium in healthy-nonsmoker and healthy-smoker, and gene expression was assessed using microarrays. Relative to nonsmokers, Nrf2 protein in the small airway epithelium of smokers was activated and localized in the nucleus. The human homologs of 201 known murine Nrf2-modulated genes were identified, and 13 highly smoking-responsive Nrf2-modulated genes were identified. Construction of an Nrf2 index to assess the expression levels of these 13 genes in the airway epithelium of smokers showed coordinate control, an observation confirmed by quantitative PCR. This coordinate level of expression of the 13 Nrf2-modulated genes was independent of smoking history or demographic parameters. The Nrf2 index was used to identify two novel Nrf2-modulated, smoking-responsive genes, pirin (PIR) and UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1-family polypeptide A4 (UGT1A4). Both genes were demonstrated to contain functional antioxidant response elements in the promoter region. These observations suggest that Nrf2 plays an important role in regulating cellular defenses against smoking in the highly vulnerable small airway epithelium cells, and that there is variability within the human population in the Nrf2 responsiveness to oxidant burden. PMID:19593404

  7. Immunomodulation of airway epithelium cell activation by mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1α and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  8. Chlorinated pool attendance, airway epithelium defects and the risks of allergic diseases in adolescents: Interrelationships revealed by circulating biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Alfred Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier

    2015-07-15

    It has been suggested that allergic diseases might be epithelial disorders driven by various environmental stressors but the epidemiological evidence supporting this concept is limited. In a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents (365 boys; mean age, 15.5 yr), we measured the serum concentrations of Club cell protein (CC16), surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) and of total and aeroallergen-specific IgE. We used the serum CC16/SP-D concentration ratio as an index integrating changes in the permeability (SP-D) and secretory function (CC16) of the airway epithelium. In both sexes, early swimming in chlorinated pools emerged as the most consistent and strongest predictor of low CC16 and CC16/SP-D ratio in serum. Among girls, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds (lowest vs. highest tertile) for pet sensitization (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.19–8.22) and for hay fever in subjects sensitized to pollen (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.28–14.4). Among boys, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds for house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.11–3.73), for allergic rhinitis in subjects sensitized to HDM (OR 3.52, 95% CI 1.22–11.1) and for asthma in subjects sensitized to any aeroallergen (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.17–11.0), HDM (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.40–24.2) or pollen (OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.51–27.4). Odds for allergic sensitization or rhinitis also increased with increasing SP-D or decreasing CC16 in serum. Our findings support the hypothesis linking the development of allergic diseases to epithelial barrier defects due to host factors or environmental stressors such as early swimming in chlorinated pools. - Highlights: • We conducted a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents. • The airway epithelium integrity was evaluated by measuring serum pneumoproteins. • The risk of allergic diseases was associated with a defective airway epithelium. • Childhood swimming in chlorinated pools can cause persistent epithelial

  9. Expansive Generation of Functional Airway Epithelium From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Brendan A.S.; Alev, Cantas; Mechael, Rami; Salci, Kyle R.; Lee, Jung Bok; Fiebig-Comyn, Aline; Guezguez, Borhane; Wu, Yuping; Sheng, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Production of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived lung progenitors has broad applicability for drug screening and cell therapy; however, this is complicated by limitations in demarcating phenotypic changes with functional validation of airway cell types. In this paper, we reveal the potential of hESCs to produce multipotent lung progenitors using a combined growth factor and physical culture approach, guided by the use of novel markers LIFRα and NRP1. Lung specification of hESCs was achieved by priming differentiation via matrix-specific support, followed by air-liquid interface to allow generation of lung progenitors capable of in vitro maturation into airway epithelial cell types, resulting in functional characteristics such as secretion of pulmonary surfactant, ciliation, polarization, and acquisition of innate immune activity. This approach provided a robust expansion of lung progenitors, allowing in vivo assessment, which demonstrated that only fully differentiated hESC-derived airway cells were retained in the distal airway, where they aided in physiological recovery in immunocompromised mice receiving airway injury. Our study provides a basis for translational applications of hESCs for lung diseases. PMID:24300555

  10. Interleukin-1α drives the dysfunctional cross-talk of the airway epithelium and lung fibroblasts in COPD.

    PubMed

    Osei, Emmanuel T; Noordhoek, Jacobien A; Hackett, Tillie L; Spanjer, Anita I R; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Heijink, Irene H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been associated with aberrant epithelial-mesenchymal interactions resulting in inflammatory and remodelling processes. We developed a co-culture model using COPD and control-derived airway epithelial cells (AECs) and lung fibroblasts to understand the mediators that are involved in remodelling and inflammation in COPD.AECs and fibroblasts obtained from COPD and control lung tissue were grown in co-culture with fetal lung fibroblast or human bronchial epithelial cell lines. mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators, pro-fibrotic molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins were assessed.Co-culture resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-8/CXCL8 and heat shock protein (Hsp70) from lung fibroblasts, and decreased expression of ECM molecules (e.g. collagen, decorin) that was not different between control and COPD-derived primary cells. This pro-inflammatory effect was mediated by epithelial-derived IL-1α and increased upon epithelial exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). When exposed to CSE, COPD-derived AECs elicited a stronger IL-1α response compared with control-derived airway epithelium and this corresponded with a significantly enhanced IL-8 release from lung fibroblasts.We demonstrate that, through IL-1α production, AECs induce a pro-inflammatory lung fibroblast phenotype that is further enhanced with CSE exposure in COPD, suggesting an aberrant epithelial-fibroblast interaction in COPD. PMID:27418555

  11. Repair and regeneration of tracheal surface epithelium and submucosal glands in a mouse model of hypoxic-ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    HEGAB, AHMED E.; NICKERSON, DEREK W.; HA, VI LUAN; DARMAWAN, DAPHNE O.; GOMPERTS, BRIGITTE N.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The heterotopic syngeneic tracheal transplant mouse model is an acute hypoxic-ischemic injury model that undergoes complete repair and regeneration. We hypothesized that the repair and regeneration process of the surface epithelium and submucosal glands would occur in a reproducible pattern that could be followed by the expression of specific markers of epithelial cell types. Methods We used the syngeneic heterotopic tracheal transplant model to develop a temporal and spatial map of cellular repair and regeneration by examining the tracheal grafts at post-transplant days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14. We used pulsed BrdU and immunofluorescent staining to identify and follow proliferating and repairing cell populations. Results We confirmed the reproducibility of the injury and repair in the model and we found a distinct sequence of reappearance of the various stem/ progenitor and differentiated cell populations of the tracheal surface epithelium and submucosal glands. In the initial phase, the basal and duct cells that survived the injury proliferated to re-epithelialize the basement membrane with K5 and K14 expressing cells. Then these cells proliferated further and differentiated to restore the function of the epithelium. During this repair process, TROP-2 marked all repairing submucosal gland tubules and ducts. Non-CCSP-expressing serous cells were found to differentiate 4–5 days before Clara, mucus and ciliated cells. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the reparative process of the airway epithelium will allow us to identify cell-specific mechanisms of repair that could be used as novel therapeutic approaches for abnormal repair leading to airway diseases. PMID:22617027

  12. Surface characteristics of isopod digestive gland epithelium studied by SEM.

    PubMed

    Millaku, Agron; Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Godec, Matjaz; Torkar, Matjaz; Jenko, Monika; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The structure of the digestive gland epithelium of a terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber has been investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and light microscopy in order to provide evidence on morphology of the gland epithelial surface in animals from a stock culture. We investigated the shape of cells, extrusion of lipid droplets, shape and distribution of microvilli, and the presence of bacteria on the cell surface. A total of 22 animals were investigated and we found some variability in the appearance of the gland epithelial surface. Seventeen of the animals had dome-shaped digestive gland "normal" epithelial cells, which were densely and homogeneously covered by microvilli and varying proportions of which extruded lipid droplets. On the surface of microvilli we routinely observed sparsely distributed bacteria of different shapes. Five of the 22 animals had "abnormal" epithelial cells with a significantly altered shape. In three of these animals, the cells were much smaller, partly or completely flat or sometimes pyramid-like. A thick layer of bacteria was detected on the microvillous border, and in places, the shape and size of microvilli were altered. In two animals, hypertrophic cells containing large vacuoles were observed indicating a characteristic intracellular infection. The potential of SEM in morphological investigations of epithelial surfaces is discussed. PMID:20155290

  13. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior. PMID:26586376

  14. BMP signaling and cellular dynamics during regeneration of airway epithelium from basal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Tomomi; Gao, Xia; Hong, Charles C.; Hotten, Danielle; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The pseudostratified epithelium of the lung contains ciliated and secretory luminal cells and basal stem/progenitor cells. To identify signals controlling basal cell behavior we screened factors that alter their self-renewal and differentiation in a clonal organoid (tracheosphere) assay. This revealed that inhibitors of the canonical BMP signaling pathway promote proliferation but do not affect lineage choice, whereas exogenous Bmp4 inhibits proliferation and differentiation. We therefore followed changes in BMP pathway components in vivo in the mouse trachea during epithelial regeneration from basal cells after injury. The findings suggest that BMP signaling normally constrains proliferation at steady state and this brake is released transiently during repair by the upregulation of endogenous BMP antagonists. Early in repair, the packing of epithelial cells along the basal lamina increases, but density is later restored by active extrusion of apoptotic cells. Systemic administration of the BMP antagonist LDN-193189 during repair initially increases epithelial cell number but, following the shedding phase, normal density is restored. Taken together, these results reveal crucial roles for both BMP signaling and cell shedding in homeostasis of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:26811382

  15. Mitotic Asynchrony Induces Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Secretion from Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Sarah E.; Benton, Angela S.; Watson, Alan M.; Kureshi, Suraiya; Reeves, Erica M. K.; Damsker, Jesse; Wang, Zuyi; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Anderson, Julia; Williams, Aaron M.; Lee, Amber J. Y.; Hayes, Kathleen; Rose, Mary C.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    We recently proposed that mitotic asynchrony in repairing tissue may underlie chronic inflammation and fibrosis, where immune cell infiltration is secondary to proinflammatory cross-talk among asynchronously repairing adjacent tissues. Building on our previous finding that mitotic asynchrony is associated with proinflammatory/fibrotic cytokine secretion (e.g., transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1), here we provide evidence supporting cause-and-effect. Under normal conditions, primary airway epithelial basal cell populations undergo mitosis synchronously and do not secrete proinflammatory or profibrotic cytokines. However, when pairs of nonasthmatic cultures were mitotically synchronized at 12 hours off-set and then combined, the mixed cell populations secreted elevated levels of TGF-β1. This shows that mitotic asynchrony is not only associated with but is also causative of TGF-β1 secretion. The secreted cytokines and other mediators from asthmatic cells were not the cause of asynchronous regeneration; synchronously mitotic nonasthmatic epithelia exposed to conditioned media from asthmatic cells did not show changes in mitotic synchrony. We also tested if resynchronization of regenerating asthmatic airway epithelia reduces TGF-β1 secretion and found that pulse-dosed dexamethasone, simvastatin, and aphidicolin were all effective. We therefore propose a new model for chronic inflammatory and fibrotic conditions where an underlying factor is mitotic asynchrony. PMID:24669775

  16. Correction of F508del CFTR in airway epithelium using nanoparticles delivering triplex-forming PNAs

    PubMed Central

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Anandalingam, Kavitha; Fields, Rachel J.; Caputo, Christina; Kopic, Sascha; Gupta, Anisha; Quijano, Elias; Polikoff, Lee; Kong, Yong; Bahal, Raman; Geibel, John P; Glazer, Peter M.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Egan, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disorder most commonly caused by the F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is not readily amenable to gene therapy because of its systemic nature and challenges including in vivo gene delivery and transient gene expression. Here, we use triplex-forming PNA molecules and donor DNA in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles to correct F508del. We confirm modification with sequencing and a functional chloride efflux assay. In vitro correction of chloride efflux occurs in up to 25% of human cells. Deep sequencing reveals negligible off-target effects in partially homologous sites. Intranasal application of nanoparticles in CF mice produces changes in nasal epithelium potential differences consistent with corrected CFTR, with gene correction also detected in lung tissue. This work represents facile genome engineering in vivo with oligonucleotides using a nanoparticle system to achieve clinically relevant levels of gene editing without off-target effects. PMID:25914116

  17. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Watson, Julie K; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D; Rawlins, Emma L

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  18. Src regulates cigarette smoke-induced ceramide generation via neutral sphingomyelinase 2 in the airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, Samuel; Vu, Simon; Filosto, Simone; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2015-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that the neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) 2 is the sole sphingomyelinase activated during cigarette smoke (CS)-induced oxidative stress of human airway epithelial cells, leading to ceramide generation and subsequent apoptosis of affected cells. Since then, we reported that nSMase2 is a phosphoprotein, the degree of enzymatic activity and stability of which are dictated by its degree of phosphorylation. Simultaneously, the non-receptor tyrosine kinase and proto-oncogene Src has increasingly become a target of interest in both smoking-related lung injury, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Within this context, we tested and now present Src as a regulator of ceramide generation via modulation of nSMase2 phosphorylation and activity during CS-induced oxidative stress. Specifically, we provide evidence that Src activity is necessary for both CS-induced ceramide accumulation in vivo (129/Sv mice) and in vitro (human airway epithelial cells) and for nSMase2 activity during CS-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, because nSMase2 is exclusively phosphorylated on serines, we show that this occurs through Src-dependent activation of the serine/threonine kinase p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase during oxidative stress. Finally, we provide evidence that Src and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activities are critical for regulating nSMase2 phosphorylation. This study provides insights into a molecular target involved in smoking-related lung injury, represented here as nSMase2, and its modulation by the oncogene Src. PMID:25347576

  19. Src Regulates Cigarette Smoke–Induced Ceramide Generation via Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 in the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Samuel; Vu, Simon; Filosto, Simone

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) 2 is the sole sphingomyelinase activated during cigarette smoke (CS)–induced oxidative stress of human airway epithelial cells, leading to ceramide generation and subsequent apoptosis of affected cells. Since then, we reported that nSMase2 is a phosphoprotein, the degree of enzymatic activity and stability of which are dictated by its degree of phosphorylation. Simultaneously, the non–receptor tyrosine kinase and proto-oncogene Src has increasingly become a target of interest in both smoking-related lung injury, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Within this context, we tested and now present Src as a regulator of ceramide generation via modulation of nSMase2 phosphorylation and activity during CS-induced oxidative stress. Specifically, we provide evidence that Src activity is necessary for both CS-induced ceramide accumulation in vivo (129/Sv mice) and in vitro (human airway epithelial cells) and for nSMase2 activity during CS-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, because nSMase2 is exclusively phosphorylated on serines, we show that this occurs through Src-dependent activation of the serine/threonine kinase p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase during oxidative stress. Finally, we provide evidence that Src and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activities are critical for regulating nSMase2 phosphorylation. This study provides insights into a molecular target involved in smoking-related lung injury, represented here as nSMase2, and its modulation by the oncogene Src. PMID:25347576

  20. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Julie K.; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D.; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  1. Vulnerability of the human airway epithelium to hyperoxia. Constitutive expression of the catalase gene in human bronchial epithelial cells despite oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Yoo, J H; Erzurum, S C; Hay, J G; Lemarchand, P; Crystal, R G

    1994-01-01

    Although catalase is a major intracellular antioxidant, the expression of the human catalase gene appears to be limited in the airway epithelium, making these cells vulnerable to oxidant stress. The basis for this limited gene expression was examined by evaluation of the expression of the endogenous gene in human bronchial epithelial cells in response to hyperoxia. Hyperoxia failed to upregulate endogenous catalase gene expression, in contrast to a marked increase in expression of the heat shock protein gene. Sequence analysis of 1.7 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the human catalase gene showed features of a "house-keeping" gene (no TATA box, high GC content, multiple CCAAT boxes, and transcription start sites). Transfection of human bronchial epithelial cells with fusion genes composed of various lengths of the catalase 5'-flanking region and luciferase as a reporter gene showed low level constitutive promoter activity that did not change after exposure to hyperoxia. Importantly, using a replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human catalase cDNA, levels of catalase were significantly increased in human airway epithelial cells and this was associated with increased survival of the cells when exposed to hyperoxia. These observations provide a basis for understanding the sensitivity of the human airway epithelium to oxidant stress and a strategy for protecting the epithelium from such injury. PMID:8282800

  2. Characterization of endocytosis and exocytosis of cationic nanoparticles in airway epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youta Dombu, Christophe; Kroubi, Maya; Zibouche, Rima; Matran, Regis; Betbeder, Didier

    2010-09-01

    A major challenge of drug delivery using colloids via the airway is to understand the mechanism implied in their interactions with epithelial cells. The purpose of this work was to characterize the process of endocytosis and exocytosis of cationic nanoparticles (NPs) made of maltodextrin which were developed as a delivery system for antigens in vaccine applications. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that these NP are rapidly endocytosed after as little as 3 min incubation, and that the endocytosis was also faster than NP binding since most of the NPs were found in the middle of the cells around the nuclei. A saturation limit was observed after a 40 min incubation, probably due to an equilibrium becoming established between endocytosis and exocytosis. Endocytosis was dramatically reduced at 4 °C compared with 37 °C, or by NaN3 treatment, both results suggesting an energy dependent process. Protamine pretreatment of the cells inhibited NPs uptake and we found that clathrin pathway is implied in their endocytosis. Cholesterol depletion increased NP uptake by 300% and this phenomenon was explained by the fact that cholesterol depletion totally blocked NP exocytosis. These results suggest that these cationic NPs interact with anionic sites, are quickly endocytosed via the clathrin pathway and that their exocytosis is cholesterol dependent, and are similar to those obtained in other studies with viruses such as influenza.

  3. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    PubMed

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes. PMID:22247295

  4. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  5. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20-70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  6. Administration of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor Inhibits Airway Inflammation and Remodeling in Chronic OVA-Induced Mice via VEGF Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Wangjian; Su, Mei; Huang, Mao; Cai, Jiankang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a recently discovered antiangiogenesis protein. PEDF possesses powerful anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiangiogenic, and antifibrosis properties. It has been reported that PEDF can regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. This study aimed to evaluate whether recombinant PEDF protein could attenuate allergic airway inflammation and airway remodeling via the negative regulation of VEGF using a murine model of chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Methods In an in vivo experiment, mice sensitized with OVA were chronically airway challenged with aerosolized 1% OVA solution for 8 weeks. Treated mice were given injections of recombinant PEDF protein (50 or 100 µg/kg body weight) via the tail vein. In an in vitro experiment, we investigated the effects of recombinant PEDF protein on VEGF release levels in BEAS-2B cells stimulated with IL-1β. Results Recombinant PEDF protein significantly inhibited eosinophilic airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway remodeling, including goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial collagen deposition, and airway smooth muscle hypertrophy. In addition, recombinant PEDF protein suppressed the enhanced expression of VEGF protein in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in OVA-challenged chronically allergic mice. In the in vitro experiment, VEGF expression was increased after IL-1β stimulation. Pretreatment with 50 and 100 ng/mL of recombinant PEDF protein significantly attenuated the increase in VEGF release levels in a concentration-dependent manner in BEAS-2B cells stimulated by IL-1β. Conclusions These results suggest that recombinant PEDF protein may abolish the development of characteristic features of chronic allergic asthma via VEGF suppression, providing a potential treatment option for chronic airway inflammation diseases such as asthma. PMID:26739410

  7. Pattern of antioxidant and DNA repair gene expression in normal airway epithelium associated with lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Thomas; Crawford, Erin L; Mullins, D'Anna; Yoon, Youngsook; Hernandez, Dawn-Alita; Khuder, Sadik; Ruppel, Patricia L; Peters, Elizabeth; Oldfield, David J; Austermiller, Brad; Anders, John C; Willey, James C

    2009-11-15

    In previous studies, we reported that key antioxidant and DNA repair genes are regulated differently in normal bronchial epithelial cells of lung cancer cases compared with non-lung cancer controls. In an effort to develop a biomarker for lung cancer risk, we evaluated the transcript expressions of 14 antioxidant, DNA repair, and transcription factor genes in normal bronchial epithelial cells (HUGO names CAT, CEBPG, E2F1, ERCC4, ERCC5, GPX1, GPX3, GSTM3, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTZ1, MGST1, SOD1, and XRCC1). A test comprising these 14 genes accurately identified the lung cancer cases in two case-control studies. The receiver operating characteristic-area under the curve was 0.82 (95% confidence intervals, 0.68-0.91) for the first case-control set (25 lung cancer cases and 24 controls), and 0.87 (95% confidence intervals, 0.73-0.96) for the second set (18 cases and 22 controls). For each gene included in the test, the key difference between cases and controls was altered distribution of transcript expression among cancer cases compared with controls, with more lung cancer cases expressing at both extremes among all genes (Kolmorogov-Smirnov test, D = 0.0795; P = 0.041). A novel statistical approach was used to identify the lower and upper boundaries of transcript expression that optimally classifies cases and controls for each gene. Based on the data presented here, there is an increased prevalence of lung cancer diagnosis among individuals that express a threshold number of key antioxidant, DNA repair, and transcription factor genes at either very high or very low levels in the normal airway epithelium. PMID:19887610

  8. Chlorinated pool attendance, airway epithelium defects and the risks of allergic diseases in adolescents: Interrelationships revealed by circulating biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Alfred; Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that allergic diseases might be epithelial disorders driven by various environmental stressors but the epidemiological evidence supporting this concept is limited. In a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents (365 boys; mean age, 15.5 yr), we measured the serum concentrations of Club cell protein (CC16), surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) and of total and aeroallergen-specific IgE. We used the serum CC16/SP-D concentration ratio as an index integrating changes in the permeability (SP-D) and secretory function (CC16) of the airway epithelium. In both sexes, early swimming in chlorinated pools emerged as the most consistent and strongest predictor of low CC16 and CC16/SP-D ratio in serum. Among girls, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds (lowest vs. highest tertile) for pet sensitization (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.19-8.22) and for hay fever in subjects sensitized to pollen (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.28-14.4). Among boys, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds for house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.11-3.73), for allergic rhinitis in subjects sensitized to HDM (OR 3.52, 95% CI 1.22-11.1) and for asthma in subjects sensitized to any aeroallergen (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.17-11.0), HDM (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.40-24.2) or pollen (OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.51-27.4). Odds for allergic sensitization or rhinitis also increased with increasing SP-D or decreasing CC16 in serum. Our findings support the hypothesis linking the development of allergic diseases to epithelial barrier defects due to host factors or environmental stressors such as early swimming in chlorinated pools. PMID:25863185

  9. Responses of well-differentiated nasal epithelial cells exposed to particles: Role of the epithelium in airway inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, Floriane; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Chamot, Christophe; Marano, Francelyne; Dazy, Anne-Catherine . E-mail: dazy@paris7.jussieu.fr

    2006-09-15

    Numerous epidemiological studies support the contention that ambient air pollution particles can adversely affect human health. To explain the acute inflammatory process in airways exposed to particles, a number of in vitro studies have been performed on cells grown submerged on plastic and poorly differentiated, and on cell lines, the physiology of which is somewhat different from that of well-differentiated cells. In order to obtain results using a model system in which epithelial cells are similar to those of the human airway in vivo, apical membranes of well-differentiated human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) were exposed for 24 h to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and Paris urban air particles (PM{sub 2.5}). DEP and PM{sub 2.5} (10-80 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) stimulated both IL-8 and amphiregulin (ligand of EGFR) secretion exclusively towards the basal compartment. In contrast, there was no IL-1{beta} secretion and only weak non-reproducible secretion of TNF-{alpha}. IL-6 and GM-CSF were consistently stimulated towards the apical compartment and only when cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5}. ICAM-1 protein expression on cell surfaces remained low after particle exposure, although it increased after TNF-{alpha} treatment. Internalization of particles, which is believed to initiate oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine expression, was restricted to small nanoparticles ({<=} 40 nm). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected, and DEP were more efficient than PM{sub 2.5}. Collectively, our results suggest that airway epithelial cells exposed to particles augment the local inflammatory response in the lung but cannot alone initiate a systemic inflammatory response.

  10. Surface fluid absorption and secretion in small airways

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, A K M; Quinton, P M

    2012-01-01

    Native small airways must remain wet enough to be pliable and support ciliary clearance, but dry enough to remain patent for gas flow. The airway epithelial lining must both absorb and secrete ions to maintain a critical level of fluid on its surface. Despite frequent involvement in lung diseases, the minuscule size has limited studies of peripheral airways. To meet this challenge, we used a capillary to construct an Ussing chamber (area <1 mm2) to measure electrolyte transport across small native airways (∼1 mm ø) from pig lung. Transepithelial potentials (Vt) were recorded in open circuit conditions while applying constant current pulses across the luminal surface of dissected airways to calculate transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt) and equivalent short circuit current () in the presence and absence of selected Na+ and Cl− transport inhibitors (amiloride, GlyH-101, Niflumic acid) and agonists (Forskolin + IBMX, UTP). Considered together the responses suggest an organ composed of both secreting and absorbing epithelia that constitutively and concurrently transport fluids into and out of the airway, i.e. in opposite directions. Since the epithelial lining of small airways is arranged in long, accordion-like rows of pleats and folds that run axially down the lumen, we surmise that cells within the pleats are mainly secretory while the cells of the folds are principally absorptive. This structural arrangement could provide local fluid transport from within the pleats toward the luminal folds that may autonomously regulate the local surface fluid volume for homeostasis while permitting acute responses to maintain clearance. PMID:22547637

  11. Regulation of normal and cystic fibrosis airway surface liquid volume by phasic shear stress.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C

    2006-01-01

    The physical removal of viruses and bacteria on the mucociliary escalator is an important aspect of the mammalian lung's innate defense mechanism. The volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) present in the respiratory tract is a critical determinant of both mucus hydration and the rate of mucus clearance from the lung. ASL volume is maintained by the predominantly ciliated epithelium via coordinated regulation of (a) absorption, by the epithelial Na+ channel, and (b) secretion, by the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (CaCC) and CFTR. This review provides an update on our current understanding of how shear stress regulates ASL volume height in normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia through extracellular ATP- and adenosine (ADO)-mediated pathways that modulate ion transport and ASL volume homeostasis. We also discuss (a) how derangement of the ADO-CFTR pathway renders CF airways vulnerable to viral infections that deplete ASL volume and produce mucus stasis, and (b) potential shear stress-dependent therapies for CF. PMID:16460283

  12. Cultivated Oral Mucosa Epithelium in Ocular Surface Reconstruction in Aniridia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Orzechowska-Wylegala, Boguslawa; Wowra, Bogumil; Wroblewska-Czajka, Ewa; Grolik, Maria; Szczubialka, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Maria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Wylegala, Edward A.; Micali, Antonio; Aragona, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Efficacy of cultivated oral mucosa epithelial transplantation (COMET) procedure in corneal epithelium restoration of aniridia patients. Methods. Study subjects were aniridia patients (13 patients; 17 eyes) with irregular, vascular conjunctival pannus involving visual axis who underwent autologous transplantation of cultivated epithelium. For the procedure oral mucosa epithelial cells were obtained from buccal mucosa with further enzymatic treatment. Suspension of single cells was seeded on previously prepared denuded amniotic membrane. Cultures were carried on culture dishes inserts in the presence of the inactivated with Mitomycin C monolayer of 3T3 fibroblasts. Cultures were carried for seven days. Stratified oral mucosa epithelium with its amniotic membrane carrier was transplanted on the surgically denuded corneal surface of aniridia patients with total or subtotal limbal stem cell deficiency. Outcome Measures. Corneal surface, epithelial regularity, and visual acuity improvement were evaluated. Results. At the end of the observation period, 76.4% of the eyes had regular transparent epithelium and 23.5% had developed epithelial defects or central corneal haze; in 88.2% of cases visual acuity had increased. VA range was from HM 0.05 before the surgery to HM up to 0.1 after surgery. Conclusion. Application of cultivated oral mucosa epithelium restores regular epithelium on the corneal surface with moderate improvement in quality of vision. PMID:26451366

  13. Molecular insights into the physiology of the ‘thin film’ of airway surface liquid

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, R C

    1999-01-01

    The epithelia that line the airways of the lung exhibit two general functions: (1) airway epithelia in all regions ‘defend’ the lung against infectious and noxious agents; and (2) airway epithelia in the proximal regions replenish water lost from airway surfaces, i.e. the ‘insensible water loss’, consequent to conditioning inspired air. How airway epithelia perform both functions, and co-ordinate them in health and disease, is the subject of this review. PMID:10200413

  14. Site of Fluid Secretion in Small Airways.

    PubMed

    Flores-Delgado, Guillermo; Lytle, Christian; Quinton, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    The secretion and management of readily transportable airway surface liquid (ASL) along the respiratory tract is crucial for the clearance of debris and pathogens from the lungs. In proximal large airways, submucosal glands (SMGs) can produce ASL. However, in distal small airways, SMGs are absent, although the lumens of these airways are, uniquely, highly plicated. Little is known about the production and maintenance of ASL in small airways, but using electrophysiology, we recently found that native porcine small airways simultaneously secrete and absorb. How these airways can concurrently transport ASL in opposite directions is puzzling. Using high expression of the Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) 1 protein (SLC12a2) as a phenotypic marker for fluid secretory cells, immunofluorescence microscopy of porcine small airways revealed two morphologically separated sets of luminal epithelial cells. NKCC1 was abundantly expressed by most cells in the contraluminal regions of the pleats but highly expressed very infrequently by cells in the luminal folds of the epithelial plications. In larger proximal airways, the acini of SMGs expressed NKCC1 prominently, but cells expressing NKCC1 in the surface epithelium were sparse. Our findings indicate that, in the small airway, cells in the pleats of the epithelium secrete ASL, whereas, in the larger proximal airways, SMGs mainly secrete ASL. We propose a mechanism in which the locations of secretory cells in the base of pleats and of absorptive cells in luminal folds physically help maintain a constant volume of ASL in small airways. PMID:26562629

  15. Primary in vitro culture of porcine tracheal epithelial cells in an air-liquid interface as a model to study airway epithelium and Aspergillus fumigatus interactions.

    PubMed

    Khoufache, Khaled; Cabaret, Odile; Farrugia, Cécile; Rivollet, Danièle; Alliot, Annie; Allaire, Eric; Cordonnier, Catherine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Botterel, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    Since the airway epithelium is the first tissue encountered by airborne fungal spores, specific models are needed to study this interaction. We developed such a model using primary porcine tracheal epithelial cells (PTEC) as a possible alternative to the use of primary human cells. PTEC were obtained from pigs and were cultivated in an air-liquid interface. Fluorescent brightener was employed to quantify the internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. Potential differences (Vt) and transepithelial resistances (Rt) after challenge with the mycotoxin, verruculogen, were studied. Primers for porcine inflammatory mediator genes IL-8, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF were designed for a quantitative real-time PCR procedure to study cellular responses to challenges with A. fumigatus conidia. TEM showed the differentiation of ciliated cells and the PTEC ability to internalize conidia. The internalization rate was 21.9 ± 1.4% after 8 h of incubation. Verruculogen (10(-6) M) significantly increased Vt without having an effect on the Rt. Exposure of PTEC to live A. fumigatus conidia for 24 h induced a 10- to 40-fold increase in the mRNA levels of inflammatory mediator genes. PTEC behave similarly to human cells and are therefore a suitable alternative to human cells for studying interaction between airway epithelium and A. fumigatus. PMID:20608777

  16. Correlative Ultratructural Investigations of Airway Epithelium Following Experimental Exposure to Defined Air Pollutants and Lifestyle Exposure to Tobacco Smoke

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context: Investigations of cell/molecular level effects of in vivo exposure of airway mucosa of experimental animals to common irritant gases have demonstrated structural and physiological changes reflective of breaches in epithelial barrier function, presence of inflammatory cel...

  17. Autophagy plays an essential role in cigarette smoke-induced expression of MUC5AC in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Hong-Bin; Wang, Yong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Li, Zhou-Yang; Xuan, Nan-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Hua, Wen; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao; Chen, Zhi-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a common pathological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the molecular basis for this condition remains incompletely understood. We have previously demonstrated a critical role of autophagy in COPD pathogenesis through mediating apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the function of autophagy as well as its upstream and downstream signals in cigarette smoke-induced mucus production in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE), as well as the classical autophagy inducers starvation or Torin-1, significantly triggered MUC5AC expression, and inhibition of autophagy markedly attenuated CSE-induced mucus production. The CSE-induced autophagy was mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitoROS), which regulated mucin expression through the JNK and activator protein-1 pathway. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was also required for CSE-induced MUC5AC in HBE cells, but it exerted inconsiderable effects on the autophagy-JNK signaling cascade. Airways of mice with dysfunctional autophagy-related genes displayed a markedly reduced number of goblet cells and attenuated levels of Muc5ac in response to cigarette smoke exposure. These results altogether suggest that mitoROS-dependent autophagy is essential for cigarette smoke-induced mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelial cells, and reemphasize autophagy inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic airway diseases. PMID:27036871

  18. CONSTITUTIVE AND STIMULATED MCP-1, GROA, B, AND Y EXPRESSION IN HUMAN A AIRWAY EPITHELIUM AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Constitutive expression of mRNAs for GROa, GROB, GROY, and MCP-1, belonging to the chemokine family of 8-10 kD cytokines with chemotactic properties for granulocytes and monocytes, has been identified in freshly isolated human nasal and bronchial epithelium, and in bronchoalveola...

  19. Growth restriction of an experimental live attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine in human ciliated airway epithelium in vitro parallels attenuation in African green monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Scull, Margaret A.; Schmidt, Alexander C.; Murphy, Brian R.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are common causes of severe pediatric respiratory viral disease. We characterized wild-type HPIV2 infection in an in vitro model of human airway epithelium (HAE) and found that the virus replicates to high titer, sheds apically, targets ciliated cells, and induces minimal cytopathology. Replication of an experimental, live attenuated HPIV2 vaccine strain, containing both temperature sensitive (ts) and non-ts attenuating mutations, was restricted >30-fold compared to rHPIV2-WT in HAE at 32°C and exhibited little productive replication at 37°C. This restriction paralleled attenuation in the upper and lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, supporting the HAE model as an appropriate and convenient system for characterizing HPIV2 vaccine candidates. PMID:20139039

  20. 17β-Estradiol inhibits Ca2+-dependent homeostasis of airway surface liquid volume in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, Ray D.; Sun, Hengrui; Clunes, Lucy A.; Rasmussen, Julia E.; Stackhouse, James R.; Okada, Seiko F.; Fricks, Ingrid; Young, Steven L.; Tarran, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Normal airways homeostatically regulate the volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) through both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of ion and water transport. In cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect causes a lack of cAMP-regulated CFTR activity, leading to diminished Cl– and water secretion from airway epithelial cells and subsequent mucus plugging, which serves as the focus for infections. Females with CF exhibit reduced survival compared with males with CF, although the mechanisms underlying this sex-related disadvantage are unknown. Despite the lack of CFTR, CF airways retain a limited capability to regulate ASL volume, as breathing-induced ATP release activates salvage purinergic pathways that raise intracellular Ca2+ concentration to stimulate an alternate pathway to Cl– secretion. We hypothesized that estrogen might affect this pathway by reducing the ability of airway epithelia to respond appropriately to nucleotides. We found that uridine triphosphate–mediated (UTP-mediated) Cl– secretion was reduced during the periovulatory estrogen maxima in both women with CF and normal, healthy women. Estrogen also inhibited Ca2+ signaling and ASL volume homeostasis in non-CF and CF airway epithelia by attenuating Ca2+ influx. This inhibition of Ca2+ signaling was prevented and even potentiated by estrogen antagonists such as tamoxifen, suggesting that antiestrogens may be beneficial in the treatment of CF lung disease because they increase Cl– secretion in the airways. PMID:19033671

  1. Replication of an Autonomous Human Parvovirus in Non-dividing Human Airway Epithelium Is Facilitated through the DNA Damage and Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xuefeng; Yan, Ziying; Cheng, Fang; Engelhardt, John F.; Qiu, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) belongs to the genus Bocaparvovirus of the Parvoviridae family, and is an emerging human pathogenic respiratory virus. In vitro, HBoV1 infects well-differentiated/polarized primary human airway epithelium (HAE) cultured at an air-liquid interface (HAE-ALI). Although it is well known that autonomous parvovirus replication depends on the S phase of the host cells, we demonstrate here that the HBoV1 genome amplifies efficiently in mitotically quiescent airway epithelial cells of HAE-ALI cultures. Analysis of HBoV1 DNA in infected HAE-ALI revealed that HBoV1 amplifies its ssDNA genome following a typical parvovirus rolling-hairpin DNA replication mechanism. Notably, HBoV1 infection of HAE-ALI initiates a DNA damage response (DDR) with activation of all three phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–related kinases (PI3KKs). We found that the activation of the three PI3KKs is required for HBoV1 genome amplification; and, more importantly, we identified that two Y-family DNA polymerases, Pol η and Pol κ, are involved in HBoV1 genome amplification. Overall, we have provided an example of de novo DNA synthesis (genome amplification) of an autonomous parvovirus in non-dividing cells, which is dependent on the cellular DNA damage and repair pathways. PMID:26765330

  2. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    Pendrin (SLC26A4) is a Cl(-)/anion exchanger expressed in the epithelium of inflamed airways where it is thought to facilitate Cl(-) absorption and HCO3 (-) secretion. Studies using pendrin knockout mice and airway epithelial cells from hearing-impaired subjects with pendrin loss of function suggest involvement of pendrin in inflammatory lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), perhaps by regulation of airway surface liquid (ASL) volume. Here we identified small-molecule pendrin inhibitors and demonstrated their efficacy in increasing ASL volume. A cell-based, functional high-throughput screen of ∼36,000 synthetic small molecules produced 3 chemical classes of inhibitors of human pendrin. After structure-activity studies, tetrahydropyrazolopyridine and pyrazolothiophenesulfonamide compounds reversibly inhibited pendrin-facilitated Cl(-) exchange with SCN(-), I(-), NO3 (-), and HCO3 (-) with drug concentration causing 50% inhibition down to ∼2.5 μM. In well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells from non-CF and CF subjects, treatment with IL-13, which causes inflammation with strong pendrin up-regulation, strongly increased Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange and the increase was blocked by pendrin inhibition. Pendrin inhibition significantly increased ASL depth (by ∼8 μm) in IL-13-treated non-CF and CF cells but not in untreated cells. These studies implicate the involvement of pendrin-facilitated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) in the regulation of ASL volume and suggest the utility of pendrin inhibitors in inflammatory lung diseases, including CF.-Haggie, P. M., Phuan, P.-W., Tan, J.-A., Zlock, L., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26932931

  3. A stereological study of the human ovarian surface epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gillett, W R; Mitchell, A; Hurst, P R

    1992-04-01

    The surface of the ovary has been found to be composed of two types of epithelial cells called A and B cells which are found in their own respective zones, the A and B zones. A quantitative study was undertaken to determine the mean cell volumes and cell ultrastructure. Ovarian biopsies were taken from six women and A and B zones, having been identified by scanning electron microscopy, were re-embedded for transmission electron microscopy. Stereological measurements using point sampled intercepts were made on vertical sections and showed that B cells are significantly larger than A cells. The volume weighted mean cell volumes of the A and B cells were 237.3 microns 3 and 676.8 microns 3 respectively. The volume fractions of the nucleus and mitochondria were similar in the two cell types. Although the vesicle content of each type was similar, a large variation between cases made the interpretation difficult. The stereological tools used in this study proved to be easy and efficient estimators of surface cell ultrastructure and give an important direction for ultrastructural research. PMID:1522184

  4. Glucocorticoids Enhance or Spare Innate Immunity: Effects in Airway Epithelium Are Mediated by CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Proteins1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Truong-Tran, Quynh Ai; Tancowny, Brian; Harris, Kathleen E.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that glucocorticoids (GC) are a mainstay of the treatment of diseases characterized by airway inflammation, little is known about the effects of GC on local innate immunity. In this article, we report that respiratory epithelial cells manifested a local “acute phase response” after stimulation with TLR activation and TNF-α and that GC spared or enhanced the epithelial expression of molecules that are involved in host defense, including complement, collectins, and other antimicrobial proteins. As expected, GC inhibited the expression of molecules responsible for inflammation such as cytokines (IFNβ and GM-CSF) and chemokines (RANTES and IL-8). Studies using Western blotting, EMSA, and functional analysis indicated that the selective effects of GC are mediated through activation of the transcription factor C/EBP. Knockdown of C/EBPβ by small interfering RNA blocked the enhancement by GC of host defense molecule expression but had no effect on inflammatory gene expression. These results suggest that GC spare or enhance local innate host defense responses in addition to exerting anti-inflammatory actions. It is possible that the known ability of GC to reduce the exacerbation of diseases in which infectious organisms serve as triggering factors (e.g., asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) may result in part from enhanced innate immune responses in airway mucosa. PMID:17579079

  5. Cytoskeletal modulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of tight junction proteins are associated with mainstream cigarette smoke-induced permeability of airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Dorian; Knall, Cindy; Boggs, Susan; Seagrave, JeanClare

    2010-03-01

    Cigarette smoke increases the permeability of the lung epithelium. Consequences of increased permeability include increased access of toxins and pathogens from the air spaces to the interstitium and even the blood stream, and leakage of fluids into the air spaces. The mechanisms for permeability alterations have not been elucidated for airway epithelia. By analogy with other types of epithelia, we hypothesized that changes in the phosphorylation status and function of tight junction (TJ) or cytoskeletal proteins might mediate the smoke-induced permeability changes. We investigated the effects of exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke (MS) on cultures of Calu-3 cells, an airway epithelial cell line. Specifically, MS exposure caused increases in phosphorylation of the myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase and myosin light chain (MLC), proteins involved in the regulation of actin polymerization. These results implicate activation of Rho kinase (ROCK), consistent with previously reported data indicating that inhibition of ROCK activation suppressed MS-induced increases in permeability. MS exposure also increased polymerized (filamentous) actin (f-actin) content and caused redistribution of the TJ proteins from the normal apical circumferential band to a more basal location. The translocation of the TJ proteins was spatially associated with local increases in both f-actin and macromolecular permeability. Finally, MS exposure increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin but not ZO-1 and decreased association between the two TJ proteins. These results indicate that MS exposure causes alterations in cytoskeletal and TJ structure and function, resulting in increased macromolecular permeability that may contribute to the adverse health effects of MS. PMID:19376691

  6. Correction of defective CFTR/ENaC function and tightness of cystic fibrosis airway epithelium by amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Annalucia; Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Diana, Anna; Paracchini, Valentina; Di Gioia, Sante; Seia, Manuela; Casavola, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Conese, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, with most of the mortality given by the lung disease. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hAMSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine in the field of lung disease; however, their potential as therapeutics for CF lung disease has not been fully explored. In the present study, hAMSCs were analysed in co-cultures on Transwell filters with CF immortalized airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line) at different ratios to exploit their potency to resume basic defects associated with CF. The results show that F-actin content was increased in co-cultures as compared with CF cells and actin was reorganized to form stress fibres. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that co-cultures had a tendency of increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 at the intercellular borders, paralleled by a decrease in dextran permeability, suggestive of more organized tight junctions (TJs). Spectrofluorometric analysis of CFTR function demonstrated that hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures resumed chloride transport, in line with the appearance of the mature Band C of CFTR protein by Western blotting. Moreover, hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures, at a 1:5 ratio, showed a decrease in fluid absorption, as opposed to CFBE cell monolayers that displayed a great rate of fluid resorption from the apical side. Our data show that human amniotic MSCs can be used in co-culture with CF respiratory epithelial cells to model their engraftment into the airways and have the potential to resume a tight epithelium with partial correction of the CF phenotype. PMID:24894806

  7. Chronic effects of mechanical force on airways.

    PubMed

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Airways are embedded in the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung. In utero, this mechanical environment is defined largely by fluid secretion into the developing airway lumen. Clinical, whole lung, and cellular studies demonstrate pivotal roles for mechanical distention in airway morphogenesis and cellular behavior during lung development. In the adult lung, the mechanical environment is defined by a dynamic balance of surface, tissue, and muscle forces. Diseases of the airways modulate both the mechanical stresses to which the airways are exposed as well as the structure and mechanical behavior of the airways. For instance, in asthma, activation of airway smooth muscle abruptly changes the airway size and stress state within the airway wall; asthma also results in profound remodeling of the airway wall. Data now demonstrate that airway epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts respond to their mechanical environment. A prominent role has been identified for the epithelium in transducing mechanical stresses, and in both the fetal and mature airways, epithelial cells interact with mesenchymal cells to coordinate remodeling of tissue architecture in response to the mechanical environment. PMID:16460284

  8. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DUHAIME, MICHAEL J.; PAGE, KHALIPH O.; VARELA, FAUSTO A.; MURRAY, ANDREW S.; SILVERMAN, MICHAEL E.; ZORATTI, GINA L.; LIST, KARIN

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  9. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  10. Nanoparticles that deliver triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid molecules correct F508del CFTR in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Anandalingam, Kavitha; Fields, Rachel J; Caputo, Christina; Kopic, Sascha; Gupta, Anisha; Quijano, Elias; Polikoff, Lee; Kong, Yong; Bahal, Raman; Geibel, John P; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark; Egan, Marie E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disorder most commonly caused by the F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is not readily amenable to gene therapy because of its systemic nature and challenges including in vivo gene delivery and transient gene expression. Here we use triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids and donor DNA in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles to correct F508del. We confirm modification with sequencing and a functional chloride efflux assay. In vitro correction of chloride efflux occurs in up to 25% of human cells. Deep-sequencing reveals negligible off-target effects in partially homologous sites. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticles in CF mice produces changes in the nasal epithelium potential difference assay, consistent with corrected CFTR function. Also, gene correction is detected in the nasal and lung tissue. This work represents facile genome engineering in vivo with oligonucleotides using a nanoparticle system to achieve clinically relevant levels of gene editing without off-target effects. PMID:25914116

  11. Mechanisms of surface-tension-induced epithelial cell damage in a model of pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Anastacia M; Dee, Kay C; Gaver, Donald P

    2003-02-01

    Airway collapse and reopening due to mechanical ventilation exerts mechanical stress on airway walls and injures surfactant-compromised lungs. The reopening of a collapsed airway was modeled experimentally and computationally by the progression of a semi-infinite bubble in a narrow fluid-occluded channel. The extent of injury caused by bubble progression to pulmonary epithelial cells lining the channel was evaluated. Counterintuitively, cell damage increased with decreasing opening velocity. The presence of pulmonary surfactant, Infasurf, completely abated the injury. These results support the hypotheses that mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening injure pulmonary epithelial cells and that pulmonary surfactant protects the epithelium from this injury. Computational simulations identified the magnitudes of components of the stress cycle associated with airway reopening (shear stress, pressure, shear stress gradient, or pressure gradient) that may be injurious to the epithelial cells. By comparing these magnitudes to the observed damage, we conclude that the steep pressure gradient near the bubble front was the most likely cause of the observed cellular damage. PMID:12433851

  12. Use of mucolytics to enhance magnetic particle retention at a model airway surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Javed; Roa, Wilson; Amirfazli, A.

    A previous study has shown that retention of magnetic particles at a model airway surface requires prohibitively strong magnetic fields. As mucus viscoelasticity is the most significant factor contributing to clearance of magnetic particles from the airway surface, mucolytics are considered in this study to reduce mucus viscoelasticity and enable particle retention with moderate strength magnetic fields. The excised frog palate model was used to simulate the airway surface. Two mucolytics, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dextran sulfate (DS) were tested. NAC was found to enable retention at moderate field values (148 mT with a gradient of 10.2 T/m), whereas DS was found to be effective only for sufficiently large particle concentrations at the airway surface. The possible mechanisms for the observed behavior with different mucolytics are also discussed based on aggregate formation and the loading of cilia.

  13. Differential regulation of MUC5AC/Muc5ac and hCLCA-1/mGob-5 expression in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Thai, Philip; Chen, Yin; Dolganov, Gregory; Wu, Reen

    2005-12-01

    This study demonstrates that the two biomarkers, MUC5AC/ Muc5ac and hCLCA1/Gob5, which are frequently associated with surface mucous/goblet cells in asthmatic airways, are differentially regulated. Intratracheal instillation of IL-13 (0.5 mug/mouse lung) elicited 8- and 110-fold induction of Muc5ac and Gob5 messages, respectively, within 24 h in wild-type mouse lung, whereas these inductions were abrogated in Stat6 knockout mice. The induction of MUC5AC/Muc5ac message could not be duplicated in vitro with primary tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) cells derived from wild-type mice or humans, despite significant inductions still seen for hCLCA1/Gob5. Further studies with JAK inhibitors and STAT6 signaling showed active signaling of the JAK/STAT6 pathway in these primary TBE cultures by IL-13 in the regulation of hCLCA1 expression. Dual immunofluorescent staining with antibodies specific to MUC5AC and hCLCA1 revealed a differential nature of the expression of these two biomarkers by distinct cell types of primary TBE cultures. Finally, MUC5AC expression could be elevated by a bacterial product, peptidoglycan, without any induction of hCLCA1. Thus, these results suggest that the two biomakers of the metaplastic airway mucous cell type are differentially regulated by JAK/STAT6-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:16151054

  14. Surface modeling and segmentation of the 3D airway wall in MSCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Margarete; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Pr"teux, Françoise; Grenier, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Airway wall remodeling in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a well-known indicator of the pathology. In this context, current clinical studies aim for establishing the relationship between the airway morphological structure and its function. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) allows morphometric assessment of airways, but requires dedicated segmentation tools for clinical exploitation. While most of the existing tools are limited to cross-section measurements, this paper develops a fully 3D approach for airway wall segmentation. Such approach relies on a deformable model which is built up as a patient-specific surface model at the level of the airway lumen and deformed to reach the outer surface of the airway wall. The deformation dynamics obey a force equilibrium in a Lagrangian framework constrained by a vector field which avoids model self-intersections. The segmentation result allows a dense quantitative investigation of the airway wall thickness with a deeper insight at bronchus subdivisions than classic cross-section methods. The developed approach has been assessed both by visual inspection of 2D cross-sections, performed by two experienced radiologists on clinical data obtained with various protocols, and by using a simulated ground truth (pulmonary CT image model). The results confirmed a robust segmentation in intra-pulmonary regions with an error in the range of the MSCT image resolution and underlined the interest of the volumetric approach versus purely 2D methods.

  15. Synergistic and additive killing by antimicrobial factors found in human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Tack, B F; McCray, P B; Welsh, M J

    2000-11-01

    Airway surface liquid contains multiple factors thought to provide a first line of defense against bacteria deposited in the airways. Although the antimicrobial action of individual factors has been studied, less is known about how they work in combination. We examined the combined action of six antimicrobial peptides found in airway surface liquid. The paired combinations of lysozyme-lactoferrin, lysozyme-secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and lactoferrin-SLPI were synergistic. The triple combination of lysozyme, lactoferrin, and SLPI showed even greater synergy. Other combinations involving the human beta-defensins, LL-37, and tobramycin (often administered to cystic fibrosis patients by inhalation) were additive. Because the airway surface liquid salt concentration may be elevated in cystic fibrosis patients, we examined the effect of salt on the synergistic combinations. As the ionic strength increased, synergistic interactions were lost. Our data suggest that the antibacterial potency of airway surface liquid may be significantly increased by synergistic and additive interactions between antimicrobial factors. These results also suggest that increased salt concentrations that may exist in cystic fibrosis could inhibit airway defenses by diminishing these synergistic interactions. PMID:11053013

  16. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-10-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface.

  17. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, S M; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2010-10-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17-32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  18. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  19. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Binds to Cell-surface F1-ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to a yet unknown protein on the surface of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a ~60-kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina to Bos taurus F1-ATP synthase β-subunit, and that F1F0-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F1. Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F1. Real-time binding by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F1 interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell-surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F1 and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF- and angiostatin-binding sites on F1. Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of ~60-kDa. Antibodies to F1 β-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. Extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly inhibited the extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F1, these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F1F0-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may be part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  20. Regulation of the epithelial Na+ channel and airway surface liquid volume by serine proteases

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Erol A.; Kota, Pradeep; Gentzsch, Martina; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian airways are protected from infection by a thin film of airway surface liquid (ASL) which covers airway epithelial surfaces and acts as a lubricant to keep mucus from adhering to the epithelial surface. Precise regulation of ASL volume is essential for efficient mucus clearance and too great a reduction in ASL volume causes mucus dehydration and mucus stasis which contributes to chronic airway infection. The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is the rate-limiting step that governs Na+ absorption in the airways. Recent in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated that ENaC is a critical determinant of ASL volume and hence mucus clearance. ENaC must be cleaved by either intracellular furin-type proteases or extracellular serine proteases to be active and conduct Na+, and this process can be inhibited by protease inhibitors. ENaC can be regulated by multiple pathways, and once proteolytically cleaved ENaC may then be inhibited by intracellular second messengers such as cAMP and PIP2. In the airways, however, regulation of ENaC by proteases seems to be the predominant mode of regulation since knockdown of either endogenous serine proteases such as prostasin, or inhibitors of ENaC proteolysis such as SPLUNC1, has large effects on ENaC activity in airway epithelia. In this review, we shall discuss how ENaC is proteolytically cleaved, how this process can regulate ASL volume, and how its failure to operate correctly may contribute to chronic airway disease. PMID:20401730

  1. Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Surface Liquid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tarran, Robert; Button, Brian; Picher, Maryse; Paradiso, Anthony M.; Ribeiro, Carla M.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Zhang, Liqun; Collins, Peter L.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian airways normally regulate the volume of a thin liquid layer, the periciliary liquid (PCL), to facilitate the mucus clearance component of lung defense. Studies under standard (static) culture conditions revealed that normal airway epithelia possess an adenosine-regulated pathway that blends Na+ absorption and Cl− secretion to optimize PCL volume. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the absence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator results in a failure of adenosine regulation of PCL volume, which is predicted to initiate mucus stasis and infection. However, under conditions that mimic the phasic motion of the lung in vivo, ATP release into PCL was increased, CF ion transport was rebalanced, and PCL volume was restored to levels adequate for lung defense. This ATP signaling system was vulnerable, however, to insults that trigger CF bacterial infections, such as viral (respiratory syncitial virus) infections, which up-regulated extracellular ATPase activity and abolished motion-dependent ATP regulation of CF PCL height. These studies demonstrate (i) how the normal coordination of opposing ion transport pathways to maintain PCL volume is disrupted in CF, (ii) the hitherto unknown role of phasic motion in regulating key aspects of normal and CF innate airways defense, and (iii) that maneuvers directed at increasing motion-induced nucleotide release may be therapeutic in CF patients. PMID:16087672

  2. Multipurpose Care Solution–Induced Corneal Surface Disruption and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Internalization in the Rabbit Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Leila C.; Zhu, Meifang; Robertson, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of a chemically preserved multipurpose contact lens care solution (MPS) on the corneal epithelial surface and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) internalization in the rabbit corneal epithelium. Methods. Rabbits were fit in one eye with a silicone hydrogel lens (balafilcon A) soaked overnight in a borate-buffered MPS (BioTrue). The contralateral eye was fit with a lens removed directly from the blister pack containing borate-buffered saline (control). Lenses were worn for 2 hours. Upon lens removal, corneas were challenged ex vivo with invasive PA strain 6487 and assessed for PA internalization. Ultrastructural changes were assessed using scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results. Scanning electron microscopy showed frank loss of surface epithelium in MPS-exposed eyes, while control eyes exhibited occasional loss of surface membranes but retention of intact junctional borders. Transmission electron microscopy data supported and extended SEM findings, demonstrating the presence of epithelial edema in MPS-treated eyes. There was a 12-fold increase in PA uptake into the corneal epithelium following wear of the MPS-treated lens compared to control (P = 0.008). Conclusions. These data demonstrate that corneal exposure to MPS during lens wear damages the surface epithelium and are consistent with our previous clinical data showing an increase in bacterial binding to exfoliated epithelial cells following MPS use with resultant increased risk for lens-mediated infection. These findings also demonstrate that the PA invasion assay may provide a highly sensitive quantitative metric for assessing the physiological impact of lens-solution biocompatibility on the corneal epithelium. PMID:24876286

  3. Cigarette smoke and calcium conspire to impair CFTR function in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    To maintain health and function in response to inhaled environmental irritants and toxins, the lungs and airways depend upon an innate defense system that involves the secretion of mucus (i.e., mucin, salts, and water) by airway epithelium onto the apical surface to trap foreign particles. Airway mucus is then transported in an oral direction via ciliary beating and coughing, which helps to keep the airways clear. CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channel in the apical membrane of epithelium that contributes to salt and water secretion onto the luminal surface of airways, thereby ensuring that secreted mucus is sufficiently hydrated for movement along the epithelial surface. Dehydration of airway mucus, as occurs in cystic fibrosis, results in a more viscous, less mobile secretion that compromises the lung’s innate defense system by facilitating a build-up of foreign particles and bacterial growth. Related to this situation is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is a leading cause of death globally. A major cause of COPD is cigarette smoking, which has been reported to decrease the cellular levels of CFTR in airway epithelia. In their recent article, Rasmussen and coworkers now report that exposure to cigarette smoke elevates cytosolic free Ca(2+) in airway epithelium, leading to decreased surface localization and cellular expression of CFTR and reduced levels of secreted airway surface liquid. Blocking this increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) largely prevented CFTR loss in airway epithelium and surprisingly, cellular lysosomes appear to be a major source for smoke-induced Ca(2+) elevation. PMID:24755862

  4. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration.

    PubMed

    Clunes, Lucy A; Davies, Catrin M; Coakley, Raymond D; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Henderson, Ashley G; Zeman, Kirby L; Worthington, Erin N; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D; Riordan, John R; Boucher, Richard C; Tarran, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB. PMID:21990373

  5. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Lucy A.; Davies, Catrin M.; Coakley, Raymond D.; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Henderson, Ashley G.; Zeman, Kirby L.; Worthington, Erin N.; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D.; Riordan, John R.; Boucher, Richard C.; Tarran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB.—Clunes, L. A., Davies, C. M., Coakley, R. D., Aleksandrov, A. A., Henderson, A. G., Zeman, K. L., Worthington, E. N., Gentzsch, M., Kreda, S. M., Cholon, D., Bennett, W. D., Riordan, J. R., Boucher, R. C., Tarran, R. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration. PMID:21990373

  6. Models of muco-ciliary transport and tracer dispersion in airway surface liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Blake, John; Gaffney, Eamonn

    2003-11-01

    The airways of the lungs are protected by a thin layer of mucus ( 5-15 microns) which traps dust and other pathogens. The mucus plaque is secreted by specialised epithelial cells, then transported axially towards the pharynx by the action of a dense mat of beating cilia. The cilia beat in a watery `periciliary liquid' (PCL). According to previous theoretical analysis, axial transport of PCL is relatively small, consistent with an impermeable epithelium. However, tracer dispersion experiments by Matsui et al. (1998) appear to show large axial transport, consistent with a highly permeable epithelium. The resolution of the question of the amount of absorption of PCL is related to the issue of the pathogensis of cystic fibrosis lung disease. We present the results of a new model of mucociliary transport which combines the best features of several very different previous models. We also present a model of tracer dispersion and show how this can be used to interpret the findings of Matsui et al. and relate them to our theoretical results.

  7. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  8. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  9. Detection of Changes on and below the Surface in Epithelium Mucosal Tissue Structure using Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslidere, Ezgi

    The aim of this work is to answer the question of whether it is possible to detect changes on and below the surface in epithelium tissue structure using light reflected from the tissue over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. Towards that end we model the 2-D reflected scans using a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM). The emphasis in this work is on the novelty of the proposed model and its theoretical pinning and foundation. The model is biologically motivated by the stochastic textural nature of the tissue. We model the textural content (which relates to tissue morphology) that manifests itself in the 2-D scans. Unlike previous works that analyze the scattered signal at one spot at various wavelengths, our method statistically analyzes 2-D scans of light scattering data over an area, and extracts from the data features (SDM parameters) that change with changes in the tissue morphology. The examination of an area rather than a spot not only leads to a more reliable calculation of the extracted parameters using single techniques (e.g. nuclear size distribution), but it also leads to the computation of additional information embedded in the spatial texture that our decomposition technique arrives at by modeling the hidden correlations that are obtained only by interrogating a wide sample area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at modeling the scattered light over an area using a stochastic decomposition model that allows for the assessment of correlation and textural characteristics that otherwise could not be revealed when the analysis of the scattering signal is a function of wavelength or angle. We also come up with a segmentation technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters

  10. Optimal Graph Search Based Segmentation of Airway Tree Double Surfaces Across Bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Danny Z.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Wu, Xiaodong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Identification of both the luminal and the wall areas of the bronchial tree structure from volumetric X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets is of critical importance in distinguishing important phenotypes within numerous major lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and asthma. However, accurate assessment of the inner and outer airway wall surfaces of a complete 3-D tree structure is difficult due to their complex nature, particularly around the branch areas. In this paper, we extend a graph search based technique (LOGISMOS) to simultaneously identify multiple inter-related surfaces of branching airway trees. We first perform a presegmentation of the input 3-D image to obtain basic information about the tree topology. The presegmented image is resampled along judiciously determined paths to produce a set of vectors of voxels (called voxel columns). The resampling process utilizes medial axes to ensure that voxel columns of appropriate lengths and directions are used to capture the object surfaces without interference. A geometric graph is constructed whose edges connect voxels in the resampled voxel columns and enforce validity of the smoothness and separation constraints on the sought surfaces. Cost functions with directional information are employed to distinguish inner and outer walls. The assessment of wall thickness measurement on a CT-scanned double-wall physical phantom (patterned after an in vivo imaged human airway tree) achieved highly accurate results on the entire 3-D tree. The observed mean signed error of wall thickness ranged from −0.09 ± 0.24 mm to 0.07 ± 0.23 mm in bifurcating/nonbifurcating areas. The mean unsigned errors were 0.16 ± 0.12 mm to 0.20 ± 0.11 mm. When the airway wall surface was partitioned into meaningful subregions, the airway wall thickness accuracy was the same in most tested bifurcation/nonbifurcation and carina/noncarina regions (p=NS). Once validated on phantoms, our method was applied

  11. Regulation of Murine Airway Surface Liquid Volume by CFTR and Ca2+-activated Cl− Conductances

    PubMed Central

    Tarran, Robert; Loewen, Matthew E.; Paradiso, Anthony M.; Olsen, John C.; Gray, Micheal A.; Argent, Barry E.; Boucher, Richard C.; Gabriel, Sherif E.

    2002-01-01

    Two Cl− conductances have been described in the apical membrane of both human and murine proximal airway epithelia that are thought to play predominant roles in airway hydration: (1) CFTR, which is cAMP regulated and (2) the Ca2+-activated Cl− conductance (CaCC) whose molecular identity is uncertain. In addition to second messenger regulation, cross talk between these two channels may also exist and, whereas CFTR is absent or defective in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, CaCC is preserved, and may even be up-regulated. Increased CaCC activity in CF airways is controversial. Hence, we have investigated the effects of CFTR on CaCC activity and have also assessed the relative contributions of these two conductances to airway surface liquid (ASL) height (volume) in murine tracheal epithelia. We find that CaCC is up-regulated in intact murine CF tracheal epithelia, which leads to an increase in UTP-mediated Cl−/volume secretion. This up-regulation is dependent on cell polarity and is lost in nonpolarized epithelia. We find no role for an increased electrical driving force in CaCC up-regulation but do find an increased Ca2+ signal in response to mucosal nucleotides that may contribute to the increased Cl−/volume secretion seen in intact epithelia. CFTR plays a critical role in maintaining ASL height under basal conditions and accordingly, ASL height is reduced in CF epithelia. In contrast, CaCC does not appear to significantly affect basal ASL height, but does appear to be important in regulating ASL height in response to released agonists (e.g., mucosal nucleotides). We conclude that both CaCC and the Ca2+ signal are increased in CF airway epithelia, and that they contribute to acute but not basal regulation of ASL height. PMID:12198094

  12. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  13. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Zabner, J; Seiler, M P; Launspach, J L; Karp, P H; Kearney, W R; Look, D C; Smith, J J; Welsh, M J

    2000-10-10

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface. PMID:11027360

  14. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface. PMID:11027360

  15. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  16. Reduced airway surface pH impairs bacterial killing in the porcine cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H Abou; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Phillip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Haagsman, Henk P; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R; Stoltz, David A; McCray, Paul B; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how the loss of CFTR function first disrupts airway host defence has remained uncertain. To investigate the abnormalities that impair elimination when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed onto the airway surface. As a model, we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly kills bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduces bacterial killing. We found that the ASL pH was more acidic in CF pigs, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and, conversely, increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defence defect to the loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO(3)(-) transport. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO(3)(-) secretion is defective, the ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs the killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF, and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  17. Reduced Airway Surface pH Impairs Bacterial Killing in the Porcine Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Phillip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Haagsman, Henk P.; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene 1. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how loss of CFTR first disrupts airway host defense has remained uncertain 2–6. We asked what abnormalities impair eradication when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway? To investigate these defects, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed on the airway surface. As a model we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease 7,8. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria 8. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly killed bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung, and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduced bacterial killing. We found that ASL pH was more acidic in CF, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defense defect to loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO3− transport 9–13. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO3− secretion is defective, ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  18. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle in vitro: role of cyclo-oxygenase and airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoden, K. J.; Barnes, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    1. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (0.1 microM-3 mM) induced variable contractions of guinea-pig isolated trachea which were attenuated by catalase (100 u ml-1) and mannitol (15 mM) suggesting that contractions were induced by H2O2 and/or the hydroxyl anion. 2. Epithelial removal potentiated contractile responses of tracheal preparations to H2O2 with a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve and an increase in the maximal response. 3. Indomethacin (3 microM) inhibited contractions to H2O2 of intact preparations and preparations without epithelium suggesting that contractions may be mediated by cyclo-oxygenase products. Intact preparations (but not preparations without epithelium) contracted in response to high concentrations (greater than 0.1 mM) of H2O2 in the presence of indomethacin suggesting that other excitatory factor(s) released by the epithelium may induce contraction. 4. Preincubation of intact tracheal preparations with H2O2 (1 mM) for 1 h had no effect on responses to histamine or isoprenaline. 5. These results suggest that hydrogen peroxide generated during the inflammatory process may play a role in bronchoconstriction. PMID:2508982

  19. Basolateral localization of fiber receptors limits adenovirus infection from the apical surface of airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; Grunst, T; Bergelson, J M; Finberg, R W; Welsh, M J; Zabner, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent identification of two receptors for the adenovirus fiber protein, coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR), and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I alpha-2 domain allows the molecular basis of adenoviral infection to be investigated. Earlier work has shown that human airway epithelia are resistant to infection by adenovirus. Therefore, we examined the expression and localization of CAR and MHC Class I in an in vitro model of well differentiated, ciliated human airway epithelia. We found that airway epithelia express CAR and MHC Class I. However, neither receptor was present in the apical membrane; instead, both were polarized to the basolateral membrane. These findings explain the relative resistance to adenovirus infection from the apical surface. In contrast, when the virus was applied to the basolateral surface, gene transfer was much more efficient because of an interaction of adenovirus fiber with its receptors. In addition, when the integrity of the tight junctions was transiently disrupted, apically applied adenovirus gained access to the basolateral surface and enhanced gene transfer. These data suggest that the receptors required for efficient infection are not available on the apical surface, and interventions that allow access to the basolateral space where fiber receptors are located increase gene transfer efficiency. PMID:10187807

  20. CX3CR1 is an important surface molecule for respiratory syncytial virus infection in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chirkova, Tatiana; Lin, Songbai; Oomens, Antonius G. P.; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Meng, Jia; Stobart, Christopher C.; Cotton, Calvin U.; Hartert, Tina V.; Moore, Martin L.; Ziady, Assem G.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and young children, and causes disease throughout life. Understanding the biology of infection, including virus binding to the cell surface, should help develop antiviral drugs or vaccines. The RSV F and G glycoproteins bind cell surface heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) through heparin-binding domains. The G protein also has a CX3C chemokine motif which binds to the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1. G protein binding to CX3CR1 is not important for infection of immortalized cell lines, but reportedly is so for primary human airway epithelial cells (HAECs), the primary site for human infection. We studied the role of CX3CR1 in RSV infection with CX3CR1-transfected cell lines and HAECs with variable percentages of CX3CR1-expressing cells, and the effect of anti-CX3CR1 antibodies or a mutation in the RSV CX3C motif. Immortalized cells lacking HSPGs had low RSV binding and infection, which was increased markedly by CX3CR1 transfection. CX3CR1 was expressed primarily on ciliated cells, and ∼50 % of RSV-infected cells in HAECs were CX3CR1+. HAECs with more CX3CR1-expressing cells had a proportional increase in RSV infection. Blocking G binding to CX3CR1 with anti-CX3CR1 antibody or a mutation in the CX3C motif significantly decreased RSV infection in HAECs. The kinetics of cytokine production suggested that the RSV/CX3CR1 interaction induced RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein), IL-8 and fractalkine production, whilst it downregulated IL-15, IL1-RA and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Thus, the RSV G protein/CX3CR1 interaction is likely important in infection and infection-induced responses of the airway epithelium, the primary site of human infection. PMID:26297201

  1. Effect of surface tension of mucosal lining liquid on upper airway mechanics in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Eastwood, Peter R; Szollosi, Irene; Platt, Peter R; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Hillman, David R

    2003-07-01

    Upper airway (UA) patency may be influenced by surface tension (gamma) operating within the (UAL). We examined the role of gamma of UAL in the maintenance of UA patency in eight isoflurane-anesthetized supine human subjects breathing via a nasal mask connected to a pneumotachograph attached to a pressure delivery system. We evaluated 1). mask pressure at which the UA closed (Pcrit), 2). UA resistance upstream from the site of UA collapse (RUS), and 3). mask pressure at which the UA reopened (Po). A multiple pressure-transducer catheter was used to identify the site of airway closure (velopharyngeal in all subjects). UAL samples (0.2 microl) were collected, and the gamma of UAL was determined by using the "pull-off force" technique. Studies were performed before and after the intrapharyngeal instillation of 5 ml of exogenous surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline). The gamma of UAL decreased from 61.9 +/- 4.1 (control) to 50.3 +/- 5.0 mN/m (surfactant; P < 0.02). Changes in Po, RUS, and Po - Pcrit (change = control - surfactant) were positively correlated with changes in gamma (r2 > 0.6; P < 0.02) but not with changes in Pcrit (r2 = 0.4; P > 0.9). In addition, mean peak inspiratory airflow (no flow limitation) significantly increased (P < 0.04) from 0.31 +/- 0.06 (control) to 0.36 +/- 0.06 l/s (surfactant). These findings suggest that gamma of UAL exerts a force on the UA wall that hinders airway opening. Instillation of exogenous surfactant into the UA lowers the gamma of UAL, thus increasing UA patency and augmenting reopening of the collapsed airway. PMID:12626492

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers CFTR-mediated airway surface liquid secretion in swine trachea

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xiaojie; Campanucci, Verónica A.; Nair, Manoj; Yilmaz, Orhan; Belev, George; Machen, Terry E.; Chapman, Dean; Ianowski, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several organs are affected in CF, but most of the morbidity and mortality comes from lung disease. Recent data show that the initial consequence of CFTR mutation is the failure to eradicate bacteria before the development of inflammation and airway remodeling. Bacterial clearance depends on a layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) consisting of both a mucus layer that traps, kills, and inactivates bacteria and a periciliary liquid layer that keeps the mucus at an optimum distance from the underlying epithelia, to maximize ciliary motility and clearance of bacteria. The airways in CF patients and animal models of CF demonstrate abnormal ASL secretion and reduced antimicrobial properties. Thus, it has been proposed that abnormal ASL secretion in response to bacteria may facilitate the development of the infection and inflammation that characterize CF airway disease. Whether the inhalation of bacteria triggers ASL secretion, and the role of CFTR, have never been tested, however. We developed a synchrotron-based imaging technique to visualize the ASL layer and measure the effect of bacteria on ASL secretion. We show that the introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria into the lumen of intact isolated swine tracheas triggers CFTR-dependent ASL secretion by the submucosal glands. This response requires expression of the bacterial protein flagellin. In patients with CF, the inhalation of bacteria would fail to trigger ASL secretion, leading to infection and inflammation. PMID:25136096

  3. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. A VSV-G Pseudotyped Last Generation Lentiviral Vector Mediates High Level and Persistent Gene Transfer in Models of Airway Epithelium In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Copreni, Elena; Palmieri, Lucia; Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency and duration of gene expression mediated by a VSV-G pseudotyped last generation lentiviral (LV) vector. We studied LV efficiency in ex-vivo models of respiratory epithelial cells, obtained from bronchial biopsies and nasal polyps, by GFP epifluorescence and cytofluorimetry. In vivo efficiency and persistence of gene expression was investigated by GFP immunohistochemistry and luciferase activity in lung cryosections and homogenates, respectively, upon intranasal and intratracheal administration protocols in C57Bl/6 mice. Both primary bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were transduced up to 70–80% 72 hr after the LV infection. In vivo nasal luciferase expression was increased by lysophosphatidylcholine pre-treatment of the nose. Conversely, the bronchial epithelium was transduced in the absence of any pre-conditioning treatment and luciferase expression lasted for at least 6 months without any decline. We conclude that a last generation LV vector is a promising gene transfer agent in the target organ of genetic and acquired lung diseases, as in the case of cystic fibrosis. PMID:21994695

  5. The Epithelial Anion Transporter Pendrin Is Induced by Allergy and Rhinovirus Infection, Regulates Airway Surface Liquid, and Increases Airway Reactivity and Inflammation in an Asthma Model1

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Favoreto, Silvio; Zhen, Guohua; Park, Sung-Woo; Nguyenvu, Louis T.; Kuperman, Douglas A.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Boushey, Homer A.; Avila, Pedro C.; Erle, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations can be triggered by viral infections or allergens. The Th2 cytokines IL-13 and IL-4 are produced during allergic responses and cause increases in airway epithelial cell mucus, electrolyte and water secretion into the airway surface liquid (ASL). Since ASL dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction, ion transporters could play a role in pathogenesis of asthma exacerbations. We previously reported that expression of the epithelial cell anion transporter pendrin is markedly increased in response to IL-13. Here we show that pendrin plays a role in allergic airway disease and in regulation of ASL thickness. Pendrin-deficient mice had less allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity and inflammation than control mice although other aspects of the Th2 response were preserved. In cultures of IL-13-stimulated mouse tracheal epithelial cells, pendrin deficiency caused an increase in ASL thickness, suggesting that reductions in allergen-induced hyperreactivity and inflammation in pendrin-deficient mice result from improved ASL hydration. To determine whether pendrin might also play a role in virus-induced exacerbations of asthma, we measured pendrin mRNA expression in human subjects with naturally occurring common colds caused by rhinovirus and found a 4.9-fold-increase in mean expression during colds. Studies of cultured human bronchial epithelial cells indicated that this increase could be explained by the combined effects of rhinovirus and IFN-γ, a Th1 cytokine induced during virus infection. We conclude that pendrin regulates ASL thickness and may be an important contributor to asthma exacerbations induced by viral infections or allergens. PMID:18641360

  6. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Carole; Gebel, Stephan; Poussin, Carine; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Sewer, Alain; Weisensee, Dirk; Hengstermann, Arnd; Ansari, Sam; Wagner, Sandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using complementary computational approaches and an integrated mRNA–microRNA (miRNA) analysis. The main cellular pathways perturbed by CS exposure were related to stress responses (oxidative stress and xenobiotic metabolism), inflammation (inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and the interferon gamma-dependent pathway), and proliferation/differentiation. Within post-exposure periods up to 48 hours, a transient kinetic response was observed at lower CS doses, whereas higher doses resulted in more sustained responses. In conclusion, this systems toxicology approach has potential for product testing according to “21st Century Toxicology”. PMID:25788831

  7. An uptake of cationized ferritin by alveolar type I cells in airway-instilled goat lung: distribution of anionic sites on the epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Atwal, O S; Viel, L; Minhas, K J

    1990-07-01

    The present study has investigated ultrastructural localization of anionic sites on the luminal surface of the alveolar epithelium of goat lung by direct airway instillation of cationized ferritin (CF) in the cranial lobe of the right lung through a bronchoscope. The cationic probe decorated preferentially the luminal plasmalemmal vesicles and plasmalemma proper of alveolar type I cell. This indicated the presence of highly charged anionic microdomains at these binding sites. The ligand was internalized in the free plasmalemmal vesicles of alveolar type I cell within 2 min. Heavy decoration of vesicles at 5 min of perfusion indicated that the amount of CF internalization increased with its concentration in the alveoli. It is suggested that exposure of alveolar surface to several gases of ruminal-origin induces changes in the surface charge of luminal plasmalemma of alveolar type I cells. The significance of these anionic plasmalemmal sites is discussed in relation to the adjustment of osmotic pressure gradient across the alveolar-capillary membrane of the ruminant lung. PMID:2390765

  8. Epithelial hyperplasia, airways

    Cancer.gov

    Number of respiratory epithelial cells is increased diffusely or focally. Frequently luminal protrusions are observed, sometimes forming papillae. Mucous (goblet) cell metaplastic hyperplasia is a variant, in which the respiratory epithelium of conducting airways is replaced by mucous cells either as a single or a pseudostratified layer.

  9. Protein composition of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and airway surface liquid from newborn pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Albertolle, Matthew E.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Zabner, Joseph; Niles, Richard K.; Fisher, Susan J.; McCray, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The airway mucosa and the alveolar surface form dynamic interfaces between the lung and the external environment. The epithelial cells lining these barriers elaborate a thin liquid layer containing secreted peptides and proteins that contribute to host defense and other functions. The goal of this study was to develop and apply methods to define the proteome of porcine lung lining liquid, in part, by leveraging the wealth of information in the Sus scrofa database of Ensembl gene, transcript, and protein model predictions. We developed an optimized workflow for detection of secreted proteins in porcine bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in methacholine-induced tracheal secretions [airway surface liquid (ASL)]. We detected 674 and 3,858 unique porcine-specific proteins in BAL and ASL, respectively. This proteome was composed of proteins representing a diverse range of molecular classes and biological processes, including host defense, molecular transport, cell communication, cytoskeletal, and metabolic functions. Specifically, we detected a significant number of secreted proteins with known or predicted roles in innate and adaptive immunity, microbial killing, or other aspects of host defense. In greatly expanding the known proteome of the lung lining fluid in the pig, this study provides a valuable resource for future studies using this important animal model of pulmonary physiology and disease. PMID:23709621

  10. A novel fluorescent sensor protein for detecting changes in airway surface liquid glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Garnett, James P.; Farrant, Matthew; Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C.; Hahn, Klaus M.; MacNevin, Christopher J.; Tarran, Robert; Baines, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Both lung disease and elevation of blood glucose are associated with increased glucose concentration (from 0.4 to ~4.0 mM) in the airway surface liquid (ASL). This perturbation of ASL glucose makes the airway more susceptible to infection by respiratory pathogens. ASL is minute (~1 μl/cm2) and the measurement of glucose concentration in the small volume ASL is extremely difficult. Therefore, we sought to develop a fluorescent biosensor with sufficient sensitivity to determine glucose concentrations in ASL in situ. We coupled a range of environmentally sensitive fluorophores to mutated forms of a glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) including H152C and H152C/A213R and determined their equilibrium binding properties. Of these, GBP H152C/A213R–BADAN (Kd 0.86 ± 0.01 mM, Fmax/F0 3.6) was optimal for glucose sensing and in ASL increased fluorescence when basolateral glucose concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. Moreover, interpolation of the data showed that the glucose concentration in ASL was increased, with results similar to that using glucose oxidase analysis. The fluorescence of GBP H152C/A213R–BADAN in native ASL from human airway epithelial cultures in situ was significantly increased over time when basolateral glucose was increased from 5 to 20 mM. Overall our data indicate that this GBP is a useful tool to monitor glucose homoeostasis in the lung. PMID:25220254

  11. A novel fluorescent sensor protein for detecting changes in airway surface liquid glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Helassa, Nordine; Garnett, James P; Farrant, Matthew; Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C; Hahn, Klaus M; MacNevin, Christopher J; Tarran, Robert; Baines, Deborah L

    2014-12-01

    Both lung disease and elevation of blood glucose are associated with increased glucose concentration (from 0.4 to ~4.0 mM) in the airway surface liquid (ASL). This perturbation of ASL glucose makes the airway more susceptible to infection by respiratory pathogens. ASL is minute (~1 μl/cm(2)) and the measurement of glucose concentration in the small volume ASL is extremely difficult. Therefore, we sought to develop a fluorescent biosensor with sufficient sensitivity to determine glucose concentrations in ASL in situ. We coupled a range of environmentally sensitive fluorophores to mutated forms of a glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) including H152C and H152C/A213R and determined their equilibrium binding properties. Of these, GBP H152C/A213R-BADAN (Kd 0.86 ± 0.01 mM, Fmax/F0 3.6) was optimal for glucose sensing and in ASL increased fluorescence when basolateral glucose concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. Moreover, interpolation of the data showed that the glucose concentration in ASL was increased, with results similar to that using glucose oxidase analysis. The fluorescence of GBP H152C/A213R-BADAN in native ASL from human airway epithelial cultures in situ was significantly increased over time when basolateral glucose was increased from 5 to 20 mM. Overall our data indicate that this GBP is a useful tool to monitor glucose homoeostasis in the lung. PMID:25220254

  12. Automated acquisition and analysis of airway surface liquid height by confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Chul; Kim, Christine Seul Ki

    2015-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a thin-liquid layer that lines the luminal side of airway epithelia. ASL contains many molecules that are involved in primary innate defense in the lung. Measurement of ASL height on primary airway cultures by confocal microscopy is a powerful tool that has enabled researchers to study ASL physiology and pharmacology. Previously, ASL image acquisition and analysis were performed manually. However, this process is time and labor intensive. To increase the throughput, we have developed an automatic ASL measurement technique that combines a fully automated confocal microscope with novel automatic image analysis software that was written with image processing techniques derived from the computer science field. We were able to acquire XZ ASL images at the rate of ∼1 image/s in a reproducible fashion. Our automatic analysis software was able to analyze images at the rate of ∼32 ms/image. As proofs of concept, we generated a time course for ASL absorption and a dose response in the presence of SPLUNC1, a known epithelial sodium channel inhibitor, on human bronchial epithelial cultures. Using this approach, we determined the IC50 for SPLUNC1 to be 6.53 μM. Furthermore, our technique successfully detected a difference in ASL height between normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelial cultures and detected changes in ATP-stimulated Cl−/ASL secretion. We conclude that our automatic ASL measurement technique can be applied for repeated ASL height measurements with high accuracy and consistency and increased throughput. PMID:26001773

  13. Gene Transfer by Guanidinium-Cholesterol Cationic Lipids into Airway Epithelial Cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Peuchmaur, Michel; Leclerc, Tony; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Lehn, Pierre

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic vectors represent an attractive alternative approach to viral vectors for gene transfer, in particular into airway epithelial cells for lung-directed gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Having recently found that guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipids are efficient reagents for gene transfer into mammalian cell lines in vitro, we have investigated their use for gene delivery into primary airway epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained indicate that the lipid bis (guanidinium)-tren-cholesterol (BGTC) can be used to transfer a reporter gene into primary human airway epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, liposomes composed of BGTC and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) are efficient for gene delivery to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo. Transfected cells were detected both in the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands. In addition, the transfection efficiency of BGTC/DOPE liposomes in vivo was quantitatively assessed by using the luciferase reporter gene system.

  14. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Hoegger, Mark J; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; McMenimen, James D; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3- concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  15. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Philip H.; McMenimen, James D.; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3– concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator–dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  16. Progenitor Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell–cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing β cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which β cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to β cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  17. Estrogen and androgen receptor expression in surface epithelium and inclusion cyst in the ovary of premenopausal and postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of surface epithelium and epithelial inclusion cysts in the ovary arises from studies demonstrating that these structures are susceptible to epithelial ovarian cancer development. The expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), androgen receptor (AR), in epithelial cells of the ovary from premenopausal and postmenopausal women is interesting because sexual steroid hormones are involved in cell growth and differentiation. Methods The presence of ER alpha, AR, and the orphan G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in ovaries obtained from 79 pre and postmenopausal patients, undergoing histero-salpingo-oophorectomy for proliferative gynecological diseases. The proportion of patients that displayed positive reaction for estrogen and androgen receptors in epithelial cells of the ovary was evaluated according to menopausal status and associated pathology. Results The proportion of patients that displayed a positive receptor expression in the epithelial cells of the ovarian surface and cortical inclusion cysts shows that ER alpha is present in 20 of 79 patients (0.25), AR in 33 of 79 (0.42) and GPR30 in 38 of 55 (0.69). There are no differences in ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 expression between pre and postmenopausal patients and considering the associated pathology, proportions for ER alpha and GPR30 are similar. The patients with cervical cancer show a higher proportion of AR expression in epithelial cells of the ovary, which is statistically significant (P < 0.01) compared with patients with other proliferative diseases. Conclusions The presence of ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 in the surface epithelial ovarian cells and its derivatives are observed with a proportion that is specific for each receptor. The proportion of expression for these receptors in the epithelial cells of the ovary does not change after menopause. The proportion of ovaries with AR positive epithelial cells in patients with cervical

  18. Conditional inactivation of Brca1 in the mouse ovarian surface epithelium results in an increase in preneoplastic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V. . E-mail: kclar075@uottawa.ca; Garson, Kenneth; Jonkers, Jos; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE); however, the molecular events underlying this transformation are poorly understood. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene result in a significantly increased risk of developing EOC and a large proportion of sporadic EOCs display some sort of BRCA1 dysfunction. Using mice with conditional expression of Brca1, we inactivated Brca1 in the murine OSE and demonstrate that this inactivation results in the development of preneoplastic changes, such as hyperplasia, epithelial invaginations, and inclusion cysts, which arise earlier and are more numerous than in control ovaries. These changes resemble the premalignant lesions that have been reported in human prophylactic oophorectomy specimens from women with BRCA1 germline mutation. We also report that inactivation of Brca1 in primary cultures of murine OSE cells leads to a suppression of proliferation due to increased apoptosis that can be rescued by concomitant inactivation of p53. These observations, along with our finding that these cells display an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin, indicate that loss of function of Brca1 in OSE cells impacts both cellular growth control and DNA-damage repair which results in altered cell behavior manifested as morphological changes in vivo that arise earlier and are more numerous than what can be attributed to ageing.

  19. Age related increase in mTOR activity contributes to the pathological changes in ovarian surface epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Preety; Nagendra, Prathima B.; Nielsen, Sarah; Sahoo, Subhransu S.; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Lombard, Janine M.; Wilkinson, Erby J.; Miller, Richard A.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease of older women. However, the molecular mechanisms of ovarian aging and their contribution to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer are currently unclear. mTOR signalling is a major regulator of aging as suppression of this pathway extends lifespan in model organisms. Overactive mTOR signalling is present in up to 80% of ovarian cancer samples and is associated with poor prognosis. This study examined the role of mTOR signalling in age-associated changes in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Histological examination of ovaries from both aged mice and women revealed OSE cell hyperplasia, papillary growth and inclusion cysts. These pathological lesions expressed bonafide markers of ovarian cancer precursor lesions, Pax8 and Stathmin 1, and were presented with elevated mTOR signalling. To understand whether overactive mTOR signalling is responsible for the development of these pathological changes, we analysed ovaries of the Pten trangenic mice and found significant reduction in OSE lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, pharmacological suppression of mTOR signalling significantly decreased OSE hyperplasia in aged mice. Treatment with mTOR inhibitors reduced human ovarian cancer cell viability, proliferation and colony forming ability. Collectively, we have established the role of mTOR signalling in age-related OSE pathologies and initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:27036037

  20. Modulation by the epithelium of the extent of bronchial narrowing produced by substances perfused through the lumen.

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, M. P.; Mitchell, H. W.

    1991-01-01

    1 Airway narrowing was determined in vitro as a measure of bronchial reactivity. A bronchial segment from pig lung was perfused with a Krebs solution and the change in flow rate to drugs and small ions perfused intraluminally was compared with that obtained by application to the serosal surface. 2 The sensitivity (EC50) to acetylchloline was 30 times greater on the serosal surface than on the luminal surface. Concentrations of histamine and carbachol which had threshold responses on flow rate when perfused intraluminally virtually stopped flow on the serosal surface. Potassium depolarizing solutions (containing either KCl or K2SO4) and vanadate (VO3-) had little or no effect intraluminally but completely stopped flow through the bronchial segment when applied to the serosal surface, i.e. they closed off the airway. 3 After removal of the epithelium the sensitivity to drugs and K+ perfused intraluminally was increased to equal that on the serosal surface. 4 No evidence for suppression of smooth muscle contraction by a putative epithelium-derived inhibitory factor (EpDIF) could be obtained: no inhibition of smooth muscle contractility was seen when the agents listed above were perfused intraluminally and their perfusion continued while they were applied to outside. 5 It was concluded that the epithelium plays a crucial role as an impermeant barrier in modulating the responsiveness of the airways smooth muscle. PMID:1878753

  1. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to ciliated airway epithelia requires prolonged incubation time.

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, J; Zeiher, B G; Friedman, E; Welsh, M J

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia will be an important factor in determining whether recombinant adenoviruses can be developed as vectors for transferring cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA to patients with cystic fibrosis. Current understanding of the biology of CF lung disease suggests that vectors should express transgene in mature, ciliated airway epithelia. We evaluated the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to primary cultures of normal and CF human airway epithelia. Our studies showed that the airway cells developed from an undifferentiated epithelium with markers characteristic of basal cells and a surface covered by short microvilli 3 days after seeding to a mature epithelium whose apical surface was covered with cilia by 10 to 14 days. The ability of adenovirus vectors to express a reporter gene and to correct defective cyclic AMP-stimulated Cl- transport in CF epithelia was correlated inversely with the state of differentiation. However, the inefficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer could be partially corrected when the contact time between vector and epithelium was prolonged. After prolonged contact, we observed complete correction of the CF Cl- transport defect in differentiated CF airway epithelia in culture and of the Cl- transport defect in the nasal epithelia of mice homozygous for the deltaF508 mutation. The fact that gene transfer to airway epithelia required prolonged incubation with vector contrasts with the rapid infection observed in cell models such as 293 and HeLa cells, which are commonly used to study adenovirus infection. Gene transfer observed after prolonged incubation may result from mechanisms different from those that mediate infection of 293 cells. These observations suggest that interventions that either increase the contact time or alter the epithelium or the vector may be required to facilitate gene transfer to ciliated respiratory epithelia

  2. Relationship between surface tension of upper airway lining liquid and upper airway collapsibility during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Madronio, Melanie; Stavrinou, Rosie; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C

    2003-11-01

    Lowering surface tension (gamma) of upper airway lining liquid (UAL) reduces upper airway opening (anesthetized humans) and closing (anesthetized rabbits) pressures. We now hypothesize that in sleeping obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients lowering gamma of UAL will enhance upper airway stability and decrease the severity of sleep-disordered breathing. Nine OSAHS patients [respiratory disturbance index (RDI): 49 +/- 8 (SE) events/h, diagnostic night] participated in a two-part, one-night, polysomnography study. In the first part, upper airway closing pressures (during non-rapid eye movement sleep, Pcrit) were measured and samples of UAL (awake) were obtained before and after 2.5 ml of surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline) was instilled into the posterior pharynx. The gamma of UAL was determined with the use of the "pull-off" force technique. In the second part, subjects received a second application of 2.5 ml of surfactant and then slept the remainder of the night (205 +/- 30 min). Instillation of surfactant decreased the gamma of UAL from 60.9 +/- 3.1 mN/m (control) to 45.2 +/- 2.5 mN/m (surfactant group) (n = 9, P < 0.001). Pcrit decreased from 1.19 +/- 1.14 cmH2O (control) to -0.56 +/- 1.15 cmH2O (surfactant group) (n = 7, P < 0.02). Compared with the second half of diagnostic night, surfactant decreased RDI from 51 +/- 8 to 35 +/- 8 events/h (n = 9, P < 0.03). The fall in RDI (deltaRDI) correlated with the fall in gamma of UAL (deltagamma) (deltaRDI = 1.8 x deltagamma, r = 0.68, P = 0.04). Hypopneas decreased approximately 50% from 42 +/- 8 to 20 +/- 5 events/h (n = 9, P < 0.03, paired t-test). The gamma of UAL measured the next morning remained low at 49.5 +/- 2.7 mN/m (n = 9, P < 0.001, ANOVA, compared with control). In conclusion, instillation of surfactant reduced the gamma of UAL in OSAHS patients and decreased Pcrit and the occurrence of hypopneas. Therapeutic manipulation of gamma of UAL may be beneficial in reducing the severity

  3. Phenotypic and physiologic variability in nasal epithelium cultured from smokers and non-smokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of air-liquid interface (ALI) culturing of mammalian airway epithelium is a recent innovation for experimental modeling of airway epithelial development, function, and pathogenic mechanisms associated with infectious agent and irritant exposure. This construct provi...

  4. Long-term cultures of polarized airway epithelial cells from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Jornot, Lan; Dudez, Tecla; Pagano, Alessandra; Rochat, Thierry; Lacroix, Jean Silvain; Suter, Susanne; Chanson, Marc

    2006-01-01

    The poor ability of respiratory epithelial cells to proliferate and differentiate in vitro into a pseudostratified mucociliated epithelium limits the general use of primary airway epithelial cell (AEC) cultures generated from patients with rare diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we describe a procedure to amplify AEC isolated from nasal polyps and generate long-term cultures of the respiratory epithelium. AEC were seeded onto microporous permeable supports that carried on their undersurface a preformed feeder layer of primary human airway fibroblasts. The use of fibroblast feeder layers strongly stimulated the proliferation of epithelial cells, allowing the expansion of the cell pool with successive passages. AEC at increasing passage were seeded onto supports undercoated with airway fibroblasts and exposed to air. Either freshly isolated or amplified AEC could differentiate into a pseudostratified mucociliated epithelium for at least 10 mo. Thus, CF epithelia cultures showed elevated Na+ transport, drastic hyperabsorption of surface liquid, and absence of cAMP-induced Cl- secretion as compared with non-CF cultures. They were also characterized by thick apical secretion that hampered the movement of cell surface debris by cilia. However, CF respiratory epithelia did not show increased production of mucins or IL-8. The method described here is now routinely used in our laboratory to establish long-term cultures of well differentiated respiratory epithelia from human airway biopsies. PMID:16179582

  5. A model of surfactant-induced surface tension effects on the parenchymal tethering of pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hideki; Halpern, David; Gaver, Donald P

    2013-01-18

    We developed a computational model of lung parenchyma, which is comprised of individual alveolar chamber models. Each alveolus is modeled by a truncated octahedron. Considering the force balance between the elastin and collagen fibers laying on the alveolar membrane and the pressures acting on the membrane, we computed the deformations of the parenchyma with a finite element method. We focused on the effect of surfactant on the force of parenchymal tethering an airway. As the lung inflates, the parenchyma becomes stiffer and the tethering force becomes stronger. As the alveolar surfactant concentration is reduced, the lung volume at a fixed alveolar pressure decreases, and thus, the tethering force becomes weaker. The distortion of parenchyma caused by the deformation of an airway extends widely around the airway. The displacement of parenchyma decays with distance from the airway wall, but deviates from the prediction based on a theory for a continuum material. Using results obtained from the present lung parenchyma model, we also developed a simple 1-dimensional model for parenchyma tethering force on an airway, which could be utilized for the analysis of liquid/gas transports in an axis-symmetric elastic airway. The effective shear modulus was calculated from the pressure-volume relation of parenchyma. By manipulating the pressure-volume curve, this simple model may be used to predict the parenchyma tethering force in diseased lungs. PMID:23235110

  6. Expression of surface platelet receptors (CD62P and CD41/61) in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO).

    PubMed

    Iwaszko-Simonik, Alicja; Niedzwiedz, Artur; Graczyk, Stanislaw; Slowikowska, Malwina; Pliszczak-Krol, Aleksandra

    2015-03-15

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is an allergic disease of horses similar to human asthma, which is characterized by airway inflammation and activation of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets. Platelet activation and an increase in circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates may lead to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to investigate platelet status in RAO-affected horses based on the platelet morphology and platelet surface expression of CD41/61 and CD62P. Ten RAO-affected horses and ten healthy horses were included in this study. Blood samples were obtained to determine the platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR). Expression of CD62P and CD41/61 was detected by flow cytometry on activated platelets. The median PLT was significantly reduced in horses with RAO compared to the controls. The MPV and the P-LCR values were significantly higher in RAO horses than controls. Expression of CD41/61 on platelets was increased in RAO horses, while CD62P expression was reduced. This study demonstrated the morphological changes in platelets and expression of platelet surface receptors. Despite the decrease of CD62P expression, the observed increased surface expression of CD41/61 on platelets in horses with RAO may contribute to the formation of platelet aggregates in their respiratory system. PMID:25665521

  7. Regulation of Cl^- Channels in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells by Extracellular ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutts, M. J.; Chinet, T. C.; Mason, S. J.; Fullton, J. M.; Clarke, L. L.; Boucher, R. C.

    1992-03-01

    The rate of Cl^- secretion by human airway epithelium is determined, in part, by apical cell membrane Cl^- conductance. In cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, defective regulation of Cl^- conductance decreases the capability to secrete Cl^-. Here we report that extracytosolic ATP in the luminal bath of cultured human airway epithelia increased transepithelial Cl^- secretion and apical membrane Cl^- permeability. Single-channel studies in excised membrane patches revealed that ATP increased the open probability of outward rectifying Cl^- channels. The latter effect occurs through a receptor mechanism that requires no identified soluble second messengers and is insensitive to probes of G protein function. These results demonstrate a mode of regulation of anion channels by binding ATP at the extracellular surface. Regulation of Cl^- conductance by external ATP is preserved in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

  8. Acute exposure to silica nanoparticles aggravate airway inflammation: different effects according to surface characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Sohn, Jung-Ho; Kim, Yoon-Ju; Park, Yoon Hee; Han, Heejae; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Kangtaek; Choi, Hoon; Um, Kiju; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Jung-Won; Lee, Jae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used in many scientific and industrial fields despite the lack of proper evaluation of their potential toxicity. This study examined the effects of acute exposure to SNPs, either alone or in conjunction with ovalbumin (OVA), by studying the respiratory systems in exposed mouse models. Three types of SNPs were used: spherical SNPs (S-SNPs), mesoporous SNPs (M-SNPs), and PEGylated SNPs (P-SNPs). In the acute SNP exposure model performed, 6-week-old BALB/c female mice were intranasally inoculated with SNPs for 3 consecutive days. In the OVA/SNPs asthma model, the mice were sensitized two times via the peritoneal route with OVA. Additionally, the mice endured OVA with or without SNP challenges intranasally. Acute SNP exposure induced significant airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, particularly in the S-SNP group. In OVA/SNPs asthma models, OVA with SNP-treated group showed significant airway inflammation, more than those treated with only OVA and without SNPs. In these models, the P-SNP group induced lower levels of inflammation on airways than both the S-SNP or M-SNP groups. Interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-1β and interferon-γ levels correlated with airway inflammation in the tested models, without statistical significance. In the mouse models studied, increased airway inflammation was associated with acute SNPs exposure, whether exposed solely to SNPs or SNPs in conjunction with OVA. P-SNPs appear to be relatively safer for clinical use than S-SNPs and M-SNPs, as determined by lower observed toxicity and airway system inflammation. PMID:26183169

  9. Nose-to-Brain Delivery: Investigation of the Transport of Nanoparticles with Different Surface Characteristics and Sizes in Excised Porcine Olfactory Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Alpesh; Stolnik, Snjezana; Illum, Lisbeth

    2015-08-01

    The ability to deliver therapeutically relevant amounts of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the central nervous system to treat neurological diseases is dependent on the availability of efficient drug delivery systems. Increased delivery and/or therapeutic effect has been shown for drugs encapsulated in nanoparticles; however, the factors governing the transport of the drugs and/or the nanoparticles from the nasal cavity to the brain are not clear. The present study evaluates the potential transport of nanoparticles across the olfactory epithelium in relation to nanoparticle characteristics. Model systems, 20, 100, and 200 nm fluorescent carboxylated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles that were nonmodified or surface modified with polysorbate 80 (P80-PS) or chitosan (C-PS), were assessed for transport across excised porcine olfactory epithelium mounted in a vertical Franz diffusion cell. Assessment of the nanoparticle content in the donor chamber of the diffusion cell, accompanied by fluorescence microscopy of dismounted tissues, revealed a loss of nanoparticle content from the donor suspension and their association with the excised tissue, depending on the surface properties and particle size. Chitosan surface modification of PS nanoparticles resulted in the highest tissue association among the tested systems, with the associated nanoparticles primarily located in the mucus, whereas the polysorbate 80-modified nanoparticles showed some penetration into the epithelial cell layer. Assessment of the bioelectrical properties, metabolic activity, and histology of the excised olfactory epithelium showed that C-PS nanoparticles applied in pH 6.0 buffer produced a damaging effect on the epithelial cell layer in a size-dependent manner, with fine 20 nm sized nanoparticles causing substantial tissue damage relative to that with the 100 and 200 nm counterparts. Although histology showed that the olfactory tissue was affected by the application of citrate buffer that was

  10. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  11. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF LUNG AIRWAY STRUCTURES USING DATA-DRIVEN SURFACE MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is a subject critical to many areas of medicine. The visualization of lung structures naturally lends itself to computer graphics modeling due to the large number of airways involved and the complexities of the branching systems...

  12. Molecular mechanism of ocular surface damage: Application to an in vitro dry eye model on human corneal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    De Servi, Barbara; Marasco, Daniela; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was concerned with the development of a new experimental model of dry eye using human reconstructed in vitro corneal epithelium (HCE). The model is based on the use of adapted culture conditions that induce relevant modifications at the cellular and molecular level thus mimicking dry eye. Methods The HCE model was maintained in a controlled environmental setting (relative humidity <40% and 40 °C temperature) for 24 h and up to 72 h to induce dry eye. The evolution of the dry eye condition was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry staining, scanning electron microscopy, and gene expression by using TaqMan gene assay technology (mucin-4 [MUC4], matrix metallopeptidase-9 [MMP9], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], and defensin β-2 [DEFB2). The effects of different commercially available tear substitutes on the induced dry eye condition were tested. Results This in vitro dry eye HCE model, that was well established within 24 h, has the characteristic features of a dry eye epithelium and could be satisfactorily used for preliminary assessment of the protective activity of some artificial tears. The transcriptional study of selected biomarkers showed an increase in MUC4, MMP9, TNF-α, and hBD-2 (DEFB2) gene expression. Conclusions By using a dynamic approach, we were able to define a biomarker gene signature of dry eye-induced effects that could be predictive of corneal damage in vivo and to discriminate the efficacy among different commercial artificial tears. PMID:21245952

  13. Epithelial modulation of preterm airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Panitch, H B; Wolfson, M R; Shaffer, T H

    1993-03-01

    To determine if epithelium from immature airways can modulate the responsiveness of smooth muscle, we studied paired trachealis muscle strips from preterm sheep. The epithelium was removed from one strip and left undisturbed in the other. Concentration-effect (CE) curves to acetylcholine (ACh), KCl, and isoproterenol were obtained. To evaluate maturational effects, responses to ACh and isoproterenol were studied in trachealis strips from adult airways. Maximal stress (Po) to ACh increased after epithelium removal in preterm (P < 0.05) but not adult strips. Epithelium removal caused a leftward shift of the ACh CE curves in both preterm and adult strips (P < 0.001) and a decrease in the dose required to achieve a one-half maximal response (ED50) in both preterm (P < 0.005) and adult strips (P < 0.05). The magnitude of the change in Po as well as in the ED50 for ACh between preterms and adults was similar. Epithelium removal did not alter either the Po or the CE curves of preterm strips stimulated by KCl. Response to isoproterenol in precontracted strips was enhanced in the presence of an intact epithelium in both groups (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that preterm airway epithelium is able to modulate the responsiveness of smooth muscle. Additionally, the magnitude of the effect is unchanged with maturation. We speculate that damage of airway epithelium from mechanical ventilation may contribute to the increased incidence of airway hyperreactivity observed in preterm infants. PMID:8482688

  14. Effect of modifying quantum dot surface charge on airway epithelial cell uptake in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Eric; Galloway, Justin F.; Nelson, Antoinette; Breysse, Patrick N.; Wirtz, Denis; Searson, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    The respiratory system is one of the portals of entry into the body, and hence inhalation of engineered nanomaterials is an important route of exposure. The broad range of physicochemical properties that influence biological responses necessitate the systematic study to contribute to understanding occupational exposure. Here, we report on the influence of nanoparticle charge and dose on human airway epithelial cells, and show that this platform can be used to evaluate consequences of exposure to engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22783847

  15. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  16. The response of the macaque tracheobronchial epithelium to acute ozone injury. A quantitative ultrastructural and autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.W.; Plopper, C.G.; Dungworth, D.L.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the response of the tracheal epithelium to cytotoxic injury in a primate species that may have an epithelium more representative of that in man than smaller laboratory species. This study evaluated changes in the light-microscopic, surface, and ultrastructural appearance of the tracheobronchial epithelium of bonnet monkeys exposed for 3 or 7 days to 0.64 ppm ozone. Population densities, epithelial volumetric densities, and thymidine labeling indexes were determined for cells from posterior membranous and anterior cartilaginous trachea and mainstem bronchus. Ozone-induced epithelial changes were characterized by decreased numbers of ciliated cells, loss of cilia, and necrosis of ciliated cells. Regional differences in lesion distribution were demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. Longitudinal streaks of ciliary loss were evident in posterior membranous trachea, but ciliary loss in the ventral trachea was most prominent over the posterior border of the cartilaginous rings. The thymidine labeling index and numbers of necrotic ciliated cells were greater after 3 days than after 7 days of continuous exposure. Foci of stratification were often associated with increased numbers of labeled nuclei in the suprabasal region of the epithelium. The results of this study suggest that small mucous granule cells and intermediate cells are important participants in the repair of chemically injured airway epithelium; stratification and increased amounts of cytoplasmic filament bundles and desmosomal attachments, rather than being evidence of squamous metaplasia or dysplastic change, might be stereotypic responses of airway epithelium to injury; and the ciliated cell population becomes less susceptible to ozone-induced necrosis with continuing exposure.

  17. Dry deposition of pollutant and marker particles onto live mouse airway surfaces enhances monitoring of individual particle mucociliary transit behaviour.

    PubMed

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S; Siu, Karen K W; Parsons, David W

    2012-07-01

    Particles suspended in the air are inhaled during normal respiration and unless cleared by airway defences, such as the mucociliary transit (MCT) system, they can remain and affect lung and airway health. Synchrotron phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) methods have been developed to non-invasively monitor the behaviour of individual particles in live mouse airways and in previous studies the MCT behaviour of particles and fibres in the airways of live mice after deposition in a saline carrier fluid have been examined. In this study a range of common respirable pollutant particles (lead dust, quarry dust and fibreglass fibres) as well as marker particles (hollow glass micro-spheres) were delivered into the trachea of live mice using a dry powder insufflator to more accurately mimic normal environmental particulate exposure and deposition via inhalation. The behaviour of the particles once delivered onto the airway surface was tracked over a five minute period via PCXI. All particles were visible after deposition. Fibreglass fibres remained stationary throughout while all other particle types transited the tracheal surface throughout the imaging period. In all cases the majority of the particle deposition and any airway surface activity was located close to the dorsal tracheal wall. Both the individual and bulk motions of the glass bead marker particles were visible and their behaviour enabled otherwise hidden MCT patterns to be revealed. This study verified the value of PCXI for examining the post-deposition particulate MCT behaviour in the mouse trachea and highlighted that MCT is not a uniform process as suggested by radiolabel studies. It also directly revealed the advantages of dry particle delivery for establishing adequate particulate presence for visualizing MCT behaviour. The MCT behaviour and rate seen after dry particle delivery was different from that in previous carrier-fluid studies. It is proposed that dry particle delivery is essential for producing

  18. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; St. George, J.A.; Wilson, D.W.; Dungworth, D.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components.

  19. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  20. Tear Film Mucins: Front Line Defenders of the Ocular Surface; Comparison with Airway and Gastrointestinal Tract Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The ocular surface including the cornea and conjunctiva and its overlying tear film are the first tissues of the eye to interact with the external environment. The tear film is complex containing multiple layers secreted by different glands and tissues. Each layer contains specific molecules and proteins that not only maintain the health of the cells on the ocular surface by providing nourishment and removal of waste products but also protect these cells from environment. A major protective mechanism that the corneal and conjunctival cells have developed is secretion of the innermost layer of the tear film, the mucous layer. Both the cornea and conjunctiva express membrane spanning mucins, whereas the conjunctiva also produces soluble mucins. The mucins present in the tear film serve to maintain the hydration of the ocular surface and to provide lubrication and anti-adhesive properties between the cells of the ocular surface and conjunctiva during the blink. A third function is to contribute to the epithelial barrier to prevent pathogens from binding to the ocular surface. This review will focus on the different types of mucins produced by the corneal and conjunctival epithelia. Also included in this review will be a presentation of the structure of mucins, regulation of mucin production, role of mucins in ocular surface diseases, and the differences in mucin production by the ocular surface, airways and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23954166

  1. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  2. Computational model for the regulation of extracellular ATP and adenosine in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Picher, Maryse; Zuo, Peiying; Okada, Seiko F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Tim C

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are key components of the signaling network regulating airway clearance. They are released by the epithelium into the airway surface liquid (ASL) to stimulate cilia beating activity, mucus secretion and airway hydration. Understanding the factors affecting their availability for purinoceptor activation is an important step toward the development of new therapies for obstructive lung diseases. This chapter presents a mathematical model developed to gain predictive insights into the regulation of ASL nucleotide concentrations on human airway epithelia. The parameters were estimated from experimental data collected on polarized primary cultures of human nasal and bronchial epithelial cells. This model reproduces major experimental observations: (1) the independence of steady-state nucleotide concentrations on ASL height, (2) the impact of selective ectonucleotidase inhibitors on their steady-state ASL concentrations, (3) the changes in ASL composition caused by mechanical stress mimicking normal breathing, (4) and the differences in steady-state concentrations existing between nasal and bronchial epithelia. In addition, this model launched the study of nucleotide release into uncharted territories, which led to the discovery that airway epithelia release, not only ATP, but also ADP and AMP. This study shows that computational modeling, coupled to experimental validation, provides a powerful approach for the identification of key therapeutic targets for the improvement of airway clearance in obstructive respiratory diseases. PMID:21560044

  3. Overexpression of Smad2 Drives House Dust Mite–mediated Airway Remodeling and Airway Hyperresponsiveness via Activin and IL-25

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Lisa G.; Mathie, Sara A.; Walker, Simone A.; Pegorier, Sophie; Jones, Carla P.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Airway hyperreactivity and remodeling are characteristic features of asthma. Interactions between the airway epithelium and environmental allergens are believed to be important in driving development of pathology, particularly because altered epithelial gene expression is common in individuals with asthma. Objectives: To investigate the interactions between a modified airway epithelium and a common aeroallergen in vivo. Methods: We used an adenoviral vector to generate mice overexpressing the transforming growth factor-β signaling molecule, Smad2, in the airway epithelium and exposed them to house dust mite (HDM) extract intranasally. Measurements and Main Results: Smad2 overexpression resulted in enhanced airway hyperreactivity after allergen challenge concomitant with changes in airway remodeling. Subepithelial collagen deposition was increased and smooth muscle hyperplasia was evident resulting in thickening of the airway smooth muscle layer. However, there was no increase in airway inflammation in mice given the Smad2 vector compared with the control vector. Enhanced airway hyperreactivity and remodeling did not correlate with elevated levels of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13 or IL-4. However, mice overexpressing Smad2 in the airway epithelium showed significantly enhanced levels of IL-25 and activin A after HDM exposure. Blocking activin A with a neutralizing antibody prevented the increase in lung IL-25 and inhibited subsequent collagen deposition and also the enhanced airway hyperreactivity observed in the Smad2 overexpressing HDM-exposed mice. Conclusions: Epithelial overexpression of Smad2 can specifically alter airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in response to an aeroallergen. Moreover, we have identified novel roles for IL-25 and activin A in driving airway hyperreactivity and remodeling. PMID:20339149

  4. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period. PMID:24785116

  5. Mathematical model of nucleotide regulation on airway epithelia. Implications for airway homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peiying; Picher, Maryse; Okada, Seiko F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2008-09-26

    In the airways, adenine nucleotides support a complex signaling network mediating host defenses. Released by the epithelium into the airway surface liquid (ASL) layer, they regulate mucus clearance through P2 (ATP) receptors, and following surface metabolism through P1 (adenosine; Ado) receptors. The complexity of ASL nucleotide regulation provides an ideal subject for biochemical network modeling. A mathematical model was developed to integrate nucleotide release, the ectoenzymes supporting the dephosphorylation of ATP into Ado, Ado deamination into inosine (Ino), and nucleoside uptake. The model also includes ecto-adenylate kinase activity and feed-forward inhibition of Ado production by ATP and ADP. The parameters were optimized by fitting the model to experimental data for the steady-state and transient concentration profiles generated by adding ATP to polarized primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The model captures major aspects of ATP and Ado regulation, including their >4-fold increase in concentration induced by mechanical stress mimicking normal breathing. The model also confirmed the independence of steady-state nucleotide concentrations on the ASL volume, an important regulator of airway clearance. An interactive approach between simulations and assays revealed that feed-forward inhibition is mediated by selective inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Importantly, the model identifies ecto-adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ASL ATP and proposes novel strategies for the treatment of airway diseases characterized by impaired nucleotide-mediated clearance. These new insights into the biochemical processes supporting ASL nucleotide regulation illustrate the potential of this mathematical model for fundamental and clinical research. PMID:18662982

  6. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  7. Importance of airway inflammation for hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, M.J.; Fabbri, L.M.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Gold, B.D.; Aizawa, H.; Walters, E.H.; Alpert, S.E.; Nadel, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    We studied whether ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness correlates with the development of airway inflammation in dogs. To assess airway responsiveness, we determined increases in pulmonary resistance produced by delivering acetylcholine aerosol to the airways. To assess airway inflammation, we biopsied the airway mucosa and counted the number of neutrophils present in the epithelium. Airway responsiveness and inflammation were assessed in anesthetized dogs before ozone exposure and then 1 h and 1 wk after ozone (2.1 ppm, 2 h). Airway responsiveness increased markedly at 1 h after ozone and returned to control levels 1 wk later in each of 6 dogs, but it did not change after ozone in another 4 dogs. Furthermore, dogs that became hyperresponsive also developed a marked and reversible increase in the number of neutrophils in the epithelium, whereas dogs that did not become hyperresponsive had no change in the number of neutrophils. For the group of dogs, the level of airway responsiveness before and after ozone exposure correlated closely with the number of epithelial neutrophils. The results suggest that ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may depend on the development of an acute inflammatory response in the airways.

  8. On-the-fly detection of changes on and below the surface in epithelium mucosal tissue architecture from scattered light.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fernand S; Taslidere, Ezgi; Murthy, Sreekant

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present a technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on or below the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters extracted from a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM) that models the scattered light reflected from the mucosal tissue structure over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. This work has the potential to enhance the endoscopist's ability to locate and identify abnormal mucosal architectures in particular when the disease is developing below the surface and hence becoming hidden during colonoscopy or endoscopic examination. It also has also potential in helping deciding as to when and where to take biopsies; steps that should lead to improvement in the diagnostic yield. PMID:20648519

  9. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puchelle, E; Peault, B

    2000-01-01

    Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa. PMID:11667974

  10. In vivo imaging of airway cilia and mucus clearance with micro-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kengyeh K.; Unglert, Carolin; Ford, Tim N.; Cui, Dongyao; Carruth, Robert W.; Singh, Kanwarpal; Liu, Linbo; Birket, Susan E.; Solomon, George M.; Rowe, Steven M.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated a 4 mm diameter rigid endoscopic probe to obtain high resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) images from the tracheal epithelium of living swine. Our common-path fiber-optic probe used gradient-index focusing optics, a selectively coated prism reflector to implement a circular-obscuration apodization for depth-of-focus enhancement, and a common-path reference arm and an ultra-broadbrand supercontinuum laser to achieve high axial resolution. Benchtop characterization demonstrated lateral and axial resolutions of 3.4 μm and 1.7 μm, respectively (in tissue). Mechanical standoff rails flanking the imaging window allowed the epithelial surface to be maintained in focus without disrupting mucus flow. During in vivo imaging, relative motion was mitigated by inflating an airway balloon to hold the standoff rails on the epithelium. Software implemented image stabilization was also implemented during post-processing. The resulting image sequences yielded co-registered quantitative outputs of airway surface liquid and periciliary liquid layer thicknesses, ciliary beat frequency, and mucociliary transport rate, metrics that directly indicate airway epithelial function that have dominated in vitro research in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but have not been available in vivo. PMID:27446685

  11. In vivo imaging of airway cilia and mucus clearance with micro-optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kengyeh K; Unglert, Carolin; Ford, Tim N; Cui, Dongyao; Carruth, Robert W; Singh, Kanwarpal; Liu, Linbo; Birket, Susan E; Solomon, George M; Rowe, Steven M; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2016-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a 4 mm diameter rigid endoscopic probe to obtain high resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) images from the tracheal epithelium of living swine. Our common-path fiber-optic probe used gradient-index focusing optics, a selectively coated prism reflector to implement a circular-obscuration apodization for depth-of-focus enhancement, and a common-path reference arm and an ultra-broadbrand supercontinuum laser to achieve high axial resolution. Benchtop characterization demonstrated lateral and axial resolutions of 3.4 μm and 1.7 μm, respectively (in tissue). Mechanical standoff rails flanking the imaging window allowed the epithelial surface to be maintained in focus without disrupting mucus flow. During in vivo imaging, relative motion was mitigated by inflating an airway balloon to hold the standoff rails on the epithelium. Software implemented image stabilization was also implemented during post-processing. The resulting image sequences yielded co-registered quantitative outputs of airway surface liquid and periciliary liquid layer thicknesses, ciliary beat frequency, and mucociliary transport rate, metrics that directly indicate airway epithelial function that have dominated in vitro research in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but have not been available in vivo. PMID:27446685

  12. Impaired Capacity of Fibroblasts to Support Airway Epithelial Progenitors in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Su-Bei; Sun, Xin; Wu, Qi; Wu, Jun-Ping; Chen, Huai-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) often develops in transplant patients and results in injury to the respiratory and terminal airway epithelium. Owing to its rising incidence, the pathogenesis of BOS is currently an area of intensive research. Studies have shown that injury to the respiratory epithelium results in dysregulation of epithelial repair. Airway epithelial regeneration is supported by stromal cells, including fibroblasts. This study aimed to investigate whether the supportive role of lung fibroblasts is altered in BOS. Methods: Suspensions of lung cells were prepared by enzyme digestion. Lung progenitor cells (LPCs) were separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Lung fibroblasts from patients with BOS or healthy controls were mixed with sorted mouse LPCs to compare the colony-forming efficiency of LPCs by counting the number of colonies with a diameter of ≥50 μm in each culture. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software (SPSS Inc., USA). The paired Student's t-test was used to test for statistical significance. Results: LPCs were isolated with the surface phenotype of CD31- CD34- CD45- EpCAM+ Sca-1+. The colony-forming efficiency of LPCs was significantly reduced when co-cultured with fibroblasts isolated from patients with BOS. The addition of SB431542 increased the colony-forming efficiency of LPCs to 1.8%; however, it was still significantly less than that in co-culture with healthy control fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The epithelial-supportive capacity of fibroblasts is impaired in the development of BOS and suggest that inefficient repair of airway epithelium could contribute to persistent airway inflammation in BOS. PMID:27569228

  13. Transfection of rat ovarian surface epithelium with erb-B2/neu induces transformed phenotypes in vitro and the tumorigenic phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Davies, B R; Auersperg, N; Worsley, S D; Ponder, B A

    1998-01-01

    The neu/cerb-B2 gene is frequently amplified and/or overexpressed in human epithelial ovarian cancers. We have established an inbred animal model for ovarian cancer that mimics aspects of human ovarian cancer by transducing a spontaneously immortalized rat ovarian surface epithelial cell line in culture with ecotropic retroviruses expressing a mutated rat neu/c-erb-B2 oncogene. Transfectants expressing neu at a high level exhibited altered morphology and behavior in two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture in Matrigel, could be cloned in soft agar, and were more invasive through a Matrigel membrane than control transfectants transduced with a similar retrovirus expressing the beta-galactosidase gene. When injected intraperitoneally, neu-expressing transfectants produced highly invasive, rapidly growing tumors that coated the peritoneal cavity and induced ascites formation. Furthermore, neu transfectants could be grown as solid tumors when injected subepithelially into the ovary. The neu-transfected cells also formed tumors when injected subcutaneously into the mammary fat pad, although they grew relatively poorly and often regressed. Transfectants expressing beta-galactosidase failed to produce tumors at any of the sites injected. A second rat ovarian surface epithelial cell line was similarly transduced with the neu/c-erb-B2-expressing retrovirus. However, transformed phenotypes and tumorigenicity were not induced in this cell line. These experiments show directly that overexpression of neu in an established line of rat ovarian epithelium is extremely oncogenic. This animal model system may prove useful for the study of ovarian cancer biology in immunocompetent animals. PMID:9422547

  14. Mucous cell metaplasia in rat nasal epithelium after a 20-month exposure to ozone: A morphometric study of epithelial differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Griffith, W.C. |

    1997-12-31

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of long-term ozone exposure on nasal epithelia and intraepithelial mucosubstances (IM) throughout the nasal airways of F344/N rats. Animals were exposed to 0 (controls). 0. 12. 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone. 6 h/day, 5 days/wk. for 20 mo. Rats were killed 1 wk after the end of the exposure. and nasal tissues were processed for light and electron microscopy. Standard morphometric techniques were used to determine epithelial cell densities and the amounts of IM in the surface epithelium lining the nasal airways. No mucous cells or IM were present in the epithelia lining the nasal lateral meatus and maxillary sinus of rats exposed to 0 or 0.12 ppm ozone. In contrast, rats exposed to 0.5 or 1.0 ppm ozone had marked mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) with numerous mucous cells and conspicuous amounts of IM in the surface epithelium lining these upper airways. Ozone-induced increases in total epithelial cells (i.e., epithelial hyperplasia) were present only in rats exposed to 1.0 ppm. The results of this study indicate that rats chronically exposed to 1.0 or 0.5 ppm, but not 0. 121 ppm. ozone can develop marked MCM with significant increases in IM in both proximal and distal nasal airways. The epithelial chances observed throughout the nasal passages of ozone-exposed rats may be adaptive responses in an attempt to protect the upper and lower respiratory tract from further ozone-induced injury.

  15. Trefoil factor-2 reverses airway remodeling changes in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Lim, Clarice; Muljadi, Ruth C; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C; Giraud, Andrew S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a small peptide with an important role in mucosal repair. TFF2 is up-regulated in asthma, suggesting a role in asthma pathogenesis. Given its known biological role in promoting epithelial repair, TFF2 might be expected to exert a protective function in limiting the progression of airway remodeling in asthma. The contribution of TFF2 to airway remodeling in asthma was investigated by examining the expression of TFF2 in the airway and lung, and evaluating the effects of recombinant TFF2 treatment on established airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD). BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 9 weeks, whereas mice with established OVA-induced AAD were treated with TFF2 or vehicle control (intranasally for 14 d). Effects on airway remodeling, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness were then assessed, whereas TFF2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. TFF2 expression was significantly increased in the airways of mice with AAD, compared with expression levels in control mice. TFF2 treatment resulted in reduced epithelial thickening, subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet-cell metaplasia, bronchial epithelium apoptosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness (all P < 0.05, versus vehicle control), but TFF2 treatment did not influence airway inflammation. The increased expression of endogenous TFF2 in response to chronic allergic inflammation is insufficient to prevent the progression of airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic AAD. However, exogenous TFF2 treatment is effective in reversing aspects of established airway remodeling. TFF2 has potential as a novel treatment for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22652198

  16. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  17. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  18. Efficient killing of inhaled bacteria in DeltaF508 mice: role of airway surface liquid composition.

    PubMed

    McCray, P B; Zabner, J; Jia, H P; Welsh, M J; Thorne, P S

    1999-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis mice have been generated by gene targeting but show little lung disease without repeated exposure to bacteria. We asked if murine mucosal defenses and airway surface liquid (ASL) Cl(-) were altered by the DeltaF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutation. Naive DeltaF508 -/- and +/- mice showed no pulmonary inflammation and after inhaled Pseudomonas aeruginosa had similar inflammatory responses and bacterial clearance rates. We therefore investigated components of the innate immune system. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice killed Escherichia coli, and the microbicidal activity was inhibited by NaCl. Because beta-defensins are salt-sensitive epithelial products, we looked for pulmonary beta-defensin expression. A mouse homolog of human beta-defensin-1 (termed "MBD-1") was identified; the mRNA was expressed in the lung. Using a radiotracer technique, ASL volume and Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]) were measured in cultured tracheal epithelia from normal and DeltaF508 -/- mice. The estimated ASL volume was similar for both groups. There were no differences in ASL [Cl(-)] in DeltaF508 -/- and normal mice (13.8 +/- 2.6 vs. 17.8 +/- 5.6 meq/l). Because ASL [Cl(-)] is low in normal and mutant mice, salt-sensitive antimicrobial factors, including MBD-1, may be normally active. PMID:10409246

  19. Bronchoconstriction and airway biology: potential impact and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gosens, Reinoud; Grainge, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that mechanical forces occurring in the airway as a consequence of bronchoconstriction are sufficient to not only induce symptoms but also influence airway biology. Animal and human in vitro and in vivo work demonstrates that the airways are structurally and functionally altered by mechanical stress induced by bronchoconstriction. Compression of the airway epithelium and mechanosensing by the airway smooth muscle trigger the activation and release of growth factors, causing cell proliferation, extracellular matrix protein accumulation, and goblet cell differentiation. These effects of bronchoconstriction are of major importance to asthma pathophysiology and appear sufficient to induce remodeling independent of the inflammatory response. We review these findings in detail and discuss previous studies in light of this new evidence regarding the influence of mechanical forces in the airways. Furthermore, we highlight potential impacts of therapies influencing mechanical forces on airway structure and function in asthma. PMID:25732446

  20. Interleukin-20 promotes airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuguo; Hao, Junqing; Xing, Chunyan; Chu, Qi; Wang, Guicheng; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Liang

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that interleukin-20 (IL-20) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and it has been implicated in psoriasis, lupus nephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. Little is known about the effects of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the function of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. To identify the expression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, in the airway epithelium in bronchial tissues, bronchial biopsy specimens were collected from patients and mice with asthma and healthy subjects and stained with specific antibodies. To characterize the effects of IL-20 in asthmatic airway remodeling, we silenced and stimulated IL-20 in cell lines isolated from mice by shRNA and recombinant protein approaches, respectively, and detected the expression of α-SMA and FN-1 by Western blot analysis. First, overexpression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, was detected in the airway epithelium collected from patients and mice with asthma. Second, IL-20 increased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA, and silencing of IL-20 in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 cells decreased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA. IL-20 may be a critical cytokine in airway remodeling in asthma. This study indicates that targeting IL-20 and/or its receptors may be a new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:25028099

  1. PLUNC Is a Novel Airway Surfactant Protein with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    PubMed Central

    Penterman, Jon; Mizrachi, Dario; Singh, Pradeep K.; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Ramaswamy, S.; McCray, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Background The PLUNC (“Palate, lung, nasal epithelium clone”) protein is an abundant secretory product of epithelia present throughout the conducting airways of humans and other mammals, which is evolutionarily related to the lipid transfer/lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LT/LBP) family. Two members of this family - the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) and the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) - are innate immune molecules with recognized roles in sensing and responding to Gram negative bacteria, leading many to propose that PLUNC may play a host defense role in the human airways. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on its marked hydrophobicity, we hypothesized that PLUNC may be an airway surfactant. We found that purified recombinant human PLUNC greatly enhanced the ability of aqueous solutions to spread on a hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, we discovered that PLUNC significantly reduced surface tension at the air-liquid interface in aqueous solutions, indicating novel and biologically relevant surfactant properties. Of note, surface tensions achieved by adding PLUNC to solutions are very similar to measurements of the surface tension in tracheobronchial secretions from humans and animal models. Because surfactants of microbial origin can disperse matrix-encased bacterial clusters known as biofilms [1], we hypothesized that PLUNC may also have anti-biofilm activity. We found that, at a physiologically relevant concentration, PLUNC inhibited biofilm formation by the airway pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an in vitro model. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that the PLUNC protein contributes to the surfactant properties of airway secretions, and that this activity may interfere with biofilm formation by an airway pathogen. PMID:20161732

  2. Production of 3-D Airway Organoids From Primary Human Airway Basal Cells and Their Use in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Hild, Marc; Jaffe, Aron B

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human airway basal cells to serve as progenitor cells in the conducting airway makes them an attractive target in a number of respiratory diseases associated with epithelial remodeling. This unit describes a protocol for the culture of 'bronchospheres', three-dimensional (3-D) organoids that are derived from primary human airway basal cells. Mature bronchospheres are composed of functional multi-ciliated cells, mucin-producing goblet cells, and airway basal cells. In contrast to existing methods used for the culture of well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells, bronchospheres do not require growth on a permeable support and can be cultured in 384-well assay plates. The system provides a mechanism for investigating the regulation of basal cell fate during airway epithelial morphogenesis, as well as a basis for studying the function of the human airway epithelium in high-throughput assays. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27171795

  3. Vitronectin expression in the airways of subjects with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M; Abraham, Thomas; Herrera, Ana M; Correa, Mario A; Ortega, Jorge E; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls). Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling. PMID:25768308

  4. Vitronectin Expression in the Airways of Subjects with Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M.; Abraham, Thomas; Herrera, Ana M.; Correa, Mario A.; Ortega, Jorge E.; Paré, Peter D.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls). Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling. PMID:25768308

  5. EGF shifts human airway basal cell fate toward a smoking-associated airway epithelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ionwa; Fukui, Tomoya; Witover, Bradley; Brekman, Angelika; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-07-16

    The airway epithelium of smokers acquires pathological phenotypes, including basal cell (BC) and/or goblet cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, structural and functional abnormalities of ciliated cells, decreased number of secretoglobin (SCGB1A1)-expressing secretory cells, and a disordered junctional barrier. In this study, we hypothesized that smoking alters airway epithelial structure through modification of BC function via an EGF receptor (EGFR)-mediated mechanism. Analysis of the airway epithelium revealed that EGFR is enriched in airway BCs, whereas its ligand EGF is induced by smoking in ciliated cells. Exposure of BCs to EGF shifted the BC differentiation program toward the squamous and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypes with down-regulation of genes related to ciliogenesis, secretory differentiation, and markedly reduced junctional barrier integrity, mimicking the abnormalities present in the airways of smokers in vivo. These data suggest that activation of EGFR in airway BCs by smoking-induced EGF represents a unique mechanism whereby smoking can alter airway epithelial differentiation and barrier function. PMID:23818594

  6. Lubiprostone targets prostanoid EP4 receptors in ovine airways

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, AW

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Lubiprostone, a prostaglandin E1 derivative, is reported to activate ClC-2 chloride channels located in the apical membranes of a number of transporting epithelia. Lack of functioning CFTR chloride channels in epithelia is responsible for the genetic disease cystic fibrosis, therefore, surrogate channels that can operate independently of CFTR are of interest. This study explores the target receptor(s) for lubiprostone in airway epithelium. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH All experiments were performed on the ventral tracheal epithelium of sheep. Epithelia were used to measure anion secretion from the apical surface as short circuit current or as fluid secretion from individual airway submucosal glands, using an optical method. KEY RESULTS The EP4 antagonists L-161982 and GW627368 inhibited short circuit current responses to lubiprostone, while EP1,2&3 receptor antagonists were without effect. Similarly, lubiprostone induced secretion in airway submucosal glands was inhibited by L-161982. L-161982 effectively competed with lubiprostone with a Kd value of 0.058 µM, close to its value for binding to human EP4 receptors (0.024 µM). The selective EP4 agonist L-902688 and lubiprostone behaved similarly with respect to EP4 receptor antagonists. Results of experiments with H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, were consistent with lubiprostone acting through a Gs-protein coupled EP4 receptor/cAMP cascade. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Lubiprostone-induced short-circuit currents and submucosal gland secretions were inhibited by selective EP4 receptor antagonists. The results suggest EP4 receptor activation by lubiprostone triggers cAMP production necessary for CFTR activation and the secretory responses, a possibility precluded in CF tissues. PMID:20883477

  7. Targeted delivery of antiprotease to the epithelial surface of human tracheal xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Cohn, Leah A; Phillips, Thomas E; Smith, Arnold; Davis, Pamela B

    2003-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is uniquely susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and infection with this organism incites an intense, compartmentalized inflammatory response that leads to chronic airway obstruction and bronchiectasis. Neutrophils migrate into the airway, and released neutrophil elastase contributes to the progression of the lung disease characteristic of CF. We have developed a strategy that permits the delivery of antiproteases to the inaccessible CF airways by targeting the respiratory epithelium via the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (hpIgR). A fusion protein consisting of a single-chain Fv directed against secretory component, the extracellular portion of the pIgR, linked to human alpha1-antitrypsin is effectively ferried across human tracheal xenografts and delivers the antiprotease to the apical surface to a much greater extent than occurs by passive diffusion of human alpha1-antitrypsin alone. Targeted antiprotease delivery paralleled hpIgR expression in the respiratory epithelium in vivo and was not increased by escalating dose, so airway penetration was receptor-dependent, not dose-dependent. Thus, this approach provides us with the ability to deliver therapeutics, like antiproteases, specifically to the lumenal surface of the respiratory epithelium, within the airway surface fluid, where it will be in highest concentration at this site. PMID:12615618

  8. POPCORN FLAVORING EFFECTS ON REACTIVITY OF RAT AIRWAYS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Zaccone, Eric J.; Thompson, Janet A.; Ponnoth, Dovenia S.; Cumpston, Amy M.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Jackson, Mark C.; Kashon, Michael L.; Frazer, David G.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Shimko, Michael J.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    “Popcorn workers’ lung” is an obstructive pulmonary disease produced by inhalation of volatile artificial butter flavorings. In rats, inhalation of diacetyl, a major component of butter flavoring, and inhalation of a diacetyl substitute, 2,3-pentanedione, produce similar damage to airway epithelium. The effects of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione and mixtures of diacetyl, acetic acid, and acetoin, all components of butter flavoring, on pulmonary function and airway reactivity to methacholine (MCh) were investigated. Lung resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) were negligibly changed 18 h after a 6-h inhalation exposure to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione (100–360 ppm). Reactivity to MCh was not markedly changed after diacetyl, but was modestly decreased after 2,3-pentanedione inhalation. Inhaled diacetyl exerted essentially no effect on reactivity to mucosally applied MCh, but 2,3-pentanedione (320 and 360 ppm) increased reactivity to MCh in the isolated, perfused trachea preparation (IPT). In IPT, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione (≥3 mM) applied to the serosal and mucosal surfaces of intact and epithelium-denuded tracheas initiated transient contractions followed by relaxations. Inhaled acetoin (150 ppm) exerted no effect on pulmonary function and airway reactivity in vivo; acetic acid (27 ppm) produced hyperreactivity to MCh; and exposure to diacetyl + acetoin + acetic acid (250 + 150 + 27 ppm) led to a diacetyl-like reduction in reactivity. Data suggest that the effects of 2,3-pentanedione on airway reactivity are greater than those of diacetyl, and that flavorings are airway smooth muscle relaxants and constrictors, thus indicating a complex mechanism. PMID:23941636

  9. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  10. Particle Deposition During Airway Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-Feng; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Inhaled aerosol particles deposit in the lung and may be from environmental, toxic, or medical therapy sources. While much research focuses on inspiratory deposition, primarily at airway bifurcations due to inertial impaction, there are other mechanisms that allow the particles to reach the airway surface, such as gravitational settling and diffusion depending on particle size. We introduce a new mechanism not previously studied, i.e. aerosol deposition from airway closure. The airways are lined with a liquid layer. Due to the surface tension driven instability, a liquid plug can form from this layer which blocks the airway. This process of airway closure tends to occur toward the end of expiration. In this study, the efficiency of the impaction of the particles during airway closure will be investigated. The particles will be released from the upstream of the airway and convected by the air flow and deposited onto the closing liquid layer. We solve the governing equations using a finite volume approach in conjunction with a sharp interface method for the interfaces. Once the velocity field of the gas flow is obtained, the path of the particles will be calculated and the efficiency of the deposition can be estimated. We acknowledge support from the National Institutes of Health grant number NIH HL85156.

  11. Effects of acid aerosol exposure on the surface properties of airway mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.M.; Schuerch, S.; Roth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    It was hypothesized that the mucous layer lining the tracheas of rats and guinea pigs contains surfactant material capable of lowering the air/mucus surface tension, {gamma}, and that exposure to an irritant aerosol would raise the {gamma}. The {gamma} of the surface film was measured directly by a spreading droplet technique and indirectly by displacement of polymethyl methacrylate particles into the aqueous layer. The morphology of the mucous film was examined by electron microscopy after nonaqueous fixation. {gamma} was 33.3 {plus_minus} 0.70 (SE) mN/m and 32.3 {plus_minus} 0.68 (SE) mN/m for the normal rat and guinea pig trachea, respectively. Exposure for 4 h to aerosols of sulfuric acid (94.1 {plus_minus} 18.68 (SD) and 43.3 {plus_minus} 4.57 (SD) mg/m{sup 3}) caused a several-fold increase in thickness of the mucous layer with exudation of protein-like material. The osmiophilic surfactant film at the air/mucus interface became irregularly thickened and multilayered. Despite these morphological changes {gamma} remained low, 33.2 {plus_minus} 0.43 (SE) mN/m and 32.6 {plus_minus} 0.60 (SE) mN/m for rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and displacement of particles into the subphase was not compromised. The results indicate that rodent tracheas are able to maintain a low surface tension in the presence of injury. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Epithelial injury and repair in airways diseases.

    PubMed

    Grainge, Christopher L; Davies, Donna E

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by variable respiratory distress with underlying airway inflammation and airflow obstruction. The incidence of asthma has risen inexorably over the past 50 years, suggesting that environmental factors are important in its etiology. All inhaled environmental stimuli interact with the lung at the respiratory epithelium, and it is a testament to the effectiveness of the airway innate defenses that the majority of inhaled substances are cleared without the need to elicit an inflammatory response. However, once this barrier is breached, effective communication with immune and inflammatory cells is required to protect the internal milieu of the lung. In asthma, the respiratory epithelium is known to be structurally and functionally abnormal. Structurally, the epithelium shows evidence of damage and has more mucus-producing cells than normal airways. Functionally, the airway epithelial barrier can be more permeable and more sensitive to oxidants and show a deficient innate immune response to respiratory virus infection compared with that in normal individuals. The potential of a susceptible epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to create a microenvironment that enables deviation of immune and inflammatory responses to external stimuli may be crucial in the development and progression of asthma. In this review, we consider three important groups of environmental stimuli on the epithelium in asthma: oxidants, such as environmental pollution and acetaminophen; viruses, including rhinovirus; and agents that cause barrier disruption, such as house dust mite allergens. The pathology associated with each stimulus is considered, and potential future treatments arising from research on their effects are presented. PMID:24297122

  13. A morphological study of the tracheal epithelium of the snake Natrix maura.

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, L M

    1990-01-01

    The epithelium of the trachea of the Natrix maura snake was studied by conventional light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The epithelium is formed of basal, ciliated, endocrine and secretory cells. It shows different thickness and distribution of the cells, depending on the area (covering the cartilaginous or the membranous zone). Secretory cells show a morphology similar to that found in lizards but it is different from the mucous cells reported in the extrapulmonary airways of turtles, birds and mammals. The ultrastructure of the secretory cells is similar to that reported for serous cells in the airways of mammals. Intra-epithelial plasma cells are also found within the epithelium. The present results show that there are marked morphological differences between the tracheal epithelium of lizards and snakes and that of turtles, birds and mammals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2272908

  14. Pathohistological changes of tracheal epithelium in laryngectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marinela; Prgomet, Drago; Marjanović, Ksenija; Pušeljić, Silvija; Kraljik, Nikola

    2015-11-01

    Total laryngectomy results in a permanent disconnection of the upper and lower airways. Thus, the upper airways are bypassed and can no longer condition, humidify, and filter the inhaled air, leading to damage of the tracheobronchial epithelium. There is little scientific information available about the effects of tracheostoma breathing and the degree of mucosal damage in laryngectomized patients. The aims of this study were to determine the histopathologic findings and investigate the potential impact of using a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) on the tracheal epithelium in long-term tracheostomy patients. Tracheal mucosal biopsies were taken from a total of 70 patients. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined by a light microscope. Normal pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium was found in only 9 (12.9%) cases; while, 17 (24.3%) cases had some degree of basal cell hyperplasia. Squamous metaplasia was the most common finding (50%). Pre-invasive lesions (mild and moderate squamous dysplasia) were found in only one patient who used an HME, and in eight (11.4%) non-users. Although the HME cannot completely restore the physiological functions of the upper respiratory track, it delivers a better quality of air to the lower airways and has a positive effect on tracheal mucosa. PMID:25399353

  15. pH modulates the activity and synergism of the airway surface liquid antimicrobials β-defensin-3 and LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The pulmonary airways are continuously exposed to bacteria. As a first line of defense against infection, the airway surface liquid (ASL) contains a complex mixture of antimicrobial factors that kill inhaled and aspirated bacteria. The composition of ASL is critical for antimicrobial effectiveness. For example, in cystic fibrosis an abnormally acidic ASL inhibits antimicrobial activity. Here, we tested the effect of pH on the activity of an ASL defensin, human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3), and the cathelicidin-related peptide, LL-37. We found that reducing pH from 8.0 to 6.8 reduced the ability of both peptides to kill Staphylococcus aureus. An acidic pH also attenuated LL-37 killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, we discovered synergism between hBD-3 and LL-37 in killing S. aureus. LL-37 and lysozyme were also synergistic. Importantly, an acidic pH reduced the synergistic effects of combinations of ASL antibacterials. These results indicate that an acidic pH reduces the activity of individual ASL antimicrobials, impairs synergism between them, and thus may disrupt an important airway host defense mechanism. PMID:25512526

  16. pH modulates the activity and synergism of the airway surface liquid antimicrobials β-defensin-3 and LL-37.

    PubMed

    Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Reznikov, Leah R; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Sheets, Kelsey A; Horswill, Alexander R; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2014-12-30

    The pulmonary airways are continuously exposed to bacteria. As a first line of defense against infection, the airway surface liquid (ASL) contains a complex mixture of antimicrobial factors that kill inhaled and aspirated bacteria. The composition of ASL is critical for antimicrobial effectiveness. For example, in cystic fibrosis an abnormally acidic ASL inhibits antimicrobial activity. Here, we tested the effect of pH on the activity of an ASL defensin, human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3), and the cathelicidin-related peptide, LL-37. We found that reducing pH from 8.0 to 6.8 reduced the ability of both peptides to kill Staphylococcus aureus. An acidic pH also attenuated LL-37 killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, we discovered synergism between hBD-3 and LL-37 in killing S. aureus. LL-37 and lysozyme were also synergistic. Importantly, an acidic pH reduced the synergistic effects of combinations of ASL antibacterials. These results indicate that an acidic pH reduces the activity of individual ASL antimicrobials, impairs synergism between them, and thus may disrupt an important airway host defense mechanism. PMID:25512526

  17. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  18. Circulating progenitor epithelial cells traffic via CXCR4/CXCL12 in response to airway injury.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Brigitte N; Belperio, John A; Rao, P Nagesh; Randell, Scott H; Fishbein, Michael C; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2006-02-01

    Recipient airway epithelial cells are found in human sex-mismatched lung transplants, implying that circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to the repair of the airway epithelium. Markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells and mechanisms for their trafficking remain to be elucidated. We demonstrate that a population of progenitor epithelial cells exists in the bone marrow and the circulation of mice that is positive for the early epithelial marker cytokeratin 5 (CK5) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We used a mouse model of sex-mismatched tracheal transplantation and found that CK5+ circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to re-epithelialization of the airway and re-establishment of the pseudostratified epithelium. The presence of CXCL12 in tracheal transplants provided a mechanism for CXCR4+ circulating progenitor epithelial cell recruitment to the airway. Depletion of CXCL12 resulted in the epithelium defaulting to squamous metaplasia, which was derived solely from the resident tissue progenitor epithelial cells. Our findings demonstrate that CK5+CXCR4+ cells are markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells in the bone marrow and circulation and that CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated recruitment of circulating progenitor epithelial cells is necessary for the re-establishment of a normal pseudostratified epithelium after airway injury. These findings support a novel paradigm for the development of squamous metaplasia of the airway epithelium and for developing therapeutic strategies for circulating progenitor epithelial cells in airway diseases. PMID:16424223

  19. Differential effects of cyclic and constant stress on ATP release and mucociliary transport by human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Picher, Maryse; Boucher, Richard C

    2007-04-15

    In the lungs, the first line of defence against bacterial infection is the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) lining the airway surface. The superficial airway epithelium exhibits complex regulatory pathways that blend ion transport to adjust ASL volume to maintain proper mucociliary clearance (MCC). We hypothesized that stresses generated by airflow and transmural pressures during breathing govern ASL volume by regulating the rate of epithelial ATP release. Luminal ATP, via interactions with apical membrane P2-purinoceptors, regulates the balance of active ion secretion versus absorption to maintain ASL volume at optimal levels for MCC. In this study we tested the hypothesis that cyclic compressive stress (CCS), mimicking normal tidal breathing, regulates ASL volume in airway epithelia. Polarized tracheobronchial epithelial cultures from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects responded to a range of CCS by increasing the rate of ATP release. In normal airway epithelia, the CCS-induced increase in ASL ATP concentration was sufficient to induce purinoceptor-mediated increases in ASL height and MCC, via inhibition of epithelial Na(+)-channel-mediated Na(+) absorption and stimulation of Cl(-) secretion through CFTR and the Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels. In contrast, static, non-oscillatory stress did not stimulate ATP release, ion transport or MCC, emphasizing the importance of rhythmic mechanical stress for airway defence. In CF airway cultures, which exhibit basal ASL depletion, CCS was partially effective, producing less ASL volume secretion than in normal cultures, but a level sufficient to restore MCC. The present data suggest that CCS may (1) regulate ASL volume in the normal lung and (2) improve clearance in the lungs of CF patients, potentially explaining the beneficial role of exercise in lung defence. PMID:17317749

  20. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  1. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Davies, Donna E.; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL–8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4–6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  2. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M; Collins, Jane E; Davies, Donna E; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL-8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4-6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  3. Airway Surface Dehydration by Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) in Cystic Fibrosis Is Due to Decreased Function of a Voltage-dependent Potassium Channel and Can Be Rescued by the Drug Pirfenidone.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, Dahis; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Dennis, John S; Tyrrell, Jean; Tarran, Robert; Salathe, Matthias

    2015-10-16

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is not only elevated in airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, whose airways are characterized by abnormal ion transport and mucociliary clearance, but TGF-β1 is also associated with worse clinical outcomes. Effective mucociliary clearance depends on adequate airway hydration, governed by ion transport. Apically expressed, large-conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-dependent K(+) (BK) channels play an important role in this process. In this study, TGF-β1 decreased airway surface liquid volume, ciliary beat frequency, and BK activity in fully differentiated CF bronchial epithelial cells by reducing mRNA expression of the BK γ subunit leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 26 (LRRC26) and its function. Although LRRC26 knockdown itself reduced BK activity, LRRC26 overexpression partially reversed TGF-β1-induced BK dysfunction. TGF-β1-induced airway surface liquid volume hyper-absorption was reversed by the BK opener mallotoxin and the clinically useful TGF-β signaling inhibitor pirfenidone. The latter increased BK activity via rescue of LRRC26. Therefore, we propose that TGF-β1-induced mucociliary dysfunction in CF airways is associated with BK inactivation related to a LRRC26 decrease and is amenable to treatment with clinically useful TGF-β1 inhibitors. PMID:26338706

  4. Th2-type cytokine-induced mucus metaplasia decreases susceptibility of human bronchial epithelium to rhinovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Jakiela, Bogdan; Gielicz, Anna; Plutecka, Hanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Bochenek, Grazyna; Soja, Jerzy; Januszek, Rafal; Aab, Alar; Musial, Jacek; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A; Sanak, Marek

    2014-08-01

    Human rhinoviruses (RVs) are a major cause of exacerbations in asthma and other chronic airway diseases. A characteristic feature of asthmatic epithelium is goblet cell metaplasia and mucus hypersecretion. Bronchial epithelium is also an important source of lipid mediators, including pro- and antiinflammatory eicosanoids. By using air-liquid interface cultures of airway epithelium from patients with asthma and nonasthmatic control subjects, we compared RV16 replication-induced changes in mRNA expression of asthma candidate genes and eicosanoid production in the epithelium with or without IL-13-induced mucus metaplasia. Mucus metaplastic epithelium was characterized by a 20-fold less effective replication of RV16 and blunted changes in gene expression; this effect was seen to the same extent in patients with asthma and control subjects. We identified ciliary cells as the main target for RV16 by immunofluorescence imaging and demonstrated that the numbers of ciliary cells decreased in RV16-infected epithelium. RV16 infection of mucociliary epithelium resulted in overexpression of genes associated with bronchial remodeling (e.g., MUC5AC, FGF2, and HBEGF), induction of cyclooxygenase-2, and increased secretion of prostaglandins. These responses were similar in both studied groups. These data indicate that structural changes associated with mucus metaplasia renders airway epithelium less susceptible to RV infection. Thus, exacerbations of the lung disease caused by RV may result from severe impairment in mucociliary clearance or activation of immune defense rather than from preferential infection of mucus metaplastic epithelium. Repeated rhinoviral infections of compromised epithelium may contribute to the remodeling of the airways. PMID:24588727

  5. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert, Jr.; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Manning, M. Lisa; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-10-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems--both inert and living--have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role.

  6. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Lisa Manning, M.; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems— both inert and living—have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell–cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role. PMID:26237129

  7. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  8. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  9. Airway basal stem cells: a perspective on their roles in epithelial homeostasis and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jason R; Randell, Scott H; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2010-01-01

    The small airways of the human lung undergo pathological changes in pulmonary disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiolitis obliterans and cystic fibrosis. These clinical problems impose huge personal and societal healthcare burdens. The changes, termed 'pathological airway remodeling', affect the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and the reciprocal trophic interactions that occur between these tissues. Most of the normal human airway is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium of ciliated cells, secretory cells and 6-30% basal cells, the proportion of which varies along the proximal-distal axis. Epithelial abnormalities range from hypoplasia (failure to differentiate) to basal- and goblet-cell hyperplasia, squamous- and goblet-cell metaplasia, dysplasia and malignant transformation. Mesenchymal alterations include thickening of the basal lamina, smooth muscle hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation. Paradoxically, given the prevalence and importance of airway remodeling in lung disease, its etiology is poorly understood. This is due, in part, to a lack of basic knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maintenance and repair of the airway epithelium. Specifically, little is known about the proliferation and differentiation of basal cells, a multipotent stem cell population of the pseudostratified airway epithelium. This Perspective summarizes what we know, and what we need to know, about airway basal cells to evaluate their contributions to normal and abnormal airway remodeling. We contend that exploiting well-described model systems using both human airway epithelial cells and the pseudostratified epithelium of the genetically tractable mouse trachea will enable crucial discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of airway disease. PMID:20699479

  10. Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 in Allergic Airway Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Veraldi, Kristen L.; Gibson, Bethany T.; Yasuoka, Hidekata; Myerburg, Michael M.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Balzar, Silvana; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: The hallmarks of allergic asthma are airway inflammation, obstruction, and remodeling. Airway remodeling may lead to irreversible airflow obstruction with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in the treatment of asthma, the mechanisms underlying airway remodeling are still poorly understood. We reported that insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding proteins (IGFBPs) contribute to extracellular matrix deposition in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; however, their contribution to airway remodeling in asthma has not been established. Objectives: We hypothesized that IGFBP-3 is overexpressed in asthma and contributes to airway remodeling. Methods: We evaluated levels of IGFBP-3 in tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with asthma at baseline and 48 hours after allergen challenge, in reparative epithelium in an in vitro wounding assay, and in conditioned media from cytokine- and growth factor–stimulated primary epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: IGFBP-3 levels and distribution were evaluated by Western blot, ELISA, and immunofluorescence. IGFBP-3 is increased in vivo in the airway epithelium of patients with asthma compared with normal control subjects. The concentration of IGFBP-3 is increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with asthma after allergen challenge, its levels are increased in reparative epithelium in an in vitro wounding assay and in the conditioned medium of primary airway epithelial cell cultures stimulated with IGF-I. Conclusions: Our results suggest that one mechanism of allergic airway remodeling is through the secretion of the profibrotic IGFBP-3 from IGF-I–stimulated airway epithelial cells during allergic inflammation. PMID:19608721

  11. Matrilysin (Matrix Metalloproteinase-7) Mediates E-Cadherin Ectodomain Shedding in Injured Lung Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, John K.; Li, Qinglang; Parks, William C.

    2003-01-01

    Matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase-7) is highly expressed in lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis and other conditions associated with airway and alveolar injury. Although matrilysin is required for closure of epithelial wounds ex vivo, the mechanism of its action in repair is unknown. We demonstrate that matrilysin mediates shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain from injured lung epithelium both in vitro and in vivo. In alveolar-like epithelial cells, transfection of activated matrilysin resulted in shedding of E-cadherin and accelerated cell migration. In vivo, matrilysin co-localized with E-cadherin at the basolateral surfaces of migrating tracheal epithelium, and the reorganization of cell-cell junctions seen in wild-type injured tissue was absent in matrilysin-null samples. E-cadherin ectodomain was shed into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of bleomycin-injured wild-type mice, but was not shed in matrilysin-null mice. These findings identify E-cadherin as a novel substrate for matrilysin and indicate that shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain is required for epithelial repair. PMID:12759241

  12. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  13. Applications of mouse airway epithelial cell culture for asthma research.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Dickinson, John D; Brody, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Primary airway epithelial cell culture provides a valuable tool for studying cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions, and the role of immune system factors in asthma pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss the application of mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures for the study of asthma biology. A major advantage of this system is the ability to use airway epithelial cells from mice with defined genetic backgrounds. The in vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse airway epithelial cells uses the air-liquid interface condition to generate well-differentiated epithelia with characteristics of native airways. Protocols are provided for manipulation of differentiation, induction of mucous cell metaplasia, genetic modification, and cell and pathogen coculture. Assays for the assessment of gene expression, responses of cells, and analysis of specific cell subpopulations within the airway epithelium are included. PMID:23943446

  14. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  15. Potential of in vitro reconstituted 3D human airway epithelia (MucilAir™) to assess respiratory sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song; Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Constant, Samuel; Roggen, Erwin

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory sensitizers are considered as substances of higher risk, at the same level as carcinogens, mutagens and toxic chemicals for reproduction. Presently, there is no validated assay for identifying the respiratory sensitizers. Based on a fully differentiated and functional in vitro cell model of the human airway epithelium, MucilAir™, we attempt to develop such assay. To this end, we invented a novel method, using Dextran as carrier, for applying the water insoluble chemicals to the apical surface of the airway epithelia. Using the Dextran carrier method, we successfully tested some reference chemical compounds known to cause respiratory sensitisation in human beings, including MDI, TMA and HCPt. Interestingly, these chemical sensitizers differentially up-regulated the releases of certain cytokines and chemokines involved in allergic responses. We believe that based on MucilAir™ an in vitro assay could be developed for identification and characterization of the respiratory sensitizers. PMID:23089132

  16. MUC4 involvement in ErbB2/ErbB3 phosphorylation and signaling in response to airway cell mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, George; Carraway, Coralie A Carothers; Carraway, Kermit L

    2009-05-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinases ErbB2 and ErbB3 are phosphorylated in response to injury of the airway epithelium. Since we have shown that the membrane mucin MUC4 can act as a ligand/modulator for ErbB2, affecting its localization in polarized epithelial cells and its phosphorylation, we questioned whether Muc4 was involved, along with ErbB2 and ErbB3, in the damage response of airway epithelia. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the localization of MUC4 in human airway samples. Both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of MUC4 and ErbB2 at the airway luminal surface. Sequential immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting from airway cells demonstrated that the MUC4 and ErbB2 are present as a complex in airway epithelial cells. To assess the participation of MUC4 in the damage response, cultures of NCI-H292 or airway cells were scratch-wounded, then analyzed for association of phospho-ErbB2 and -ErbB3 with MUC4 by sequential immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Wounded cultures exhibited increased phosphorylation of both receptors in complex with MUC4. Scratch wounding also increased activation of the downstream pathway through Akt, as predicted from our previous studies on Muc4 effects on ErbB2 and ErbB3. The participation of MUC4 in the phosphorylation response was also indicated by siRNA repression of MUC4 expression, which resulted in diminution of the phosphorylation of ErbB2 and ErbB3. These studies provide a new model for the airway epithelial damage response, in which the MUC4-ErbB2 complex is a key element in the sensor mechanism and phosphorylation of the receptors. PMID:19288496

  17. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Lentivirus-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giulia; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Chan, Mario; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Brody, Steven L; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Alton, Eric W F W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis is to provide long-term correction of the genetic defect. This may be achievable by targeting airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells with an integrating vector. Here, we evaluated the ability of a lentiviral vector, derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus and pseudotyped with F and HN envelope proteins from Sendai virus, to transduce progenitor basal cells of the mouse nasal airways. We first transduced basal cell-enriched cultures ex vivo and confirmed efficient transduction of cytokeratin-5 positive cells. We next asked whether progenitor cells could be transduced in vivo. We evaluated the transduction efficiency in mice pretreated by intranasal administration of polidocanol to expose the progenitor cell layer. Compared to control mice, polidocanol treated mice demonstrated a significant increase in the number of transduced basal cells at 3 and 14 days post vector administration. At 14 days, the epithelium of treated mice contained clusters (4 to 8 adjacent cells) of well differentiated ciliated, as well as basal cells suggesting a clonal expansion. These results indicate that our lentiviral vector can transduce progenitor basal cells in vivo, although transduction required denudation of the surface epithelium prior to vector administration. PMID:26471068

  18. Notch signaling promotes airway mucous metaplasia and inhibits alveolar development.

    PubMed

    Guseh, J Sawalla; Bores, Sam A; Stanger, Ben Z; Zhou, Qiao; Anderson, William J; Melton, Douglas A; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2009-05-01

    The airways are conduits that transport atmospheric oxygen to the distal alveolus. Normally, airway mucous cells are rare. However, diseases of the airway are often characterized by mucous metaplasia, in which there are dramatic increases in mucous cell numbers. As the Notch pathway is known to regulate cell fate in many contexts, we misexpressed the active intracellular domain of the mouse Notch1 receptor in lung epithelium. Notch misexpression resulted in an increase in mucous cells and a decrease in ciliated cells in the airway. Similarly, mouse embryonic tracheal explants and adult human airway epithelium treated with Notch agonists displayed increased mucous cell numbers and decreased ciliated cell numbers. Notch antagonists had the opposite effect. Notably, Notch antagonists blocked IL13-induced mucous metaplasia. IL13 has a well-established role as an inflammatory mediator of mucous metaplasia and functions through Stat6-mediated gene transcription. We found that Notch ligands, however, are able to cause mucous metaplasia in Stat6-null cultured trachea, thus identifying a novel pathway that stimulates mucous metaplasia. Notch signaling may therefore play an important role in airway disease and, by extension, Notch antagonists may have therapeutic value. Conversely, in the distal lung, Notch misexpression prevented the differentiation of alveolar cell types. Instead, the distal lung formed cysts composed of cells that were devoid of alveolar markers but that expressed some, but not all, markers of proximal airway epithelium. Occasional distal cystic cells appeared to differentiate into normal proximal airway cells, suggesting that ectopic Notch signaling arrests the normal differentiation of distal lung progenitors before they initiate an alveolar program. PMID:19369400

  19. REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN BIOELECTRIC PROPERTIES AND ION FLOW IN EXCISED CANINE AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption of airway liquid, as it moves from the large surface area of distal airways to more central airway surfaces, is considered to be essential for regulation of the depth of airway liquid. The short-circuited excised canine trachea, however, secretes C(-1) and absorbs a le...

  20. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  1. Mucociliary clearance defects in a murine in vitro model of pneumococcal airway infection.

    PubMed

    Fliegauf, Manfred; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Kremer, Bernhard; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where--in pneumococcal infection--persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance. PMID:23527286

  2. Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 mediates antigen-induced acute airway inflammation and late-phase airway obstruction in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, R H; Wegner, C D; Torcellini, C A; Clarke, C C; Haynes, N; Rothlein, R; Smith, C W; Letts, L G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the role of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) in the development of the acute airway inflammation (cell influx) and late-phase airway obstruction in a primate model of extrinsic asthma. In animals sensitive to antigen, a single inhalation exposure induced the rapid expression of ELAM-1 (6 h) exclusively on vascular endothelium that correlated with the influx of neutrophils into the lungs and the onset of late-phase airway obstruction. In contrast, basal levels of ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on vascular endothelium and airway epithelium before antigen challenge. After the single antigen exposure, changes in ICAM-1 expression did not correlate with neutrophil influx or the change in airway caliber. This was confirmed by showing that pretreatment with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1 did not inhibit the acute influx of neutrophils associated with late-phase airway obstruction, whereas a monoclonal antibody to ELAM-1 blocked both the influx of neutrophils and the late-phase airway obstruction. This study demonstrates a functional role for ELAM-1 in the development of acute airway inflammation in vivo. We conclude that, in primates, the late-phase response is the result of an ELAM-1 dependent influx of neutrophils. Therefore, the regulation of ELAM-1 expression may provide a novel approach to controlling the acute inflammatory response, and thereby, affecting airway function associated with inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Images PMID:1717514

  3. Bronchoscopic assessment of airway retention time of aerosolized xylitol

    PubMed Central

    Durairaj, Lakshmi; Neelakantan, Srividya; Launspach, Janice; Watt, Janet L; Allaman, Margaret M; Kearney, William R; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Zabner, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Background Human airway surface liquid (ASL) has abundant antimicrobial peptides whose potency increases as the salt concentration decreases. Xylitol is a 5-carbon sugar that has the ability to lower ASL salt concentration, potentially enhancing innate immunity. Xylitol was detected for 8 hours in the ASL after application in airway epithelium in vitro. We tested the airway retention time of aerosolized iso-osmotic xylitol in healthy volunteers. Methods After a screening spirometry, volunteers received 10 ml of nebulized 5% xylitol. Bronchoscopy was done at 20 minutes (n = 6), 90 minutes (n = 6), and 3 hours (n = 5) after nebulization and ASL was collected using microsampling probes, followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Xylitol concentration was measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and corrected for dilution using urea concentration. Results All subjects tolerated nebulization and bronchoscopy well. Mean ASL volume recovered from the probes was 49 ± 23 μl. The mean ASL xylitol concentration at 20, 90, and 180 minutes was 1.6 ± 1.9 μg/μl, 0.6 ± 0.6 μg/μl, and 0.1 ± 0.1 μg/μl, respectively. Corresponding BAL concentration corrected for dilution was consistently lower at all time points. The terminal half-life of aerosolized xylitol obtained by the probes was 45 minutes with a mean residence time of 65 minutes in ASL. Corresponding BAL values were 36 and 50 minutes, respectively. Conclusion After a single dose nebulization, xylitol was detected in ASL for 3 hours, which was shorter than our in vitro measurement. The microsampling probe performed superior to BAL when sampling bronchial ASL. PMID:16483382

  4. The Pseudomonas toxin pyocyanin inhibits the Dual oxidase-based antimicrobial system as it imposes oxidative stress on airway epithelial cells1

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Balázs; Lekstrom, Kristen; Damian, Sorin; Dupuy, Corinne; Leto, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    The dual oxidase-thiocyanate-lactoperoxidase (Duox/SCN−/LPO) system generates the microbicidal oxidant hypothiocyanite in the airway surface liquid by using LPO, thiocyanate, and Duox-derived hydrogen peroxide released from the apical surface of the airway epithelium. This system is effective against several microorganisms that infect airways of cystic fibrosis and other immunocompromised patients. We show here that exposure of airway epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from long-term cultures inhibits Duox1-dependent hydrogen peroxide release, suggesting some microbial factor suppresses Duox activity. These inhibitory effects were not seen with the pyocyanin-deficient P. aeruginosa strain, PA14 Phz1/2. We showed that purified pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa, inhibits human airway cell Duox activity by depleting intracellular stores of NADPH, as it generates intracellular superoxide. Long-term exposure of human airway (primary normal human bronchial and NCI-H292) cells to pyocyanin also blocks induction of Duox1 by Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13), which was prevented by the anti-oxidants glutathione and N-acetylcysteine. Furthermore, we showed that low concentrations of pyocyanin blocked killing of wild-type P. aeruginosa by the Duox/SCN-/LPO system on primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, pyocyanin can subvert Pseudomonas killing by the Duox-based system as it imposes oxidative stress on the host. We also show that lactoperoxidase can oxidize pyocyanin, thereby diminishing its cytotoxicity. These data establish a novel role for pyocyanin in the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in human airways through competitive redox-based reactions between the pathogen and host. PMID:18802092

  5. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Hussell, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations) are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition. PMID:26324813

  6. Generation of airway epithelial cells with native characteristics from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Susumu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Ikeda, Masakazu; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Omori, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are expected to be a useful source for the regeneration of airway epithelium. Our preliminary study of embryoid body (EB) formation and the air-liquid interface (ALI) method suggested that mouse iPS cells can differentiate into airway epithelial cells. However, whether the cells generated from mouse iPS cells had the character and phenotype of native airway epithelial cells remained uninvestigated. In this study, we generated airway epithelial cells from EBs by culturing them under serum-free conditions supplemented with Activin and bFGF and by the ALI method and characterized the iPS cell-derived airway epithelial cells in terms of their gene expression, immunoreactivity, morphology, and function. Analysis by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) revealed that the expression of the undifferentiated cell marker Nanog decreased time-dependently after the induction of differentiation, whereas definitive endoderm markers Foxa2 and Cxcr4 were transiently up-regulated. Thereafter, the expression of airway epithelium markers such as Tubb4a, Muc5ac, and Krt5 was detected by RT-PCR and immunostaining. The formation of tight junctions was also confirmed by immunostaining and permeability assay. Analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the cells generated from mouse iPS cells formed airway-epithelium-like tissue and had cilia, the movement of which was visualized and observed to be synchronized. These results demonstrate that the airway epithelial cells generated by our method have native characteristics and open new perspectives for the regeneration of injured airway epithelium. PMID:26590823

  7. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of airway allergic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelium lining the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human IgE receptor, CD23 (Fc'RII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monola...

  8. Morphological integrity of the bronchial epithelium in mild asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Lozewicz, S; Wells, C; Gomez, E; Ferguson, H; Richman, P; Devalia, J; Davies, R J

    1990-01-01

    In severe asthma bronchial epithelial cells are damaged and detached, and it has been proposed that such damage might lead to the bronchial hyperresponsiveness that characterises asthma. To investigate the relation between airway hyperresponsiveness and epithelial damage, biopsy specimens of the bronchial mucus membrane were obtained at fibreoptic bronchoscopy from 11 patients with mild atopic asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) less than 1.0 mg/ml), and from 17 healthy non-atopic subjects who did not have airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20 methacholine greater than 8.0 mg/ml). Observers who were blind to the presence or absence of asthma examined the biopsy specimens by light and electron microscopy. Epithelial cells, intercellular spaces, and goblet cells were counted. Intercellular junctional complexes were examined, and a semiquantitative assessment was made of ciliary loss, non-parallel central ciliary filaments, and vacuoles in ciliated cells. There were no differences between the asthmatic and healthy groups in any of these measurements. These findings indicate that airway hyperresponsiveness may be present when there is no apparent change in the structure of the bronchial epithelium. PMID:2321171

  9. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lance; E, Xueping; Tarsi, Jaime; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor; Horiuchi, Todd K.; Cochran, Rebecca; DeMartino, Steve; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Hussain, Iftikhar; Holtzman, Michael J.; Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Despite long-term therapy with corticosteroids, patients with severe asthma develop irreversible airway obstruction. Objectives: To evaluate if there are structural and functional differences in the airway epithelium in severe asthma associated with airway remodeling. Methods: In bronchial biopsies from 21 normal subjects, 11 subjects with chronic bronchitis, 9 subjects with mild asthma, and 31 subjects with severe asthma, we evaluated epithelial cell morphology: epithelial thickness, lamina reticularis (LR) thickness, and epithelial desquamation. Levels of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), Ki67, and Bcl-2 were measured, reflecting cellular proliferation and death. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to study cellular apoptosis. Measurements and Main Results: Airway epithelial and LR thickness was greater in subjects with severe asthma compared with those with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects (p = 0.009 and 0.033, respectively). There was no significant difference in epithelial desquamation between groups. Active, hypophosphorylated Rb expression was decreased (p = 0.002) and Ki67 was increased (p < 0.01) in the epithelium of subjects with severe asthma as compared with normal subjects, indicating increased cellular proliferation. Bcl-2 expression was decreased (p < 0.001), indicating decreased cell death suppression. There was a greater level of apoptotic activity in the airway biopsy in subjects with severe asthma as compared with the normal subjects using the TUNEL assay (p = 0.002), suggesting increased cell death. Conclusions: In subjects with severe asthma, as compared with subjects with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects, we found novel evidence of increased cellular proliferation in the airway contributing to a thickened epithelium and LR. These changes may contribute to the progressive decline in lung function and airway remodeling in patients with severe

  10. Airway epithelial repair in health and disease: Orchestrator or simply a player?

    PubMed

    Iosifidis, Thomas; Garratt, Luke W; Coombe, Deirdre R; Knight, Darryl A; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial cells represent the most important surface of contact in the body and form the first line of defence of the body to external environment. Consequently, epithelia have numerous roles in order to maintain a homeostatic defence barrier. Although the epithelium has been extensively studied over several decades, it remains the focus of new research, indicating a lack of understanding that continues to exist around these cells in specific disease settings. Importantly, evidence is emerging that airway epithelial cells in particular have varied complex functions rather than simple passive roles. One area of current interest is its role following injury. In particular, the epithelial-specific cellular mechanisms regulating their migration during wound repair remain poorly understood and remain an area that requires much needed investigation. A better understanding of the physiological, cellular and molecular wound repair mechanisms could assist in elucidating pathological processes that contribute to airway epithelial pathology. This review attempts to highlight migration-specific and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) aspects of repair used by epithelial cells under normal and disease settings, in the context of human airways. PMID:26804630

  11. Expression of ligands for Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 in human airways and airway cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Yu, Huifeng; Fernandes, Steve M.; Wei, Yadong; Gonzalez-Gil, Anabel; Motari, Mary G.; Vajn, Katarina; Stevens, Whitney W.; Peters, Anju T.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Balanced activation and inhibition of the immune system ensures pathogen clearance while avoiding hyperinflammation. Siglecs, sialic acid binding proteins found on subsets of immune cells, often inhibit inflammation: Siglec-8 on eosinophils and Siglec-9 on neutrophils engage sialoglycan ligands on airways to diminish ongoing inflammation. The identities of human siglec ligands and their expression during inflammation are largely unknown. Objective The histological distribution, expression and molecular characteristics of siglec ligands were explored in healthy and inflamed human upper airways and in a cellular model of airway inflammation. Methods Normal and chronically inflamed upper airway tissues were stained for siglec ligands. The ligands were extracted from normal and inflamed tissues and from human Calu-3 cells for quantitative analysis by siglec blotting and isolation by siglec capture. Results Siglec-8 ligands were expressed on a subpopulation of submucosal gland cells of human inferior turbinate, whereas Siglec-9 ligands were expressed more broadly (submucosal glands, epithelium, connective tissue); both were significantly upregulated in chronic rhinosinusitis patients. Human airway (Calu-3) cells expressed Siglec-9 ligands on mucin 5B under inflammatory control via the NF-κB pathway, and mucin 5B carried sialoglycan ligands of Siglec-9 on human upper airway tissue. Conclusion Inflammation results in upregulation of immune inhibitory Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 sialoglycan ligands on human airways. Siglec-9 ligands were upregulated via the NF-κB pathway resulting in their enhanced expression on mucin 5B. Siglec sialoglycan ligand expression in inflamed cells and tissues may contribute to the control of airway inflammation. PMID:25747723

  12. Apical localization of the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor by glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol modification is sufficient for adenovirus-mediated gene transfer through the apical surface of human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; van't Hof, W; Yi, S M; Schroth, M K; Zabner, J; Crystal, R G; Welsh, M J

    2001-08-01

    In well-differentiated human airway epithelia, the coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR) resides primarily on the basolateral membrane. This location may explain the observation that gene transfer is inefficient when adenovirus vectors are applied to the apical surface. To further test this hypothesis and to investigate requirements and barriers to apical gene transfer to differentiated human airway epithelia, we expressed CAR in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (GPI-CAR). As controls, we expressed wild-type CAR and CAR lacking the cytoplasmic domain (Tailless-CAR). All three constructs enhanced gene transfer with similar efficiencies in fibroblasts. In airway epithelia, GPI-CAR localized specifically to the apical membrane, where it bound adenovirus and enhanced gene transfer to levels obtained when vector was applied to the basolateral membrane. Moreover, GPI-CAR facilitated gene transfer of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, correcting the Cl(-) transport defect. In contrast, when we expressed wild-type CAR it localized to the basolateral membrane and failed to increase apical gene transfer. Only a small amount of Tailless-CAR resided in the apical membrane, and the effects on apical virus binding and gene transfer were minimal. These data indicate that binding of adenovirus to an apical membrane receptor is sufficient to mediate effective gene transfer to human airway epithelia and that the cytoplasmic domain of CAR is not required for this process. The results suggest that targeting apical receptors in differentiated airway epithelia may be sufficient for gene transfer in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. PMID:11462042

  13. Apical Localization of the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor by Glycosyl-Phosphatidylinositol Modification Is Sufficient for Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer through the Apical Surface of Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert W.; van't Hof, Wouter; Yi, Su Min P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Zabner, Joseph; Crystal, Ronald G.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    In well-differentiated human airway epithelia, the coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR) resides primarily on the basolateral membrane. This location may explain the observation that gene transfer is inefficient when adenovirus vectors are applied to the apical surface. To further test this hypothesis and to investigate requirements and barriers to apical gene transfer to differentiated human airway epithelia, we expressed CAR in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (GPI-CAR). As controls, we expressed wild-type CAR and CAR lacking the cytoplasmic domain (Tailless-CAR). All three constructs enhanced gene transfer with similar efficiencies in fibroblasts. In airway epithelia, GPI-CAR localized specifically to the apical membrane, where it bound adenovirus and enhanced gene transfer to levels obtained when vector was applied to the basolateral membrane. Moreover, GPI-CAR facilitated gene transfer of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, correcting the Cl− transport defect. In contrast, when we expressed wild-type CAR it localized to the basolateral membrane and failed to increase apical gene transfer. Only a small amount of Tailless-CAR resided in the apical membrane, and the effects on apical virus binding and gene transfer were minimal. These data indicate that binding of adenovirus to an apical membrane receptor is sufficient to mediate effective gene transfer to human airway epithelia and that the cytoplasmic domain of CAR is not required for this process. The results suggest that targeting apical receptors in differentiated airway epithelia may be sufficient for gene transfer in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. PMID:11462042

  14. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  15. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  16. Sox2 Activates Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in the Respiratory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Keiser, Angela R.; Wert, Susan E.; Bruno, Michael D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Sox2, a transcription factor critical for the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and induction of pluripotent stem cells, is expressed exclusively in the conducting airway epithelium of the lung, where it is required for differentiation of nonciliated, goblet, and ciliated cells. To determine the role of Sox2 in respiratory epithelial cells, Sox2 was selectively and conditionally expressed in nonciliated airway epithelial cells and in alveolar type II cells in the adult mouse. Sox2 induced epithelial cell proliferation within 3 days of expression. Epithelial cell proliferation was associated with increased Ki-67 and cyclin D1 staining. Expression of cell cycle genes, including FoxM1, Ccna2 (Cyclin A2), Ccnb2 (Cyclin B2), and Ccnd1 (Cyclin D1), was increased. Consistent with a role in cell proliferation, Sox2 activated the transcription of FoxM1 in vitro. In alveoli, Sox2 caused hyperplasia and ectopic differentiation of epithelial cells to those with morphologic and molecular characteristics of conducting airway epithelium. Sox2 induced the expression of conducting airway epithelial specific genes, including Scgb1a1, Foxj1, Tubb3, and Cyp2f2. Although prolonged expression of Sox2 caused cell proliferation and epithelial hyperplasia, Sox2 did not induce pulmonary tumors. Sox2 induces proliferation of respiratory epithelial cells and, subsequently, partially reprograms alveolar epithelial cells into cells with characteristics of the conducting airways. PMID:20855650

  17. Characteristics of filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae and surface of interface epithelium-connective tissue of the maned sloth tongue mucosa (Bradypus torquatus, Iliger, 1811): Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Benetti, E J; Pícoli, L C; Guimarães, J P; Motoyama, A A; Miglino, M A; Watanabe, L-S

    2009-02-01

    The study of lingual surfaces and the surface of interface epithelium-connective tissue of the tongue of Bradypus torquatus was performed by employing the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results revealed that the rostral part of the tongue presents a round apex and covered by filiform and fungiform lingual papillae and a ventral smooth surface. It was observed that the epithelial layer of the dorsal surface possesses the basal, spinosum, granular and cornified epithelial cells. The lamina propria is characterized by a dense connective tissue forming the long, short and round papillae. Numerous typical filiform papillae are located especially in the rostral part intermingled for few fungiform papillae, which were revealed in three-dimensional SEM images. Usually, the fungiform papillae are located in the border of rostral apex of the tongue exhibiting the rounded form. They are covered by keratinized epithelial cells. In the fungiform papillae, several taste pores were observed on the surface. The vallate papillae presented numerous taste buds in the wall of epithelial cells, being that the major number of taste buds is located on the superior half of vallate papilla. The taste pores are surrounded by several laminae of keratinized epithelial cells. The samples treated with NaOH solution and examined by SEM revealed, after removal of the epithelial layer, the dense connective core in original disposition, presenting different sizes and shapes. The specimens stained with Picrosirius and examined by polarized light microscopy revealed the connective tissue, indicating the collagen fibres type I and type III. PMID:19143682

  18. Airway Injury from Initiating Ventilation in Preterm Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Pillow, J. Jane; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Nitsos, Ilias; Jobe, Alan H.

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants exposed to ventilation are at risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and persistent lung disease in childhood. We report where injury occurred within the lung following brief ventilation at birth. Preterm sheep (129d gestation) were ventilated with an escalating VT to 15mL/kg by 15 min to injure the lungs, with the placental circulation intact (Fetal) or after delivery (Newborn). Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for 2h 45min, while Newborn lambs were maintained with gentle ventilatory support for the same period. The control group was not ventilated. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were analysed. In both Fetal and Newborn lambs, ventilation caused bronchial epithelial disruption in medium-sized airways. Egr-1, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1β mRNA increased in lung tissue from Fetal and Newborn lambs. Egr-1, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNA were induced in mesenchymal cells surrounding small airways, whereas IL-1β mRNA localized to the epithelium of medium/small airways. Ventilation caused loss of HSP70 mRNA from the bronchial epithelium, but induced mRNA in smooth muscle surrounding large airways. HSP70 protein decreased in lung tissue and increased in BALF with ventilation. Initiation of ventilation induced a stress response and inflammatory cytokines in small and medium-sized airways. PMID:19816239

  19. Airway and lung pathology due to mucosal surface dehydration in β-Epithelial Na+ Channel-overexpressing mice: role of TNFα and IL-4Rα signaling, influence of neonatal development, and limited efficacy of glucocorticoid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Livraghi, Alessandra; Grubb, Barbara R.; Hudson, Elizabeth J.; Wilkinson, Kristen J.; Sheehan, John K.; Mall, Marcus A.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Boucher, Richard C.; Randell, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the epithelial Na+ channel β subunit (Scnn1b gene, βENaC protein) in transgenic (Tg) mouse airways dehydrates mucosal surfaces, producing mucus obstruction, inflammation, and neonatal mortality. Airway inflammation includes macrophage activation, neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and elevated KC, TNFα and chitinase levels. These changes recapitulate aspects of complex human obstructive airway diseases, but their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to identify pathways relevant to the development of Scnn1b-Tg mouse lung pathology. Genetic deletion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) or its receptor, TNFR1, had no measurable effect on the phenotype. Deletion of the interleukin-4 receptor alpha subunit (IL-4Rα) abolished transient mucous secretory cell (MuSC) abundance and eosinophilia normally observed in neonatal wild-type (WT) mice. Similarly, IL-4Rα deficiency decreased MuSC and eosinophils in neonatal Scnn1b-Tg mice, which correlated with improved neonatal survival. However, chronic lung pathology in adult Scnn1b-Tg mice was not affected by IL-4Rα status. Prednisolone treatment ablated eosinophilia and MuSC in adult Scnn1b-Tg mice, but did not decrease mucus plugging or neutrophilia. These studies demonstrate that: 1) normal neonatal mouse airway development entails an IL-4Rα-dependent, transient abundance of MuSC and eosinophils; 2) absence of IL-4Rα improved neonatal survival of Scnn1b-Tg mice, likely reflecting decreased formation of asphyxiating mucus plugs; and 3) in Scnn1b-Tg mice, neutrophilia, mucus obstruction, and airspace enlargement are IL-4Rα- and TNFα-independent, and only MuSC and eosinophilia are sensitive to glucocorticoids. Thus, manipulation of multiple pathways will likely be required to treat the complex pathogenesis caused by airway surface dehydration. PMID:19299736

  20. Mitochondrial Transplantation Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Inhibition of Cholinergic Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Liping; Yu, Xiangyuan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yankai; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Tongfei; Li, Jiansha; Xia, Jingyan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholinergic activity has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness, and alternations of mitochondrial structure and function appear to be involved in many lung diseases including airway hyperresponsiveness. It is crucial to clarify the cause-effect association between mitochondrial dysfunction and cholinergic hyperactivity in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. Male SD rats and cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide administration; mitochondria isolated from airway epithelium were delivered into epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-induced cholinergic hyperactivity in vitro and the airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in vivo were reversed by the transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. The rescue effects of exogenous mitochondria were imitated by the elimination of excessive reactive oxygen species or blockage of muscarinic M3 receptor, but inhibited by M receptor enhancer. Mitochondrial transplantation effectively attenuates cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-stimulated airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of ROS-enhanced epithelial cholinergic hyperactivity. PMID:27279915

  1. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Moderates Airway Re-Epithelialization by Regulating Matrilysin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peter; McGuire, John K.; Hackman, Robert C.; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Black, Roy A.; Poindexter, Kurt; Yan, Wei; Liu, Phillip; Chen, Ann J.; Parks, William C.; Madtes, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is the histopathological finding in chronic lung allograft rejection. Mounting evidence suggests that epithelial damage drives the development of airway fibrosis in OB. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression increases in lung allografts and is associated with the onset of allograft rejection. Furthermore, in a mouse model of OB, airway obliteration is reduced in TIMP-1-deficient mice. Matrilysin (matrix metallproteinase-7) is essential for airway epithelial repair and is required for the re-epithelialization of airway wounds by facilitating cell migration; therefore, the goal of this study was to determine whether TIMP-1 inhibits re-epithelialization through matrilysin. We found that TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in the epithelium of human lungs with OB and both co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated in wounded primary airway epithelial cultures. TIMP-1-deficient cultures migrated faster, and epithelial cells spread to a greater extent compared with wild-type cultures. TIMP-1 also inhibited matrilysin-mediated cell migration and spreading in vitro. In vivo, TIMP-1 deficiency enhanced airway re-epithelialization after naphthalene injury. Furthermore, TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in airway epithelial cells adjacent to the wound edge. Our data demonstrate that TIMP-1 interacts with matrix metalloproteinases and regulates matrilysin activity during airway epithelial repair. Furthermore, we speculate that TIMP-1 overexpression restricts airway re-epithelialization by inhibiting matrilysin activity, contributing to a stereotypic injury response that promotes airway fibrosis via bronchiole airway epithelial damage and obliteration. PMID:18385523

  2. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  3. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Meyerholz, David K; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Ernst, Sarah E; Karp, Philip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Heilmann, Kristopher P; Leidinger, Mariah R; Allen, Patrick D; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Stoltz, David A; Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-01-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H(+) secretion by the nongastric H(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H(+); consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  4. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  5. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  6. The Nectin-4/Afadin Protein Complex and Intercellular Membrane Pores Contribute to Rapid Spread of Measles Virus in Primary Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Hornick, Andrew L.; Krishnamurthy, Sateesh; Locke, Anna C.; Mendoza, Crystal A.; Mateo, Mathieu; Miller-Hunt, Catherine L.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery that measles virus (MV) uses the adherens junction protein nectin-4 as its epithelial receptor provides a new vantage point from which to characterize its rapid spread in the airway epithelium. We show here that in well-differentiated primary cultures of airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE), MV infectious centers form rapidly and become larger than those of other respiratory pathogens: human respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus 5, and Sendai virus. While visible syncytia do not form after MV infection of HAE, the cytoplasm of an infected cell suddenly flows into an adjacent cell, as visualized through wild-type MV-expressed cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein (GFP). High-resolution video microscopy documents that GFP flows through openings that form on the lateral surfaces between columnar epithelial cells. To assess the relevance of the protein afadin, which connects nectin-4 to the actin cytoskeleton, we knocked down its mRNA. This resulted in more-limited infectious-center formation. We also generated a nectin-4 mutant without the afadin-binding site in its cytoplasmic tail. This mutant was less effective than wild-type human nectin-4 at promoting MV infection in primary cultures of porcine airway epithelia. Thus, in airway epithelial cells, MV spread requires the nectin-4/afadin complex and is based on cytoplasm transfer between columnar cells. Since the viral membrane fusion apparatus may open the passages that allow cytoplasm transfer, we refer to them as intercellular membrane pores. Virus-induced intercellular pores may contribute to extremely efficient measles contagion by promoting the rapid spread of the virus through the upper respiratory epithelium. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV), while targeted for eradication, still causes about 120,000 deaths per year worldwide. The recent reemergence of measles in insufficiently vaccinated populations in Europe and North America reminds us that measles is extremely

  7. In vivo survival and stratification of cultured limbal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Anees; Vemuganti, Geeta K; Iftekhar, Ghazala; Rao, Gullapalli N; Sangwan, Virender S

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old Bangladeshi girl presented with total limbal stem cell deficiency in the left eye, secondary to a 6-month-old chemical injury. The patient had also previously undergone two limbal transplantation surgeries. At the authors' centre the child underwent autologous cultured limbal epithelium transplantation, on human amniotic membrane, without the use of air-lift technique. Symptomatic relief, re-epithelialization of the ocular surface, regression of corneal pannus and slight improvement in vision were all noted. The corneal button obtained at the time of keratoplasty (performed 4 months later) revealed stratified epithelium with basement membrane. Thirty-seven months post keratoplasty, the best-corrected visual acuity was 6/15 with clear graft and stable ocular surface. Herein, a case of limbal stem cell deficiency successfully managed by monolayer of cultured limbal epithelium is presented. PMID:17300583

  8. Coupling of airway ciliary activity and mucin secretion to mechanical stresses by purinergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Davis, C William; Lazarowski, Eduardo

    2008-11-30

    The mucociliary clearance system is comprised of three components, ion transport activities controlling the height of airway surface liquid (ASL), mucin secretion, and ciliary activity. These activities in humans are controlled principally by local agonists, extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides released from the epithelium. Importantly, mechanical stresses stimulate goblet cell mucin secretion, ciliary beating, and Cl- and fluid secretion through mechanically induced nucleotide release. Emerging evidence also implicates co-secretion of nucleotides and mucin from goblet cells as a source of extracellular agonist. At rest, ATP is released onto airway surfaces at approximately 370fmol/mincm2, but only approximately 3% of released ATP is recovered in ASL. Secreted UTP meets with a similar fate. A wide variety of hydrolytic and transphosphorylating ecto-enzymes convert the triphosphate nucleotides into ADP, AMP, and adenosine, UDP, UMP, and uridine. Of these, ATP, adenosine, UTP, and UDP act as agonists at apical P2Y2 (ATP, UTP), P2Y6 (UDP), and A2B (adenosine) receptors on ciliated and/or goblet cells to regulate mucociliary clearance. PMID:18635403

  9. Extracellular matrix remodeling by dynamic strain in a three-dimensional tissue-engineered human airway wall model.

    PubMed

    Choe, Melanie M; Sporn, Peter H S; Swartz, Melody A

    2006-09-01

    Airway wall remodeling is a hallmark of asthma, characterized by subepithelial thickening and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Mechanical stress due to hyperresponsive smooth muscle cells may contribute to this remodeling, but its relevance in a three-dimensional environment (where the ECM plays an important role in modulating stresses felt by cells) is unclear. To characterize the effects of dynamic compression in ECM remodeling in a physiologically relevant three-dimensional environment, a tissue-engineered human airway wall model with differentiated bronchial epithelial cells atop a collagen gel containing lung fibroblasts was used. Lateral compressive strain of 10 or 30% at 1 or 60 cycles per hour was applied using a novel straining device. ECM remodeling was assessed by immunohistochemistry and zymography. Dynamic strain, particularly at the lower magnitude, induced airway wall remodeling, as indicated by increased deposition of types III and IV collagen and increased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9. These changes paralleled increased myofibroblast differentiation and were fibroblast-dependent. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of type III collagen deposition correlated with that of myofibroblasts; both were concentrated near the epithelium and decreased diffusely away from the surface, indicating some epithelial control of the remodeling response. Thus, in a physiologically relevant three-dimensional model of the bronchial wall, dynamic compressive strain induced tissue remodeling that mimics many features of remodeling seen in asthma, in the absence of inflammation and dependent on epithelial-fibroblast signaling. PMID:16601241

  10. A novel bronchial ring bioassay for the evaluation of small airway smooth muscle function in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, John Q; Yang, Dennis; Folz, Rodney J

    2006-08-01

    Advances in our understanding of murine airway physiology have been hindered by the lack of suitable, ex vivo, small airway bioassay systems. In this study, we introduce a novel small murine airway bioassay system that permits the physiological and pharmacological study of intrapulmonary bronchial smooth muscle via a bronchial ring (BR) preparation utilizing BR segments as small as 200 microm in diameter. Using this ex vivo BR bioassay, we characterized small airway smooth muscle contraction and relaxation in the presence and absence of bronchial epithelium. In control BRs, the application of mechanical stretch is followed by spontaneous bronchial smooth muscle relaxation. BRs pretreated with methacholine (MCh) partially attenuate this stretch-induced relaxation by as much as 42% compared with control. MCh elicited a dose-dependent bronchial constriction with a maximal tension (E(max)) of 8.7 +/- 0.2 mN at an EC(50) of 0.33 +/- 0.02 microM. In the presence of nifedipine, ryanodine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and SKF-96365, E(max) to MCh was significantly reduced. In epithelium-denuded BRs, MCh-induced contraction was significantly enhanced to 11.4 +/- 1.0 mN with an EC(50) of 0.16 +/- 0.04 microM (P < 0.01). Substance P relaxed MCh-precontracted BR by 62.1%; however, this bronchial relaxation effect was completely lost in epithelium-denuded BRs. Papaverine virtually abolished MCh-induced constriction in both epithelium-intact and epithelium-denuded bronchial smooth muscle. In conclusion, this study introduces a novel murine small airway BR bioassay that allows for the physiological study of smooth muscle airway contractile responses that may aid in our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma. PMID:16648239

  11. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  12. INDUCED SPUTUM DERIVES FROM THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: CONFIRMATION USING A RADIOLABELED AEROSOL BOLUS DELIVERY TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indirect evidence suggests that induced sputum derives from the surfaces of the bronchial airways. To confirm this experimentally, we employed a radiolabeled aerosol bolus delivery technique that preferentially deposits aerosol in the central airways in humans. We hypothesized th...

  13. Physiologic and molecular changes in the tracheal epithelium of rats following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sam; Zhu, Yong; Kraft, Robert; Cotto, Christopher; Carmical, Joseph R; Wood, Thomas G; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Herndon, David N; Hawkins, Hal K; Cox, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading complication in the critical care of burn victims. Airway epithelial dysfunction compromises host defense against pneumonia. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that burn injury alters the physiology of the airway epithelium. A rat model of 60% TBSA third degree scald burn was used. At 24 hours after injury, tracheal epithelial ultrastructure was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and proliferation was measured by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Mucociliary clearance (MCC) was measured using fluorescent microspheres. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA), an indicator of lipid peroxidation, was also measured. Changes in epithelial mRNA expression were measured using microarray. Burn injury led to a ten-fold reduction in MCC that was statistically significant (p = 0.007) 24 hours after injury. No significant change was noted in the morphology of tracheal epithelial cells between groups, although a marginal increase in extracellular space was noted in injured animals. Ki67 nuclear expression was significantly reduced (25%, p = 0.008) in injured rats. There was a significant increase in MDA levels in the epithelial lysate of burned animals, p = 0.001. Microarray analysis identified 59 genes with significant differences between sham and injured animals. Burn injury altered multiple important functions in rat tracheal epithelium. The decrease in MCC and cell proliferation may be due to oxidative injury. Mechanistic studies to identify physiological processes associated with changes in airway function may help in designing therapeutic agents to reduce burn-induced airway pathogenesis. PMID:26064800

  14. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  15. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  16. Observing planar cell polarity in multiciliated mouse airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Lee, Yin Loon; Stearns, Tim; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The concerted movement of cilia propels inhaled contaminants out of the lungs, safeguarding the respiratory system from toxins, pathogens, pollutants, and allergens. Motile cilia on the multiciliated cells (MCCs) of the airway epithelium are physically oriented along the tissue axis for directional motility, which depends on the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway. The MCCs of the mouse respiratory epithelium have emerged as an important model for the study of motile ciliogenesis and the PCP signaling mechanism. Unlike other motile ciliated or planar polarized tissues, airway epithelial cells are relatively easily accessible and primary cultures faithfully model many of the essential features of the in vivo tissue. There is growing interest in understanding how cells acquire and polarize motile cilia due to the impact of mucociliary clearance on respiratory health. Here, we present methods for observing and quantifying the planar polarized orientation of motile cilia both in vivo and in primary culture airway epithelial cells. We describe how to acquire and evaluate electron and light microscopy images of ciliary ultrastructural features that reveal planar polarized orientation. Furthermore, we describe the immunofluorescence localization of PCP pathway components as a simple readout for airway epithelial planar polarization and ciliary orientation. These methods can be adapted to observe ciliary orientation in other multi- and monociliated cells and to detect PCP pathway activity in any tissue or cell type. PMID:25837385

  17. Molecular mechanisms controlling CFTR gene expression in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Ott, Christopher J; Lewandowska, Marzena A; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The low levels of CFTR gene expression and paucity of CFTR protein in human airway epithelial cells are not easily reconciled with the pivotal role of the lung in cystic fibrosis pathology. Previous data suggested that the regulatory mechanisms controlling CFTR gene expression might be different in airway epithelium in comparison to intestinal epithelium where CFTR mRNA and protein is much more abundant. Here we examine chromatin structure and modification across the CFTR locus in primary human tracheal (HTE) and bronchial (NHBE) epithelial cells and airway cell lines including 16HBE14o- and Calu3. We identify regions of open chromatin that appear selective for primary airway epithelial cells and show that several of these are enriched for a histone modification (H3K4me1) that is characteristic of enhancers. Consistent with these observations, three of these sites encompass elements that have cooperative enhancer function in reporter gene assays in 16HBE14o- cells. Finally, we use chromosome conformation capture (3C) to examine the three-dimensional structure of nearly 800 kb of chromosome 7 encompassing CFTR and observe long-range interactions between the CFTR promoter and regions far outside the locus in cell types that express high levels of CFTR. PMID:21895967

  18. Nonmicrobial-mediated inflammatory airway diseases--an update.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Babu, Polani B; Krishnamoorthy, P

    2014-03-01

    In lungs, airways are in constant contact with air, microbes, allergens, and environmental pollutants. The airway epithelium represents the first line of lung defense through different mechanisms, which facilitate clearance of inhaled pathogens and environmental particles while minimizing an inflammatory response. The innate immune system facilitates immediate recognition of both foreign pathogens and tissue damage through toll-like receptor, which acts as a gateway for all intracellular events leading to inflammation. In the absence of microbial stimulus, the immune system is capable of detecting a wide range of insults against the host. This review focuses on various molecular mechanisms involved in pathophysiology of airway inflammation mediated by environmental factors, cellular stress, and pharmacological and clinical agents. PMID:24293217

  19. Electrolyte transport properties in distal small airways from cystic fibrosis pigs with implications for host defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Vargas Buonfiglio, Luis G; Comellas, Alejandro P; Thornell, Ian M; Ramachandran, Shyam; Karp, Philip H; Taft, Peter J; Sheets, Kelsey; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Welsh, Michael J; Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    While pathological and clinical data suggest that small airways are involved in early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease development, little is known about how the lack of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function contributes to disease pathogenesis in these small airways. Large and small airway epithelia are exposed to different airflow velocities, temperatures, humidity, and CO2 concentrations. The cellular composition of these two regions is different, and small airways lack submucosal glands. To better understand the ion transport properties and impacts of lack of CFTR function on host defense function in small airways, we adapted a novel protocol to isolate small airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF pigs and established an organotypic culture model. Compared with non-CF large airways, non-CF small airway epithelia cultures had higher Cl(-) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) short-circuit currents and higher airway surface liquid (ASL) pH under 5% CO2 conditions. CF small airway epithelia were characterized by minimal Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transport and decreased ASL pH, and had impaired bacterial killing compared with non-CF small airways. In addition, CF small airway epithelia had a higher ASL viscosity than non-CF small airways. Thus, the activity of CFTR is higher in the small airways, where it plays a role in alkalinization of ASL, enhancement of antimicrobial activity, and lowering of mucus viscosity. These data provide insight to explain why the small airways are a susceptible site for the bacterial colonization. PMID:26801568

  20. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  1. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  2. Regulation of airway neurogenic inflammation by neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, G U; Bellofiore, S; Geppetti, P

    1998-12-01

    Airway neurogenic inflammation is caused by tachykinins released from peripheral nerve endings of sensory neurons within the airways, and is characterized by plasma protein extravasation, airway smooth muscle contraction and increased secretion of mucus. Tachykinins are degraded and inactivated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase, which is located mainly at the surface of airway epithelial cells, but is also present in airway smooth muscle cells, submucosal gland cells and fibroblasts. The key role of NEP in limiting and regulating the neurogenic inflammation provoked by different stimuli has been demonstrated in a large series of studies published in recent years. It has also been shown that a variety of factors, which are relevant for airway diseases, including viral infections, allergen exposure, inhalation of cigarette smoke and other respiratory irritants, is able to reduce NEP activity, thus enhancing the effects of tachykinins within the airways. On the basis of these observations, the reduction of neutral endopeptidase activity may be regarded as a factor that switches neurogenic airway responses from their physiological and protective functions to a detrimental role that increases and perpetuates airway inflammation. However, further studies are needed to assess the role of neutral endopeptidase down regulation in the pathogenesis of asthma and other inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:9877509

  3. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  4. Syntaxin 1A is expressed in airway epithelial cells, where it modulates CFTR Cl– currents

    PubMed Central

    Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Di, Anke; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Boyaka, Prosper N.; McGhee, Jerry R.; Zhou, Weihong; Akagawa, Kimio; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Thome, Ulrich; Engelhardt, John F.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2000-01-01

    The CFTR Cl– channel controls salt and water transport across epithelial tissues. Previously, we showed that CFTR-mediated Cl– currents in the Xenopus oocyte expression system are inhibited by syntaxin 1A, a component of the membrane trafficking machinery. This negative modulation of CFTR function can be reversed by soluble syntaxin 1A peptides and by the syntaxin 1A binding protein, Munc-18. In the present study, we determined whether syntaxin 1A is expressed in native epithelial tissues that normally express CFTR and whether it modulates CFTR currents in these tissues. Using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, we observed syntaxin 1A in native gut and airway epithelial tissues and showed that epithelial cells from these tissues express syntaxin 1A at >10-fold molar excess over CFTR. Syntaxin 1A is seen near the apical cell surfaces of human bronchial airway epithelium. Reagents that disrupt the CFTR-syntaxin 1A interaction, including soluble syntaxin 1A cytosolic domain and recombinant Munc-18, augmented cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl– currents by more than 2- to 4-fold in mouse tracheal epithelial cells and cells derived from human nasal polyps, but these reagents did not affect CaMK II–activated Cl– currents in these cells. PMID:10675364

  5. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  6. Vectors for airway gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Pamela B; Cooper, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of genes to the airway epithelium for therapeutic purposes seemed easy at first, because the epithelial cells interface with the environment and are therefore accessible. However, problems encountered were more substantial than were originally expected. Nonviral systems may be preferred for long-term gene expression, for they can be dosed repeatedly. Two nonviral gene transfer systems have been in clinical trials, lipid-mediated gene transfer and DNA nanoparticles. Both have sufficient efficiency to be candidates for correction of the cystic fibrosis defect, and both can be dosed repeatedly. However, lipid-mediated gene transfer in the first generation provokes significant inflammatory toxicity, which may be engineered out by adjustments of the lipids, the plasmid CpG content, or both. Both lipid-mediated gene transfer and DNA nanoparticles in the first generation have short duration of expression, but reengineering of the plasmid DNA to contain mostly eukaryotic sequences may address this problem. Considerable advances in the understanding of the cellular uptake and expression of these agents and in their practical utility have occurred in the last few years; these advances are reviewed here. PMID:17408235

  7. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  8. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  9. Airway epithelial homeostasis and planar cell polarity signaling depend on multiciliated cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Nayak, Jayakar V.; Milla, Carlos E.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Motile airway cilia that propel contaminants out of the lung are oriented in a common direction by planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, which localizes PCP protein complexes to opposite cell sides throughout the epithelium to orient cytoskeletal remodeling. In airway epithelia, PCP is determined in a 2-phase process. First, cell-cell communication via PCP complexes polarizes all cells with respect to the proximal-distal tissue axis. Second, during ciliogenesis, multiciliated cells (MCCs) undergo cytoskeletal remodeling to orient their cilia in the proximal direction. The second phase not only directs cilium polarization, but also consolidates polarization across the epithelium. Here, we demonstrate that in airway epithelia, PCP depends on MCC differentiation. PCP mutant epithelia have misaligned cilia, and also display defective barrier function and regeneration, indicating that PCP regulates multiple aspects of airway epithelial homeostasis. In humans, MCCs are often sparse in chronic inflammatory diseases, and these airways exhibit PCP dysfunction. The presence of insufficient MCCs impairs mucociliary clearance in part by disrupting PCP-driven polarization of the epithelium. Consistent with defective PCP, barrier function and regeneration are also disrupted. Pharmacological stimulation of MCC differentiation restores PCP and reverses these defects, suggesting its potential for broad therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27570836

  10. Design of peripheral airways for efficient gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Ewald R; Sapoval, Bernard; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-08-25

    Peripheral airways combine branched tubes for ventilation with the gas exchanging alveoli in the pulmonary acini, defined as the complex of airways supplied by one first order respiratory or transitional bronchiole. In this part, the replenishment of oxygen at the alveolar surface occurs by a combination of convective air flow with diffusion of oxygen in the air. The transition between convection and diffusion depends on the morphometric properties of the airways. The design of the peripheral airways in the acinus of the human lung is described quantitatively on the basis of measurements obtained on casts of the acinar airways. Comparable data for rat and rabbit are also discussed. On the basis of this morphometric information, a typical path model for human acinar airways is derived. These studies also form the basis for advanced modeling studies of gas exchange and ventilation. In particular the problems occurring because of diffusional screening and the design conditions for minimizing this effect are discussed. PMID:15921964

  11. High glucose induces dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier through down-regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Xia, Li

    2016-03-01

    The airway epithelium is a barrier to the inhaled antigens and pathogens. Connexin 43 (Cx43) has been found to play critical role in maintaining the function of airway epithelial barrier and be involved in the pathogenesis of the diabetic retinal vasculature, diabetes nephropathy and diabetes skin. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that the down-regulation of Cx43 induced by HG alters the expression of tight junctions (zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and contributes to dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier, and Cx43 plays a critical role in the process in human airway epithelial cells (16 HBE). We show that high glucose (HG) decreased the expression of ZO-1 and occludin, disassociated interaction between Cx43 and tight junctions, and then increased airway epithelial transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and permeability by down-regulation of Cx43 in human airway epithelial cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for Cx43 in regulating HG-induced dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary infection related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for the dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26902399

  12. Human airway smooth muscle cells secrete amphiregulin via bradykinin/COX-2/PGE2, inducing COX-2, CXCL8, and VEGF expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC) contribute to asthma pathophysiology through an increased smooth muscle mass and elevated cytokine/chemokine output. Little is known about how HASMC and the airway epithelium interact to regulate chronic airway inflammation and remodeling. Amphiregulin is a member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agonists with cell growth and proinflammatory roles and increased expression in the lungs of asthma patients. Here we show that bradykinin (BK) stimulation of HASMC increases amphiregulin secretion in a mechanism dependent on BK-induced COX-2 expression, increased PGE2 output, and the stimulation of HASMC EP2 and EP4 receptors. Conditioned medium from BK treated HASMC induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 mRNA and protein accumulation in airway epithelial cells, which were blocked by anti-amphiregulin antibodies and amphiregulin siRNA, suggesting a paracrine effect of HASMC-derived amphiregulin on airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, recombinant amphiregulin induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 in airway epithelial cells. Finally, we found that conditioned media from amphiregulin-stimulated airway epithelial cells induced amphiregulin expression in HASMC and that this was dependent on airway epithelial cell COX-2 activity. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic axis of interaction between HASMC and epithelial cells that amplifies CXCL8, VEGF, COX-2, and amphiregulin production. PMID:26047642

  13. Differential Expression Patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 in Nasal Polyp Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Subramaniam, Somasundaram; Yu, Xue Min; Li, Ying Ying; Chen, De Hua; Li, Tian Ying; Shen, Liang; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors play an important role in airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation. The current study investigates the expression profiles of EGF, EGFR and ERBB4 in patients with nasal polyps (NP), and their response to glucocorticosteroid (GC) treatment. Fifty patients with NP (40 without GC treatment and 10 with oral GC) and 20 control subjects with septal deviation were recruited into the study. Protein levels of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 were evaluated by immune-staining. In healthy nasal epithelium, EGF and EGFR localized within p63+ basal cells, while ERBB4 localized within ciliated cells. GC-naïve NP epithelium showed weak expression of EGF in 90% of samples versus 5% of controls. EGFR was significantly increased in the epithelium with basal cell hyperplasia from GC-naïve NPs (78%, 31/40) compared to controls (23%, 4/17). EGFR was also found in some degranulating goblet cells. ERBB4 expression was significantly higher in hyperplastic epithelium from GC-naïve NPs (65%, 26/40) than in controls (6%, 1/17). GC treatment restored the EGF expression and normalized the EGFR and ERBB4 expression in NPs. Differential expression patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 are essential in epithelial restitution and remodeling in nasal epithelium. PMID:27285994

  14. Small airway remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a study in autopsy lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Airway dysfunction in patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is evidenced by expiratory flow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. These functional alterations have been attributed to closure/obstruction of small airways. Airway morphological changes have been reported in experimental models of acute lung injury, characterized by epithelial necrosis and denudation in distal airways. To date, however, no study has focused on the morphological airway changes in lungs from human subjects with ARDS. The aim of this study is to evaluate structural and inflammatory changes in distal airways in ARDS patients. Methods We retrospectively studied autopsy lung tissue from subjects who died with ARDS and from control subjects who died of non pulmonary causes. Using image analysis, we quantified the extension of epithelial changes (normal, abnormal and denudated epithelium expressed as percentages of the total epithelium length), bronchiolar inflammation, airway wall thickness, and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein content in distal airways. The Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test was used to compare data between the ARDS and control groups. Bonferroni adjustments were used for multiple tests. The association between morphological and clinical data was analyzed by Pearson rank test. Results Thirty-one ARDS patients (A: PaO2/FiO2 ≤200, 45 ± 14 years, 16 males) and 11 controls (C: 52 ± 16 years, 7 males) were included in the study. ARDS airways showed a shorter extension of normal epithelium (A:32.9 ± 27.2%, C:76.7 ± 32.7%, P < 0.001), a larger extension of epithelium denudation (A:52.6 ± 35.2%, C:21.8 ± 32.1%, P < 0.01), increased airway inflammation (A:1(3), C:0(1), P = 0.03), higher airway wall thickness (A:138.7 ± 54.3 μm, C:86.4 ± 33.3 μm, P < 0.01), and higher airway content of collagen I, fibronectin, versican and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) compared to controls (P ≤0.03). The extension of normal epithelium

  15. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D.; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S.; Garrison, Carly B.; Walser, Tonya C.; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C.; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R.; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O’Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  16. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S; Garrison, Carly B; Walser, Tonya C; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O'Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N; Dubinett, Steven M; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A; Lenburg, Marc E; Spira, Avrum

    2013-11-19

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  17. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  18. Tissue Engineered Airways: A Prospects Article.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Stephanie L; Teoh, Gui Zhen; Birchall, Martin A

    2016-07-01

    An ideal tracheal scaffold must withstand luminal collapse yet be flexible, have a sufficient degree of porosity to permit vascular and cellular ingrowth, but also be airtight and must facilitate growth of functional airway epithelium to avoid infection and aid in mucocilliary clearance. Finally, the scaffold must also be biocompatible to avoid implant rejection. Over the last 40 years, efforts to design and manufacture the airway have been undertaken worldwide but success has been limited and far apart. As a result, tracheal resection with primary repair remains the Gold Standard of care for patients presenting with airway disorders and malignancies. However, the maximum resectable length of the trachea is restricted to 30% of the total length in children or 50% in adults. Attempts to provide autologous grafts for human application have also been disappointing for a host of different reasons, including lack of implant integration, insufficient donor organs, and poor mechanical strength resulting in an unmet clinical need. The two main approaches researchers have taken to address this issue have been the development of synthetic scaffolds and the use of decellularized organs. To date, a number of different decellularization techniques and a variety of materials, including polyglycolic acid (PGA) and nanocomposite polymers have been explored. The findings thus far have shown great promise, however, there remain a significant number of caveats accompanying each approach. That being said, the possibilities presented by these two approaches could be combined to produce a highly successful, clinically viable hybrid scaffold. This article aims to highlight advances in airway tissue engineering and provide an overview of areas to explore and utilize in accomplishing the aim of developing an ideal tracheal prosthesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1497-1505, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853803

  19. Imaging of mucus clearance in the airways of living spontaneously breathing mice by optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Mario; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Hüttmann, Gereon; König, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mucus transport is essential to remove inhaled particles and pathogens from the lung. Impaired removal of mucus often results in worsening of lung diseases. To understand the mechanisms of mucus transport and to monitor the impact of therapeutic strategies, it is essential to visualize airways and mucus in living animals without disturbing transport processes by intubation or surgically opening the airways. We developed a custom-built optical coherence microscope (OCM) providing a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 1.5 µm with a field of view of 2 mm at up to 150 images/s. Images of the intact trachea and its mucus transport were recorded in anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice. NaCl solution (0.9% and 7%) or Lipopolysaccharide were applied intranasally. OCM resolved detailed structure of the trachea and enabled measuring the airway surface liquid (ASL) thickness through the tracheal wall. Without stimulation, the amount of ASL was only a few µm above the epithelium and remained constant. After intranasal application of 30 µl saline at different concentrations, an early fast cough-like fluid removal with velocities higher than 1 mm/s was observed that removed a high amount of liquid. The ASL thickness increased transiently and quickly returned to levels before stimulation. In contrast to saline, application of Lipopolysaccharide induced substantial mucus release and an additional slow mucus transport by ciliary beating (around 100 µm/s) towards the larynx was observed. In conclusion, OCM is appropriate unique tool to study mechanisms of mucus transport in the airways and effects of therapeutic interventions in living animals.

  20. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868633

  1. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  2. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  3. Innate lymphoid cells in the airways.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer A; McKenzie, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    The airways, similar to other mucosal surfaces, are continuously exposed to the outside environment and a barrage of antigens, allergens, and microorganisms. Of critical importance therefore is the ability to mount rapid and effective immune responses to control commensal and pathogenic microbes, while simultaneously limiting the extent of these responses to prevent immune pathology and chronic inflammation. The function of the adaptive immune response in controlling these processes at mucosal surfaces has been well documented but the important role of the innate immune system, particularly the recently identified family of innate lymphoid cells, has only lately become apparent. In this review, we give an overview of the innate lymphoid cells that exist in the airways and examine the evidence pertaining to their emerging roles in airways immunity, inflammation, and homeostasis. PMID:22678892

  4. Biofilm-dependent airway infections: a role for ambroxol?

    PubMed

    Cataldi, M; Sblendorio, V; Leo, A; Piazza, O

    2014-08-01

    Biofilms are a key factor in the development of both acute and chronic airway infections. Their relevance is well established in ventilator associated pneumonia, one of the most severe complications in critically ill patients, and in cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians. Accumulating evidence suggests that biofilms could have also a role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their involvement in bronchiectasis has been proposed as well. When they grow in biofilms, microorganisms become multidrug-resistant. Therefore the treatment of biofilm-dependent airway infections is problematic. Indeed, it still largely based on measures aiming to prevent the formation of biofilms or remove them once that they are formed. Here we review recent evidence suggesting that the mucokinetic drug ambroxol has specific anti-biofilm properties. We also discuss how additional pharmacological properties of this drug could be beneficial in biofilm-dependent airway infections. Specifically, we review the evidence showing that: 1-ambroxol exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting at multiple levels the activity of neutrophils, and 2-it improves mucociliary clearance by interfering with the activity of airway epithelium ion channels and transporters including sodium/bicarbonate and sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporters, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and aquaporins. As a whole, the data that we review here suggest that ambroxol could be helpful in biofilm-dependent airway infections. However, considering the limited clinical evidence available up to date, further clinical studies are required to support the use of ambroxol in these diseases. PMID:24252805

  5. Denervation resulting in dento-alveolar ankylosis associated with decreased Malassez epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, K; Yamashiro, T; Fukunaga, T; Balam, T A; Zheng, L; Takano-Yamamoto, T

    2004-08-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve denervation causes appreciable decreases in the distribution of epithelial rests of Malassez. To explore roles of the Malassez epithelium, we attempted to evaluate possible changes in dento-alveolar tissues surrounding this epithelium by experimental denervation. We found that denervation led to dento-alveolar ankylosis with a decrease in the width of the periodontal spaces. Interestingly, with regeneration of the Malassez epithelium 10 weeks after the denervation, the periodontal space width showed a correspondingly significant increase. These findings suggest that the Malassez epithelium may be involved in the maintenance of periodontal space and that sensory innervation might be indirectly associated with it. In addition, it is of interest that denervation activated root resorption of the coronal root surface and that the consequently resorbed lacunae were repaired by cellular cementum. It is suggested that Malassez epithelium may negatively regulate root resorption and induce acellular cementum formation. PMID:15271971

  6. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  7. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  8. Airway disorders of the fetus and neonate: An overview.

    PubMed

    Vijayasekaran, Shyan; Lioy, Janet; Maschhoff, Kathryn

    2016-08-01

    Differences between neonatal, pediatric and adult airway anatomy, structure and function are important to understand. Size, surface area, proportion, resistance and compliance are all very different between age groups and infants are certainly not small adults. Knowledge of these airway differences is essential in rapid correction of an emergency situation. Unanticipated airway emergencies are the most serious of all and may be classified into profiles such as the unanticipated emergency in the non-intubated patient, the unanticipated emergency in the intubated patient, and patients with tracheostomy. A neonatal airway emergency can be effectively managed by a strategy for anticipation, identification, preparation, mobilization, and execution. Furthermore, neonatal airways may be classified by severity in being considered either difficult or critical. These neonatal specific clinical challenges have recently substantiated the need for a distinct neonatal airway algorithm. This strategy is strengthened by regular education of the team and frequent simulation of airway emergencies. Following a predetermined pathway for activating an airway emergency alert and having all necessary equipment readily available are essential components of a well-defined strategy. Finally, knowing the pediatric otolaryngologist's perspective of what defines these airway disorders and current management is key to working collaboratively. PMID:27039115

  9. Activity of abundant antimicrobials of the human airway.

    PubMed

    Travis, S M; Conway, B A; Zabner, J; Smith, J J; Anderson, N N; Singh, P K; Greenberg, E P; Welsh, M J

    1999-05-01

    Human airways produce several antimicrobial factors; the most abundant are lysozyme and lactoferrin. Despite their likely importance in preventing infection, and their possible key role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), we know little about their antibacterial activity in the context of the CF airway. We found that abundant airway antimicrobial factors kill common CF pathogens, although Burkholderia was relatively resistant. To study the antibacterial activity, we developed a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative in vitro luminescence assay. Because NaCl concentrations may be elevated in CF airway surface liquid, we tested the effect of salt on antibacterial activity. Activity of individual factors and of airway lavage fluid was inhibited by high ionic strength, and it was particularly sensitive to divalent cations. However, it was not inhibited by nonionic osmolytes and thus did not require hypotonic liquid. The inhibition by ionic strength could be partially compensated by increased concentrations of antibacterial factors, thus there was no one unique salt concentration for inhibition. CF airway secretions also contain abundant mucin and elastase; however, these had no effect on antibacterial activity of lysozyme, lactoferrin, or airway lavage fluids. When studied at low NaCl concentrations, CF and non-CF airway lavage fluids contained similar levels of antibacterial activity. These results suggest approaches toward developing treatments aimed at preventing or reducing airway infections in individuals with CF. PMID:10226057

  10. Airway Epithelial NF-κB Activation Promotes Mycoplasma pneumoniae Clearance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Nelson, Mark L.; Gally, Fabienne; Smith, Sean; Wu, Qun; Minor, Maisha; Case, Stephanie; Thaikoottathil, Jyoti; Chu, Hong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objective Respiratory infections including atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) contribute to the pathobiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mp infection mainly targets airway epithelium and activates various signaling pathways such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We have shown that short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) serves as a novel host defense protein and is up-regulated upon Mp infection through NF-κB activation in cultured human and mouse primary airway epithelial cells. However, the in vivo role of airway epithelial NF-κB activation in host defense against Mp infection has not been investigated. In the current study, we investigated the effects of in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation on lung Mp clearance and its association with airway epithelial SPLUNC1 expression. Methodology/Main Results Non-antimicrobial tetracycline analog 9-t-butyl doxycycline (9-TB) was initially optimized in mouse primary tracheal epithelial cell culture, and then utilized to induce in vivo airway epithelial specific NF-κB activation in conditional NF-κB transgenic mice (CC10-CAIKKβ) with or without Mp infection. Lung Mp load and inflammation were evaluated, and airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that 9-TB treatment in NF-κB transgene positive (Tg+), but not transgene negative (Tg−) mice significantly reduced lung Mp load. Moreover, 9-TB increased airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein expression in NF-κB Tg+ mice. Conclusion By using the non-antimicrobial 9-TB, our study demonstrates that in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes lung bacterial clearance, which is accompanied by increased epithelial SPLUNC1 expression. PMID:23285237

  11. GRHL2 coordinates regeneration of a polarized mucociliary epithelium from basal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xia; Bali, Aman S.; Randell, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudostratified airway epithelium of the lung is composed of polarized ciliated and secretory cells maintained by basal stem/progenitor cells. An important question is how lineage choice and differentiation are coordinated with apical–basal polarity and epithelial morphogenesis. Our previous studies indicated a key integrative role for the transcription factor Grainyhead-like 2 (Grhl2). In this study, we present further evidence for this model using conditional gene deletion during the regeneration of airway epithelium and clonal organoid culture. We also use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in primary human basal cells differentiating into organoids and mucociliary epithelium in vitro. Loss of Grhl2 inhibits organoid morphogenesis and the differentiation of ciliated cells and reduces the expression of both notch and ciliogenesis genes (Mcidas, Rfx2, and Myb) with distinct Grhl2 regulatory sites. The genome editing of other putative target genes reveals roles for zinc finger transcription factor Znf750 and small membrane adhesion glycoprotein in promoting ciliogenesis and barrier function as part of a network of genes coordinately regulated by Grhl2. PMID:26527742

  12. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  13. Keratin promoter based gene manipulation in the murine conducting airway

    PubMed Central

    Malkoski, Stephen P.; Cleaver, Timothy G.; Lu, Shi-Long; Lighthall, Jessyka G.; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2010-01-01

    Systems capable of targeting genetic manipulations to keratin-positive airway basal cells are more poorly developed than systems targeting other airway epithelial cell populations and this has likely hindered development of animal models of diseases such as lung squamous cell carcinoma. Although keratin promoter driven-Cre recombinase constructs are potentially useful for targeting these cells, these constructs have substantially higher activity in the skin and oral epithelium than in the airways. We developed a method for delivering RU486, the conditional activator of Cre recombinase progesterone receptor (CrePR) fusion proteins to the lung and then examined the activity of three keratin-driven CrePR constructs in the conducting airways. We also developed a technique for survival bronchioalveolar lavage on non-ventilated animals to examine the effects of the acetone/oil vehicle required to deliver RU486 to the lung. K5CrePR1 and K14CrePR1 constructs differ only in the keratin promoter used to target CrePR1 expression while K5Cre*PR contains a truncated progesterone receptor designed to reduce RU486-independent Cre activity. While all three constructs demonstrate RU486-inducible Cre activity in the conducting airways, both construct activity and tightness of regulation vary considerably. K5Cre*PR is the most tightly regulated Cre driver making it ideal for targeting somatic mutations to the airway epithelia while K5CrePR1 and K14CrePR1 may be better suited to studying diseases of the conducting airways where gene targeting of keratin expressing cells and their derivatives is desired. PMID:20140084

  14. Velocity fields in a collectively migrating epithelium.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, L; Reffay, M; Grasland-Mongrain, E; Poujade, M; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Silberzan, P

    2010-05-19

    We report quantitative measurements of the velocity field of collectively migrating cells in a motile epithelium. The migration is triggered by presenting free surface to an initially confluent monolayer by using a microstencil technique that does not damage the cells. To avoid the technical difficulties inherent in the tracking of single cells, the field is mapped using the technique of particle image velocimetry. The main relevant parameters, such as the velocity module, the order parameter, and the velocity correlation function, are then extracted from this cartography. These quantities are dynamically measured on two types of cells (collectively migrating Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and fibroblastlike normal rat kidney (NRK) cells), first as they approach confluence, and then when the geometrical constraints are released. In particular, for MDCK cells filling up the patterns, we observe a sharp decrease in the average velocity after the point of confluence, whereas the densification of the monolayer is much more regular. After the peeling off of the stencil, a velocity correlation length of approximately 200 microm is measured for MDCK cells versus only approximately 40 microm for the more independent NRK cells. Our conclusions are supported by parallel single-cell tracking experiments. By using the biorthogonal decomposition of the velocity field, we conclude that the velocity field of MDCK cells is very coherent in contrast with the NRK cells. The displacements in the fingers arising from the border of MDCK epithelia are very oriented along their main direction. They influence the velocity field in the epithelium over a distance of approximately 200 microm. PMID:20441742

  15. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  16. Sex differences in the development of airway epithelial tolerance to naphthalene

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, K. M.; Edwards, P. C.; Combs, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to pulmonary diseases. Naphthalene (NA), an abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in tobacco smoke and urban air, is a model toxicant for air pollution effects in the lung. Repeated exposures to NA in male mice result in tolerance, defined as the emergence of a resistant cell phenotype after prior exposure. Tolerance has not been studied in females. Females have sex differences in airway epithelial responses and in the prevalence of certain airway diseases. Male and female mice were exposed to a tolerance-inducing regimen of NA, and lungs were examined by airway level to characterize the cellular changes associated with repeated NA exposure and to assess the expression of genes and proteins involved in NA bioactivation and detoxification. The airway epithelium in treated males resembled that of controls. Females in the tolerant state were characterized by dense populations of ciliated cells in midlevel, distal, and bifurcating airways and a lower abundance of Clara cells at all airway levels. Cytotoxicity following a secondary challenge dose was also greater in females than males. Furthermore, females had decreased gene/protein expression of CYP2F2, a P-450 that metabolizes NA to a toxic epoxide, and glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione synthesis, than NA-tolerant males at all airway levels examined. We conclude that, while females develop tolerance, sex differences exist in the tolerant state by airway level, and females remain more susceptible than males to repeated exposures to NA. PMID:22003090

  17. How the airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis reacts in proinflammatory conditions: implications for airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, Sarah; Martin, James G

    2013-04-01

    Among patients with cystic fibrosis there is a high prevalence (40-70%) of asthma signs and symptoms such as cough and wheezing and airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled histamine or methacholine. Whether these abnormal airway responses are due to a primary deficiency in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or are secondary to the inflammatory environment in the cystic fibrosis lungs is not clear. A role for the CFTR in smooth muscle function is emerging, and alterations in contractile signalling have been reported in CFTR-deficient airway smooth muscle. Persistent bacterial infection, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, stimulates interleukin-8 release from the airway epithelium, resulting in neutrophilic inflammation. Increased neutrophilia and skewing of CFTR-deficient T-helper cells to type 2 helper T cells creates an inflammatory environment characterised by high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-8, and interleukin-13, which might all contribute to increased contractility of airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis. An emerging role of interleukin-17, which is raised in patients with cystic fibrosis, in airway smooth muscle proliferation and hyper-responsiveness is apparent. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the altered smooth muscle physiology in patients with cystic fibrosis might provide insight into airway dysfunction in this disease. PMID:24429094

  18. Transmigration of macrophages across the choroid plexus epithelium in response to the feline immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, Rick B.; Bragg, D. C.; Poulton, Winona; Hudson, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Although lentiviruses such as human, feline and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, FIV, SIV) rapidly gain access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the mechanisms that control this entry are not well understood. One possibility is that the virus may be carried into the brain by immune cells that traffic across the blood–CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Since few studies have directly examined macrophage trafficking across the blood–CSF barrier, we established transwell and explant cultures of feline choroid plexus epithelium and measured trafficking in the presence or absence of FIV. Macrophages in co-culture with the epithelium showed significant proliferation and robust trafficking that was dependent on the presence of epithelium. Macrophage migration to the apical surface of the epithelium was particularly robust in the choroid plexus explants where 3-fold increases were seen over the first 24 h. Addition of FIV to the cultures greatly increased the number of surface macrophages without influencing replication. The epithelium in the transwell cultures was also permissive to PBMC trafficking, which increased from 17 to 26% of total cells after exposure to FIV. Thus, the choroid plexus epithelium supports trafficking of both macrophages and PBMCs. FIV significantly enhanced translocation of macrophages and T cells indicating that the choroid plexus epithelium is likely to be an active site of immune cell trafficking in response to infection. PMID:22281685

  19. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  20. Candida albicans Ultrastructure: Colonization and Invasion of Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Julie A.; Squier, Christopher A.

    1980-01-01

    The colonization and invasion of various animal oral mucosae by Candida albicans were examined in an organ culture model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the oral epithelium between 12 and 30 h after inoculation with the fungus revealed the morphological relationships between host and parasite. Examination of the fungi in thin sections showed five distinct layers in the cell wall of C. albicans within the epithelium, but changes were evident in the organization and definition of the outer cell wall layers in budding hyphae and in hyphae participating in colonization and invasion of the epithelial cells. Adherence of the fungus to the superficial cells of the oral mucosa appeared to involve intimate contact between the epithelial cell surface and the deeper layers of the fungal cell wall. During invasion a close seal was maintained between the invading hyphae and the surrounding epithelial cell envelope, there being no other evidence of damage to the host cell surface except at the site of entry. Within the epithelial cells there was only occasional loss of cytoplasmic components in the vicinity of the invading hyphae. These findings would suggest that enzymatic lysis associated with the invasive process is localized and that the mechanical support provided by surface adherence and the intimate association between the fungus and the epithelial cell envelope may permit growth of Candida on through the epithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6995338

  1. Demonstration of carboxylesterase in cytology samples of human nasal respiratory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Avila, K.

    1995-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the nasal airways is a target for responses induced by a variety of toxicant exposures. The high metabolic capacity of this tissue has been suggested to play a role in both protection of the airways through detoxication of certain toxicants, as well as in activation of other compounds to more toxic metabolites. Specifically, nasal carboxylesterase (CE) has been shown to mediate the toxicity of inhaled esters and acrylates by converting them to more toxic acid and alcohol metabolites which can be cytotoxic and/or carcinogenic to the nasal mucosa. Due to difficulties in extrapolating rodent models to human, new paradigms using human cells and tissues are essential to understanding and evaluating the metabolic processes in human nasal epithelium.

  2. O3-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to noncholinergic system and other stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, M.G.; Segura, P.; Vargas, M.H.; Vanda, B.; Ponce-Monter, H.; Selman, M.; Montano, L.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The effect of O3 exposure (3 ppm, 1 h) on the in vivo and in vitro airway responsiveness, as well as the changes in cell contents in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, were evaluated 16-18 h after O3 exposure in sensitized and nonsensitized male guinea pigs. The sensitization procedure was performed through repeated inhalation of ovalbumin for 3 wk. Increase in pulmonary insufflation pressure produced by the excitatory nonadrenergic noncholinergic (eNANC) system, histamine, and antigen were assessed in in vivo conditions, whereas airway responsiveness to histamine and substance P was evaluated in in vitro conditions by use of tracheal chains with or without epithelium and lung parenchymal strips. The authors found that O3 exposure (1) increased the neutrophil content in BAL fluids in both sensitized and nonsensitized guinea pigs, (2) caused hyperresponsiveness to eNANC stimulation in nonsensitized guinea pigs (although combination of sensitization and O3 exposure paradoxically abolished the hyperresponsiveness to eNANC stimulation), (3) increased the in vivo bronchoconstrictor responses to histamine and antigen, (4) caused hyperresponsiveness to substance P in nonsensitized tracheae with or without epithelium and in sensitized tracheae with epithelium, (5) did not modify the responsiveness to histamine in tracheae with or without epithelium (and in addition, epithelium removal caused hyperresponsiveness to histamine even in those tracheae exposed to O3), and (6) produced hyperresponsiveness to histamine in lung parenchymal strips either from sensitized or nonsensitized guinea pigs.

  3. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  4. Mechanosensitive ATP Release Maintains Proper Mucus Hydration of Airways

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F.; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal auto-crine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  5. Mechanosensitive ATP release maintains proper mucus hydration of airways.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-06-11

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal autocrine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  6. Mechanisms of airway responses to esophageal acidification in cats.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Haworth, Steven T; Medda, Bidyut K; Forster, Hubert; Shaker, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Acid in the esophagus causes airway constriction, tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and a decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport rate. This study was designed to investigate the neuropharmacological mechanisms controlling these responses. In chloralose-anesthetized cats (n = 72), we investigated the effects of vagotomy or atropine (100 μg·kg(-1)·30 min(-1) iv) on airway responses to esophageal infusion of 0.1 M PBS or 0.1 N HCl at 1 ml/min. We quantified 1) diameter of the bronchi, 2) tracheobronchial mucociliary transport rate, 3) tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and 4) mucous content of the tracheal epithelium and submucosa. We found that vagotomy or atropine blocked the airway constriction response but only atropine blocked the increase in mucous output and decrease in mucociliary transport rate caused by esophageal acidification. The mucous cells of the mucosa produced more Alcian blue- than periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained mucosubstances, and the mucous cells of the submucosa produced more PAS- than Alcian blue-stained mucosubstances. Selective perfusion of the different segments of esophagus with HCl or PBS resulted in significantly greater production of PAS-stained mucus in the submucosa of the trachea adjacent to the HCl-perfused esophagus than in that adjacent to the PBS-perfused esophagus. In conclusion, airway constriction caused by esophageal acidification is mediated by a vagal cholinergic pathway, and the tracheobronchial transport response is mediated by cholinergic receptors. Acid perfusion of the esophagus selectively increases production of neutral mucosubstances of the apocrine glands by a local mechanism. We hypothesize that the airway responses to esophageal acid exposure are part of the innate, rather than acute emergency, airway defense system. PMID:26846551

  7. Epidermal growth factor system regulates mucin production in airways

    PubMed Central

    Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Dabbagh, Karim; Lee, Heung-Man; Agustí, Carlos; Lausier, James A.; Ueki, Iris F.; Grattan, Kathleen M.; Nadel, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    Goblet-cell hyperplasia is a critical pathological feature in hypersecretory diseases of airways. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown, and no effective therapy exists. Here we show that stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) by its ligands, EGF and transforming growth factor α (TGFα), causes MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells both in in vitro and in vivo. We found that a MUC5AC-inducing epithelial cell line, NCI-H292, expresses EGF-R constitutively; EGF-R gene expression was stimulated further by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). EGF-R ligands increased the expression of MUC5AC at both gene and protein levels, and this effect was potentiated by TNFα. Selective EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked MUC5AC expression induced by EGF-R ligands. Pathogen-free rats expressed little EGF-R protein in airway epithelial cells; intratracheal instillation of TNFα induced EGF-R in airway epithelial cells, and subsequent instillation of EGF-R ligands increased the number of goblet cells, Alcian blue–periodic acid–Schiff staining (reflecting mucous glycoconjugates), and MUC5AC gene expression, whereas TNFα, EGF, or TGFα alone was without effect. In sensitized rats, three intratracheal instillations of ovalbumin resulted in EGF-R expression and goblet-cell production in airway epithelium. Pretreatment with EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, BIBX1522, prevented goblet-cell production both in rats stimulated by TNFα-EGF-R ligands and in an asthma model. These findings suggest potential roles for inhibitors of the EGF-R cascade in hypersecretory diseases of airways. PMID:10077640

  8. Early events in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Smoking-induced reprogramming of airway epithelial basal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-12-01

    The airway epithelium is the primary site of the earliest pathologic changes induced by smoking, contributing to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The normal human airway epithelium is composed of several major cell types, including differentiated ciliated and secretory cells, intermediate undifferentiated cells, and basal cells (BC). BC contain the stem/progenitor cell population responsible for maintenance of the normally differentiated airway epithelium. Although inflammatory and immune processes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of COPD, the earliest lesions include hyperplasia of the BC population, suggesting that the disease may start with this cell type. Apart from BC hyperplasia, smoking induces a number of COPD-relevant airway epithelial remodeling phenotypes that are likely initiated in the BC population, including mucous cell hyperplasia, squamous cell metaplasia, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, altered ciliated and nonmucous secretory cell differentiation, and suppression of junctional barrier integrity. Significant progress has been recently made in understanding the biology of human airway BC, including gene expression features, stem/progenitor, and other functions, including interaction with other airway cell types. Accumulating evidence suggests that human airway BC function as both sensors and cellular sources of various cytokines and growth factors relevant to smoking-associated airway injury, as well as the origin of various molecular and histological phenotypes relevant to the pathogenesis of COPD. In the context of these considerations, we suggest that early BC-specific smoking-induced molecular changes are critical to the pathogenesis of COPD, and these represent a candidate target for novel therapeutic approaches to prevent COPD progression in susceptible individuals. PMID:25525728

  9. Dendritic Cell-Nerve Clusters Are Sites of T Cell Proliferation in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Tibor Z.; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell–T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell–cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell–T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa. PMID:19179611

  10. Processes involved in the repair of injured airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered many aspects of the repair processes that follow airway epithelial injury. Although the repair process has common elements among various epithelia, such as the ones lining the airways, skin, and gut, there are differences based on their diverse functions. Whenever possible, similarities are pointed out that could help researchers further investigate their application to airway epithelia, although it would be beyond the scope of this review to cover the processes that may occur during the repair of all types of epithelia. In general, five major steps are involved in the recovery of airway epithelia from injury: 1) epithelial cells migrate to cover denuded areas within minutes, and certain proteins, such as the trefoil factor family proteins, are crucial to this process; 2) epithelial cells start to proliferate in order to replace injured cells and to differentiate to establish squamous or mucous cell metaplasia; 3) because more epithelial cells are present after proliferation, some of the cells must be discarded to restore the epithelium to the original condition; 4) once the cell numbers have been reduced to those found in unexposed individuals, the normal proportions of cell types are restored; 5) finally, studies from exposures of rats to ozone show that epithelial cells can adapt and develop a memory of the chronic exposure to which they were exposed. This adaptation allows the epithelium to respond quickly, thus minimizing further injury. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in these major steps of the recovery process are largely unknown, disruption of these steps clearly causes the permanent changes observed in diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and cancer; therefore, extensive research of these mechanisms may provide ideas for novel therapies. PMID:14626427

  11. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  12. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  13. Nested expression domains for odorant receptors in zebrafish olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weth, F; Nadler, W; Korsching, S

    1996-11-12

    The mapping of high-dimensional olfactory stimuli onto the two-dimensional surface of the nasal sensory epithelium constitutes the first step in the neuronal encoding of olfactory input. We have used zebrafish as a model system to analyze the spatial distribution of odorant receptor molecules in the olfactory epithelium by quantitative in situ hybridization. To this end, we have cloned 10 very divergent zebrafish odorant receptor molecules by PCR. Individual genes are expressed in sparse olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of the position of labeled cells in a simplified coordinate system revealed three concentric, albeit overlapping, expression domains for the four odorant receptors analyzed in detail. Such regionalized expression should result in a corresponding segregation of functional response properties. This might represent the first step of spatial encoding of olfactory input or be essential for the development of the olfactory system. PMID:8917589

  14. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  15. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin; Nielsen, Mads; Edula, Goutham; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2010-03-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 manually segmented images extracted from 15 different subjects and shown to give accurate results, with 37% less errors than the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) algorithm and 62% less than a similar graph cut method without coupled surfaces. Common measures of airway wall thickness such as the Interior Area (IA) and Wall Area percentage (WA%) was measured by the proposed method on a total of 723 CT scans from a lung cancer screening study. These measures were significantly different for participants with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) compared to asymptomatic participants. Furthermore, reproducibility was good as confirmed by repeat scans and the measures correlated well with the outcomes of pulmonary function tests, demonstrating the use of the algorithm as a COPD diagnostic tool. Additionally, a new measure of airway wall thickness is proposed, Normalized Wall Intensity Sum (NWIS). NWIS is shown to correlate better with lung function test values and to be more reproducible than previous measures IA, WA% and airway wall thickness at a lumen perimeter of 10 mm (PI10).

  16. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Bradley W; Brucker, Robert M; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E; Bordenstein, Seth R; Blackwell, Timothy S; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR(-/-)) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR(-/-) mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR(-/-) mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  17. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Bradley W.; Brucker, Robert M.; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E.; Bordenstein, Seth R.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR−/−) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR−/− mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR−/− mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  18. Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation induced by toluene diisocyanate in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.; McDonald, D.M.; Distefano, S.; Scypinski, L.

    1985-11-01

    The authors examined the changes in airway responsiveness to increasing doses of an acetylcholine aerosol in anesthetized and ventilated guinea pigs 2, 6, or 24 h after exposure to 2 ppm toluene diisocyanate (TDI) or 2 h after exposure to air or 1 ppm TDI. The concentration of acetylcholine calculated to cause a 200% increase in RL was significantly lower for animals studied at 2 h (0.68%) or at 6 h (0.77%), but not at 24 h (2.39%), after TDI than for air animals (3.07%). The increase in airway responsiveness in the TDI-exposed animals was associated with histologic changes in the trachea and intrapulmonary airways. Exposure to 2 ppm TDI caused a patchy loss of cilia, shedding of epithelial cells into the airway lumen, and an influx of inflammatory cells into the trachea and other airways. In the lamina propria of the trachea, the concentration of extravascular polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was 13- to 26-fold greater in animals studied 2 or 6 h after exposure to 2 ppm TDI or at 2 h after 1 ppm TDI than in animals exposed to air. The concentration of PMN in the epithelium was significantly increased only in animals examined 2 h after 2 ppm TDI. These results indicate that a single exposure to TDI can cause an increase in airway responsiveness that is associated with epithelial injury and acute airway inflammation.

  19. Dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Crapster-Pregont, Margaret; Yeo, Janice; Sanchez, Raquel L.; Kuperman, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background IL-13 in the airway induces pathologies that are highly characteristic of asthma, including mucus metaplasia, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and airway inflammation. As such, it is important to identify the IL-13–responding cell types that mediate each of the above pathologies. For example, IL-13’s effects on epithelium contribute to mucus metaplasia and AHR. IL-13’s effects on smooth muscle also contribute to AHR. However, it has been difficult to identify the cell types that mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Objective We sought to determine which cell types mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Methods We treated the airways of mice with IL-13 alone or in combination with IFN-γ. We associated the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production with cell types in the lung that coexpress IL-13 and IFN-γ receptors. We then evaluated IL-13–induced responses in CD11c promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor–expressing mice that were depleted of both dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages and in CD11b promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor– expressing mice that were depleted of dendritic cells. Results Dendritic cell and alveolar macrophage depletion protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL11, CCL24, CCL22, and CCL17 chemokine production. Preferential depletion of dendritic cells protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL22 and CCL17 chemokine production but not from IL-13–induced CCL11 and CCL24 chemokine production. In either case mice were not protected from IL-13–induced AHR and mucus metaplasia. Conclusions Pulmonary dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012;129:1621-7.) PMID:22365581

  20. Sensory neuropeptides and the human lower airways: present state and future directions.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Germonpre, P R; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1994-06-01

    The sensory neuropeptides, substance P and neurokinin A, are present in human airway nerves, beneath and within the epithelium, around blood vessels and submucosal glands, and within the bronchial smooth muscle layer. Studies on autopsy tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage and sputum suggest that in asthma the substance P content of the airways may be increased. Neurokinin A is a more potent bronchoconstrictor than substance P. Asthmatics are hyperresponsive to neurokinin A and substance P. The neuropeptide degrading enzyme, neutral endopeptidase is present in the airways and is involved in the degradation of endogenously released and exogenously administered substance P and neurokinin A, both in normal and asthmatic subjects. As for other indirect bronchoconstrictor stimuli, the effect of neurokinin A on airway calibre in asthmatics can be inhibited by pretreatment with nedocromil sodium. Evidence is accumulating, not only from studies in animals but also from experiments on human airways, that tachykinins may also cause mucus secretion and plasma extravasation. They also have important proinflammatory effects, such as the chemoattraction of eosinophils and neutrophils, the adhesion of neutrophils, and the stimulation of lymphocytes, macrophages and mast cells. The tachykinins interact with the targets on the airways by specific tachykinin receptors. The NK1 and the NK2 receptor have been characterized in human airways, both pharmacologically and by cloning. The NK2 receptor is responsible for the in vitro contraction of normal airways, whilst the NK1 receptor is responsible for most of the other airway effects. Because of their presence in the airways and because of their ability to mimic the various pathophysiological features of asthma, substance P and neurokinin A are presently considered as possible mediators of asthma. The present development of potent and selective tachykinin antagonists will allow us to further define the role of tachykinins in the pathogenesis

  1. Human vomeronasal epithelium development: An immunohistochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Lóránd; Pap, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, Annamária; Gergely, István; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-06-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor structure of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in vertebrates. It is found bilaterally in the submucosa of the inferior part of the nasal septum. There are ongoing controversies regarding the functionality of this organ in humans. In this study we propose the immunohistochemical evaluation of changes in components of the human vomeronasal epithelium during foetal development. We used 45 foetuses of different age, which were included in three age groups. After VNO identification immunohistochemical reactions were performed using primary antibodies against the following: neuron specific enolase, calretinin, neurofilament, chromogranin, synaptophysin, cytokeratin 7, pan-cytokeratin and S100 protein. Digital slides were obtained and following colorimetric segmentation, surface area measurements were performed. The VNO was found in less than half of the studied specimens (42.2%). Neuron specific enolase and calretinin immunoexpression showed a decreasing trend with foetal age, while the other neural/neuroendocrine markers were negative in all specimens. Cytokeratin 7 expression increased with age, while Pan-Ctk had no significant variations. S100 protein immunoexpression also decreased around the VNO. The results of the present work uphold the theory of regression of the neuroepithelium that is present during initial stages of foetal development. PMID:26132837

  2. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of upper airways from MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchet, Diane; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-03-01

    Under the framework of clinical respiratory investigation, providing accurate modalities for morpho-functional analysis is essential for diagnosis improvement, surgical planning and follow-up. This paper focuses on the upper airways investigation and develops an automated approach for 3D mesh reconstruction from MDCT acquisitions. In order to overcome the difficulties related to the complex morphology of the upper airways and to the image gray level heterogeneity of the airway lumens and thin bony septa, the proposed 3D reconstruction methodology combines 2D segmentation and 3D surface regularization approaches. The segmentation algorithm relies on mathematical morphology theory and provides airway lumen robust discrimination from the surrounding tissues, while preserving the connectivity relationship between the different anatomical structures. The 3D regularization step uses an energy-based modeling in order to achieve a smooth and well-fitted 3D surface of the upper airways. An accurate 3D mesh representation of the reconstructed airways makes it possible to develop specific clinical applications such as virtual endoscopy, surgical planning and computer assisted intervention. In addition, building up patient-specific 3D models of upper airways is highly valuable for the study and design of inhaled medication delivery via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  4. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  5. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  6. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  7. Airway Microbiota and the Implications of Dysbiosis in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Durack, Juliana; Boushey, Homer A; Lynch, Susan V

    2016-07-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the human body are typically colonized by polymicrobial communities seeded in infancy and are continuously shaped by environmental exposures. These communities interact with the mucosal immune system to maintain homeostasis in health, but perturbations in their composition and function are associated with lower airway diseases, including asthma, a developmental and heterogeneous chronic disease with various degrees and types of airway inflammation. This review will summarize recent studies examining airway microbiota dysbioses associated with asthma and their relationship with the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:27393699

  8. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  9. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Pieter S; McCray, Paul B; Bals, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered to be central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as the first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. Herein, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis will be discussed. PMID:25700381

  10. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Pieter S.; McCray, Paul B.; Bals, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as a first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. In the review, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, are discussed. PMID:25700381

  11. Neural control of submucosal gland and apical membrane secretions in airways

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Alan W; Murthy, Meena; Darlington, Alexander P S

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that lay behind the low-level secretions from airway submucosal glands and the surface epithelium in the absence of external innervation have been investigated in small areas (1.0–1.5 cm2) of mucosa from sheep tracheas, freshly collected from a local abattoir. Glandular secretion was measured by an optical method while short circuit current was used as a measure of surface secretion. Activation of neurones in the intrinsic nerve net by veratrine alkaloids caused an immediate increase in both glandular secretion and short circuit current, both effects being blocked by the addition of tetrodotoxin. However, agents known to be acting directly on the glands, such as muscarinic agonists (e.g., carbachol) or adenylate cyclase activators (e.g., forskolin) were not influenced by tetrodotoxin. The toxin alone had no discernable effect on the low-level basal secretion shown by unstimulated glands. Calu-3 cell monolayers, generally agreed to be a surrogate for the secretory cells of submucosal glands, showed no sensitivity to veratrine alkaloids, strengthening the view that the veratrine-like drugs acted exclusively on the intrinsic nerve net. The data are discussed in relation way in which transplanted lungs can maintain mucociliary clearance and hence a sterile environment in the absence of external innervation, as in transplanted lungs. PMID:26059031

  12. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  13. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  14. Dual Function of Novel Pollen Coat (Surface) Proteins: IgE-binding Capacity and Proteolytic Activity Disrupting the Airway Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamed Elfatih H.; Ward, Jason M.; Cummings, Matthew; Karrar, Eltayeb E.; Root, Michael; Mohamed, Abu Bekr A.; Naclerio, Robert M.; Preuss, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Background The pollen coat is the first structure of the pollen to encounter the mucosal immune system upon inhalation. Prior characterizations of pollen allergens have focused on water-soluble, cytoplasmic proteins, but have overlooked much of the extracellular pollen coat. Due to washing with organic solvents when prepared, these pollen coat proteins are typically absent from commercial standardized allergenic extracts (i.e., “de-fatted”), and, as a result, their involvement in allergy has not been explored. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a unique approach to search for pollen allergenic proteins residing in the pollen coat, we employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to assess the impact of organic solvents on the structural integrity of the pollen coat. TEM results indicated that de-fatting of Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) pollen (BGP) by use of organic solvents altered the structural integrity of the pollen coat. The novel IgE-binding proteins of the BGP coat include a cysteine protease (CP) and endoxylanase (EXY). The full-length cDNA that encodes the novel IgE-reactive CP was cloned from floral RNA. The EXY and CP were purified to homogeneity and tested for IgE reactivity. The CP from the BGP coat increased the permeability of human airway epithelial cells, caused a clear concentration-dependent detachment of cells, and damaged their barrier integrity. Conclusions/Significance Using an immunoproteomics approach, novel allergenic proteins of the BGP coat were identified. These proteins represent a class of novel dual-function proteins residing on the coat of the pollen grain that have IgE-binding capacity and proteolytic activity, which disrupts the integrity of the airway epithelial barrier. The identification of pollen coat allergens might explain the IgE-negative response to available skin-prick-testing proteins in patients who have positive symptoms. Further study of the role of these pollen coat proteins in allergic responses is

  15. Nucleotide-mediated airway clearance.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas; Clunes, Lucy A; Salathe, Mathias; Verdugo, Pedro; Dietl, Paul; Davis, C William; Tarran, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) lines the entire surface of the lung and is the first point of contact between the lung and the environment. Surfactants contained within this layer are secreted in the alveolar region and are required to maintain a low surface tension and to prevent alveolar collapse. Mucins are secreted into the ASL throughout the respiratory tract and serve to intercept inhaled pathogens, allergens and toxins. Their removal by mucociliary clearance (MCC) is facilitated by cilia beating and hydration of the ASL by active ion transport. Throughout the lung, secretion, ion transport and cilia beating are under purinergic control. Pulmonary epithelia release ATP into the ASL which acts in an autocrine fashion on P2Y(2) (ATP) receptors. The enzymatic network describes in Chap. 2 then mounts a secondary wave of signaling by surface conversion of ATP into adenosine (ADO), which induces A(2B) (ADO) receptor-mediated responses. This chapter offers a comprehensive description of MCC and the extensive ramifications of the purinergic signaling network on pulmonary surfaces. PMID:21560046

  16. Elastic properties of the bronchial mucosa: epithelial unfolding and stretch in response to airway inflation.

    PubMed

    Noble, P B; Sharma, A; McFawn, P K; Mitchell, H W

    2005-12-01

    The bronchial mucosa contributes to elastic properties of the airway wall and may influence the degree of airway expansion during lung inflation. In the deflated lung, folds in the epithelium and associated basement membrane progressively unfold on inflation. Whether the epithelium and basement membrane also distend on lung inflation at physiological pressures is uncertain. We assessed mucosal distensibility from strain-stress curves in mucosal strips and related this to epithelial length and folding. Mucosal strips were prepared from pig bronchi and cycled stepwise from a strain of 0 (their in situ length at 0 transmural pressure) to a strain of 0.5 (50% increase in length). Mucosal stress and epithelial length in situ were calculated from morphometric data in bronchial segments fixed at 5 and 25 cmH(2)O luminal pressure. Mucosal strips showed nonlinear strain-stress properties, but regions at high and low stress were close to linear. Stresses calculated in bronchial segments at 5 and 25 cmH(2)O fell in the low-stress region of the strain-stress curve. The epithelium of mucosal strips was deeply folded at low strains (0-0.15), which in bronchial segments equated to < or =10 cmH(2)O transmural pressure. Morphometric measurements in mucosal strips at greater strains (0.3-0.4) indicated that epithelial length increased by approximately 10%. Measurements in bronchial segments indicated that epithelial length increased approximately 25% between 5 and 25 cmH(2)O. Our findings suggest that, at airway pressures <10 cmH(2)O, airway expansion is due primarily to epithelial unfolding but at higher pressures the epithelium also distends. PMID:16024520

  17. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha; Rabowsky, Michelle F.; Last, Michael S.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia. PMID:20953358

  18. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  19. Dual Oxidase Regulates Neutrophil Recruitment in Allergic Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described, and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13) or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOX to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa−/−) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa−/− mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa−/− mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia, and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa+/+ mice as expected, but was absent in Duoxa−/− mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa−/− mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of

  20. Macrolides Inhibit Fusobacterium nucleatum-Induced MUC5AC Production in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Migiyama, Yohei; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most common anaerobic bacteria in periodontitis and is responsible for several extraoral infections, including respiratory tract diseases. In this study, we examined whether F. nucleatum induces mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells. We also examined the effects of macrolides on F. nucleatum-induced mucus production compared with the effects of other antibiotics that exert anti-anaerobic activities. The production of MUC5AC, the major core protein of mucin secreted from the airway surface epithelium, in bronchial epithelial cells after stimulation with culture supernatants (Sup) of F. nucleatum was analyzed by performing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative RT-PCR. The cell-signaling pathway of F. nucleatum Sup stimulation was also analyzed by Western blotting. For inhibition studies, cells were treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin (CLDM), and metronidazole (MTZ). The F. nucleatum Sup induced NCI-H292 cells to express MUC5AC at both the protein level and the mRNA level in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Macrolides inhibited F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production, while CLDM and MTZ were less effective. F. nucleatum Sup induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this induction was suppressed by macrolides. F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production was blocked by the ERK pathway inhibitor U0126. F. nucleatum is likely to contribute to excessive mucin production, which suggests that periodontitis may correlate with the pathogenesis of chronic respiratory tract infection. Macrolides seem to reduce this mucin production and might represent an additional means of therapeutic intervention for F. nucleatum respiratory tract infections other than CLDM and MTZ. PMID:23380724

  1. Patterns of recruitment and injury in a heterogeneous airway network model.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Peter S; Jensen, Oliver E

    2015-10-01

    In respiratory distress, lung airways become flooded with liquid and may collapse due to surface-tension forces acting on air-liquid interfaces, inhibiting gas exchange. This paper proposes a mathematical multiscale model for the mechanical ventilation of a network of occluded airways, where air is forced into the network at a fixed tidal volume, allowing investigation of optimal recruitment strategies. The temporal response is derived from mechanistic models of individual airway reopening, incorporating feedback on the airway pressure due to recruitment. The model accounts for stochastic variability in airway diameter and stiffness across and between generations. For weak heterogeneity, the network is completely ventilated via one or more avalanches of recruitment (with airways recruited in quick succession), each characterized by a transient decrease in the airway pressure; avalanches become more erratic for airways that are initially more flooded. However, the time taken for complete ventilation of the network increases significantly as the network becomes more heterogeneous, leading to increased stresses on airway walls. The model predicts that the most peripheral airways are most at risk of ventilation-induced damage. A positive-end-expiratory pressure reduces the total recruitment time but at the cost of larger stresses exerted on airway walls. PMID:26423440

  2. Airflow, transport and regional deposition of aerosol particles during chronic bronchitis of human central airways.

    PubMed

    Farkhadnia, Fouad; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of airway blockage in chronic bronchitis disease on the flow patterns and transport/deposition of micro-particles in a human symmetric triple bifurcation lung airway model, i.e., Weibel's generations G3-G6 was investigated. A computational fluid and particle dynamics model was implemented, validated and applied in order to evaluate the airflow and particle transport/deposition in central airways. Three breathing patterns, i.e., resting, light activity and moderate exercise, were considered. Using Lagrangian approach for particle tracking and random particle injection, an unsteady particle tracking method was performed to simulate the transport and deposition of micron-sized aerosol particles in human central airways. Assuming laminar, quasi-steady, three-dimensional air flow and spherical non-interacting particles in sequentially bifurcating rigid airways, airflow patterns and particle transport/deposition in healthy and chronic bronchitis (CB) affected airways were evaluated and compared. Comparison of deposition efficiency (DE) of aerosols in healthy and occluded airways showed that at the same flow rates DE values are typically larger in occluded airways. While in healthy airways, particles deposit mainly around the carinal ridges and flow dividers-due to direct inertial impaction, in CB affected airways they deposit mainly on the tubular surfaces of blocked airways because of gravitational sedimentation. PMID:26541595

  3. Upper Airway Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Verbraecken, Johan A.; De Backer, Wilfried A.

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiological aspects of sleep-disordered breathing, with focus on upper airway mechanics in obstructive and central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to substantial pathology, i.e. increased upper airway collapsibility, control of breathing instability, increased work of breathing, disturbed ventilatory system mechanics and neurohormonal changes. Concepts are changing. Although sleep apnoea is considered more and more to be an increased loop gain disorder, the central type of apnoea is now considered as an obstructive event, because it causes pharyngeal narrowing, associated with prolonged expiration. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious circle. Knowledge of common patterns of sleep-disordered breathing may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:19478479

  4. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Lambert, Allison A.; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M. Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M.

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI) to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We demonstrate that HIV can enter airway

  5. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kieran A; Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Lambert, Allison A; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI) to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We demonstrate that HIV can enter airway

  6. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  7. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  8. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  9. Airway closure in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dutrieue, Brigitte; Verbanck, Sylvia; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G Kim

    2005-08-25

    Recent single breath washout (SBW) studies in microgravity and on the ground have suggested an important effect of airway closure on gas mixing in the human lung, reflected particularly in the phase III slope of vital capacity SBW and bolus tests. In order to explore this effect, we designed a SBW in which subjects inspired 2-l from residual volume (RV) starting with a 150 ml bolus of He and SF6. In an attempt to vary the pattern of airways closure configuration before the test, the experiments were conducted in 1G and in microgravity during parabolic flight allowing the pre-test expiration to RV to be either in microgravity or at 1.8 G, with the actual test gas inhalation performed entirely in microgravity. Contrary to our expectations, the measured phase III slope and phase IV height and volume obtained from seven subjects in microgravity were essentially identical irrespective of the gravity level during the pre-test expiration to RV. The results suggest that airway closure configuration at RV before the test inspiration has no apparent impact on phases III and IV generation. PMID:15979418

  10. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  11. Airway branching morphogenesis in three dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    bronchioalveolar-like structures in 3-D culture. This novel model of human airway morphogenesis can be used to study critical events in human lung development and suggests a supportive role for the endothelium in promoting branching of airway epithelium. PMID:21108827

  12. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  13. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  14. Purification and characterization of factors produced by Aspergillus fumigatus which affect human ciliated respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Amitani, R; Taylor, G; Elezis, E N; Llewellyn-Jones, C; Mitchell, J; Kuze, F; Cole, P J; Wilson, R

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Aspergillus fumigatus colonizes the respiratory mucosa are unknown. Culture filtrates of eight of nine clinical isolates of A. fumigatus slowed ciliary beat frequency and damaged human respiratory epithelium in vitro. These changes appeared to occur concurrently. Culture filtrates of two clinical isolates of Candida albicans had no effect on ciliated epithelium. We have purified and characterized cilioinhibitory factors of a clinical isolate of A. fumigatus. The cilioinhibitory activity was heat labile, reduced by dialysis, and partially extractable into chloroform. The activity was associated with both high- and low-molecular-weight factors, as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50. A low-molecular-weight cilioinhibitory factor was further purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and shown by mass spectrometry to be gliotoxin, a known metabolite of A. fumigatus. Gliotoxin significantly slowed ciliary beat frequency in association with epithelial damage at concentrations above 0.2 microgram/ml; other Aspergillus toxins, i.e., fumagillin and helvolic acid, were also cilioinhibitory but at much higher concentrations. High-molecular-weight (> or = 35,000 and 25,000) cilioinhibitory materials had neither elastolytic nor proteolytic activity and remain to be identified. Thus, A. fumigatus produces a number of biologically active substances which slow ciliary beating and damage epithelium and which may influence colonization of the airways. PMID:7543879

  15. Galactomannan and Zymosan Block the Epinephrine-Induced Particle Transport in Tracheal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Weiterer, Sebastian; Kohlen, Thomas; Veit, Florian; Sachs, Lydia; Uhle, Florian; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Weigand, Markus A.; Henrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Ciliary beating by respiratory epithelial cells continuously purges pathogens from the lower airways. Here we investigated the effect of the fungal cell wall polysaccharides Galactomannan (GM) and Zymosan (Zym) on the adrenergic activated particle transport velocity (PTV) of tracheal epithelium. Methods Experiments were performed using tracheae isolated from male C57BL/6J mice. Transport velocity of the cilia bearing epithelial cells was measured by analysing recorded image sequences. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using Amplex Red reagents. PCR experiments were performed on isolated tracheal epithelium to identify adrenergic receptor mRNA. Results The adrenergic receptors α1D, α2A, β1 and β2 have been identified in isolated tracheal epithelium. We found epinephrine responsible for an increase in PTV, which could only be reduced by selective β-receptor-inhibition. In addition, either GM or Zym prevented the epinephrine induced PTV increase. Furthermore, we observed a strong ROS generation evoked by GM or Zym. However, epinephrine induced increase in PTV recovered in the presence of GM and Zym after application of ROS scavengers. Conclusion Both GM or Zym trigger reversible ROS generation in tracheal tissue leading to inhibition of the β-adrenergic increase in PTV. PMID:26571499

  16. Acute regulation of tight junction ion selectivity in human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Andrea N.; Itani, Omar A.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Electrolyte transport through and between airway epithelial cells controls the quantity and composition of the overlying liquid. Many studies have shown acute regulation of transcellular ion transport in airway epithelia. However, whether ion transport through tight junctions can also be acutely regulated is poorly understood both in airway and other epithelia. To investigate the paracellular pathway, we used primary cultures of differentiated human airway epithelia and assessed expression of claudins, the primary determinants of paracellular permeability, and measured transepithelial electrical properties, ion fluxes, and La3+ movement. Like many other tissues, airway epithelia expressed multiple claudins. Moreover, different cell types in the epithelium expressed the same pattern of claudins. To evaluate tight junction regulation, we examined the response to histamine, an acute regulator of airway function. Histamine stimulated a rapid and transient increase in the paracellular Na+ conductance, with a smaller increase in Cl− conductance. The increase was mediated by histamine H1 receptors and depended on an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that ion flow through the paracellular pathway can be acutely regulated. Such regulation could facilitate coupling of the passive flow of counter ions to active transcellular transport, thereby controlling net transepithelial salt and water transport. PMID:19208806

  17. Airway reopening: Steadily propagating bubbles in buckled elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L.

    2001-11-01

    Many pulmonary diseases result in the collapse and occlusion of parts of the lung by viscous fluid. The subsequent airway reopening is generally assumed to occur via the propagation of an air finger into the collapsed, fluid-filled part of the airway. The problem has some similarity to the scenario of the `first breath' when air has to enter the fluid-filled lungs of a newborn baby for the first time. We have developed the first three-dimensional computational model of airway reopening, based on a finite-element solution of the free-surface Stokes equations, fully coupled to the equations of large-displacement shell theory. Following a brief discussion of the numerical method, we will present results that illustrate the 3D flow field by which the steadily propagating air finger reopens the non-axisymmetrically collapsed airway. Finally, we will contrast the system's behaviour to predictions from earlier two-dimensional models.

  18. Murine Cytomegalovirus Influences Foxj1 Expression, Ciliogenesis, and Mucus Plugging in Mice with Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol A.; Peluso, John J.; Shanley, John D.; Puddington, Lynn; Thrall, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    We have followed throughout time the development of allergic airway disease (AAD) in both uninfected mice and mice infected intranasally with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Histological evaluation of lung tissue from uninfected mice with AAD demonstrated mucus plugging after 14 and 21 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge, with resolution of mucus plugging occurring by 42 days. In MCMV/AAD mice, mucus plugging was observed after 7 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge and remained present at 42 days. The level of interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from MCMV/AAD mice was decreased compared with AAD mice and was accompanied by increased levels of interferon-γ. Levels of Muc5A/C, Muc5B, or Muc2 mucin mRNA in the lungs of MCMV/AAD mice were not elevated compared with AAD mice. MCMV was able to infect the airway epithelium, resulting in decreased expression of Foxj1, a transcription factor critical for ciliogenesis, and a loss of ciliated epithelial cells. In addition, an increase in the number of epithelial cells staining positive for periodic acid-Schiff was observed in MCMV/AAD airways. Together, these findings suggest that MCMV infection of the airway epithelium enhances goblet cell metaplasia and diminishes efficient mucociliary clearance in mice with AAD, resulting in increased mucus plugging. PMID:18258850

  19. Indomethacin inhibits the airway hyperresponsiveness but not the neutrophil influx induced by ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Byrne, P.M.; Walters, E.H.; Aizawa, H.; Fabbri, L.M.; Holtzman, M.J.; Nadel, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    To determine whether oxygenation products of arachidonic acid may be involved in the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone exposure, we studied whether ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness could be inhibited by the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, in dogs. Airway responsiveness was assessed with dose-response curves of acetylcholine aerosol versus pulmonary resistance in 2 sets of experiments: in one set, 5 dogs were given no indomethacin treatment and were studied both before and after ozone exposure (3.0 ppm, 2 h); in another set, the same dogs were studied before indomethacin treatment or ozone exposure and then during treatment (1 mg/kg every 12 h for 4 days) both before and after ozone exposure. On each occasion, we also determined the number of neutrophils in biopsies of the airway epithelium. When the dogs were not treated with indomethacin, ozone caused a marked increase in responsiveness to acetylcholine and a marked increase in the number of neutrophils in the airway epithelium. When the dogs were given indomethacin, responsiveness was no different during treatment than before treatment, but more importantly, responsiveness did not increase significantly after they were exposed to ozone. Interestingly, indomethacin treatment did not affect either the baseline number of epithelial neutrophils before ozone exposure or the increase in the number of neutrophils after exposure. The results suggest that oxygenation products of arachidonic acid that are sensitive to inhibition by indomethacin play a role in ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness without affecting the influx of neutrophils.

  20. Pulmonary dendritic cell distribution and prevalence in guinea pig airways: effect of ovalbumin sensitization and challenge.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T E; Millecchia, L L; Frazer, D G; Fedan, J S

    1997-08-01

    We characterized the localization and prevalence of dendritic cells (DC) in guinea pig airways before and after s.c. sensitization and aerosol challenge with ovalbumin (OVA). DC, eosinophils, macrophages, T cells and B cells in lung and trachea were identified and quantified in frozen sections using monoclonal antibodies and computer-assisted image analysis. Airway reactivity of conscious animals to inhaled methacholine was examined. In unsensitized animals, DC were localized primarily within the lamina propria of the trachea and bronchi, in the submucosa of the trachea and in the adventitia of the bronchi. In contrast to reported studies on rats, few DC were noted in the epithelium. After OVA challenge, sensitized animals demonstrated an early obstructive response and a late-phase response that was well developed by 18 hr. Challenge with OVA increased DC prevalence in the lamina propria and submucosa of the trachea and in the lamina propria and adventitia of the bronchi. There was widespread eosinophilia throughout the airways, but no changes in B cells or T cells were evident. Macrophages were increased in the epithelium of both OVA-treated and saline-treated animals. At 18 hr after challenge, sensitized guinea pigs but not saline-treated controls were hyperreactive to inhaled methacholine. Except for macrophages, none of these effects were observed after saline treatment. Our findings indicate that inflammation in the airways of OVA-sensitized guinea pigs involves infiltration of DC, which is seen at the time animals are hyperreactive to inhaled methacholine. PMID:9262368

  1. Large-scale gene discovery in human airway epithelia reveals novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scheetz, Todd E; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Coco, Justin; Eyestone, Mari de Fatima; Bonaldo, Maria; Kucaba, Tamara; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McCray, Paul B

    2004-03-12

    The airway epithelium represents an important barrier between the host and the environment. It is a first site of contact with pathogens, particulates, and other stimuli, and has evolved the means to dynamically respond to these challenges. In an effort to define the transcript profile of airway epithelia, we created and sequenced cDNA libraries from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF epithelia and from human lung tissue. Sequencing of these libraries produced approximately 53,000 3'-expressed sequence tags (3'-ESTs). From these, a nonredundant UniGene set of more than 19,000 sequences was generated. Despite the relatively small contribution of airway epithelia to the total mass of the lung, focused gene discovery in this tissue yielded novel results. The ESTs included several thousand transcripts (6,416) not previously identified from cDNA sequences as expressed in the lung. Among the abundant transcripts were several genes involved in host defense. Most importantly, the set also included 879 3'-ESTs that appear to be novel sequences not previously represented in the National Center for Biotechnology Information UniGene collection. This UniGene set should be useful for studies of pulmonary diseases involving the airway epithelium including cystic fibrosis, respiratory infections and asthma. It also provides a reagent for large-scale expression profiling. PMID:14701920

  2. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, A. M.; Gaver, D. P.

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway's walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble's tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls' nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble's speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway's cellular epithelium during airway reopening.

  3. An investigation of the influence of cell topography on epithelial mechanical stresses during pulmonary airway reopening.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A M; Gaver, D P

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the local mechanical environment of the pulmonary epithelium in a computational model of airway reopening. To this end, the boundary element method (BEM) in conjunction with lubrication theory is implemented to assess the stationary-state behavior of a semi-infinite bubble traveling through a liquid-occluded parallel plate flow chamber lined with epithelial cells. The fluid occlusion is assumed to be Newtonian and inertia is neglected. The interactions between the microgeometry of the model airway's walls and the interfacial kinematics surrounding the bubble's tip result in a complex, spatially and temporally dependent stress distribution. The walls' nonplanar topography magnifies the normal and shear stresses and stress gradients. We find that decreasing the bubble's speed serves to increase the maximum normal stress and stress gradient but decrease the maximum shear stress and stress gradient. Our results give credence to the pressure-gradient-induced epithelial damage theory recently proposed by Bilek et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 94, 770 (2003)] and Kay et al. [J. Appl. Physiol. 97, 269 (2004)]. We conclude that the amplified pressure gradients found in this study may be even more detrimental to the airway's cellular epithelium during airway reopening. PMID:23745044

  4. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  5. Airway Epithelial Cells are the Site of Expression of a Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptide Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Gill; Jones, Douglas E.; Bevins, Charles L.

    1993-05-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide from the bovine tracheal mucosa, which we called tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP). We now show the TAP gene is expressed throughout the adult conducting airway, from nasal to bronchiolar tissue, but not in tissues other than airway mucosa, as determined by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of airway sections localizes TAP mRNA to columnar cells of the pseudostratified epithelium. We report the structural organization of the TAP gene and show that TAP is a member of a large family of related sequences with high nucleotide identity in the 5'exon. The data support the hypothesis that antimicrobial peptides contribute to host defense of the respiratory tract.

  6. Modulation of Treg function improves adenovirus vector-mediated gene expression in the airway.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Y; Limberis, M P; Zhang, H

    2014-02-01

    Virus vector-mediated gene transfer has been developed as a treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease, a lethal inherited disorder caused by somatic mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. The pathological proinflammatory environment of CF as well as the naïve and adaptive immunity induced by the virus vector itself limits the effectiveness of gene therapy for CF airway. Here, we report the use of an HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), to enhance the activity of the regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and to improve the expression of virus vector-mediated gene transfer to the respiratory epithelium. Our study demonstrates the potential utility of VPA, a drug used for over 50 years in humans as an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizer, in controlling inflammation and improving the efficacy of gene transfer in CF airway. PMID:24385144

  7. Understanding Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Airway Epithelial Repair: Selecting the Most Appropriate Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya, B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and repair of airway epithelial structures demands close characterization of the associated cellular and molecular events. The choice of an animal model system to study these processes and the role of lung stem cells is debatable since ideally the chosen animal model should offer a valid comparison with the human lung. Species differences may include the complex three-dimensional lung structures, cellular composition of the lung airway as well as transcriptional control of the molecular events in response to airway epithelium regeneration, and repair following injury. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the study of the lung repair and regeneration including the role of putative stem cells in small- and large-animal models. At the end of this paper, the author discuss the potential for using sheep as a model which can help bridge the gap between small-animal model systems and humans. PMID:23049478

  8. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  10. Transcriptional Targeting in the Airway Using Novel Gene Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Burnight, Erin R.; Wang, Guoshun; McCray, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to airway epithelia is a goal of many gene therapy strategies to treat cystic fibrosis. Because the native regulatory elements of the CFTR are not well characterized, the development of vectors with heterologous promoters of varying strengths and specificity would aid in our selection of optimal reagents for the appropriate expression of the vector-delivered CFTR gene. Here we contrasted the performance of several novel gene-regulatory elements. Based on airway expression analysis, we selected putative regulatory elements from BPIFA1 and WDR65 to investigate. In addition, we selected a human CFTR promoter region (∼ 2 kb upstream of the human CFTR transcription start site) to study. Using feline immunodeficiency virus vectors containing the candidate elements driving firefly luciferase, we transduced murine nasal epithelia in vivo. Luciferase expression persisted for 30 weeks, which was the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, when the nasal epithelium was ablated using the detergent polidocanol, the mice showed a transient loss of luciferase expression that returned 2 weeks after administration, suggesting that our vectors transduced a progenitor cell population. Importantly, the hWDR65 element drove sufficient CFTR expression to correct the anion transport defect in CFTR-null epithelia. These results will guide the development of optimal vectors for sufficient, sustained CFTR expression in airway epithelia. PMID:22447971

  11. Pim1 kinase activity preserves airway epithelial integrity upon house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M; Hesse, L; Jonker, M R; van den Berge, M; van Oosterhout, A J M; Heijink, I H; Nawijn, M C

    2015-12-01

    Most patients with allergic asthma are sensitized to house dust mite (HDM). The allergenicity of HDM largely depends on disruption of the integrity and proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that Pim1 kinase activity attenuates HDM-induced asthma by preserving airway epithelial integrity. The effects of Pim1 kinase activity on barrier function and release of the proinflammatory mediators IL-1α and CCL20 were studied in vitro in 16HBE and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs). Pim1-proficient and -deficient mice were exposed to a HDM-driven model of allergic asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured upon methacholine challenge. Airway inflammation and proinflammatory mediators in lung tissue and BAL fluid were determined. We observed that inhibition of Pim1 kinase prolongs the HDM-induced loss of barrier function in 16HBE cells and sensitizes PBECs to HDM-induced barrier dysfunction. Additionally, inhibition of Pim1 kinase increased the HDM-induced proinflammatory activity of 16HBE cells as measured by IL-1α secretion. In line herewith, HDM exposure induced an enhanced production of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL17 and CCL20 in Pim1-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. While we observed a marked increase in eosinophilic and neutrophilic granulocytes as well as mucus cell metaplasia and AHR to methacholine in mice exposed to HDM, these parameters were independent of Pim1 kinase activity. In contrast, levels of the Th2-cytokines IL-5 and IL-10 were significantly augmented in HDM-treated Pim1-deficient mice. Taken together, our study shows that Pim1 kinase activity maintains airway epithelial integrity and protects against HDM-induced proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. PMID:26453516

  12. Lung registration using airway tree morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Park, Sang; Pu, Jiantao; Wenzel, Sally E.; Leader, Joseph K.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a non-linear medical image registration algorithm that aligns lung CT images scanned at different respiratory phases. The method uses landmarks obtained from the airway tree to find the airway branch extension lines and where the lines intersect the lung surface. The branch extension and lung intersection voxels on the surface were the crucial landmarks that initialize the non-rigid registration process. The advantage of these landmarks is that they have high correspondence between the matching patterns in the template images and deformed images. This method was developed and tested on CT examinations from participants in an asthma study. The registration accuracy was evaluated by the average distance between the corresponding airway tree branch points in the pair of images. The mean value of the distance between landmarks in template images and deformed matching images for subjects 1 and 2 were 8.44 mm (+/-4.46 mm) and 4.33 mm (+/- 3.78 mm), respectively. The results show that the lung image registration technique developed in this study may prove useful in quantifying longitudinal changes, performing regional analysis, tracking lung tumors, and compensating for subject motion across CT images.

  13. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wykes, P M

    1991-06-01

    This is a complex condition, recognized primarily in brachycephalic breeds, that results in varying degrees of upper airway obstruction. The signs consist of respiratory distress, stridor, reduced exercise tolerance, and in more severe cases, cyanosis and collapse. The inherent anatomy of the brachycephalic skull contributes to the development of these signs. Such anatomic features include: a shortened and distorted nasopharynx, stenotic nares, an elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules. The increased negative pressure created in the pharyngolaryngeal region, as a result of these obstructing structures, ultimately results in distortion and collapse of the arytenoid cartilages of the larynx. PMID:1802247

  14. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  15. Electrodeposition of pronectin for titanium to augment gingival epithelium adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shingo; Asano, Kazunari; Miyazawa, Atsuko; Satoh, Tazuko; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-05-01

    This paper is one trial of surface modification of titanium with pronectin F+ (PN) of an artificial protein to enhance gingival adhesion. Titanium plates were electrodeposited in the PN solution to prepare PN-electrodeposited titanium plates. When PN detachment from the PN-electrodeposited titanium plates was investigated, no detachment was observed, in contrast to the case of titanium plates simply coated with PN. A cell culture experiment demonstrated that electrodeposited PN had an inherent ability to enhance the initial attachment of gingival epithelial cells. The PN-electrodeposited titanium plates were implanted between the gingival epithelium and the underlying bone tissue of rabbits to evaluate epithelial growth on the plates and their gingival adhesion. Non-treated and PN-coated titanium plates were used as controls. PN electrodeposition enhanced epithelial growth and adhesion of titanium plates to a significantly great extent compared with PN-coated plates. These findings demonstrate that PN electrodeposition is a promising method to enhance epithelium adhesion onto a titanium surface. PMID:22294437

  16. Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J.; Clarke, Christine L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D. L.; Harnett, Paul R.; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute

  17. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H; Kho, Alvin T; Tambe, Dhananjay T; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Henske, Elizabeth P; Weiss, Scott T; Manning, M Lisa; Butler, James P; Drazen, Jeffrey M; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems-both inert and living-have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role. PMID:26237129

  18. Permeation of Therapeutic Drugs in Different Formulations across the Airway Epithelium In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Stranzinger, Sandra; Dzidic, Neira; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh; Mohr, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary drug delivery is characterized by short onset times of the effects and an increased therapeutic ratio compared to oral drug delivery. This delivery route can be used for local as well as for systemic absorption applying drugs as single substance or as a fixed dose combination. Drugs can be delivered as nebulized aerosols or as dry powders. A screening system able to mimic delivery by the different devices might help to assess the drug effect in the different formulations and to identify potential interference between drugs in fixed dose combinations. The present study evaluates manual devices used in animal studies for their suitability for cellular studies. Methods Calu-3 cells were cultured submersed and in air-liquid interface culture and characterized regarding mucus production and transepithelial electrical resistance. The influence of pore size and material of the transwell membranes and of the duration of air-liquid interface culture was assessed. Compounds were applied in solution and as aerosols generated by MicroSprayer IA-1C Aerosolizer or by DP-4 Dry Powder Insufflator using fluorescein and rhodamine 123 as model compounds. Budesonide and formoterol, singly and in combination, served as examples for drugs relevant in pulmonary delivery. Results and Conclusions Membrane material and duration of air-liquid interface culture had no marked effect on mucus production and tightness of the cell monolayer. Co-application of budesonide and formoterol, applied in solution or as aerosol, increased permeation of formoterol across cells in air-liquid interface culture. Problems with the DP-4 Dry Powder Insufflator included compound-specific delivery rates and influence on the tightness of the cell monolayer. These problems were not encountered with the MicroSprayer IA-1C Aerosolizer. The combination of Calu-3 cells and manual aerosol generation devices appears suitable to identify interactions of drugs in fixed drug combination products on permeation. PMID:26274590

  19. Expression of Signaling Components in Embryonic Eyelid Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the “eyelid closure pathways”. However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms. PMID:24498290

  20. A hybrid method for airway segmentation and automated measurement of bronchial wall thickness on CT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Mansoor, Awais; Udupa, Jayaram K; Mollura, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory and infectious lung diseases commonly involve bronchial airway structures and morphology, and these abnormalities are often analyzed non-invasively through high resolution computed tomography (CT) scans. Assessing airway wall surfaces and the lumen are of great importance for diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, obtaining high accuracy from a complete 3-D airway tree structure can be quite challenging. The airway tree structure has spiculated shapes with multiple branches and bifurcation points as opposed to solid single organ or tumor segmentation tasks in other applications, hence, it is complex for manual segmentation as compared with other tasks. For computerized methods, a fundamental challenge in airway tree segmentation is the highly variable intensity levels in the lumen area, which often causes a segmentation method to leak into adjacent lung parenchyma through blurred airway walls or soft boundaries. Moreover, outer wall definition can be difficult due to similar intensities of the airway walls and nearby structures such as vessels. In this paper, we propose a computational framework to accurately quantify airways through (i) a novel hybrid approach for precise segmentation of the lumen, and (ii) two novel methods (a spatially constrained Markov random walk method (pseudo 3-D) and a relative fuzzy connectedness method (3-D)) to estimate the airway wall thickness. We evaluate the performance of our proposed methods in comparison with mostly used algorithms using human chest CT images. Our results demonstrate that, on publicly available data sets and using standard evaluation criteria, the proposed airway segmentation method is accurate and efficient as compared with the state-of-the-art methods, and the airway wall estimation algorithms identified the inner and outer airway surfaces more accurately than the most widely applied methods, namely full width at half maximum and phase congruency. PMID:26026778

  1. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  2. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:23697359

  3. Irritant-induced airway disorders.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M; Bernstein, I Leonard

    2011-11-01

    Thousands of persons experience accidental high-level irritant exposures each year but most recover and few die. Irritants function differently than allergens because their actions proceed nonspecifically and by nonimmunologic mechanisms. For some individuals, the consequence of a single massive exposure to an irritant, gas, vapor or fume is persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the clinical picture of asthma, referred to as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Repeated irritant exposures may lead to chronic cough and continual airway hyperresponsiveness. Cases of asthma attributed to repeated irritant-exposures may be the result of genetic and/or host factors. PMID:21978855

  4. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  5. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  6. Rare Upper Airway Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Alanna; Clemmens, Clarice; Jacobs, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of congenital upper airway anomalies can occur as a result of errors during embryologic development. In this review, we will describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies for a few select, rare congenital malformations of this system. The diagnostic tools used in workup of these disorders range from prenatal tests to radiological imaging, swallowing evaluations, indirect or direct laryngoscopy, and rigid bronchoscopy. While these congenital defects can occur in isolation, they are often associated with disorders of other organ systems or may present as part of a syndrome. Therefore workup and treatment planning for patients with these disorders often involves a team of multiple specialists, including paediatricians, otolaryngologists, pulmonologists, speech pathologists, gastroenterologists, and geneticists. PMID:26277452

  7. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  8. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  9. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  10. Experimental and computational studies of sound transmission in a branching airway network embedded in a compliant viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-03-01

    Breath sounds are often used to aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary disease. Mechanical and numerical models could be used to enhance our understanding of relevant sound transmission phenomena. Sound transmission in an airway mimicking phantom was investigated using a mechanical model with a branching airway network embedded in a compliant viscoelastic medium. The Horsfield self-consistent model for the bronchial tree was adopted to topologically couple the individual airway segments into the branching airway network. The acoustics of the bifurcating airway segments were measured by microphones and calculated analytically. Airway phantom surface motion was measured using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry. Finite element simulations of sound transmission in the airway phantom were performed. Good agreement was achieved between experiments and simulations. The validated computational approach can provide insight into sound transmission simulations in real lungs.

  11. Experimental and Computational Studies of Sound Transmission in a Branching Airway Network Embedded in a Compliant Viscoelastic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Breath sounds are often used to aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary disease. Mechanical and numerical models could be used to enhance our understanding of relevant sound transmission phenomena. Sound transmission in an airway mimicking phantom was investigated using a mechanical model with a branching airway network embedded in a compliant viscoelastic medium. The Horsfield self-consistent model for the bronchial tree was adopted to topologically couple the individual airway segments into the branching airway network. The acoustics of the bifurcating airway segments were measured by microphones and calculated analytically. Airway phantom surface motion was measured using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry. Finite element simulations of sound transmission in the airway phantom were performed. Good agreement was achieved between experiments and simulations. The validated computational approach can provide insight into sound transmission simulations in real lungs. PMID:26097256

  12. Expression of IL-4/IL-13 receptors in differentiating human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    White, Steven R; Martin, Linda D; Stern, Randi; Laxman, Bharathi; Marroquin, Bertha A

    2010-11-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 elicit several important responses in airway epithelium including chemokine secretion and mucous secretion that may contribute to airway inflammation, cell migration, and differentiation. These cytokines have overlapping but not identical effector profiles likely due to shared subunits in their receptor complexes. These receptors are variably described in epithelial cells, and the relative expression, localization, and function of these receptors in differentiated and repairing epithelial cells are not clear. We examined IL-4/IL-13 receptor expression and localization in primary airway epithelial cells collected from normal human lungs and grown under conditions yielding both undifferentiated and differentiated cells inclusive of basal, goblet, and ciliated cell phenotypes. Gene expression of the IL-4Rα, IL-2Rγc, IL-13Rα1, and IL-13Rα2 receptor subunits increased with differentiation, but different patterns of localization and protein abundance were seen for each subunit based on both differentiation and the cell subtypes present. Increased expression of receptor subunits observed in more differentiated cells was associated with more substantial functional responses to IL-4 stimulation including increased eotaxin-3 expression and accelerated migration after injury. We demonstrate substantial differences in IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunit expression and responsiveness to IL-4 based on the extent of airway epithelial cell differentiation and suggest that these differences may have functional consequences in airway inflammation. PMID:20729386

  13. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  14. Development of the ovarian follicular epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Lavranos, T C; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F

    1999-05-25

    A lot is known about the endocrine control of the development of ovarian follicles, but a key question now facing researchers is which molecular and cellular processes take part in control of follicular growth and development. The growth and development of ovarian follicles occurs postnatally and throughout adult life. In this review, we focus on the follicular epithelium (membrana granulosa) and its basal lamina. We discuss a model of how granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells and then enter different lineages before differentiation. The structure of the epithelium at the antral stage of development is presented, and the effects that follicle growth has on the behavior of the granulosa cells are discussed. Finally, we discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition. This would be expected if the behavior of the granulosa cells changes, or if the permeability of the basal lamina changes. It will be evident that the follicular epithelium has similarities to other epithelia in the body, but that it is more dynamic, as gross changes occur during the course of follicle development. This basic information will be important for the development of future reproductive technologies in both humans and animals, and possibly for understanding polycystic ovarian syndrome in women. PMID:10411332

  15. Confocal fluorescence microendoscopy of bronchial epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Leriche, Jean C.; Anderson, Marshall W.; Macaulay, Calum E.

    2009-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy permits the acquisition of high-resolution real-time confocal images of bronchial mucosa via the instrument channel of an endoscope. We report here on the construction and validation of a confocal fluorescence microendoscope and its use to acquire images of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Our objective is to develop an imaging method that can distinguish preneoplastic lesions from normal epithelium to enable us to study the natural history of these lesions and the efficacy of chemopreventive agents without biopsy removal of the lesion that can introduce a spontaneous regression bias. The instrument employs a laser-scanning engine and bronchoscope-compatible confocal probe consisting of a fiber-optic image guide and a graded-index objective lens. We assessed the potential of topical application of physiological pH cresyl violet (CV) as a fluorescence contrast-enhancing agent for the visualization of tissue morphology. Images acquired ex vivo with the confocal microendoscope were first compared with a bench-top confocal fluorescence microscope and conventional histology. Confocal images from five sites topically stained with CV were then acquired in vivo from high-risk smokers and compared to hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of biopsies taken from the same site. Sufficient contrast in the confocal imagery was obtained to identify cells in the bronchial epithelium. However, further improvements in the miniature objective lens are required to provide sufficient axial resolution for accurate classification of preneoplastic lesions.

  16. Continuity of airway goblet cells and intraluminal mucus in the airways of patients with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Shimura, S; Andoh, Y; Haraguchi, M; Shirato, K

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the formation of the widespread mucous-plugging observed in autopsied lungs from patients with bronchial asthma. We performed morphometric analysis of airways of autopsied lungs from eight patients with bronchial asthma (Group BA), and compared it with those of six chronic bronchitics (Group CB) and four control patients (Control). The following parameters were measured in paraffin sections: volume proportion of bronchial glands to bronchial wall (Gland%); goblet cell granules to total epithelial layer (Goblet %); intraluminal mucus expressed as the mucus occupying ratio (MOR); volume ratio of intraluminal mucus continuous with goblet cells to total intraluminal mucus (Vc/Vtol %); and surface ratio of the contact surface of intraluminal mucus continuous with goblet cells to the total luminal surface (Sc/Stot %). Gland%, Goblet %, and MOR or inflammatory cell numbers in the airway walls both from Group BA and CB were larger than those from the Control group. However, no significant differences were observed between Group BA and CB in Gland%, Goblet %, MOR or inflammatory cell numbers, except for the eosinophil number: i.e. 23 +/- 3, 22 +/- 3 and 6 +/- 2% in Gland%; 22 +/- 9, 5 +/- 4 and 2 +/- 2% in Goblet%; 10 +/- 3, 18 +/- 3 and 0.3 +/- 0.5% in MOR; 199 +/- 68, 10 +/- 3 and 2 +/- 2 cells. mm-2 in eosinophil number of the peripheral airways from Groups BA, CB and Control, respectively. In contrast, marked and significant increases were observed both in Vc/Vtot% and Sc/Stot% in Group BA compared to Groups CB and Control both in central and peripheral airways: i.e. Vc/Vtot% in the peripheral airways was 53 +/- 5, 4 +/- 3 and 0.8 +/- 0.8% from Groups BA, CB and Control, respectively (BA vs CB or BA vs Control, p < 0.01 each). These findings suggest that the continuity of goblet cells and intraluminal mucus or lack of full release of mucus, from goblet cells, is peculiar to asthmatic airways, and may contribute to

  17. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions. PMID:3189886

  18. Nanotopography follows force in TGF-β1 stimulated epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoelking, Gerold; Reiss, Bjoern; Wegener, Joachim; Oberleithner, Hans; Pavenstaedt, Hermann; Riethmuller, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    Inflammation and cellular fibrosis often imply an involvement of the cytokine TGF-β1. TGF-β1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT), a term describing the loss of epithelium-specific function. Indicative for this process are an elongated cell shape parallel to stress fibre formation. Many signalling pathways of TGF-β1 have been discovered, but mechanical aspects have not yet been investigated. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyse surface topography and mechanical properties of EMT in proximal kidney tubule epithelium (NRK52E). Elongated cells, an increase of stress fibre formation and a loss of microvillus compatible structures were observed as characteristic signs of EMT. Furthermore, AFM could identify an increase in stiffness by 71% after six days of stimulation with TGF-β1. As a novel topographical phenomenon, nodular protrusions emerged at the cell-cell junctions. They occurred preferentially at sites where stress fibres cross the border. Since these nodular protrusions were sensitive to inhibitors of force generation, they can indicate intracellular tension. The results demonstrate a manifest impact of elevated tension on the cellular topography.

  19. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  20. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  1. Tachykinin receptors and airway pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian tachykinins (TKs), substance P and neurokinin A, are present in sensory nerve fibres in the upper and lower airways of various mammalian species, including humans. TKs are released from these afferent nerves in an "efferent" mode at peripheral level, especially in response to irritant stimuli. TKs exert a variety of biological effects (bronchoconstriction, plasma protein extravasation, stimulation of mucus secretion), collectively known as "neurogenic inflammation", and this process is thought to be of potential pathogenic relevance for various airway diseases. The recent development of potent and selective TK receptor antagonists on the one hand provides important new tools for the understanding of basic airway physiology and pathophysiology and, on the other, opens new possibilities for therapy of airway diseases. PMID:8390944

  2. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  3. Imaging of the Distal Airways

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P.; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques of the lung continues to advance with improving ability to image the more distal airways. Two imaging techniques are reviewed, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance with hyperpolarized helium-3. PMID:19962040

  4. The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench.

    PubMed

    Quammen, Cory W; Taylor Ii, Russell M; Krajcevski, Pavel; Mitran, Sorin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Superfine, Richard; Davis, Brad; Davis, Stephanie; Zdanski, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench (VPAW) is a patient-centered surgical planning software system targeted to pediatric patients with airway obstruction. VPAW provides an intuitive surgical planning interface for clinicians and supports quantitative analysis regarding prospective surgeries to aid clinicians deciding on potential surgical intervention. VPAW enables a full surgical planning pipeline, including importing DICOM images, segmenting the airway, interactive 3D editing of airway geometries to express potential surgical treatment planning options, and creating input files for offline geometric analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulations for evaluation of surgical outcomes. In this paper, we describe the VPAW system and its use in one case study with a clinician to successfully describe an intended surgery outcome. PMID:27046595

  5. Hyperosmolar solution effects in guinea pig airways. IV. Lipopolysaccharide-induced alterations in airway reactivity and epithelial bioelectric responses to methacholine and hyperosmolarity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Van Scott, Michael R; Kommineni, Choudari; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Dortch-Carnes, Juanita; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment (4 mg/kg i.p.) on guinea pig airway smooth muscle reactivity and epithelial bioelectric responses to methacholine (MCh) and hyperosmolarity. Hyperosmolar challenge of the epithelium releases epithelium-derived relaxing factor (EpDRF). Using a two-chamber, whole body plethysmograph 18 h post-treatment, animals treated with LPS were hyporeactive to inhaled MCh aerosol. This could involve an increase in the release and/or actions of EpDRF, because LPS treatment enhanced EpDRF-induced smooth muscle relaxation in vitro in the isolated perfused trachea apparatus. In isolated perfused tracheas the basal transepithelial potential difference (Vt) was increased after LPS treatment. The increase in Vt was inhibited by amiloride and indomethacin. Concentration-response curves for changes in Vt in response to serosally and mucosally applied MCh were biphasic (hyperpolarization, <3 x 10(-7)M; depolarization, >3 x 10(-7)M); MCh was more potent when applied serosally. The hyperpolarization response to MCh, but not the depolarization response, was potentiated after LPS treatment. In both treatment groups, mucosally applied hyperosmolar solution (using added NaCl) depolarized the epithelium; this response was greater in tracheas from LPS-treated animals. The results of this study indicate that airway hyporeactivity in vivo after LPS treatment is accompanied by an increase in the release and/or actions of EpDRF in vitro. These changes may involve LPS-induced bioelectric alterations in the epithelium. PMID:14566002

  6. Co-culture of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons and corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Forbes, D J; Pozos, R S; Nelson, J D

    1987-03-01

    Corneal epithelium and the trigeminal ganglion neurons which normally innervate the epithelium have been grown in adjacent chambers of a 35 mm tissue culture plate. Dissociated nerve cells from late embryonic rats were plated inside an 8 mm cloning cylinder attached to the center of the culture plate by silicone grease. In 7-10 days neurites extended out of this inner chamber by growing through the grease seal and along parallel scratches in the collagen coating of the tissue culture plate. Once this occurred, pure corneal epithelial explants were isolated from young adult rats and plated in the area surrounding the cloning cylinder, i.e. in the outer chamber. Cultures were monitored regularly with phase microscopy and, at various times, were fixed for ultrastructural examination. Within 24-48 hours of the epithelial plating, there were both individual neurites and bundles of neurites in contact with the epithelium. This interaction increased substantially over the next few days. Growth cones of the neurites could be seen to approach the microvilli-covered surface of the epithelium, travel over the surface and penetrate between the epithelial cells. This tissue culture model of the innervated ocular surface may prove valuable in the study of a variety of ocular conditions or diseases, as well as provide a means to study functional relationships and mechanisms of cellular interaction between neurons and their target cells. PMID:3556022

  7. The effect of ambroxol on chloride transport, CFTR and ENaC in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Hussain, Rashida; Strid, Hilja; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2013-11-01

    Ambroxol, a mucokinetic anti-inflammatory drug, has been used for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). The respiratory epithelium is covered by the airway surface liquid (ASL), the thickness and composition of which is determined by Cl(-) efflux via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Na(+) influx via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). In cells expressing wt-CFTR, ambroxol increased the Cl(-) conductance, but not the bicarbonate conductance of the CFTR channels. We investigated whether treatment with ambroxol enhances chloride transport and/or CFTR and ENaC expression in CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE) cells. CFBE cells were treated with 100 µM ambroxol for 2, 4 or 8 h. mRNA expression for CFTR and ENaC subunits was analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); protein expression was measured by Western blot. The effect of ambroxol on Cl(-) transport was measured by Cl(-) efflux measurements with a fluorescent chloride probe. Ambroxol significantly stimulated Cl(-) efflux from CFBE cells (a sixfold increase after 8 h treatment), and enhanced the expression of the mRNA of CFTR and α-ENaC, and of the CFTR protein. No significant difference was observed in β-ENaC after exposure to ambroxol, whereas mRNA expression of γ-ENaC was reduced. No significant effects of ambroxol on the ENaC subunits were observed by Western blot. Ambroxol did not significantly affect the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Upregulation of CFTR and enhanced Cl(-) efflux after ambroxol treatment should promote transepithelial ion and water transport, which may improve hydration of the mucus, and therefore be beneficial to CF-patients. PMID:23765701

  8. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  9. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  10. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  11. INTEGRATED CT/BRONCHOSCOPY IN THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Melissa J.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Many imaging modalities and methodologies exist for evaluating the pulmonary airways. Individually, each modality provides insight to the state of the airways however, alone they do not necessary provide a comprehensive description. The goal of this paper is to integrate complementary medical imaging datasets to form a synergistic description of the airways. Materials and Methods Two digital bronchoscopy techniques were used to evaluate the pulmonary mucosa. A digital color bronchoscopy system was used to detect mucosal color alterations, and a fluorescence detection system was used to assess the microvasculature of the bronchial mucosa. Study participants were also imaged with a multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. Virtual bronchoscopy and image registration techniques were exploited to combine 3D surface renderings, extracted from the MDCT data, together with the 2D digital bronchoscopy images. Validation of the fusion process was performed on a rubber phantom of an adult airway with 4 embedded metal beads. Results The fusion of the MDCT extracted airway tree and the digital bronchoscopy datasets were presented for 3 study participants. In addition, the detected accuracy of the registration method to reliably align the MDCT and bronchoscopy image datasets was determined to be 1.98 mm in the phantom airway model. Conclusion We have demonstrated that merging of three distinct digital datasets to provide a single synergistic description of the airways is possible. This is a pilot project in the field of eidomics, the process of combining digital image datasets and image based processes together. We anticipate that in the future eidomics will provide a universal and predictive imaging language that will change health care delivery. PMID:18486014

  12. Effect of inflammatory mediators on airway nerves and muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, E.E.; O'Byrne, P. )

    1991-03-01

    The neuromuscular mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness have been reviewed on the basis of studies of the changes induced by ozone inhalation in dogs. In vivo, there is increased, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness based on studies of the response to inhaled acetylcholine or histamine. The underlying inflammatory mechanism involves release of LTB4 and/or other chemotactic agents from epithelial or lumenal cells, ingress of macrophages, neutrophils, and platelets from the blood vessels between the muscle and epithelium, and migration of mast cells into the epithelium. The hyperresponsiveness seems to depend upon the influx of neutrophils and actions of thromboxane A2 released from the neutrophils. In vitro, there is increased responsiveness to field stimulation of cholinergic nerves and to acetylcholine (not to KCI) in tracheal strips. These effects can be mimicked by a thromboxane A2 analog (U44619). In the sucrose gap, the TxA2 analog does not affect the excitatory junction potential, but in low concentration it increases and prolongs a series of fading membrane oscillations closely related to the contractions. We consider these oscillations to reflect ongoing release and/or action of acetylcholine. In high concentrations the analog causes a small depolarization and a tonic contraction, but it does not enhance the sensitivity to acetylcholine. TxA2 may be acting either presynaptically or postsynaptically or both to produce these effects; however, changes in release of an epithelial-derived relaxing factor do not seem to be involved. We conclude that TxA2 actions probably underlie hyperresponsiveness developed in vivo and in vitro after ozone inhalation.

  13. Detection and monitoring of early airway injury effects of half-mustard (2-chloroethylethylsulfide) exposure using high-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, Kelly A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David S.; Su, Jianping; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Narula, Navneet; Guo, Shuguang; Wakida, Nicole; Raub, Chris; Berns, Michael W.; George, Steven C.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, high-resolution imaging technology capable of delivering real-time, near-histologic images of tissues. Mustard gas is a vesicant-blistering agent that can cause severe and lethal damage to airway and lungs. The ability to detect and assess airway injury in the clinical setting of mustard exposure is currently limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability to detect and monitor progression of half-mustard [2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES)] airway injuries with OCT techniques. A ventilated rabbit mustard exposure airway injury model is developed. A flexible fiber optic OCT probe is introduced into the distal trachea to image airway epithelium and mucosa in vivo. Progression of airway injury is observed over eight hours with OCT using a prototype time-domain superluminescent diode OCT system. OCT tracheal images from CEES exposed animals are compared to control rabbits for airway mucosal thickening and other changes. OCT detects the early occurrence and progression of dramatic changes in the experimental group after exposure to CEES. Histology and immunofluorescence staining confirms this finding. OCT has the potential to be a high resolution imaging modality capable of detecting, assessing, and monitoring treatment for airway injury following mustard vesicant agent exposures.

  14. Detection and monitoring of early airway injury effects of half-mustard (2-chloroethylethylsulfide) exposure using high-resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Kelly A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David S.; Su, Jianping; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Narula, Navneet; Guo, Shuguang; Wakida, Nicole; Raub, Chris; Berns, Michael W.; George, Steven C.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, high-resolution imaging technology capable of delivering real-time, near-histologic images of tissues. Mustard gas is a vesicant-blistering agent that can cause severe and lethal damage to airway and lungs. The ability to detect and assess airway injury in the clinical setting of mustard exposure is currently limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability to detect and monitor progression of half-mustard [2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES)] airway injuries with OCT techniques. A ventilated rabbit mustard exposure airway injury model is developed. A flexible fiber optic OCT probe is introduced into the distal trachea to image airway epithelium and mucosa in vivo. Progression of airway injury is observed over eight hours with OCT using a prototype time-domain superluminescent diode OCT system. OCT tracheal images from CEES exposed animals are compared to control rabbits for airway mucosal thickening and other changes. OCT detects the early occurrence and progression of dramatic changes in the experimental group after exposure to CEES. Histology and immunofluorescence staining confirms this finding. OCT has the potential to be a high resolution imaging modality capable of detecting, assessing, and monitoring treatment for airway injury following mustard vesicant agent exposures. PMID:19725748

  15. WNT7A and PAX6 define corneal epithelium homeostasis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hong; Xue, Yuanchao; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xi, Lei; Patel, Sherrina; Cai, Huimin; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Yang; Li, Gen; Li, Hairi; Jiang, Wei; Yeh, Emily; Lin, Jonathan; Pei, Michelle; Zhu, Jin; Cao, Guiqun; Zhang, Liangfang; Yu, Benjamin; Chen, Shaochen; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Yizhi; Zhang, Kang

    2014-07-17

    The surface of the cornea consists of a unique type of non-keratinized epithelial cells arranged in an orderly fashion, and this is essential for vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Cornea epithelial cells (CECs) undergo continuous renewal from limbal stem or progenitor cells (LSCs), and deficiency in LSCs or corneal epithelium--which turns cornea into a non-transparent, keratinized skin-like epithelium--causes corneal surface disease that leads to blindness in millions of people worldwide. How LSCs are maintained and differentiated into corneal epithelium in healthy individuals and which key molecular events are defective in patients have been largely unknown. Here we report establishment of an in vitro feeder-cell-free LSC expansion and three-dimensional corneal differentiation protocol in which we found that the transcription factors p63 (tumour protein 63) and PAX6 (paired box protein PAX6) act together to specify LSCs, and WNT7A controls corneal epithelium differentiation through PAX6. Loss of WNT7A or PAX6 induces LSCs into skin-like epithelium, a critical defect tightly linked to common human corneal diseases. Notably, transduction of PAX6 in skin epithelial stem cells is sufficient to convert them to LSC-like cells, and upon transplantation onto eyes in a rabbit corneal injury model, these reprogrammed cells are able to replenish CECs and repair damaged corneal surface. These findings suggest a central role of the WNT7A-PAX6 axis in corneal epithelial cell fate determination, and point to a new strategy for treating corneal surface diseases. PMID:25030175

  16. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. Methods In this study, 90 cases of 1–14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%–50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. Results There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (p<0.05). Conclusion We concluded that for airway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA. PMID:27366563

  17. Role of Small Airways in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Finkas, Lindsay K; Martin, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition of both the small and large airways. Recently the small airways have gained attention as studies have shown significant inflammation in the small airways in all severities of asthma. This inflammation has correlated with peripheral airway resistance and as a result, noninvasive methods to reliably measure small airways have been pursued. In addition, recent changes in asthma inhalers have led to alterations in drug formulations and the development of extrafine particle inhalers that improve delivery to the distal airways. PMID:27401620

  18. Defence mechanisms of olfactory neuro-epithelium: mucosa regeneration, metabolising enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Watelet, J B; Strolin-Benedetti, M; Whomsley, R

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory neuro-epithelium is highly sensitive to chemicals and its direct microbiological environment. It also plays a role as an interface between the airways and the nervous system, and so it has developed several defence instruments for rapid regeneration or for the detoxification of the immediate environment. This review illustrates three of these defence mechanisms: regeneration of the epithelium, local production of metabolising enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. Toxicants can inflict damage by a direct toxic response. Alternatively, they may require metabolic activation to produce the proximate toxicant. In addition to detoxifying inhaled and systemically derived xenobiotics, the local olfactory metabolism may fulfil multiple functions such as the modification of inhaled odorant, the modulation of endogenous signalling molecules and the protection of other tissues such as the CNS and lungs from inhaled toxicants. Finally, the permeability of nasal and olfactory mucosa is an important efficacy parameter for some anti-allergic drugs delivered by intranasal administration or inhalation. Efflux or update transporters expressed in these tissues may therefore significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of drugs administered topically. PMID:20084803

  19. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-06-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. PMID:10856027

  20. Antimicrobial Peptide P60.4Ac-Containing Creams and Gel for Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Cultured Skin and Airway Epithelial Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; Göblyös, Anikó; Ravensbergen, Bep; Adriaans, Alwin E; Cordfunke, Robert A; Schrumpf, Jasmijn; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; den Hartigh, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    We previously found the LL-37-derived peptide P60.4Ac to be effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human epidermal models (EMs). The goal of this study was to identify the preferred carrier for this peptide for topical application on skin and mucosal surfaces. We prepared P60.4Ac in three formulations, i.e., a water-in-oil cream with lanolin (Softisan 649), an oil-in-water cream with polyethylene glycol hexadecyl ether (Cetomacrogol), and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (hypromellose) 4000 gel. We tested the antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide in these formulations against mupirocin-resistant and -sensitive MRSA strains on EMs and bronchial epithelial models (BEMs). The cytotoxic effects of formulated P60.4Ac on these models were determined using histology and WST-1 and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Moreover, we assessed the stability of the peptide in these formulations with storage for up to 3 months. Killing of MRSA by P60.4Ac in the two creams was less effective than that by P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel. In agreement with those findings, P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel was highly effective in eradicating the two MRSA strains from EMs. We found that even 0.1% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel killed >99% of the viable planktonic bacteria and >85% of the biofilm-associated bacteria on EMs. Hypromellose gels containing 0.1% and 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac effectively reduced the numbers of viable MRSA cells from BEMs by >90%. No cytotoxic effects of P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel with up to 2% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on keratinocytes in EMs and in the hypromellose gel with up to 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on epithelial cells in BEMs were observed. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that P60.4Ac was stable in the Softisan cream and the hypromellose gel but not in the Cetomacrogol cream. We conclude that P60.4Ac formulated in hypromellose gel is both stable and highly effective in eradicating MRSA from colonized EMs and

  1. Defective Barrier Function in Neosquamous Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jovov, Biljana; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Geraldine S.; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common strategy for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). After RFA, the ablated esophagus heals on acid suppressive therapy, and is re-populated with a stratified squamous epithelium, referred to as ‘neosquamous epithelium (NSE).’ Because the ability of the NSE to protect the underlying tissue from recurrent insult by reflux is unclear, we assessed the barrier function of NSE by comparing it to that of the native upper squamous epithelium (USE) in subjects having undergone RFA. METHODS At varying intervals following RFA, the barrier function of NSE and USE were assessed in endoscopic biopsies by light and electron microscopy, and by measurement of electrical resistance (RT) and fluorescein flux in mini-Ussing chambers. Chamber results were further compared with results from control biopsies (healthy distal esophagus). A claudin expression profile in the tight junctions (TJ) of NSE and USE was determined using qRT-PCR. Differential expression of claudin 4 between NSE and USE was assayed by immunoblots. RESULTS USE was histologically normal while NSE showed dilated intercellular spaces and marked eosinophilia. NSE was also more permeable than USE and healthy controls, having lower mean RT and higher fluorescein fluxes. Abnormally low RT values for NSE were unrelated to the time period following RFA (or number of prior RFA sessions), being abnormal even 26 months after RFA. Abnormal permeability in NSE was associated with significantly lower values for claudin-4 and claudin-10 than in USE. CONCLUSIONS NSE commonly exhibits defective barrier function. Since this defect will make it vulnerable to injury, inflammation and destruction by acidic and weakly acidic refluxates, it may in part explain incidences of recurrence of BE following ablation. PMID:23318477

  2. Retinal pigment epithelium engineering using synthetic biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    2001-12-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays a key role in the maintenance of the normal functions of the retina, especially photoreceptors. Alteration in RPE structure and function is implicated in a variety of ocular disorders. Tissue engineering strategies using synthetic biodegradable polymers as temporary substrates for RPE cell culture and subsequent transplantation may provide a promising new therapy. In this review article, the manufacture of thin biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) films and their degradation behavior in vitro are discussed. RPE cell proliferation and differentiation on these PLGA films are reviewed. The fabrication of model substrates with desired chemical micropatterns in the micrometer scale is discussed and the effects of surface patterning on RPE morphology and function are assessed. Finally. the preparation of biodegradable micropatterns with adhesive PLGA and non-adhesive poly(ethylene glycol)/PLA domains to modulate RPE cell adhesion is presented. PMID:11700807

  3. The Pivotal Role of Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ozier, Annaïg; Allard, Benoit; Bara, Imane; Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Trian, Thomas; Marthan, Roger; Berger, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by the association of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodelling. The aim of the present article is to review the pivotal role of airway smooth muscle (ASM) in the pathophysiology of asthma. ASM is the main effector of AHR. The mechanisms of AHR in asthma may involve a larger release of contractile mediators and/or a lower release of relaxant mediators, an improved ASM cell excitation/contraction coupling, and/or an alteration in the contraction/load coupling. Beyond its contractile function, ASM is also involved in bronchial inflammation and remodelling. Whereas ASM is a target of the inflammatory process, it can also display proinflammatory and immunomodulatory functions, through its synthetic properties and the expression of a wide range of cell surface molecules. ASM remodelling represents a key feature of asthmatic bronchial remodelling. ASM also plays a role in promoting complementary airway structural alterations, in particular by its synthetic function. PMID:22220184

  4. Epithelium integrity is crucial for the relaxant activity of brain natriuretic peptide in human isolated bronchi

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Maria G; Calzetta, Luigino; Passeri, Daniela; Facciolo, Francesco; Rendina, Erino A; Page, Clive; Cazzola, Mario; Orlandi, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plays an important role in several biological functions, including bronchial relaxation. Here, we have investigated the role of BNP and its cognate receptors in human bronchial tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of BNP on responses to carbachol and histamine were evaluated in non-sensitized, passively sensitized, epithelium-intact or denuded isolated bronchi and in the presence of methoctramine, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and aminoguanidine. Natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) were investigated by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Release of NO and acetylcholine from bronchial tissues and cultured BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells was also investigated. KEY RESULTS BNP reduced contractions mediated by carbachol and histamine, with decreased Emax (carbachol: 22.7 ± 4.7%; histamine: 59.3 ± 1.8%) and increased EC50 (carbachol: control 3.33 ± 0.88 µM, BNP 100 ± 52.9 µM; histamine: control 16.7 ± 1.7 µM, BNP 90 ± 30.6 µM); BNP was ineffective in epithelium-denuded bronchi. Among NPRs, only atrial NPR (NPR1) transcripts were detected in bronchial tissue. Bronchial NPR1 immunoreactivity was detected in epithelium and inflammatory cells but faint or absent in airway smooth muscle cells. NPR1 transcripts in bronchi increased after incubation with BNP, but not after sensitization. Methoctramine and quinine abolished BNP-induced relaxant activity. The latter was associated with increased bronchial mRNA for NO synthase and NO release, inhibited by L-NAME and aminoguanidine. In vitro, BNP increased acetylcholine release from bronchial epithelial cells, whereas NO release was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Epithelial cells mediate the BNP-induced relaxant activity in human isolated bronchi. PMID:21410689

  5. Characterization of Nipah virus infection in a model of human airway epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Vergara, Leoncio A; Wen, Julie W; Long, Dan; Rockx, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause lethal respiratory illness in humans. No vaccine/therapeutic is currently licensed for humans. Human-to-human transmission was previously reported during outbreaks and NiV could be isolated from respiratory secretions, but the proportion of cases in Malaysia exhibiting respiratory symptoms was significantly lower than that in Bangladesh. Previously, we showed that primary human basal respiratory epithelial cells are susceptible to both NiV-Malaysia (M) and -Bangladesh (B) strains causing robust pro-inflammatory responses. However, the cells of the human respiratory epithelium that NiV targets are unknown and their role in NiV transmission and NiV-related lung pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here, we characterized NiV infection of the human respiratory epithelium using a model of the human tracheal/bronchial (B-ALI) and small airway (S-ALI) epithelium cultured at an air-liquid interface. We show that NiV-M and NiV-B infect ciliated and secretory cells in B/S-ALI, and that infection of S-ALI, but not B-ALI, results in disruption of the epithelium integrity and host responses recruiting human immune cells. Interestingly, NiV-B replicated more efficiently in B-ALI than did NiV-M. These results suggest that the human tracheal/bronchial epithelium is favourable to NiV replication and shedding, while inducing a limited host response. Our data suggest that the small airways epithelium is prone to inflammation and lesions as well as constituting a point of virus entry into the pulmonary vasculature. The use of relevant models of the human respiratory tract, such as B/S-ALI, is critical for understanding NiV-related lung pathogenesis and identifying the underlying mechanisms allowing human-to-human transmission. PMID:26932515

  6. Interaction of Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash with cells of the respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Adler, K B; Mossman, B T; Butler, G B; Jean, L M; Craighead, J E

    1984-12-01

    Respirable-sized dust from the Mount St. Helens (MSH) eruption of Spring 1980, and minerals similar to the major components of the volcanic ash, were examined comparatively for interactions with epithelial cells of rodent respiratory airways in vitro. MSH dust, Na feldspar, cristobalite, and alpha-quartz, in concentrations of 0.4 to 40 mg/ml, had neither significant effects on mucin release by tracheal explants nor acute toxic effects after exposure for 2 hr. Long-term incubation (1 and 3 weeks) of explants after a 1-hr exposure to MSH dust failed to elicit widespread toxic or proliferative changes in airway epithelial cells. In contrast, long-term exposure to Na feldspar, cristobalite, and alpha-quartz caused significant toxicity to the explants, although metaplastic changes were not observed. Ultrastructural evidence of associations (e.g., phagocytosis) between particulates and respiratory epithelium was not observed. The results of these studies suggest that volcanic ash from MSH interacts minimally with cells of the respiratory mucosa. PMID:6510386

  7. New insights on the viral and host factors contributing to the airway pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Lay, Margarita K; Bueno, Susan M; Gálvez, Nicolás; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-09-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most prevalent etiological agent of lower respiratory tract infections and the first cause of hospitalization in infants due to respiratory disease worldwide. However, efforts to develop safe and effective vaccines and antivirals have been challenged by an incomplete understanding of the RSV pathogenesis and the host immune response to RSV infection in the airways. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the interaction between RSV and the epithelium to induce pathogenesis in the airways, such as the role of the RSV NS2 protein in the airway epithelium, as well as the events involved in the RSV entry process. In addition, we summarize the cellular factors produced by airway epithelial cells (AECs) in response to RSV infection that lead to the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses, inducing lung inflammation and disease. Further, we discuss the possible contribution of a recently identified cytokine, thymic stromal lymphopoitein (TSLP), in the lung immunopathology caused by RSV. PMID:26119025

  8. Smoking dysregulates the human airway basal cell transcriptome at COPD risk locus 19q13.2.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dorothy M; Vincent, Thomas L; Salit, Jacqueline; Walters, Matthew S; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Shaykhiev, Renat; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Buro-Auriemma, Lauren J; Staudt, Michelle R; Hackett, Neil R; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies have identified a number of risk loci associated with the smoking-related disease COPD, a disorder that originates in the airway epithelium. Since airway basal cell (BC) stem/progenitor cells exhibit the earliest abnormalities associated with smoking (hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia), we hypothesized that smoker BC have a dysregulated transcriptome, enriched, in part, at known GWAS/candidate gene loci. Massive parallel RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptome of BC purified from the airway epithelium of healthy nonsmokers (n = 10) and healthy smokers (n = 7). The chromosomal location of the differentially expressed genes was compared to loci identified by GWAS to confer risk for COPD. Smoker BC have 676 genes differentially expressed compared to nonsmoker BC, dominated by smoking up-regulation. Strikingly, 166 (25%) of these genes are located on chromosome 19, with 13 localized to 19q13.2 (p<10⁻⁴ compared to chance), including 4 genes (NFKBIB, LTBP4, EGLN2 and TGFB1) associated with risk for COPD. These observations provide the first direct connection between known genetic risks for smoking-related lung disease and airway BC, the population of lung cells that undergo the earliest changes associated with smoking. PMID:24498427

  9. Detonation Nanodiamond Toxicity in Human Airway Epithelial Cells Is Modulated by Air Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detonational nanodiamonds (DND), a nanomaterial with an increasing range of industrial and biomedical applications, have previously been shown to induce a pro-inflammatory response in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). We now show that surface modifications induced by...

  10. Distal Airway Stem Cells Render Alveoli in Vitro and During Lung Regeneration Following H1N1 Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pooja A.; Hu, Yuanyu; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hoe, Neo Boon; Wei, Tay Seok; Mu, Dakai; Sun, Yan; Joo, Lim Siew; Dagher, Rania; Zielonka, Elisabeth; Wang, De Yun; Chow, Vincent T.; Crum, Christopher P.; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The extent of lung regeneration following catastrophic damage and the potential role of adult stem cells in such a process remains obscure. Sublethal infection of mice with an H1N1 influenza virus related to that of the 1918 pandemic triggers massive airway damage followed by apparent regeneration. We show here that p63-expressing stem cells in the bronchiolar epithelium undergo rapid proliferation after infection and radiate to interbronchiolar regions of alveolar ablation. Once there, these cells assemble into discrete, Krt5+ pods and initiate expression of markers typical of alveoli. Gene expression profiles of these pods suggest that they are intermediates in the reconstitution of the alveolar-capillary network eradicated by viral infection. The dynamics of this p63-expressing stem cell in lung regeneration mirrors our parallel finding that defined pedigrees of human distal airway stem cells assemble alveoli-like structures in vitro and suggests new therapeutic avenues to acute and chronic airway disease. PMID:22036562

  11. Human bronchial epithelial cells exposed in vitro to cigarette smoke at the air-liquid interface resemble bronchial epithelium from human smokers

    PubMed Central

    Poussin, Carine; Weisensee, Dirk; Gebel, Stephan; Hengstermann, Arnd; Sewer, Alain; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Wagner, Sandra; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-01-01

    Organotypic culture of human primary bronchial epithelial cells is a useful in vitro system to study normal biological processes and lung disease mechanisms, to develop new therapies, and to assess the biological perturbations induced by environmental pollutants. Herein, we investigate whether the perturbations induced by cigarette smoke (CS) and observed in the epithelium of smokers' airways are reproducible in this in vitro system (AIR-100 tissue), which has been shown to recapitulate most of the characteristics of the human bronchial epithelium. Human AIR-100 tissues were exposed to mainstream CS for 7, 14, 21, or 28 min at the air-liquid interface, and we investigated various biological endpoints [e.g., gene expression and microRNA profiles, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) release] at multiple postexposure time points (0.5, 2, 4, 24, 48 h). By performing a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we observed a significant enrichment of human smokers' bronchial epithelium gene signatures derived from different public transcriptomics datasets in CS-exposed AIR-100 tissue. Comparison of in vitro microRNA profiles with microRNA data from healthy smokers highlighted various highly translatable microRNAs associated with inflammation or with cell cycle processes that are known to be perturbed by CS in lung tissue. We also found a dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 release by AIR-100 tissue 48 h after CS exposure in agreement with the known effect of CS on this collagenase expression in smokers' tissues. In conclusion, a similar biological perturbation than the one observed in vivo in smokers' airway epithelium could be induced after a single CS exposure of a human organotypic bronchial epithelium-like tissue culture. PMID:23355383