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Sample records for airway surface layer

  1. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  2. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  3. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-10-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface.

  4. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Spence, Paul A.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  5. Inhibition of airway surface fluid absorption by cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Krouse, Mauri E.; Choi, Jae Young; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper airways airway surface liquid (ASL) depth and clearance rates are both increased by fluid secretion. Secretion is opposed by fluid absorption, mainly via the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC. In static systems, increased fluid depth activates ENaC and decreased depth inhibits it, suggesting that secretion indirectly activates ENaC to reduce ASL depth. We propose an alternate mechanism in which cholinergic input, which causes copious airway gland secretion, also inhibits ENaC-mediated absorption. The conjoint action accelerates clearance, and the increased transport of mucus out of the airways restores ASL depth while cleansing the airways. We were intrigued by early reports of cholinergic inhibition of absorption by airways in some species. To reinvestigate this phenomenon, we studied inward short-circuit currents (Isc) in tracheal mucosa from human, sheep, pig, ferret, and rabbit and in two types of cultured cells. Basal Isc was inhibited 20–70% by the ENaC inhibitor, benzamil. Long-lasting inhibition of ENaC-dependent Isc was also produced by basolateral carbachol in all preparations except rabbit and the H441 cell line. Atropine inhibition produced a slow recovery or prevented inhibition if added before carbachol. The mechanism for inhibition was not determined and is most likely multi-factorial. However, its physiological significance is expected to be increased mucus clearance rates in cholinergically stimulated airways. PMID:26846701

  6. Surface fluid absorption and secretion in small airways

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, A K M; Quinton, P M

    2012-01-01

    Native small airways must remain wet enough to be pliable and support ciliary clearance, but dry enough to remain patent for gas flow. The airway epithelial lining must both absorb and secrete ions to maintain a critical level of fluid on its surface. Despite frequent involvement in lung diseases, the minuscule size has limited studies of peripheral airways. To meet this challenge, we used a capillary to construct an Ussing chamber (area <1 mm2) to measure electrolyte transport across small native airways (∼1 mm ø) from pig lung. Transepithelial potentials (Vt) were recorded in open circuit conditions while applying constant current pulses across the luminal surface of dissected airways to calculate transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt) and equivalent short circuit current () in the presence and absence of selected Na+ and Cl− transport inhibitors (amiloride, GlyH-101, Niflumic acid) and agonists (Forskolin + IBMX, UTP). Considered together the responses suggest an organ composed of both secreting and absorbing epithelia that constitutively and concurrently transport fluids into and out of the airway, i.e. in opposite directions. Since the epithelial lining of small airways is arranged in long, accordion-like rows of pleats and folds that run axially down the lumen, we surmise that cells within the pleats are mainly secretory while the cells of the folds are principally absorptive. This structural arrangement could provide local fluid transport from within the pleats toward the luminal folds that may autonomously regulate the local surface fluid volume for homeostasis while permitting acute responses to maintain clearance. PMID:22547637

  7. Soluble mediators, not cilia, determine airway surface liquid volume in normal and cystic fibrosis superficial airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Trout, Laura; Donaldson, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C

    2006-05-01

    A key aspect of the lung's innate defense system is the ability of the superficial epithelium to regulate airway surface liquid (ASL) volume to maintain a 7-mum periciliary liquid layer (PCL), which is required for cilia to beat and produce mucus flow. The mechanisms whereby airway epithelia regulate ASL height to >or=7 microm are poorly understood. Using bumetanide as an inhibitor of Cl- secretion, and nystatin as an activator of Na+ absorption, we found that a coordinated "blending" of both Cl- secretion and Na+ absorption must occur to effect ASL volume homeostasis. We then investigated how ASL volume status is regulated by the underlying epithelia. Cilia were not critical to this process as (a) ASL volume was normal in cultures from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia with immotile cilia, and (b) in normal cultures that had not yet undergone ciliogenesis. However, we found that maneuvers that mimic deposition of excess ASL onto the proximal airways, which occurs during mucociliary clearance and after glandular secretion, acutely stimulated Na+ absorption, suggesting that volume regulation was sensitive to changes in concentrations of soluble mediators in the ASL rather than alterations in ciliary beating. To investigate this hypothesis further, we added potential "soluble mediators" to the ASL. ASL volume regulation was sensitive to a channel-activating protein (CAP; trypsin) and a CAP inhibitor (aprotinin), which regulated Na+ absorption via changes in epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity in both normal and cystic fibrosis cultures. ATP was also found to acutely regulate ASL volume by inducing secretion in normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) cultures, while its metabolite adenosine (ADO) evoked secretion in normal cultures but stimulated absorption in CF cultures. Interestingly, the amount of ASL/Cl- secretion elicited by ATP/ADO was influenced by the level of CAP-induced Na+ absorption, suggesting that there are important interactions between the soluble

  8. The Martian surface layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Moore, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    The global characteristics of the Martian surface layer are discussed on the basis of thermal, albedo, color, and radar data for the region between approximately 60 deg S and 60 deg N. Thermal data reveal the presence of large low- and high-inertia regions of the northern hemisphere, with much of the south covered by material of moderate inertia. There is a strong anticorrelation between inertia and albedo, a correlation between inertia and rock abundance, and, over much of the planet, a correlation of radar-derived density with inertia. Viking Orbiter color data indicate the presence of three major surface materials: low-inertia, bright-red material that is presumably dust; high-inertia, dark-grey material interpreted to be lithic material mixed with palagonitelike dust; and moderate-inertia, dark-red material that is rough at subpixel scales and interpreted to be indurated. Observations from the Viking landing sites show rocks, fines of varying cohesion and crusts. These sites have indications of aeolian erosion and deposition in the recent past.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers CFTR-mediated airway surface liquid secretion in swine trachea.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiaojie; Campanucci, Verónica A; Nair, Manoj; Yilmaz, Orhan; Belev, George; Machen, Terry E; Chapman, Dean; Ianowski, Juan P

    2014-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several organs are affected in CF, but most of the morbidity and mortality comes from lung disease. Recent data show that the initial consequence of CFTR mutation is the failure to eradicate bacteria before the development of inflammation and airway remodeling. Bacterial clearance depends on a layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) consisting of both a mucus layer that traps, kills, and inactivates bacteria and a periciliary liquid layer that keeps the mucus at an optimum distance from the underlying epithelia, to maximize ciliary motility and clearance of bacteria. The airways in CF patients and animal models of CF demonstrate abnormal ASL secretion and reduced antimicrobial properties. Thus, it has been proposed that abnormal ASL secretion in response to bacteria may facilitate the development of the infection and inflammation that characterize CF airway disease. Whether the inhalation of bacteria triggers ASL secretion, and the role of CFTR, have never been tested, however. We developed a synchrotron-based imaging technique to visualize the ASL layer and measure the effect of bacteria on ASL secretion. We show that the introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria into the lumen of intact isolated swine tracheas triggers CFTR-dependent ASL secretion by the submucosal glands. This response requires expression of the bacterial protein flagellin. In patients with CF, the inhalation of bacteria would fail to trigger ASL secretion, leading to infection and inflammation. PMID:25136096

  10. The effect of viscoelasticity on the stability of a pulmonary airway liquid layer

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The lungs consist of a network of bifurcating airways that are lined with a thin liquid film. This film is a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid possessing viscoelastic characteristics. Surface tension induces flows within the layer, which may cause the lung’s airways to close due to liquid plug formation if the liquid film is sufficiently thick. The stability of the liquid layer is also influenced by the viscoelastic nature of the liquid, which is modeled using the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation or as a Jeffreys fluid. To examine the role of mucus alone, a single layer of a viscoelastic fluid is considered. A system of nonlinear evolution equations is derived using lubrication theory for the film thickness and the film flow rate. A uniform film is initially perturbed and a normal mode analysis is carried out that shows that the growth rate g for a viscoelastic layer is larger than for a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. Closure occurs if the minimum core radius, Rmin(t), reaches zero within one breath. Solutions of the nonlinear evolution equations reveal that Rmin normally decreases to zero faster with increasing relaxation time parameter, the Weissenberg number We. For small values of the dimensionless film thickness parameter ε, the closure time, tc, increases slightly with We, while for moderate values of ε, ranging from 14% to 18% of the tube radius, tc decreases rapidly with We provided the solvent viscosity is sufficiently small. Viscoelasticity was found to have little effect for ε>0.18, indicating the strong influence of surface tension. The film thickness parameter ε and the Weissenberg number We also have a significant effect on the maximum shear stress on tube wall, max(τw), and thus, potentially, an impact on cell damage. Max(τw) increases with ε for fixed We, and it decreases with increasing We for small We provided the solvent viscosity parameter is sufficiently

  11. 17beta-Estradiol inhibits Ca2+-dependent homeostasis of airway surface liquid volume in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Ray D; Sun, Hengrui; Clunes, Lucy A; Rasmussen, Julia E; Stackhouse, James R; Okada, Seiko F; Fricks, Ingrid; Young, Steven L; Tarran, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Normal airways homeostatically regulate the volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) through both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of ion and water transport. In cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect causes a lack of cAMP-regulated CFTR activity, leading to diminished Cl- and water secretion from airway epithelial cells and subsequent mucus plugging, which serves as the focus for infections. Females with CF exhibit reduced survival compared with males with CF, although the mechanisms underlying this sex-related disadvantage are unknown. Despite the lack of CFTR, CF airways retain a limited capability to regulate ASL volume, as breathing-induced ATP release activates salvage purinergic pathways that raise intracellular Ca2+ concentration to stimulate an alternate pathway to Cl- secretion. We hypothesized that estrogen might affect this pathway by reducing the ability of airway epithelia to respond appropriately to nucleotides. We found that uridine triphosphate-mediated (UTP-mediated) Cl- secretion was reduced during the periovulatory estrogen maxima in both women with CF and normal, healthy women. Estrogen also inhibited Ca2+ signaling and ASL volume homeostasis in non-CF and CF airway epithelia by attenuating Ca2+ influx. This inhibition of Ca2+ signaling was prevented and even potentiated by estrogen antagonists such as tamoxifen, suggesting that antiestrogens may be beneficial in the treatment of CF lung disease because they increase Cl- secretion in the airways. PMID:19033671

  12. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  13. Airway surface liquid volume regulation determines different airway phenotypes in liddle compared with betaENaC-overexpressing mice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Button, Brian; Johannesson, Bjarki; Zhou, Zhe; Livraghi, Alessandra; Caldwell, Ray A; Schubert, Susanne C; Schultz, Carsten; O'Neal, Wanda K; Pradervand, Sylvain; Hummler, Edith; Rossier, Bernard C; Grubb, Barbara R; Boucher, Richard C

    2010-08-27

    Studies in cystic fibrosis patients and mice overexpressing the epithelial Na(+) channel beta-subunit (betaENaC-Tg) suggest that raised airway Na(+) transport and airway surface liquid (ASL) depletion are central to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, patients or mice with Liddle gain-of-function betaENaC mutations exhibit hypertension but no lung disease. To investigate this apparent paradox, we compared the airway phenotype (nasal versus tracheal) of Liddle with CFTR-null, betaENaC-Tg, and double mutant mice. In mouse nasal epithelium, the region that functionally mimics human airways, high levels of CFTR expression inhibited Liddle epithelial Nat channel (ENaC) hyperfunction. Conversely, in mouse trachea, low levels of CFTR failed to suppress Liddle ENaC hyperfunction. Indeed, Na(+) transport measured in Ussing chambers ("flooded" conditions) was raised in both Liddle and betaENaC-Tg mice. Because enhanced Na(+) transport did not correlate with lung disease in these mutant mice, measurements in tracheal cultures under physiologic "thin film" conditions and in vivo were performed. Regulation of ASL volume and ENaC-mediated Na(+) absorption were intact in Liddle but defective in betaENaC-Tg mice. We conclude that the capacity to regulate Na(+) transport and ASL volume, not absolute Na(+) transport rates in Ussing chambers, is the key physiologic function protecting airways from dehydration-induced lung disease.

  14. Protein composition of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and airway surface liquid from newborn pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Albertolle, Matthew E.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Zabner, Joseph; Niles, Richard K.; Fisher, Susan J.; McCray, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The airway mucosa and the alveolar surface form dynamic interfaces between the lung and the external environment. The epithelial cells lining these barriers elaborate a thin liquid layer containing secreted peptides and proteins that contribute to host defense and other functions. The goal of this study was to develop and apply methods to define the proteome of porcine lung lining liquid, in part, by leveraging the wealth of information in the Sus scrofa database of Ensembl gene, transcript, and protein model predictions. We developed an optimized workflow for detection of secreted proteins in porcine bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in methacholine-induced tracheal secretions [airway surface liquid (ASL)]. We detected 674 and 3,858 unique porcine-specific proteins in BAL and ASL, respectively. This proteome was composed of proteins representing a diverse range of molecular classes and biological processes, including host defense, molecular transport, cell communication, cytoskeletal, and metabolic functions. Specifically, we detected a significant number of secreted proteins with known or predicted roles in innate and adaptive immunity, microbial killing, or other aspects of host defense. In greatly expanding the known proteome of the lung lining fluid in the pig, this study provides a valuable resource for future studies using this important animal model of pulmonary physiology and disease. PMID:23709621

  15. Composition of nasal airway surface liquid in cystic fibrosis and other airway diseases determined by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Vanthanouvong, V; Kozlova, I; Johannesson, M; Nääs, E; Nordvall, S L; Dragomir, A; Roomans, G M

    2006-04-01

    The ionic composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) in healthy individuals and in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been debated. Ion transport properties of the upper airway epithelium are similar to those of the lower airways and it is easier to collect nasal ASL from the nose. ASL was collected with ion exchange beads, and the elemental composition of nasal fluid was determined by X-ray microanalysis in healthy subjects, CF patients, CF heterozygotes, patients with rhinitis, and with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In healthy subjects, the ionic concentrations were approximately isotonic. In CF patients, CF heterozygotes, rhinitis, and PCD patients, [Na] and [Cl] were significantly higher compared when compared with those in controls. [K] was significantly higher in CF and PCD patients compared with that in controls. Severely affected CF patients had higher ionic concentrations in their nasal ASL than in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. Female CF patients had higher levels of Na, Cl, and K than male patients. As higher salt concentrations in the ASL are also found in other patients with airway diseases involving chronic inflammation, it appears likely that inflammation-induced epithelial damage is important in determining the ionic composition of the ASL. PMID:16586482

  16. Use of mucolytics to enhance magnetic particle retention at a model airway surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Javed; Roa, Wilson; Amirfazli, A.

    A previous study has shown that retention of magnetic particles at a model airway surface requires prohibitively strong magnetic fields. As mucus viscoelasticity is the most significant factor contributing to clearance of magnetic particles from the airway surface, mucolytics are considered in this study to reduce mucus viscoelasticity and enable particle retention with moderate strength magnetic fields. The excised frog palate model was used to simulate the airway surface. Two mucolytics, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dextran sulfate (DS) were tested. NAC was found to enable retention at moderate field values (148 mT with a gradient of 10.2 T/m), whereas DS was found to be effective only for sufficiently large particle concentrations at the airway surface. The possible mechanisms for the observed behavior with different mucolytics are also discussed based on aggregate formation and the loading of cilia.

  17. Automated acquisition and analysis of airway surface liquid height by confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Chul; Kim, Christine Seul Ki

    2015-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a thin-liquid layer that lines the luminal side of airway epithelia. ASL contains many molecules that are involved in primary innate defense in the lung. Measurement of ASL height on primary airway cultures by confocal microscopy is a powerful tool that has enabled researchers to study ASL physiology and pharmacology. Previously, ASL image acquisition and analysis were performed manually. However, this process is time and labor intensive. To increase the throughput, we have developed an automatic ASL measurement technique that combines a fully automated confocal microscope with novel automatic image analysis software that was written with image processing techniques derived from the computer science field. We were able to acquire XZ ASL images at the rate of ∼1 image/s in a reproducible fashion. Our automatic analysis software was able to analyze images at the rate of ∼32 ms/image. As proofs of concept, we generated a time course for ASL absorption and a dose response in the presence of SPLUNC1, a known epithelial sodium channel inhibitor, on human bronchial epithelial cultures. Using this approach, we determined the IC50 for SPLUNC1 to be 6.53 μM. Furthermore, our technique successfully detected a difference in ASL height between normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelial cultures and detected changes in ATP-stimulated Cl−/ASL secretion. We conclude that our automatic ASL measurement technique can be applied for repeated ASL height measurements with high accuracy and consistency and increased throughput. PMID:26001773

  18. Quantitative airway analysis in longitudinal studies using groupwise registration and 4D optimal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jens; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Dirksen, Asger; Ourselin, Sebastien; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying local changes to the airway wall surfaces from computed tomography images is important in the study of diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Current approaches segment the airways in the individual time point images and subsequently aggregate per airway generation or perform branch matching to assess regional changes. In contrast, we propose an integrated approach analysing the time points simultaneously using a subject-specific groupwise space and 4D optimal surface segmentation. The method combines information from all time points and measurements are matched locally at any position on the resulting surfaces. Visual inspection of the scans of 10 subjects showed increased tree length compared to the state of the art with little change in the amount of false positives. A large scale analysis of the airways of 374 subjects including a total of 1870 images showed significant correlation with lung function and high reproducibility of the measurements. PMID:24579152

  19. Surface modeling and segmentation of the 3D airway wall in MSCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Margarete; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Pr"teux, Françoise; Grenier, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Airway wall remodeling in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a well-known indicator of the pathology. In this context, current clinical studies aim for establishing the relationship between the airway morphological structure and its function. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) allows morphometric assessment of airways, but requires dedicated segmentation tools for clinical exploitation. While most of the existing tools are limited to cross-section measurements, this paper develops a fully 3D approach for airway wall segmentation. Such approach relies on a deformable model which is built up as a patient-specific surface model at the level of the airway lumen and deformed to reach the outer surface of the airway wall. The deformation dynamics obey a force equilibrium in a Lagrangian framework constrained by a vector field which avoids model self-intersections. The segmentation result allows a dense quantitative investigation of the airway wall thickness with a deeper insight at bronchus subdivisions than classic cross-section methods. The developed approach has been assessed both by visual inspection of 2D cross-sections, performed by two experienced radiologists on clinical data obtained with various protocols, and by using a simulated ground truth (pulmonary CT image model). The results confirmed a robust segmentation in intra-pulmonary regions with an error in the range of the MSCT image resolution and underlined the interest of the volumetric approach versus purely 2D methods.

  20. Computational analysis of microbubble flows in bifurcating airways: role of gravity, inertia, and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zielinski, Rachel; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2014-10-01

    Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy for patients with severe lung disorders, the microbubble flows generated during ventilation generate hydrodynamic stresses, including pressure and shear stress gradients, which damage the pulmonary epithelium. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics to investigate how gravity, inertia, and surface tension influence both microbubble flow patterns in bifurcating airways and the magnitude/distribution of hydrodynamic stresses on the airway wall. Direct interface tracking and finite element techniques were used to simulate bubble propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled bifurcating airway. Computational solutions of the full incompressible Navier-Stokes equation were used to investigate how inertia, gravity, and surface tension forces as characterized by the Reynolds (Re), Bond (Bo), and Capillary (Ca) numbers influence pressure and shear stress gradients at the airway wall. Gravity had a significant impact on flow patterns and hydrodynamic stress magnitudes where Bo > 1 led to dramatic changes in bubble shape and increased pressure and shear stress gradients in the upper daughter airway. Interestingly, increased pressure gradients near the bifurcation point (i.e., carina) were only elevated during asymmetric bubble splitting. Although changes in pressure gradient magnitudes were generally more sensitive to Ca, under large Re conditions, both Re and Ca significantly altered the pressure gradient magnitude. We conclude that inertia, gravity, and surface tension can all have a significant impact on microbubble flow patterns and hydrodynamic stresses in bifurcating airways.

  1. Tear Film Mucins: Front Line Defenders of the Ocular Surface; Comparison with Airway and Gastrointestinal Tract Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The ocular surface including the cornea and conjunctiva and its overlying tear film are the first tissues of the eye to interact with the external environment. The tear film is complex containing multiple layers secreted by different glands and tissues. Each layer contains specific molecules and proteins that not only maintain the health of the cells on the ocular surface by providing nourishment and removal of waste products but also protect these cells from environment. A major protective mechanism that the corneal and conjunctival cells have developed is secretion of the innermost layer of the tear film, the mucous layer. Both the cornea and conjunctiva express membrane spanning mucins, whereas the conjunctiva also produces soluble mucins. The mucins present in the tear film serve to maintain the hydration of the ocular surface and to provide lubrication and anti-adhesive properties between the cells of the ocular surface and conjunctiva during the blink. A third function is to contribute to the epithelial barrier to prevent pathogens from binding to the ocular surface. This review will focus on the different types of mucins produced by the corneal and conjunctival epithelia. Also included in this review will be a presentation of the structure of mucins, regulation of mucin production, role of mucins in ocular surface diseases, and the differences in mucin production by the ocular surface, airways and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23954166

  2. Surface tension of airway aspirates withdrawn during neonatal resuscitation reflects lung maturity.

    PubMed

    Stichtenoth, Guido; Walter, Gabi; Lange, Romy; Raith, Marco; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Herting, Egbert

    2014-08-01

    The indications for treatment of neonates with exogenous pulmonary surfactant are still discussed controversially. Some premature neonates are sufficiently treated by CPAP, others need conventional ventilation and/or surfactant. The available lung maturity tests have limitations. The captive bubble surfactometer (CBS) provides measurement of surface activity from rather small amounts of surfactant. This study aimed to determine surface activity from small volume aspirates of the upper airways of neonates by means of the CBS and to correlate the results with clinical data. Small upper airway aspirates from 159 neonates (gestational age 25-42 weeks) were withdrawn and concentrated 16.7-fold by ultracentrifugation and resuspension in saline. Surface activities after 5 min of adsorption were determined in the CBS and correlated to the perinatal data (e.g., gestational age, birth weight, gender), airway interventions (like CPAP, conventional ventilation) and surfactant treatment. Additionally, 27 samples were analyzed for surfactant specific phosphatidylcholine concentrations by using electrospray ionization tandem mass-spectroscopy. Surface activities show a significant correlation to gestational age, birth weight, and the need for airway interventions. Comparing the need for airway interventions versus surface activity, a receiver operating characteristic calculated a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.72 at a "cut off" of 44 mN/m. Surface activity correlates significantly with the phosphatidylcholine concentrations and the latter one correlates with the gestational age. Determination of surface activity from upper airway aspirates is feasible. Further clinical studies are needed to prove the predictive value of the method.

  3. Charged layer with undulated surface: configuration of electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Hwa

    2010-06-15

    A charged layer with undulated surface exists commonly in natural entities (for example the biological membrane layer and the surface of charged colloid) and in artificial fabrications (for example the peripheral surface of ion-exchange membrane pores). When the micro- or nano-scale charged layer systems are concerned, the effect of undulation of charged layer surface on the electrical phenomenon may become great significant. In this work, using the perturbation method, the significance of undulated surface on a charged layer in the electrical phenomenon is investigated. Under assumptions that the undulation amplitude is small and that the Debye-Huckel approximation is applicable, the electrical potential field in three regions is solved simultaneously. Based on the analytical results it is found that, if compared with that in condition of flat surface, the undulation of charged layer surface decreases/increases the magnitude of electrical potential field near the wave crest/trough, due to the curvature of undulated surface. In addition, the surface potential on the undulated surface shows a wavelike distribution. The analytical results also show that, the significance of undulated surface is determined by the physical parameters, including the geometry of undulated surface, the amplitude and the period of undulation, and the fixed charge density in charged layer.

  4. Airway surface fluid composition in the rat determined by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, E A; Govindaraju, K; Lloyd, D K; Eidelman, D H

    1997-10-01

    The apical surface of respiratory epithelial cells is covered by a thin layer of low-viscosity fluid termed airway surface fluid (ASF), about which relatively little is known. We collected samples of ASF from anesthetized rats, which were then analyzed using capillary electrophoresis, a method that enables extremely small quantities of fluid to be analyzed. We found values for Na+ (40.57 +/- 3.08 mM), K+ (1.74 +/- 0.36 mM), and Cl- (45.16 +/- 1.81 mM), indicating that this fluid is hypotonic compared with rat plasma. In contrast, the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate within ASF were higher than reported plasma values. Additionally, intravenous administration of the cholinergic agonist methacholine (MCh) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the concentration of Na+ and Cl- within the ASF. This increase is approximately 50% in these ions after a dose of 100 ng MCh/g body wt. This animal model, together with this microanalytical technique, may be useful for investigating the in vivo regulation of ASF composition.

  5. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Lucy A.; Davies, Catrin M.; Coakley, Raymond D.; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Henderson, Ashley G.; Zeman, Kirby L.; Worthington, Erin N.; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D.; Riordan, John R.; Boucher, Richard C.; Tarran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB.—Clunes, L. A., Davies, C. M., Coakley, R. D., Aleksandrov, A. A., Henderson, A. G., Zeman, K. L., Worthington, E. N., Gentzsch, M., Kreda, S. M., Cholon, D., Bennett, W. D., Riordan, J. R., Boucher, R. C., Tarran, R. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration. PMID:21990373

  6. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  7. Molecular organization of the mucins and glycocalyx underlying mucus transport over mucosal surfaces of the airways.

    PubMed

    Kesimer, M; Ehre, C; Burns, K A; Davis, C W; Sheehan, J K; Pickles, R J

    2013-03-01

    Mucus, with its burden of inspired particulates and pathogens, is cleared from mucosal surfaces of the airways by cilia beating within the periciliary layer (PCL). The PCL is held to be "watery" and free of mucus by thixotropic-like forces arising from beating cilia. With radii of gyration ~250 nm, however, polymeric mucins should reptate readily into the PCL, so we assessed the glycocalyx for barrier functions. The PCL stained negative for MUC5AC and MUC5B, but it was positive for keratan sulfate (KS), a glycosaminoglycan commonly associated with glycoconjugates. Shotgun proteomics showed KS-rich fractions from mucus containing abundant tethered mucins, MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16, but no proteoglycans. Immuno-histology by light and electron microscopy localized MUC1 to microvilli, MUC4 and MUC20 to cilia, and MUC16 to goblet cells. Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed molecular lengths of 190-1,500 nm for tethered mucins, and a finely textured glycocalyx matrix filling interciliary spaces. Adenoviral particles were excluded from glycocalyx of the microvilli, whereas the smaller adenoassociated virus penetrated, but were trapped within. Hence, tethered mucins organized as a space-filling glycocalyx function as a selective barrier for the PCL, broadening their role in innate lung defense and offering new molecular targets for conventional and gene therapies.

  8. Airway surface liquid volume expansion induces rapid changes in amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport across upper airway epithelium-Implications concerning the resolution of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Fouad; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-09-01

    During airway inflammation, airway surface liquid volume (ASLV) expansion may result from the movement of plasma proteins and excess liquid into the airway lumen due to extravasation and elevation of subepithelial hydrostatic pressure. We previously demonstrated that elevation of submucosal hydrostatic pressure increases airway epithelium permeability resulting in ASLV expansion by 500 μL cm(-2) h(-1). Liquid reabsorption by healthy airway epithelium is regulated by active Na(+) transport at a rate of 5 μL cm(-2) h(-1). Thus, during inflammation the airway epithelium may be submerged by a large volume of luminal liquid. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which ASLV expansion alters active epithelial Na(+) transport, and we have characterized the time course of the change. We used primary cultures of tracheal airway epithelium maintained under air interface (basal ASLV, depth is 7 ± 0.5 μm). To mimic airway flooding, ASLV was expanded to a depth of 5 mm. On switching from basal to expanded ASLV conditions, short-circuit current (Isc, a measure of total transepithelial active ion transport) declined by 90% with a half-time (t1/2) of 1 h. 24 h after the switch, there was no significant change in ATP concentration nor in the number of functional sodium pumps as revealed by [(3)H]-ouabain binding. However, amiloride-sensitive uptake of (22)Na(+) was reduced by 70% upon ASLV expansion. This process is reversible since after returning cells back to air interface, Isc recovered with a t1/2 of 5-10 h. These results may have important clinical implications concerning the development of Na(+) channels activators and resolution of pulmonary edema.

  9. Uncertainties in Surface Layer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendergrass, W.

    2015-12-01

    A central problem for micrometeorologists has been the relationship of air-surface exchange rates of momentum and heat to quantities that can be predicted with confidence. The flux-gradient profile developed through Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) provides an integration of the dimensionless wind shear expression where is an empirically derived expression for stable and unstable atmospheric conditions. Empirically derived expressions are far from universally accepted (Garratt, 1992, Table A5). Regardless of what form of these relationships might be used, their significance over any short period of time is questionable since all of these relationships between fluxes and gradients apply to averages that might rarely occur. It is well accepted that the assumption of stationarity and homogeneity do not reflect the true chaotic nature of the processes that control the variables considered in these relationships, with the net consequence that the levels of predictability theoretically attainable might never be realized in practice. This matter is of direct relevance to modern prognostic models which construct forecasts by assuming the universal applicability of relationships among averages for the lower atmosphere, which rarely maintains an average state. Under a Cooperative research and Development Agreement between NOAA and Duke Energy Generation, NOAA/ATDD conducted atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research using Duke renewable energy sites as research testbeds. One aspect of this research has been the evaluation of legacy flux-gradient formulations (the ϕ functions, see Monin and Obukhov, 1954) for the exchange of heat and momentum. At the Duke Energy Ocotillo site, NOAA/ATDD installed sonic anemometers reporting wind and temperature fluctuations at 10Hz at eight elevations. From these observations, ϕM and ϕH were derived from a two-year database of mean and turbulent wind and temperature observations. From this extensive measurement database, using a

  10. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  11. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  12. Airway surface liquid homeostasis in cystic fibrosis: pathophysiology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Haq, Iram J; Gray, Michael A; Garnett, James P; Ward, Christopher; Brodlie, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease characterised by recurrent respiratory infections, inflammation and lung damage. The volume and composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) are important in maintaining ciliary function, mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial properties of the airway. In CF, these homeostatic mechanisms are impaired, leading to a dehydrated and acidic ASL. ASL volume depletion in CF is secondary to defective anion transport by the abnormal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Abnormal CFTR mediated bicarbonate transport creates an unfavourable, acidic environment, which impairs antimicrobial function and alters mucus properties and clearance. These disease mechanisms create a disordered airway milieu, consisting of thick mucopurulent secretions and chronic bacterial infection. In addition to CFTR, there are additional ion channels and transporters in the apical airway epithelium that play a role in maintaining ASL homeostasis. These include the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the solute carrier 26A (SLC26A) family of anion exchangers, and calcium-activated chloride channels. In this review we discuss how the ASL is abnormal in CF and how targeting these alternative channels and transporters could provide an attractive therapeutic strategy to correct the underlying ASL abnormalities evident in CF. PMID:26719229

  13. Airway surface liquid homeostasis in cystic fibrosis: pathophysiology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Haq, Iram J; Gray, Michael A; Garnett, James P; Ward, Christopher; Brodlie, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease characterised by recurrent respiratory infections, inflammation and lung damage. The volume and composition of the airway surface liquid (ASL) are important in maintaining ciliary function, mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial properties of the airway. In CF, these homeostatic mechanisms are impaired, leading to a dehydrated and acidic ASL. ASL volume depletion in CF is secondary to defective anion transport by the abnormal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Abnormal CFTR mediated bicarbonate transport creates an unfavourable, acidic environment, which impairs antimicrobial function and alters mucus properties and clearance. These disease mechanisms create a disordered airway milieu, consisting of thick mucopurulent secretions and chronic bacterial infection. In addition to CFTR, there are additional ion channels and transporters in the apical airway epithelium that play a role in maintaining ASL homeostasis. These include the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the solute carrier 26A (SLC26A) family of anion exchangers, and calcium-activated chloride channels. In this review we discuss how the ASL is abnormal in CF and how targeting these alternative channels and transporters could provide an attractive therapeutic strategy to correct the underlying ASL abnormalities evident in CF.

  14. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems. PMID:26856872

  15. Layer Control of WSe2 via Selective Surface Layer Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yang, Sisi; Dhall, Rohan; Kosmowska, Ewa; Shi, Haotian; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Cronin, Stephen B

    2016-07-26

    We report Raman and photoluminescence spectra of mono- and few-layer WSe2 and MoSe2 taken before and after exposure to a remote oxygen plasma. For bilayer and trilayer WSe2, we observe an increase in the photoluminescence intensity and a blue shift of the photoluminescence peak positions after oxygen plasma treatment. The photoluminescence spectra of trilayer WSe2 exhibit features of a bilayer after oxygen plasma treatment. Bilayer WSe2 exhibits features of a monolayer, and the photoluminescence of monolayer WSe2 is completely absent after the oxygen plasma treatment. These changes are observed consistently in more than 20 flakes. The mechanism of the changes observed in the photoluminescence spectra of WSe2 is due to the selective oxidation of the topmost layer. As a result, N-layer WSe2 is reduced to N-1 layers. Raman spectra and AFM images taken from the WSe2 flakes before and after the oxygen treatment corroborate these findings. Because of the low kinetic energy of the oxygen radicals in the remote oxygen plasma, the oxidation is self-limiting. By varying the process duration from 1 to 10 min, we confirmed that the oxidation will only affect the topmost layer of the WSe2 flakes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the surface layer WOx of the sample can be removed by a quick dip in KOH solution. Therefore, this technique provides a promising way of controlling the thickness of WSe2 layer by layer. PMID:27391161

  16. Increased phosphatidylcholine concentration in saliva reduces surface tension and improves airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Kirkness, J P; Yamamura, S; Imaizumi, K; Yoshimine, H; Oi, K; Ayuse, T

    2013-10-01

    Surface tension may have important role for maintaining upper airway patency in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. It has been demonstrated that elevated surface tension increases the pharyngeal pressures required to reopen the upper airway following collapse. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between the concentrations of endogenous surfactants in saliva with indices of upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea. We studied 20 male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (age: 60·3 ± 10·3 years; BMI: 25·9 ± 4·6 kg m(-2); AHI: 41·5 ± 18·6 events h(-1)). We obtained 100-μL samples of saliva prior to overnight polysomnographic sleep study. The surface tension was determined using the pull-off force technique. The concentration of phosphatidylcholine (PC) was evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Regression analysis between apnoea, hypopnoea and apnoea/hypopnoea indices and the ratio of hypopnoea time/total disordered breathing time (HT/DBT) with surface tension and PC were performed. P < 0·05 was considered significant. The mean saliva surface tension was 48·8 ± 8·0 mN m(-1) and PC concentration was 15·7 ± 11·1 nM. The surface tension was negatively correlated with the PC concentration (r = -0·48, P = 0·03). There was a significant positive correlation between surface tension with hypopnoea index (r = 0·50, P = 0·03) and HT/DBT (r = 0·6, P = 0·006), but not apnoea or apnoea/hypopnoea index (P > 0·11). Similarly, PC concentration negatively correlated with hypopnoea index (r = -0·45, P = 0·04) and HT/DBT (r = -0·6, P = 0·004), but not with apnoea index or AHI (P > 0·08). An increase in salivary PC concentration may increase upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea through a reduction in surface tension.

  17. Surface layer characterization at Paranal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, G.; Melnick, J.; Hinojosa Goñi, R. H.; Navarrete, J.; Sarazin, M.; Berdja, A.; Tokovinin, A.; Wilson, R.; Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Shepherd, H.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the Paranal Surface Layer characterization is presented. Causes, physics and behavior of the SL above Paranal surface are discussed. The analysis is developed using data from different turbulence profilers operated during several campaigns between 2007 and 2009. Instruments used are SL-SLODAR, DIMM, Elevated DIMM, MASS, Lunar Scintillometer and Ultrasonic Anemometers with temperature sensors positioned at different strategic heights.

  18. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.

    1993-12-31

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties.

  19. Paracrystalline surface layers of dairy propionibacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lortal, S; Rouault, A; Cesselin, B; Sleytr, U B

    1993-01-01

    We examined 70 dairy propionibacteria and detected a crystalline surface layer (S-layer) in only 2 organisms (Propionibacterium freudenreichii CNRZ 722 and Propionibacterium jensenii CNRZ 87) by freeze-etching and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Both S-layers exhibited oblique (p2) symmetry (a = 9.9 nm; b = 5.4 nm; gamma = 80 degrees) and completely covered the cell surface. Treatment for 15 min at the ambient temperature with 5 M guanidine hydrochloride or acidic conditions (250 mM ammonium acetate, pH 2.7) efficiently extracted the S-layer protein from intact cells of strain CNRZ 722, whereas treatment with 5 M guanidine hydrochloride at 100 degrees C for 15 min was necessary to isolate the S-layer protein of strain CNRZ 87. The precipitates obtained after dialysis of the extracting agents produced no regular patterns. The molecular masses of the two S-layer proteins, as estimated by SDS-PAGE, were 58.5 kDa for the strain CNRZ 722 and 67.3 kDa for the strain CNRZ 87. Mass spectrometry of the isolated S-layer protein of strain CNRZ 722 gave a molecular mass value close to the expected value (56,533 Da). The N-terminal sequences of the two purified S-layer proteins differed, as did their amino acid compositions, except that the same high hydrophobic amino acid content (52%) was observed. Images PMID:8304753

  20. Effect of surface tension of mucosal lining liquid on upper airway mechanics in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Eastwood, Peter R; Szollosi, Irene; Platt, Peter R; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Hillman, David R

    2003-07-01

    Upper airway (UA) patency may be influenced by surface tension (gamma) operating within the (UAL). We examined the role of gamma of UAL in the maintenance of UA patency in eight isoflurane-anesthetized supine human subjects breathing via a nasal mask connected to a pneumotachograph attached to a pressure delivery system. We evaluated 1). mask pressure at which the UA closed (Pcrit), 2). UA resistance upstream from the site of UA collapse (RUS), and 3). mask pressure at which the UA reopened (Po). A multiple pressure-transducer catheter was used to identify the site of airway closure (velopharyngeal in all subjects). UAL samples (0.2 microl) were collected, and the gamma of UAL was determined by using the "pull-off force" technique. Studies were performed before and after the intrapharyngeal instillation of 5 ml of exogenous surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline). The gamma of UAL decreased from 61.9 +/- 4.1 (control) to 50.3 +/- 5.0 mN/m (surfactant; P < 0.02). Changes in Po, RUS, and Po - Pcrit (change = control - surfactant) were positively correlated with changes in gamma (r2 > 0.6; P < 0.02) but not with changes in Pcrit (r2 = 0.4; P > 0.9). In addition, mean peak inspiratory airflow (no flow limitation) significantly increased (P < 0.04) from 0.31 +/- 0.06 (control) to 0.36 +/- 0.06 l/s (surfactant). These findings suggest that gamma of UAL exerts a force on the UA wall that hinders airway opening. Instillation of exogenous surfactant into the UA lowers the gamma of UAL, thus increasing UA patency and augmenting reopening of the collapsed airway. PMID:12626492

  1. Non-Genomic Estrogen Regulation of Ion Transport and Airway Surface Liquid Dynamics in Cystic Fibrosis Bronchial Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Harvey, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Male cystic fibrosis (CF) patients survive longer than females and lung exacerbations in CF females vary during the estrous cycle. Estrogen has been reported to reduce the height of the airway surface liquid (ASL) in female CF bronchial epithelium. Here we investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on the airway surface liquid height and ion transport in normal (NuLi-1) and CF (CuFi-1) bronchial epithelial monolayers. Live cell imaging using confocal microscopy revealed that airway surface liquid height was significantly higher in the non-CF cells compared to the CF cells. 17β-estradiol (0.1–10 nM) reduced the airway surface liquid height in non-CF and CF cells after 30 min treatment. Treatment with the nuclear-impeded Estrogen Dendrimer Conjugate mimicked the effect of free estrogen by reducing significantly the airway surface liquid height in CF and non-CF cells. Inhibition of chloride transport or basolateral potassium recycling decreased the airway surface liquid height and 17β-estradiol had no additive effect in the presence of these ion transporter inhibitors. 17β-estradiol decreased bumetanide-sensitive transepithelial short-circuit current in non-CF cells and prevented the forskolin-induced increase in ASL height. 17β-estradiol stimulated an amiloride-sensitive transepithelial current and increased ouabain-sensitive basolateral short-circuit current in CF cells. 17β-estradiol increased PKCδ activity in CF and non-CF cells. These results demonstrate that estrogen dehydrates CF and non-CF ASL, and these responses to 17β-estradiol are non-genomic rather than involving the classical nuclear estrogen receptor pathway. 17β-estradiol acts on the airway surface liquid by inhibiting cAMP-mediated chloride secretion in non-CF cells and increasing sodium absorption via the stimulation of PKCδ, ENaC and the Na+/K+ATPase in CF cells. PMID:24223826

  2. Surface free energy of polyimide aligning layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borycki, Jerzy; Okulska-Bozek, Malgorzata

    2000-05-01

    Polyimides from four selected dianhydrides and seven diamines were synthesized by two-step polycondensation method. During the first step 10% solutions of poly(amic acid)s in N,N-dimethylformamide and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone were obtained. The thin polyimide layers on soda glass were prepared by thermal cyclodehydration. Contact angles of series of standard liquids for tested polyimide films were measured. The values of surface free energy and its components were calculated accordingly to Zisman, Owens et al. and van Oss equations. Some correlation between the surface properties and the chemical structure of polyimide aligning layers were presented.

  3. The refraction in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golitsyn, G. S.

    1982-12-01

    An analytical theory of refraction for the atmospheric layer is developed in which the vertical profiles of the refraction are calculated based on the theory of Monin and Obukhov (1954). A similarity parameter is found for the refraction in such conditions. These results are used to clarify the idea of Moroz (1976) that the nearness of the horizon as recorded by the automatic stations on the surface of Venus can be explained by the decrease in the temperature at the very surface of the planet. In addition, several other optical phenomena which occur near the surface of the earth are examined.

  4. Characteristics of the Martian atmosphere surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, G. D.; Haberle, R. M.

    Elements of various terrestrial boundary layer models are extended to Mars in order to estimate sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum fluxes within the Martian atmospheric surface ('constant flux') layer. The atmospheric surface layer consists of an interfacial sublayer immediately adjacent to the ground and an overlying fully turbulent surface sublayer where wind-shear production of turbulence dominates buoyancy production. Within the interfacial sublayer, sensible and latent heat are transported by non-steady molecular diffusion into small-scale eddies which intermittently burst through this zone. Both the thickness of the interfacial sublayer and the characteristics of the turbulent eddies penetrating through it depend on whether airflow is aerodynamically smooth or aerodynamically rough, as determined by the Roughness Reynold's number. Within the overlying surface sublayer, similarity theory can be used to express the mean vertical windspeed, temperature, and water vapor profiles in terms of a single parameter, the Monin-Obukhov stability parameter. To estimate the molecular viscosity and thermal conductivity of a CO2-H2O gas mixture under Martian conditions, parameterizations were developed using data from the TPRC Data Series and the first-order Chapman-Cowling expressions; the required collision integrals were approximated using the Lenard-Jones potential. Parameterizations for specific heat and binary diffusivity were also determined. The Brutsart model for sensible and latent heat transport within the interfacial sublayer for both aerodynamically smooth and rough airflow was experimentally tested under similar conditions, validating its application to Martian conditions. For the surface sublayer, the definition of the Monin-Obukhov length was modified to properly account for the buoyancy forces arising from water vapor gradients in the Martian atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that under most Martian conditions, the interfacial and surface

  5. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Lipoxin A4 Stimulates Calcium-Activated Chloride Currents and Increases Airway Surface Liquid Height in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Mazen; Costello, Richard W.; McNally, Paul; Chiron, Raphaël; Harvey, Brian J.; Urbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl− secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA4 is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA4 are reported to be decreased in the airways of patients with CF. We have previously shown that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LXA4 produced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+. We have investigated, the effect of LXA4 on Cl− secretion and the functional consequences on ASL generation in bronchial epithelial cells obtained from CF and non-CF patient biopsies and in bronchial epithelial cell lines. We found that LXA4 stimulated a rapid intracellular Ca2+ increase in all of the different CF bronchial epithelial cells tested. In non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia, LXA4 stimulated whole-cell Cl− currents which were inhibited by NPPB (calcium-activated Cl− channel inhibitor), BAPTA-AM (chelator of intracellular Ca2+) but not by CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor). We found, using confocal imaging, that LXA4 increased the ASL height in non-CF and in CF airway bronchial epithelia. The LXA4 effect on ASL height was sensitive to bumetanide, an inhibitor of transepithelial Cl− secretion. The LXA4 stimulation of intracellular Ca2+, whole-cell Cl− currents, conductances and ASL height were inhibited by Boc-2, a specific antagonist of the ALX/FPR2 receptor. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence for a novel role of LXA4 in the stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ signalling leading to Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion and enhanced ASL height in non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia. PMID:22662206

  7. Early cystic fibrosis lung disease: Role of airway surface dehydration and lessons from preventive rehydration therapies in mice.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Graeber, Simon Y; Stahl, Mirjam; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease starts in the first months of life and remains one of the most common fatal hereditary diseases. Early therapeutic interventions may provide an opportunity to prevent irreversible lung damage and improve outcome. Airway surface dehydration is a key disease mechanism in CF, however, its role in the in vivo pathogenesis and as therapeutic target in early lung disease remains poorly understood. Mice with airway-specific overexpression of the epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC-Tg) recapitulate airway surface dehydration and phenocopy CF lung disease. Recent studies in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration produces early mucus plugging in the absence of mucus hypersecretion, which triggers airway inflammation, promotes bacterial infection and causes early mortality. Preventive rehydration therapy with hypertonic saline or amiloride effectively reduced mucus plugging and mortality in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice. These results support clinical testing of preventive/early rehydration strategies in infants and young children with CF. PMID:24561284

  8. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Hoegger, Mark J; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; McMenimen, James D; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3- concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF.

  9. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Philip H.; McMenimen, James D.; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3– concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator–dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  10. Diurnal ocean surface layer model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Jeffrey D.; May, Douglas A.; Abell, Fred, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The diurnal ocean surface layer (DOSL) model at the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center forecasts the 24-hour change in a global sea surface temperatures (SST). Validating the DOSL model is a difficult task due to the huge areas involved and the lack of in situ measurements. Therefore, this report details the use of satellite infrared multichannel SST imagery to provide day and night SSTs that can be directly compared to DOSL products. This water-vapor-corrected imagery has the advantages of high thermal sensitivity (0.12 C), large synoptic coverage (nearly 3000 km across), and high spatial resolution that enables diurnal heating events to be readily located and mapped. Several case studies in the subtropical North Atlantic readily show that DOSL results during extreme heating periods agree very well with satellite-imagery-derived values in terms of the pattern of diurnal warming. The low wind and cloud-free conditions necessary for these events to occur lend themselves well to observation via infrared imagery. Thus, the normally cloud-limited aspects of satellite imagery do not come into play for these particular environmental conditions. The fact that the DOSL model does well in extreme events is beneficial from the standpoint that these cases can be associated with the destruction of the surface acoustic duct. This so-called afternoon effect happens as the afternoon warming of the mixed layer disrupts the sound channel and the propagation of acoustic energy.

  11. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  12. Parallel activities and interactions between antimicrobial peptides and complement in host defense at the airway epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides and complement components contribute to host defense as well as inflammation and tissue injury in the respiratory tract. The airway epithelial surface is the main site of action of these immune effectors, and airway epithelial cells contribute markedly to their local production. Whereas both antimicrobial peptides and complement display overlapping functions, it is increasingly clear that both effector mechanisms also interact. Furthermore, excessive or uncontrolled release of antimicrobial peptides as well as complement activation may contribute to inflammatory lung diseases. Therefore, further knowledge of interactions between these systems may provide more insight into the pathogenesis of a range of lung diseases. In this review, recent findings on the functions, collaborations and other interactions between antimicrobial peptides and complement are discussed with a specific focus on the airway epithelium.

  13. Are atmospheric surface layer flows ergodic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Chad W.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Froidevaux, Martin; Simeonov, Valentin; Parlange, Marc B.

    2013-06-01

    The transposition of atmospheric turbulence statistics from the time domain, as conventionally sampled in field experiments, is explained by the so-called ergodic hypothesis. In micrometeorology, this hypothesis assumes that the time average of a measured flow variable represents an ensemble of independent realizations from similar meteorological states and boundary conditions. That is, the averaging duration must be sufficiently long to include a large number of independent realizations of the sampled flow variable so as to represent the ensemble. While the validity of the ergodic hypothesis for turbulence has been confirmed in laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations for idealized conditions, evidence for its validity in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL), especially for nonideal conditions, continues to defy experimental efforts. There is some urgency to make progress on this problem given the proliferation of tall tower scalar concentration networks aimed at constraining climate models yet are impacted by nonideal conditions at the land surface. Recent advancements in water vapor concentration lidar measurements that simultaneously sample spatial and temporal series in the ASL are used to investigate the validity of the ergodic hypothesis for the first time. It is shown that ergodicity is valid in a strict sense above uniform surfaces away from abrupt surface transitions. Surprisingly, ergodicity may be used to infer the ensemble concentration statistics of a composite grass-lake system using only water vapor concentration measurements collected above the sharp transition delineating the lake from the grass surface.

  14. Regulation of MUC5AC mucin secretion and airway surface liquid metabolism by IL-1beta in human bronchial epithelia.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas; Coakley, Ray; Hirsh, Andrew; Thornton, David; Kirkham, S; Koo, Ja-Seok; Burch, Lauranell; Boucher, Richard; Nettesheim, Paul

    2004-02-01

    Mucociliary transport in the airways significantly depends on the liquid and mucin components of the airway surface liquid (ASL). The regulation of ASL water and mucin content during pathological conditions is not well understood. We hypothesized that airway epithelial mucin production and liquid transport are regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli and tested this hypothesis by investigating the effects of the pleiotropic, early-response cytokine, IL-1beta, on cultured primary human bronchial epithelial and second-passage, normal human tracheo-bronchial epithelial (NHTBE) cell cultures. Fully differentiated NHTBE cultures secreted two major airway mucins, MUC5AC and MUC5B. IL-1beta, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, increased the secretion of MUC5AC, but not MUC5B. MUC5AC mRNA levels were only transiently increased at 1 and 4 h after the start of IL-1beta treatment and returned to control levels thereafter, even though MUC5AC mucin production remained elevated for at least 72 h. Synchronous with elevated MUC5AC secretion, ASL volume increased, its percentage of solid was reduced, and the pH/[HCO(3)(-)] of the ASL was elevated. ASL volume changes reflected altered ion transport, including an upregulation of Cl(-) secretory currents (via CFTR and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance) and an inhibition of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated absorptive Na(+) currents. IL-1beta increased CFTR mRNA levels without affecting those for ENaC subunits. The synchronous regulation of ASL mucin and liquid metabolism triggered by IL-1beta may be an important defense mechanism of the airway epithelium to enhance mucociliary clearance during airway inflammation. PMID:14527933

  15. Models of muco-ciliary transport and tracer dispersion in airway surface liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Blake, John; Gaffney, Eamonn

    2003-11-01

    The airways of the lungs are protected by a thin layer of mucus ( 5-15 microns) which traps dust and other pathogens. The mucus plaque is secreted by specialised epithelial cells, then transported axially towards the pharynx by the action of a dense mat of beating cilia. The cilia beat in a watery `periciliary liquid' (PCL). According to previous theoretical analysis, axial transport of PCL is relatively small, consistent with an impermeable epithelium. However, tracer dispersion experiments by Matsui et al. (1998) appear to show large axial transport, consistent with a highly permeable epithelium. The resolution of the question of the amount of absorption of PCL is related to the issue of the pathogensis of cystic fibrosis lung disease. We present the results of a new model of mucociliary transport which combines the best features of several very different previous models. We also present a model of tracer dispersion and show how this can be used to interpret the findings of Matsui et al. and relate them to our theoretical results.

  16. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajoure, Meloud; Tajouri, Ali; Abuzriba, Mokhtar; Akreem, Mosbah

    2013-12-01

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A & the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  17. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tajoure, Meloud; Tajouri, Ali E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Akreem, Mosbah

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  18. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    Pendrin (SLC26A4) is a Cl(-)/anion exchanger expressed in the epithelium of inflamed airways where it is thought to facilitate Cl(-) absorption and HCO3 (-) secretion. Studies using pendrin knockout mice and airway epithelial cells from hearing-impaired subjects with pendrin loss of function suggest involvement of pendrin in inflammatory lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), perhaps by regulation of airway surface liquid (ASL) volume. Here we identified small-molecule pendrin inhibitors and demonstrated their efficacy in increasing ASL volume. A cell-based, functional high-throughput screen of ∼36,000 synthetic small molecules produced 3 chemical classes of inhibitors of human pendrin. After structure-activity studies, tetrahydropyrazolopyridine and pyrazolothiophenesulfonamide compounds reversibly inhibited pendrin-facilitated Cl(-) exchange with SCN(-), I(-), NO3 (-), and HCO3 (-) with drug concentration causing 50% inhibition down to ∼2.5 μM. In well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells from non-CF and CF subjects, treatment with IL-13, which causes inflammation with strong pendrin up-regulation, strongly increased Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange and the increase was blocked by pendrin inhibition. Pendrin inhibition significantly increased ASL depth (by ∼8 μm) in IL-13-treated non-CF and CF cells but not in untreated cells. These studies implicate the involvement of pendrin-facilitated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) in the regulation of ASL volume and suggest the utility of pendrin inhibitors in inflammatory lung diseases, including CF.-Haggie, P. M., Phuan, P.-W., Tan, J.-A., Zlock, L., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26932931

  19. Automated segmentation of porcine airway wall layers using optical coherence tomography: comparison with manual segmentation and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Miranda; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Candido, Tara; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre; Lam, Stephen; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to develop an automated optical coherence tomography (OCT) segmentation method. We evaluated three ex-vivo porcine airway specimens; six non-sequential OCT images were selected from each airway specimen. Histology was also performed for each airway and histology images were co-registered to OCT images for comparison. Manual segmentation of the airway luminal area, mucosa area, submucosa area and the outer airway wall area were performed for histology and OCT images. Automated segmentation of OCT images employed a despecking filter for pre-processing, a hessian-based filter for lumen and outer airway wall area segmentation, and K-means clustering for mucosa and submucosa area segmentation. Bland-Altman analysis indicated that there was very little bias between automated OCT segmentation and histology measurements for the airway lumen area (bias=-6%, 95% CI=-21%-8%), mucosa area, (bias=-4%, 95% CI=-14%-5%), submucosa area (bias=7%, 95% CI=-7%-20%) and outer airway wall area segmentation results (bias=-5%, 95% CI=-14%-5%). We also compared automated and manual OCT segmentation and Bland-Altman analysis indicated that there was negligible bias between luminal area (bias=4%, 95% CI=1%-8%), mucosa area (bias=-3%, 95% CI=-6%-1%), submucosa area (bias=-2%, 95% CI=-10%-6%) and the outer airway wall (bias=-3%, 95% CI=-13%-6%). The automated segmentation method for OCT airway imaging developed here allows for accurate and precise segmentation of the airway wall components, suggesting that translation of this method to in vivo human airway analysis would allow for longitudinal and serial studies.

  20. Surface Layer Turbulence During a Frontal Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, M; Lundquist, J K

    2004-06-15

    Some recent investigations have begun to quantify turbulence and dissipation in frontal zones to address the question of what physical mechanism counteracts the intensification of temperature and velocity gradients across a developing front. Frank (1994) examines the turbulence structure of two fronts that passed a 200m instrumented tower near Karlsruhe, Germany. In addition to showing the mean vertical structure of the fronts as they pass the tower, Frank demonstrates that there is an order of magnitude or more increase in turbulent kinetic energy across the frontal zone. Blumen and Piper (1999) reported turbulence statistics, including dissipation rate measurements, from the MICROFRONTS field experiment, where high-frequency turbulence data were collected from tower-mounted hotwire and sonic anemometers in a cold front and in a density current. Chapman and Browning (2001) measured dissipation rate in a precipitating frontal zone with high-resolution Doppler radar. Their measurements were conducted above the surface layer, to heights of 5km. The dissipation rate values they found are comparable to those measured in Kennedy and Shapiro (1975) in an upper-level front. Here, we expand on these recent studies by depicting the behavior of the fine scales of turbulence near the surface in a frontal zone. The primary objective of this study is to quantify the levels of turbulence and dissipation occurring in a frontal zone through the calculation of kinetic energy spectra and dissipation rates. The high-resolution turbulence data used in this study are taken during the cold front that passed the MICROFRONTS site in the early evening hours of 20 March 1995. These new measurements can be used as a basis for parameterizing the effects of surface-layer turbulence in numerical models of frontogenesis. We present three techniques for calculating the dissipation rate: direct dissipation technique, inertial dissipation technique and Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. Dissipation rate

  1. Expression of surface platelet receptors (CD62P and CD41/61) in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO).

    PubMed

    Iwaszko-Simonik, Alicja; Niedzwiedz, Artur; Graczyk, Stanislaw; Slowikowska, Malwina; Pliszczak-Krol, Aleksandra

    2015-03-15

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is an allergic disease of horses similar to human asthma, which is characterized by airway inflammation and activation of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets. Platelet activation and an increase in circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates may lead to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to investigate platelet status in RAO-affected horses based on the platelet morphology and platelet surface expression of CD41/61 and CD62P. Ten RAO-affected horses and ten healthy horses were included in this study. Blood samples were obtained to determine the platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR). Expression of CD62P and CD41/61 was detected by flow cytometry on activated platelets. The median PLT was significantly reduced in horses with RAO compared to the controls. The MPV and the P-LCR values were significantly higher in RAO horses than controls. Expression of CD41/61 on platelets was increased in RAO horses, while CD62P expression was reduced. This study demonstrated the morphological changes in platelets and expression of platelet surface receptors. Despite the decrease of CD62P expression, the observed increased surface expression of CD41/61 on platelets in horses with RAO may contribute to the formation of platelet aggregates in their respiratory system.

  2. Turbulent transport process in atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Awasaki, T.

    2012-04-01

    The organized motion or the coherent motion can be detected in wind tunnel and water channel experiments and those motions play an important role for the production of turbulent energy and transport of turbulent fluxes. Similar phenomena can be found in the atmospheric surface layer (Gao et al., 1989). The purpose of this study is to clarify the transport structure and process of turbulent fluxes, especially heat, water vapor and carbon dioxide. The organized motions are detected by using the wavelet transform analysis as well as the conventional statistical method such as Fourier spectral analysis. We consider the dependency of transport process by the organized motion to the atmospheric stability in the surface layer. The observation was carried out at the test field of Shionomisaki Wind Effect Laboratory, where two sets of the combination of sonic anemometer thermometer and open path H2O/CO2 analyzer were mounted at 2m and 20m height. The evident ramp and inverse ramp structures can be found in the time series of temperature, water vapor and CO2 in the unstable stability, using the Mexican hut wavelet transform analysis. The co-spectral density in wavelet analysis is considered as the flux at each time scale. The large amount of fluxes is transported at the sudden decrease in scalar ramp structure and the sudden increase in inverse ramp structure in several tens of seconds. The scalar and vertical wind velocity are completely either in phase or out of phase, which means that the turbulent transport by the organized motion occurs at time scales of several tens of seconds. The quadrant analysis of turbulent flux shows that the rate of the transport amount of scalar by ejection and sweep to the total transport flux increases according to the increase of the atmospheric stability. At 2m height, the transport by ejection is dominant in unstable condition, and that by sweep is larger in the stable condition. At 20m height, transport by ejection is larger than that by

  3. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF LUNG AIRWAY STRUCTURES USING DATA-DRIVEN SURFACE MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is a subject critical to many areas of medicine. The visualization of lung structures naturally lends itself to computer graphics modeling due to the large number of airways involved and the complexities of the branching systems...

  4. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  5. Effects of acid aerosol exposure on the surface properties of airway mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.M.; Schuerch, S.; Roth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    It was hypothesized that the mucous layer lining the tracheas of rats and guinea pigs contains surfactant material capable of lowering the air/mucus surface tension, {gamma}, and that exposure to an irritant aerosol would raise the {gamma}. The {gamma} of the surface film was measured directly by a spreading droplet technique and indirectly by displacement of polymethyl methacrylate particles into the aqueous layer. The morphology of the mucous film was examined by electron microscopy after nonaqueous fixation. {gamma} was 33.3 {plus_minus} 0.70 (SE) mN/m and 32.3 {plus_minus} 0.68 (SE) mN/m for the normal rat and guinea pig trachea, respectively. Exposure for 4 h to aerosols of sulfuric acid (94.1 {plus_minus} 18.68 (SD) and 43.3 {plus_minus} 4.57 (SD) mg/m{sup 3}) caused a several-fold increase in thickness of the mucous layer with exudation of protein-like material. The osmiophilic surfactant film at the air/mucus interface became irregularly thickened and multilayered. Despite these morphological changes {gamma} remained low, 33.2 {plus_minus} 0.43 (SE) mN/m and 32.6 {plus_minus} 0.60 (SE) mN/m for rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and displacement of particles into the subphase was not compromised. The results indicate that rodent tracheas are able to maintain a low surface tension in the presence of injury. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  7. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-01

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  8. Kinetics of Initial Layer-by-Layer Oxidation of Si(001) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Kato, Koichi; Uda, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Ken; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kawamura, Takaaki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    1998-01-01

    Layer-by-layer oxidation of Si(001) surfaces has been studied by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM). The oxidation kinetics of the top and second layers were independently investigated from the change in oxygen Auger peak intensity calibrated from the SREM observation. A barrierless oxidation of the first subsurface layer, as well as oxygen chemisorption onto the top layer, occurs at room temperature. The energy barrier of the second-layer oxidation was found to be 0.3 eV. The initial oxidation kinetics are discussed based on first-principles calculations.

  9. Equilibrium of wetting layers on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang-Yu

    The objective of this dissertation is to study physical adsorption on solids with complex surface geometry--especially on self-similar and self-affine fractal surfaces--in the context of three phase equilibria. Such studies will facilitate the prediction of the adsorbed film from known surface properties, e.g., topography or interactions (direct problem), and the inference of unknown surface properties from experimental data (inverse problem). These results will then be compared against wetting phenomena on planar surfaces and with other methods of probing complex surface geometries of solids. Chapter One offers the basic context, including wetting phenomena on planar surfaces, the cornerstone prediction of wetting transition on planar surfaces by Cahn, the concepts of fractal geometry, and the formation of fractal objects, for later comparison. The rest of this dissertation will be devoted to the study of multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces. When a liquid film completely wets the surface, the number of adsorbed molecules as a function of the vapor pressure will depend strongly on the underlying surface geometry. The fractal structure leads to the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill type isotherms with the exponents in the corresponding power laws depending on the fractal dimension and on whether the dominant influence is from the substrate potential (van der Waals wetting) or from the film-vapor surface tension (capillary wetting). The transition between the two is the analog of Cahn's transition: The thermal disorder is replaced by the quenched disorder. This analogy is studied in Chapter Two for self-similar surfaces, and in Chapter Four for self-affine surfaces. In Chapter Two the derivation framework also automatically identifies well-defined coexistence lines in the pressure-dimension diagram. The effect of the repulsive part is examined there too. A simple analysis of adsorption/desorption hysteresis on self-similar surfaces in Chapter Three concludes that the

  10. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  11. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record. PMID:27221593

  12. Ameriflux data used for verification of surface layer parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassone, Caterina; Ek, Mike

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric surface-layer parameterization is an important component in a coupled model, as its output, the surface exchange coefficients for momentum, heat and humidity, are used to determine the fluxes of these quantities between the land-surface and the atmosphere. An accurate prediction of these fluxes is therefore required in order to provide a correct forecast of the surface temperature, humidity and ultimately also the precipitation in a model. At the NOAA/NCEP Environmental Modeling Center, a one-dimensional Surface Layer Simulator (SLS) has been developed for simulating the surface layer and its interface. Two different configurations of the SLS exist, replicating in essence the way in which the surface layer is simulated in the GFS and the NAM, respectively. Input data for the SLS are the basic atmospheric quantities of winds, temperature, humidity and pressure evaluated at a specific height above the ground, surface values of temperature and humidity, and the momentum roughness length z0. The output values of the SLS are the surface exchange coefficients for heat and momentum. The exchange coefficients computed by the SLS are then compared with independent estimates derived from measured surface heat fluxes. The SLS is driven by a set of Ameriflux data acquired at 22 stations over a period of several years. This provides a large number of different vegetation characteristics and helps ensure statistical significance. Even though there are differences in the respective surface layer formulations between the GFS and the NAM, they are both based on similarity theory, and therefore lower boundary conditions, i.e. roughness lengths for momentum and heat, and profile functions are among the main components of the surface layer that need to be evaluated. The SLS is a very powerful tool for this type of evaluation. We present the results of the Ameriflux comparison and discuss the implications of our results for the surface layer parameterizations of the NAM

  13. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  14. Temperature Dependence of Surface Layering in a Dielectric Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Mo,H.; Kewalramani, S.; Evmenenko, G.; Kim, K.; Ehrlich, S.; Dutta, P.

    2007-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density oscillations (layers) at the free surface of tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane, a nonmetallic molecular liquid, was investigated using x-ray reflectivity. Below {approx}215K , the layer parameters weakly vary with temperature, if at all. Above this temperature, the layer spacings and intrinsic layer widths increase continuously, until there is no identifiable layering above 230K . This transition occurs at T/{Tc}{approx}0.23 , a temperature region that is usually accessible in metallic liquids but is preempted by freezing in many dielectric liquids.

  15. Generation and characterization of surface layers on acoustically levitated drops.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Bauerecker, Sigurd; Cammenga, Heiko K

    2007-06-15

    Surface layers of natural and technical amphiphiles, e.g., octadecanol, stearic acid and related compounds as well as perfluorinated fatty alcohols (PFA), have been investigated on the surface of acoustically levitated drops. In contrast to Langmuir troughs, traditionally used in the research of surface layers at the air-water interface, acoustic levitation offers the advantages of a minimized and contact-less technique. Although the film pressure cannot be directly adjusted on acoustically levitated drops, it runs through a wide pressure range due to the shrinking surface of an evaporating drop. During this process, different states of the generated surface layer have been identified, in particular the phase transition from the gaseous or liquid-expanded to the liquid-condensed state of surface layers of octadecanol and other related amphiphiles. Characteristic parameters, such as the relative permeation resistance and the area per molecule in a condensed surface layer, have been quantified and were found comparable to results obtained from surface layers generated on Langmuir troughs. PMID:17376468

  16. Observation of Surface Layering in a Nonmetallic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Mo,H.; Evmenenko, G.; Kewalramani, S.; Kim, K.; Ehrlich, S.; Dutta, P.

    2006-01-01

    Oscillatory density profiles (layers) have previously been observed at the free surfaces of liquid metals but not in other isotropic liquids. We have used x-ray reflectivity to study a molecular liquid, tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane. When cooled to T/T{sub c}{approx}0.25 (well above the freezing point for this liquid), density oscillations appear at the surface. Lateral order within the layers is liquidlike. Our results confirm theoretical predictions that a surface-layered state will appear even in dielectric liquids at sufficiently low temperatures, if not preempted by freezing.

  17. Observation of surface layering in a nonmetallic liquid.

    PubMed

    Mo, Haiding; Evmenenko, Guennadi; Kewalramani, Sumit; Kim, Kyungil; Ehrlich, Steven N; Dutta, Pulak

    2006-03-10

    Oscillatory density profiles (layers) have previously been observed at the free surfaces of liquid metals but not in other isotropic liquids. We have used x-ray reflectivity to study a molecular liquid, tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane. When cooled to T/Tc approximately 0.25 (well above the freezing point for this liquid), density oscillations appear at the surface. Lateral order within the layers is liquidlike. Our results confirm theoretical predictions that a surface-layered state will appear even in dielectric liquids at sufficiently low temperatures, if not preempted by freezing.

  18. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content. PMID:26269034

  19. The Cold Surface Layer of Kahiltna Glacier, Central Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. D.; Gusmeroli, A.; Arendt, A. A.; Atwood, D. K.; Kampes, B.; Sanford, M.; Young, J. C.; Aschwanden, A.; Truffer, M.; Herreid, S. J.; Hock, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    In Arctic, sub-Arctic and high-Alpine settings the ablation area of many mountain glaciers is rarely entirely temperate, and a cold near-surface layer of variable thickness, whose temperature remains below freezing throughout the year, can be found. This occurs when summer ablation rates do not melt the near-surface ice enough to remove the cold layer from the previous winter. A cold near-surface layer is a useful climatological parameter because, for example, its thinning over time can be related to climatic warming. In April 2011 we conducted several 100 MHz ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys in the upper ablation area (˜1200 m a.s.l.) of the Kahiltna glacier, in the central Alaska Range. Surface ice temperatures, measured continuously during the preceding winter remained at ˜-4°C for 6 months. The GPR data showed the presence of a spatially variable, ˜20 m thick, transparent layer which we interpret to be the cold surface layer. A layer of similar thickness was retrieved by airborne IFSAR P-band radar surveys on several Alaskan glaciers. We use these observations to discuss the occurrence of a cold-surface layer in the Alaska Range and its usefulness for glacier monitoring studies.

  20. Process Conditions of Forming the Surface Layer of Aluminum Powder Product by Layer-by-layer Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents data on state of the art in selective laser sintering of products. Layer-by-layer sintering is shown to be a future-oriented technology, making it possible to synthesize products of metal powder materials. Factors, influencing the quality of a sintered product, are revealed in the paper. It presents outcomes of experiments, focused on the dependence of surface layer thickness of sintered aluminum powder PA-4 on laser processing conditions. Basic factors, influencing the quality of a sintered surface layer include laser power, speeds of scanning and moving the laser beam on the layer of powder. Thickness of the sintered layer varies from 0.74 to 1.55 mm, as the result of changing the laser processing conditions.

  1. Surface properties of polyimide layers used in microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borycki, Jerzy; Okulska-Bozek, Malgorzata

    1998-01-01

    Dozens of poly(amic acids) from selected aromatic diamines and dianhydrides were prepared in the first step of the classical two-step polycondensation. Polyimide layers on different surfaces were obtained by the poly(amic acids) imidization. Some of mechanical properties of these layers were tested. Some correlations between these properties and chemical structure of them wee noticed and discussed.

  2. Thin gold layer in Ni electroforming process: optical surface characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, G.; Spiga, D.; Pareschi, G.; Missaglia, N.; Paganini, L.

    2009-08-01

    Mandrel replication by Nickel electroforming is a well-suited process to manufacture X-ray mirrors, making use of Gold layer playing the twofold role of release agent and reflective coating. To increase the optical performances of mirrors it is crucial to minimize the impact of X-ray scattering effects related to surface microroughness, especially when the mirror is intended to operate in hard X-rays. In this case, the Gold layer simply acts as release agent because the reflection is demanded to interferential over-coatings. Even though the replicated optical surface is usually believed to reproduce the smooth topography of the master, a surface degradation is commonly observed. Such a worsening can also suffer from a contribution from the spontaneous roughness growth of the Gold layer itself: if this is the case, the mirror's optical quality could potentially benefit from the utilization of a thin Gold layer (< 100 nm) instead of the traditional thick gold layer (> 100 nm). To prove the effectiveness of the Gold thickness reduction, a microroughness characterization of replicated thin gold layers has been achieved. We report here a preliminary roughness study of 3 electroformed Ni samples replicated from a super-polished Zerodur flat master with various Gold layer thicknesses, in the spectral range 0.02-1000 μm. The study is organized as follows: (a) characterization of the 3 replicated samples; (b) comparison of the Gold roughness for thin vs. thick layers; (c) comparison of the two sides of Gold layers.

  3. Acid drainage response to surface limestone layers

    SciTech Connect

    Geidel, G.; Caruccio, F.T.

    1982-12-01

    A 150 acre drainage basin in an unreclaimed coal strip mine in east-central Ohio was studied and extensively monitored to determine the effect of a surface application of limestone on the ground water quality. Prior to the limestone treatment the ground and surface water of the basin was acidic due to pyrite oxidation in the spoil. In order to assess the effect of the limestone application the basin was divided into seven sub-basins, five of which were treated and two which served as controls. The seeps from the treated sub-basins with low acid concentrations became alkaline due to neutralization but after a long dry period, they returned to their acid condition. The moderately and highly acidic seeps showed a decline in the acid concentrations which could be attributed to a combination of neutralization and a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation. The results of this field study and simultaneous laboratory experiments showed that under natural conditions, with no limestone application, the acidity generated by pyrite oxidation in a backfill decreased. A surface application of limestone slightly enhanced the decrease in acidity by both neutralization and decreasing the rate of pyrite oxidation. However, the limestone application did not provide sufficient alkalinity to produce either neutral or alkaline discharges from the abandoned coal strip mine site.

  4. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  5. Boundary layer flow visualisation patterns on a riblet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. G.

    Boundary layer flow visualization methods, developed at Queen Mary and Westfield College, have been applied to a riblet surface. The results reveal cellular crossflows developing in the grooves between the riblets. These local flor regimes appear to have little direct effect on the flow in the wall layers immediately adjacent to them. Qualitatively, the behavior of the wall layers appears to be that which would be expected if a virtual surface existed at a level slightly above the riblet tops, but a tendency for the origin of longitudinal eddy pairs to become anchored to the top of a riblet is noted.

  6. Nanoshells made easy: improving Au layer growth on nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brinson, Bruce E; Lassiter, J Britt; Levin, Carly S; Bardhan, Rizia; Mirin, Nikolay; Halas, Naomi J

    2008-12-16

    The growth of a continuous, uniform Au layer on a dielectric nanoparticle is the critical step in the synthesis of nanoparticles such as nanoshells or nanorice, giving rise to their unique geometry-dependent plasmon resonant properties. Here, we report a novel, streamlined method for Au layer metallization on prepared nanoparticle surfaces using carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. This approach consistently yields plasmonic nanoparticles with highly regular shell layers and is immune to variations in precursor or reagent preparation. Single particle spectroscopy combined with scanning electron microscopy reveal that thinner, more uniform shell layers with correspondingly red-shifted optical resonances are achievable with this approach. PMID:19360963

  7. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  8. Thermocapillary convection in two immiscible liquid layers with free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, Takao; Koster, Jean N.

    1993-01-01

    Thermocapillary convection is studied in two immiscible liquid layers with one free surface, one liquid/liquid interface, and differential heating applied parallel to the interfaces. An analytical solution is introduced for infinite horizontal layers. The defining parameter for the flow pattern is lambda, the ratio of the temperature coefficient of the interfacial tension to that of the surface tension. Four different flow patterns exist under zero gravity conditions. 'Halt' conditions which halt the fluid motion in the lower encapsulated liquid layer have been found. A numerical experiment is carried out to study effects of vertical end walls on the double layer convection in a 2D cavity. The halt condition obtained from the analytical study is found to be valid in the limit of small Reynolds numbers. The flow in the encapsulated liquid layer can be suppressed substantially.

  9. Dusty boundary layer in a surface-burst explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Ferguson, R.E.; Chien, K.Y.; Collins, J.P.

    1993-08-01

    Dusty boundary layers are an inherent feature of explosions over ground surfaces. Detailed knowledge of dusty boundary layer characteristics is needed in explosion safety analysis (e.g., to calculate the drag loads on structures). Also, to predicct the amount of dust in the rising fireball of an explsion, one must know the dusty boundary layer swept up during the positive and negative phases of the blast wave and how much of this boundary layer dust is entrained into the stem of the dust cloud. This paper describes the results of numerical simulations of the dusty boundary layer created by a surface burst explosion. The evolution of the flow was calculated by a high-order Godunov code that solves the nonsteady conservation laws.

  10. Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendin, Gali; Toledo, Yaron

    2016-04-01

    Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface Gali Hendin(1), Yaron Toledo(1) January 13, 2016 (1)School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Israel Understanding the boundary layer flow over surface gravity waves is of great importance as various atmosphere-ocean processes are essentially coupled through these waves. Nevertheless, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of this complex flow behaviour. The present work investigates the fundamentals of the boundary layer air flow over progressive, small-amplitude waves. It aims to extend the well-known Blasius solution for a boundary layer over a flat plate to one over a moving wavy surface. The current analysis pro- claims the importance of the small curvature and the time-dependency as second order effects, with a meaningful impact on the similarity pattern in the first order. The air flow over the ocean surface is modelled using an outer, inviscid half-infinite flow, overlaying the viscous boundary layer above the wavy surface. The assumption of a uniform flow in the outer layer, used in former studies, is now replaced with a precise analytical solution of the potential flow over a moving wavy surface with a known celerity, wavelength and amplitude. This results in a conceptual change from former models as it shows that the pressure variations within the boundary layer cannot be neglected. In the boundary layer, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are formulated in a curvilinear, orthogonal coordinate system. The formulation is done in an elaborate way that presents additional, formerly neglected first-order effects, resulting from the time-varying coordinate system. The suggested time-dependent curvilinear orthogonal coordinate system introduces a platform that can also support the formulation of turbulent problems for any surface shape. In order to produce a self-similar Blasius-type solution, a small wave-steepness is assumed and a perturbation method is applied. Consequently, a

  11. Layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on the surface of condensed DNA particles.

    PubMed Central

    Trubetskoy, V S; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Budker, V G; Wolff, J A

    1999-01-01

    DNA can be condensed with an excess of poly-cations in aqueous solutions forming stable particles of submicron size with positive surface charge. This charge surplus can be used to deposit alternating layers of polyanions and polycations on the surface surrounding the core of condensed DNA. Using poly-L-lysine (PLL) and succinylated PLL (SPLL) as polycation and polyanion, respectively, we demonstrated layer-by-layer architecture of the particles. Polyanions with a shorter carboxyl/backbone distance tend to disassemble binary DNA/PLL complexes by displacing DNA while polyanions with a longer carboxyl/backbone distance effectively formed a tertiary complex. The zeta potential of such complexes became negative, indicating effective surface recharging. The charge stoichiometry of the DNA/PLL/SPLL complex was found to be close to 1:1:1, resembling poly-electrolyte complexes layered on macrosurfaces. Recharged particles containing condensed plasmid DNA may find applications as non-viral gene delivery vectors. PMID:10454604

  12. Layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on the surface of condensed DNA particles.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Budker, V G; Wolff, J A

    1999-08-01

    DNA can be condensed with an excess of poly-cations in aqueous solutions forming stable particles of submicron size with positive surface charge. This charge surplus can be used to deposit alternating layers of polyanions and polycations on the surface surrounding the core of condensed DNA. Using poly-L-lysine (PLL) and succinylated PLL (SPLL) as polycation and polyanion, respectively, we demonstrated layer-by-layer architecture of the particles. Polyanions with a shorter carboxyl/backbone distance tend to disassemble binary DNA/PLL complexes by displacing DNA while polyanions with a longer carboxyl/backbone distance effectively formed a tertiary complex. The zeta potential of such complexes became negative, indicating effective surface recharging. The charge stoichiometry of the DNA/PLL/SPLL complex was found to be close to 1:1:1, resembling poly-electrolyte complexes layered on macrosurfaces. Recharged particles containing condensed plasmid DNA may find applications as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  13. Vapor layer evolution during drop impact on a heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyeon; Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Jisan; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid drop impacts on a sufficiently hot surface above the boiling point, a vapor layer is formed between the drop and the surface, preventing direct contact between them and as a result levitating the drop, known as the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding the evolution of the vapor layer is largely unexplored despite its importance in estimating heat transfer in cooling systems of thermal or nuclear power plants. The side-profile visualization of the vapor layer, as absolutely required for investigating its evolution, has been however unavailable by conventional optical microscopy. In this study, by employing ultrafast X-ray phase contrast imaging, we directly visualize the profiles of the vapor layers during liquid drop impact on a hot surface and elucidate the evolution of the vapor layers during spreading and retraction of the drop as functions of impact height and surface temperature. We reveal that the evolution is governed by the propagation of capillary waves generated in retraction and the wavelength of capillary waves λ is inversely proportional to the impact height h with a relation ~σ/ρh ~We-1 where We is weber number. Capillary waves that converge at the center of the vapor layers are linked to the bouncing behavior of the drop.

  14. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Hershberger, Jeffrey G.

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  15. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  16. Anomalous surface fatigue in a nano-layered material.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun; Shao, Zhifeng

    2014-10-01

    Nanoscale materials fatigue within a single 7 Å layer of a 2D nano-layered material, muscovite mica, resembles fatigue in macroscopic systems except for two remarkable properties: first, there is an Å-scale precision in the depth of the damage and second, there are sharply defined "magical" stresses, beyond yield, at which the surface remains intact regardless of the number of applications of stress.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtovyy, Oleksandr

    The composition and behavior of surfaces and interfaces play a pivotal role in dictating the overall efficiency of the majority of polymeric materials and devices. Surface properties of the materials can be altered using surface modification techniques. It is necessary to highlight that successful methods of surface modification should affect only the upper layer of the polymer material without changing bulk properties. The processes must introduce new functionalities to the surface, optimize surface roughness, lubrication, hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, adhesion, conductivity, and/or biocompatibility. Research presented in this dissertation is dedicated to the synthesis, characterization, and application of thin macromolecular layers anchored to polymer substrates. Specifically, attachment of functional polymers via a "grafting to" approach has been extensively studied using PET and nylon model substrates. First, poly(glycidyl methacrylate) was used to introduce permanent functionalities to the model substrates by anchoring it to model films. Then, three different functional polymers were grafted on top of the previous layer. As one part of this study, the temperature and time dependence of grafting functional layers were studied. The surface coverage by hydrophobic polymer was determined from experimental data and predicted by a model. In general, the model has a high degree of predictive capability. Next, surface modification of polymeric fibers and membranes is presented as an important application of the polymer thin layers targeted in the study. Specifically, the procedures developed for surface modification of model substrates was employed for modification of PET, nylon, and cotton fabrics as well as PET track-etched membranes. Since epoxy groups are highly reactive in various chemical reactions, the approach becomes virtually universal, allowing both various surfaces and end-functionalized macromolecules to be used in the grafted layer synthesis. PET

  18. Alternative barrier layers for surface covers in dry climates

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Surface covers are one of the most widespread remediation and waste management options in all climates. Barrier layers to limit percolation through cover systems are principal features of engineered, multi-component cover designs. Conventional barrier layer components developed for humid climates have limitations in dry climates. One alternative barrier layer is a capillary barrier, which consists of a fine-over-coarse soil arrangement. The capacity of capillary barrier to laterally divert downward moving water is the key to their success. Another alternative is a dry barrier, in which atmospheric air is circulated through a coarse layer within the cover to remove water vapor. Incorporating a coarse layer which stores water for subsequent removal by air flow reduces the requirements for the air flow velocity and increases the applicability of the dry barrier.

  19. Surface stress of graphene layers supported on soft substrate

    PubMed Central

    Du, Feng; Huang, Jianyong; Duan, Huiling; Xiong, Chunyang; Wang, Jianxiang

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the surface stress of a single layer and multilayers of graphene supported on silicone substrates by measuring the deformation of the graphene-covered substrates induced by the surface tension of liquid droplets together with the Neumann’s triangle concept. We find that the surface stress of the graphene-covered substrate is significant larger than that of the bare substrate, and it increases with increasing graphene layers, and finally reaches a constant value of about 120 mN/m on three and more layers of graphene. This work demonstrates that the apparent surface stress of graphene-substrate systems can be tuned by the substrate and the graphene layers. The surface stress and the tuning effect of the substrate on it may have applications in design and characterization of graphene-based ultra-sensitive sensors and other devices. Moreover, the method may also be used to measure the surface stress of other ultrathin films supported on soft substrates. PMID:27166087

  20. Biphasic surface amorphous layer lubrication of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Graindorge, Simon; Ferrandez, Wendy; Jin, Zhongmin; Ingham, Eileen; Grant, Colin; Twigg, Peter; Fisher, John

    2005-12-01

    The biphasic nature of articular cartilage has been acknowledged for some time and is known to play an important role in many of the biomechanical functions performed by this unique tissue. From the lubrication point of view however, a simple biphasic model is unable to account for the extremely low friction coefficients that have been recorded experimentally, particularly during start-up. In addition, research over the last decade has indicated the presence of a surface amorphous layer on top of articular cartilage. Here, we present results from a finite element model of articular cartilage that includes a thin, soft, biphasic surface amorphous layer (BSAL). The results of this study show that a thin BSAL, with lower elastic modulus, dramatically altered the load sharing between the solid and liquid phases of articular cartilage, particularly in the near-surface regions of the underlying bulk cartilage and within the surface amorphous layer itself where the fluid load support exceeded 85%. By transferring the load from the solid phase to the fluid phase, the biphasic surface layer improves lubrication and reduces friction, whilst also protecting the underlying cartilage surface by 'shielding' the solid phase from elevated stresses. The increase in lubrication effectiveness is shown to be greatest during short duration loading scenarios, such as shock loads.

  1. Structural rearrangements in self-assembled surfactant layers at surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun

    2010-03-25

    The transition from compact to extended configuration in ionic surfactant layers under the influence of salt, surfactant surface density and temperature is studied using the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The increase in ionic strength of aqueous salt solution or in surfactant surface density leads to the transition from the hemicylindrical to the perpendicular monolayer configuration of the molecules. Although producing the same structural rearrangement in the surfactant layer the origin of the effect of salt and surface density is different. While the addition of salt increases the out-of-plane attractive interactions with the solvent, the increase in density results in the increase in the in-plane repulsion in surfactant layer. The temperature effects are subtler and are mainly manifested in the reduction of the solution structuring at elevated temperatures.

  2. The Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Rough Curvilinear Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droblenkov, V. F.

    1958-01-01

    A number of semiempirical approximate methods exist for determining the characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer on a curvilinear surface. At present, among these methods, the one proposed by L. G. Loitsianskii is given frequent practical application. This method is sufficiently effective and permits, in the case of wing profiles with technically smooth surfaces, calculating the basic characteristics of the boundary layer and the values of the overall drag with an accuracy which suffices for practical purposes. The idea of making use of the basic integral momentum equation ((d delta(sup xx))/dx) + ((V' delta(sup xx))/V) (2 + H) = (tau(sub 0))/(rho V(exp 2)) proves to be fruitful also for the solution of the problems in the determination of the characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer on a rough surface.

  3. An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers along curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A curved wall tunnel was designed, and an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer was set up on the straight section preceding the curved test section. Turbulent boundary layer flows with uniform and adverse pressure distributions along convex and concave walls were investigated. Hot-wire measurements along the convex surface indicated that turbulent mixing between fluid layers was very much reduced. However, the law of the wall held and the skin friction, thus determined, correlated well with other measurements. Hot-wire measurements along the concave test wall revealed a system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer and confirmed that concave curvature enhances mixing. A self-consistent set of turbulent boundary layer equations for flows along curved surfaces was derived together with a modified eddy viscosity. Solution of these equations together with the modified eddy viscosity gave results that correlated well with the present data on flows along the convex surface with arbitrary pressure distribution. However, it could only be used to predict the mean characteristics of the flow along concave walls because of the existence of the system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer.

  4. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  5. Sputtered silver oxide layers for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchel, D.; Mihalcea, C.; Fukaya, T.; Atoda, N.; Tominaga, J.; Kikukawa, T.; Fuji, H.

    2001-07-01

    We present results of reactively sputtered silver oxide thin films as a substrate material for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Herein, we show that deposited layers develop an increasingly strong SERS activity upon photoactivation at 488 nm. A benzoic acid/2-propanol solution was used to demonstrate that the bonding of molecules to SERS active sites at the surface can be followed by investigating temporal changes of the corresponding Raman intensities. Furthermore, the laser-induced structural changes in the silver oxide layers lead to a fluctuating SERS activity at high laser intensities which also affects the spectral features of amorphous carbon impurities.

  6. Effect of nanoconfinement on polymer dynamics: surface layers and interphases.

    PubMed

    Krutyeva, M; Wischnewski, A; Monkenbusch, M; Willner, L; Maiz, J; Mijangos, C; Arbe, A; Colmenero, J; Radulescu, A; Holderer, O; Ohl, M; Richter, D

    2013-03-01

    We present neutron spin echo experiments that address the much debated topic of dynamic phenomena in polymer melts that are induced by interacting with a confining surface. We find an anchored surface layer that internally is highly mobile and not glassy as heavily promoted in the literature. The polymer dynamics in confinement is, rather, determined by two phases, one fully equal to the bulk polymer and another that is partly anchored at the surface. By strong topological interaction, this phase confines further chains with no direct contact to the surface. These form the often invoked interphase, where the full chain relaxation is impeded through the interaction with the anchored chains. PMID:23521308

  7. Surface morphological evolution during annealing of epitaxial Cu(001) layers

    SciTech Connect

    Purswani, J. M.; Gall, D.

    2008-08-15

    Single crystal Cu(001) layers were grown on MgO(001) by ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputtering at T{sub s}=100 deg. C. Quantitative surface morphological analyses by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy show that the surfaces exhibit self-affine mound structures with a scaling exponent of 0.82{+-}0.03 and a mound radius r{sub c} that increases from 31{+-}8 to 39{+-}6 nm for increasing layer thickness t=24-120 nm. In situ annealing at 200 and 300 deg. C leads to a thermodynamically driven mass transport that minimizes the surface step density, resulting in broader mounds and a smaller root mean square surface roughness {sigma}. This effect is most pronounced for t=24 nm, for which r{sub c} increases from 31{+-}8 to 70{+-}20 nm and {sigma} decreases from 1.3{+-}0.1 to 0.74{+-}0.08 nm, resulting in a decrease in the average surface slope from {chi}=7 deg. to 2 deg. and an increase in the average terrace width w{sub T} by more than a factor of 4. In contrast, w{sub T} increases by only 20% for t=120 nm. This remarkable difference between 'thin' and 'thick' layers is attributed to diverging surface morphological pathways during annealing: The strong smoothening for t=24 nm is due to a competitive coalescence process where some mounds grow laterally at the expense of their smaller neighbors, which die out. In contrast, the initially wider mounds of thicker layers (t=120 nm) combine to form a quasistable surface morphology that exhibits anisotropic mound structures, which limit mass transport and stabilize the surface step density.

  8. Super-hydrophobic surfaces of layer-by-layer structured film-coated electrospun nanofibrous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tasuku; Ding, Bin; Sone, Yuji; Shiratori, Seimei

    2007-04-01

    We have recently fabricated super-hydrophobic membrane surfaces based on the inspiration of self-cleaning silver ragwort leaves. This biomimetic super-hydrophobic surface was composed of fluoroalkylsilane (FAS)-modified layer-by-layer (LBL) structured film-coated electrospun nanofibrous membranes. The rough fibre surface caused by the electrostatic LBL coating of TiO2 nanoparticles and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to imitate the rough surface of nanosized grooves along the silver ragwort leaf fibre axis. The results showed that the FAS modification was the key process for increasing the surface hydrophobicity of the fibrous membranes. Additionally, the dependence of the hydrophobicity of the membrane surfaces upon the number of LBL coating bilayers was affected by the membrane surface roughness. Moreover, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further indicated that the surface of LBL film-coated fibres absorbed more fluoro groups than the fibre surface without the LBL coating. A (TiO2/PAA)10 film-coated cellulose acetate nanofibrous membrane with FAS surface modification showed the highest water contact angle of 162° and lowest water-roll angle of 2°.

  9. Estimating Active Layer Thickness from Remotely Sensed Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Zhang, T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate active layer thickness (ALT) from remotely sensed surface subsidence during thawing seasons derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. Ground ice takes up more volume than ground water, so as the soil thaws in summer and the active layer deepens, the ground subsides. The volume of melted ground water during the summer thaw determines seasonal subsidence. ALT is defined as the maximum thaw depth at the end of a thawing season. By using InSAR to measure surface subsidence between the start and end of summer season, one can estimate the depth of thaw over a large area (typically 100 km by 100 km). We developed an ALT retrieval algorithm integrating InSAR-derived surface subsidence, observed soil texture, organic matter content, and moisture content. We validated this algorithm in the continuous permafrost area on the North Slope of Alaska. Based on InSAR measurements using ERS-1/2 SAR data, our estimated values match in situ measurements of ALT within 1--10 cm at Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites within the study area. The active layer plays a key role in land surface processes in cold regions. Current measurements of ALT using mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, or inferred from temperature measurements are of high quality, but limited in spatial coverage. Using InSAR to estimate ALT greatly expands the spatial coverage of ALT observations.

  10. Luna 9 photographs: Evidence for a fragmental surface layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gault, D.E.; Quaide, W.L.; Oberbeck, V.R.; Moore, H.J.

    1966-01-01

    The morphological features of the lunar surface photographed by Luna 9 indicate a surficial layer of weakly cohesive to noncohesive fragmental material. Most of this material is finer than a centimeter and probably finer than a few millimeters, although objects of centimeter size and larger are plentiful.

  11. NMR of thin layers using a meanderline surface coil

    DOEpatents

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature meanderline sensor coil which extends the capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to provide analysis of thin planar samples and surface layer geometries. The sensor coil allows standard NMR techniques to be used to examine thin planar (or curved) layers, extending NMRs utility to many problems of modern interest. This technique can be used to examine contact layers, non-destructively depth profile into films, or image multiple layers in a 3-dimensional sense. It lends itself to high resolution NMR techniques of magic angle spinning and thus can be used to examine the bonding and electronic structure in layered materials or to observe the chemistry associated with aging coatings. Coupling this sensor coil technology with an arrangement of small magnets will produce a penetrator probe for remote in-situ chemical analysis of groundwater or contaminant sediments. Alternatively, the sensor coil can be further miniaturized to provide sub-micron depth resolution within thin films or to orthoscopically examine living tissue. This thin-layer NMR technique using a stationary meanderline coil in a series-resonant circuit has been demonstrated and it has been determined that the flat meanderline geometry has about he same detection sensitivity as a solenoidal coil, but is specifically tailored to examine planar material layers, while avoiding signals from the bulk.

  12. Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

  13. Nucleation and Early Stages of Layer-by-Layer Growth of Metal Organic Frameworks on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to resolve the evolution of crystallites of a metal organic framework (HKUST-1) grown on Au(111) using a liquid-phase layer-by-layer methodology. The nucleation and faceting of individual crystallites is followed by repeatedly imaging the same submicron region after each cycle of growth and we find that the growing surface is terminated by {111} facets leading to the formation of pyramidal nanostructures for [100] oriented crystallites, and triangular [111] islands with typical lateral dimensions of tens of nanometres. AFM images reveal that crystallites can grow by 5–10 layers in each cycle. The growth rate depends on crystallographic orientation and the morphology of the gold substrate, and we demonstrate that under these conditions the growth is nanocrystalline with a morphology determined by the minimum energy surface. PMID:26709359

  14. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    PubMed

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected.

  15. CX3CR1 is an important surface molecule for respiratory syncytial virus infection in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chirkova, Tatiana; Lin, Songbai; Oomens, Antonius G. P.; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Meng, Jia; Stobart, Christopher C.; Cotton, Calvin U.; Hartert, Tina V.; Moore, Martin L.; Ziady, Assem G.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and young children, and causes disease throughout life. Understanding the biology of infection, including virus binding to the cell surface, should help develop antiviral drugs or vaccines. The RSV F and G glycoproteins bind cell surface heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) through heparin-binding domains. The G protein also has a CX3C chemokine motif which binds to the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1. G protein binding to CX3CR1 is not important for infection of immortalized cell lines, but reportedly is so for primary human airway epithelial cells (HAECs), the primary site for human infection. We studied the role of CX3CR1 in RSV infection with CX3CR1-transfected cell lines and HAECs with variable percentages of CX3CR1-expressing cells, and the effect of anti-CX3CR1 antibodies or a mutation in the RSV CX3C motif. Immortalized cells lacking HSPGs had low RSV binding and infection, which was increased markedly by CX3CR1 transfection. CX3CR1 was expressed primarily on ciliated cells, and ∼50 % of RSV-infected cells in HAECs were CX3CR1+. HAECs with more CX3CR1-expressing cells had a proportional increase in RSV infection. Blocking G binding to CX3CR1 with anti-CX3CR1 antibody or a mutation in the CX3C motif significantly decreased RSV infection in HAECs. The kinetics of cytokine production suggested that the RSV/CX3CR1 interaction induced RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein), IL-8 and fractalkine production, whilst it downregulated IL-15, IL1-RA and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Thus, the RSV G protein/CX3CR1 interaction is likely important in infection and infection-induced responses of the airway epithelium, the primary site of human infection. PMID:26297201

  16. Modification of Surface Layers by Surfacing Intermetallic Coatings with Variable Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, D. N.; Zakharov, O. V.; Vinogradov, A. N.; Kochetkov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper considers the possibility of forming coating layers for parts within wide limits of microhardness. The technology uses surfacing of intermetallic coatings provided by a unique experimental setup. Theoretical and experimental dependence of the coating layer microhardness on the filler concentration using the changes in the speed of the filler wire feed and current intensity were determined.

  17. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  18. Surface morphological evolution of epitaxial CrN(001) layers

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.R.; Gall, D.

    2005-09-01

    CrN layers, 57 and 230 nm thick, were grown on MgO(001) at T{sub s}=600-800 deg. C by ultrahigh-vacuum magnetron sputter deposition in pure N{sub 2} discharges from an oblique deposition angle {alpha}=80 deg. . Layers grown at 600 deg. C nucleate as single crystals with a cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship with the substrate. However, rough surfaces with cauliflower-type morphologies cause the nucleation of misoriented CrN grains that develop into cone-shaped grains that protrude out of the epitaxial matrix to form triangular faceted surface mounds. The surface morphology of epitaxial CrN(001) grown at 700 deg. C is characterized by dendritic ridge patterns extending along the orthogonal <110> directions superposed by square-shaped super mounds with <100> edges. The ridge patterns are attributed to a Bales-Zangwill instability while the supermounds form due to atomic shadowing which leads to the formation of epitaxial inverted pyramids that are separated from the surrounding layer by tilted nanovoids. Growth at 800 deg. C yields complete single crystals with smooth surfaces. The root-mean-square surface roughness for 230-nm-thick layers decreases from 18.8 to 9.3 to 1.1 nm as T{sub s} is raised from 600 to 700 to 800 deg. C. This steep decrease is due to a transition in the roughening mechanism from atomic shadowing to kinetic roughening. Atomic shadowing is dominant at 600 and 700 deg. C, where misoriented grains and supermounds, respectively, capture a larger fraction of the oblique deposition flux in comparison to the surrounding epitaxial matrix, resulting in a high roughening rate that is described by a power law with an exponent {beta}>0.5. In contrast, kinetic roughening controls the surface morphology for T{sub s}=800 deg. C, as well as the epitaxial fraction of the layers grown at 600 and 700 deg. C, yielding relatively smooth surfaces and {beta}{<=}0.27.

  19. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  20. Characterization of carbides composite surface layers produced by PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajoure, M.; Tajouri, A.

    2015-03-01

    Composite surface layer of nickel base with titanium carbide in powder form was deposited on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard by using plasma transferred arc technique. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hardfacin process was successfully conducted by using PMNICr50P alloy plus titanium carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 754 HV and minimum dilution of 4.6 % were achieved by using an arc current of 80 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A& the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base with titanium carbide feature uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with irregular grain shape and relatively small particles size, and regular boundary line between the substrate and over layer with presence of black area along the boundary line. A few micro - porosities are located in the matrix.

  1. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  2. Layer-by-layer assembly of polymersomes and polyelectrolytes on planar surfaces and microsized colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Coustet, Marcos; Irigoyen, Joseba; Garcia, Teodoro Alonso; Murray, Richard A; Romero, Gabriela; Susana Cortizo, M; Knoll, Wolfgang; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid polyelectrolyte multilayer systems were fabricated on top of planar surfaces and colloidal particles via layer by layer (LbL) assembly of polystyrene sulphonate (PSS) and polybenzyl methacrylate-block-poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PBzMA-b-PDMAEMA) polymersomes. Polymersomes were prepared by self assembly of PBzMA-b-PDMAEMA copolymer, synthesised by group transfer polymerisation. Polymersomes display a diameter of 270 nm and a shell thickness of 11nm. Assembly on planar surfaces was followed by means of the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Detailed information on the assembly mechanism and surface topology of the polymersome/polyelectrolyte films was thereby obtained. The assembly of polymersomes and PSS on top of silica particles of 500 nm in diameter was confirmed by ζ-potential measurements. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that polymersome/PSS coated silica particles increase in total diameter up to 3-5μm. This hints toward the formation of densely packed polymersome layers. In addition, CLSM showed that polymersome/PSS films exhibit a high loading capacity that could potentially be used for encapsulation and delivery of diverse chemical species. These results provide an insight into the formation of multilayered films with compartmentalised hydrophilic/hydrophobic domains and may lead to the successful application of polymersomes in surface-engineered colloidal systems.

  3. Magnetic Or Optical Surface Layer Would Indicate Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1995-01-01

    In proposed method of obtaining information on strain at surface of material specimen, magnetic coat (like that on magnetic tape) or optical coat (like that on compact disk) applied to all or part of surface monitored. Coating layer and associated measuring equipment, taken together, constitute system called "material strain monitor" (MSM). MSM important in research in materials and mechanics; in particular, expected to compete strongly with systems based on image-analysis and laser techniques now being developed to obtain information on strain fields.

  4. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguet, T.; Ledieu, J.; Dubois, J. M.; Fournée, V.

    2008-08-01

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the γ-Al4Cu9 approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]_{\\mathrm {Al}}\\parallel [110]_{\\mathrm {Al_4Cu_9}}\\parallel [5\\mathrm {f}]_{i\\mbox {-}\\mathrm {Al\\mbox {--}Cu \\mbox {--}Fe}} .

  5. Laser-Based Transient Surface Acceleration of Thermoelastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CETINKAYA, CETIN; WU, CUNLI; LI, CHEN

    2000-03-01

    The removal of particles from elastic substrates has been an important practical problem in the electronics industry especially as the sizes of electronic units shrink. In recent years, there has been an interest in removingsubmicron level particles from surfaces. The use of traditional surface cleaning methods, such as ultrasonically induced fluid flow, vibrational methods, centrifugal techniques, is limited to particles that require surface acceleration lower than 107m/s2. For the effective removal of submicron particles, a higher level surface acceleration is needed since the adhesion forces (mainly van der Waals force for dry surfaces) are related to the particle size and increase approximately linearly as the characteristic radius of small particles that are to be removed decreases. In current work, based on the generalized dynamic theory of thermoelasticity reported, a transfer matrix formulation including the second sound effect is developed for a thermoelastic layer. The transfer matrix for axisymmetric wave propagation in a thermoelastic layer is obtained by adopting a double integral transform approach. The second sound effect is included to eliminate the thermal wave travelling with infinite velocity as predicted by the diffusion heat transfer model, and, consequently, the immediate arrival of waves. Using the current formulation and the periodic systems framework, a transfer function formulation for calculating the accelerations is developed for transient analysis. A double integral transform inversion method is used for transient response calculations. Acceleration levels, sufficient for submicron particle removal, are reported. Various processes such as thermoelastic stresses, surface evaporation, and optical breakdown may be responsible for surface acceleration components and particle removal. In current work, only the surface acceleration due to transient thermoelastic wave propagation is under investigation.

  6. The mechanics of airway closure.

    PubMed

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2008-11-30

    We describe how surface-tension-driven instabilities of the lung's liquid lining may lead to pulmonary airway closure via the formation of liquid bridges that occlude the airway lumen. Using simple theoretical models, we demonstrate that this process may occur via a purely fluid-mechanical "film collapse" or through a coupled, fluid-elastic "compliant collapse" mechanism. Both mechanisms can lead to airway closure in times comparable with the breathing cycle, suggesting that surface tension is the primary mechanical effect responsible for the closure observed in peripheral regions of the human lungs. We conclude by discussing the influence of additional effects not included in the simple models, such as gravity, the presence of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory flow and wall motion, the airways' geometry, and the mechanical structure of the airway walls. PMID:18595784

  7. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  8. Surface Dynamics of Segregation Layer in Blockcopolymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sanghoon; Cha, Wonsuk; Jiang, Zhang; Narayanan, Suresh; Ruehm, Adrian; Sinha, Sunil K.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the surface dynamics of supported block copolymer films of poly(styrene)-b-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PS-b- PDMS) in the spherical phase, i.e., PDMS cores surrounded by PS shells by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) in grazing angle geometry. The experiment was performed at the beamline 8ID-I in Advanced Photon Source. We found that the PDMS-rich layer near the surface appears at the temperature higher than the glass transition temperature. We applied the modified theory for bilayer model with surface capillary waves on simple viscoelastic liquid films. The viscosity obtained in this study is compared with that from the rheology measurement for bulk.

  9. Linear stability of a layered fluid with mobile surface plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffett, B. A.; Gable, C. W.; O'Connell, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a general method of calculating the linear stability of a fluid with homogeneous layers that is heated from below. The method employs a propagator technique to obtain expressions for the fluid velocity, stress, and temperature. The principal advantage of the method is the ease with which solutions are adapted to a wide variety of boundary conditions and fluid properties. We demonstrate the utility of the method using three examples which quantify the effects of (1) rheological layering, (2) mobile plates at the surface, and (3) multiple phase transitions. Each example is presented in the context of Earth's mantle. In the first example, we predict that convection becomes confined to the upper mantle once the viscosity increase between the upper and lower mantle exceeds a factor of 2000, consistent with the nonlinear calculations of Davies (1977). In the second example we find that the heat flux variations in a convecting fluid with variably sized, surface plates can be attributed, in part, to changes in the critical Rayleigh number. The linear stability of a fluid with multiple phase transitions is significantly affects by the locations of the transitions. We find that phase transitions have their largest effect when they are located at the center of the fluid layer and become much less important when they are located near the exterior boundaries.

  10. Multi-layer topological transmissions of spoof surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bai Cao; Zhao, Jie; Liao, Zhen; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-03-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in microwave frequency provide a high field confinement in subwavelength scale and low-loss and flexible transmissions, which have been widely used in novel transmission waveguides and functional devices. To play more important roles in modern integrated circuits and systems, it is necessary and helpful for the SPP modes to propagate among different layers of devices and chips. Owing to the highly confined property and organized near-field distribution, we show that the spoof SPPs could be easily transmitted from one layer into another layer via metallic holes and arc-shaped transitions. Such designs are suitable for both the ultrathin and flexible single-strip SPP waveguide and double-strip SPP waveguide for active SPP devices. Numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate the broadband and high-efficiency multi-layer topological transmissions with controllable absorption that is related to the superposition area of corrugated metallic strips. The transmission coefficient of single-strip SPP waveguide is no worse than -0.8 dB within frequency band from 2.67 GHz to 10.2 GHz while the transmission of double-strip SPP waveguide keeps above -1 dB within frequency band from 2.26 GHz to 11.8 GHz. The proposed method will enhance the realizations of highly complicated plasmonic integrated circuits.

  11. Composition, microstructure, and surface barrier layer development during brine salting.

    PubMed

    Melilli, C; Carcò, D; Barbano, D M; Tumino, G; Carpino, S; Licitra, G

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the changes in chemical composition, porosity, and structure that occur at the surface of a block of brine-salted cheese and their relationship to the rate at which salt is taken up from the brine. To create a difference in composition, salt uptake, and barrier layer properties, identical blocks of Ragusano cheese were placed in saturated and 18% salt brine at 18 degrees C for 12 d. The overall moisture content and porosity decreased, whereas salt and salt in moisture content increased near the surface of blocks of brine-salted Ragusano cheese for all treatments. The general appearance of the microstructure of the surface of the blocks of brine-salted cheese was much more compact than the microstructure 1 mm inside the block at both brine concentrations. Large differences in porosity of the barrier layer were produced by brine-salting cheese in 18% vs. saturated brine, with cheese in saturated brine having much lower porosity at the surface and taking up much less salt during brining. The macro network of water channels within the microstructure of the cheese was less open near the surface of the block for cheese in both saturated and 18% brine after 4 d. However, no large differences in the size of the macro channels in the cheese structure due to the difference in brine concentration were observed by scanning electron microscopy. It is possible that the shrinkage of the much smaller pore structure within the casein matrix of the cheese is more important and will become more limiting to the rate of salt diffusion. Further microstructure work at higher resolution is needed to answer this question. The calculated decrease in porosity at the exterior 1-mm portion of the block was 50.8 and 29.2% for cheeses that had been in saturated vs. 18% brine for 12 d, respectively. The difference in brine concentration had a very large impact on the salt in moisture content of the cheese. The exterior of the cheese in 18% brine reached

  12. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  13. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, S.; Andreasen, M.; Vuollet, J.; Vehviläinen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Jonard, F.; Weihermüller, L.; Zakharova, E.; Wigneron, J.-P.; Kerr, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and HOBE sites are

  14. Atmospheric surface and boundary layers of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Three phases of work were performed: design of and preparation for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2-A); execution of the ABLE 2-A field program; and analysis of the ABLE 2-A data. Three areas of experiment design were dealt with: surface based meteorological measurements; aircraft missions; and project meteorological support. The primary goal was to obtain a good description of the structure of the atmosphere immediately above the rain forest canopy (top of canopy to a few thousand meters), to describe this region during the growing daytime phase of the boundary layer; and to examine the nighttime stratified state. A secondary objective was to examine the role that deep convective storms play in the vertical transport of heat, water vapor, and other trace gases. While significant progress was made, much of the analysis remains to be done.

  15. Double-layer interaction between two plates with hairy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haohao; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2004-05-01

    In most theoretical treatments of colloidal particles with hairy surfaces, only the steric effect is taken into account. The steric force is a short-range interaction and acts only when the chains on different particles begin to interpenetrate each other. However, since the hairy chains are extended into the continuous phase, they constrain the orientation of the water molecules near the surface and, as a result, the dielectric constant in that region can become very different from that in the bulk. The low dielectric constant affects the distributions of ion concentrations and the gradient of the electric field. Therefore, the double-layer interactions between two plates with hairy surfaces cannot be calculated on the basis of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory, which involves a uniform dielectric constant in the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A model which accounts for the difference in dielectric constants in the hairy region and outside that region is therefore proposed. The ion specificity is also taken into account by using Born's expression for the free energy of hydration of ions. The repulsive forces calculated via the Gouy-Chapman theory and via the new model are compared. The hairy region can have a long range effect on the repulsive double-layer interactions.

  16. Surface activation of CNT Webs towards layer by layer assembly of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Musameh, Mustafa; Huynh, Chi P; Hickey, Mark; Kyratzis, Ilias Louis

    2016-04-25

    Several surface activation methods such as chemical, electrochemical and plasma have been used for enhancing the electrochemical performance of carbon based electrodes for various applications. However, some of these surface activation methods may not be useful depending on the chemical and physical properties of the activated surface. Herein we investigate the surface activation of carbon nanotube (CNT) webs by electrochemical and plasma techniques to enhance their electrochemical performance and enable the fabrication of a biosensor using the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach. The pretreated CNT webs were characterized by SEM, TEM, Raman, XPS and electrochemical methods. TEM images and Raman analysis showed an increase in the level of surface defects upon pretreatment with higher number of defects after electrochemical pretreatment. XPS analysis showed an increase in the level of oxygen functional groups after pretreatment (4 to 5 times increase) which resulted in enhanced water wettability especially for plasma pretreated CNT webs. The pretreated CNT web electrodes also showed an enhanced electrochemical activity towards the oxidation and reduction of different redox probes with higher sensitivity for the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrode that was accompanied by a higher level of noise in amperometric measurements. A highly linear response was obtained for the untreated and the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrodes towards the amperometric detection of NADH (R(2) of 0.9996 and 0.9986 respectively) while a non-linear response was observed for the plasma pretreated CNT web electrode (R(2) of 0.8538). The pretreated CNT web electrodes enabled the fabrication of a LBL biosensor for alcohol detection with highest operational stability obtained for the plasma pretreated CNT web surface.

  17. Epitaxially guided assembly of collagen layers on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Leow, Wee Wen; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2011-09-01

    Ordered assembly of collagen molecules on flat substrates has potential for various applications and serves as a model system for studying the assembly process. While previous studies demonstrated self-assembly of collagen on muscovite mica into highly ordered layers, the mechanism by which different conditions affect the resulting morphology remains to be elucidated. Using atomic force microscopy, we follow the assembly of collagen on muscovite mica at a concentration lower than the critical fibrillogenesis concentration in bulk. Initially, individual collagen molecules adsorb to mica and subsequently nucleate into fibrils possessing the 67 nm D-periodic bands. Emergence of fibrils aligned in parallel despite large interfibril distances agrees with an alignment mechanism guided by the underlying mica. The epitaxial growth was further confirmed by the formation of novel triangular networks of collagen fibrils on phlogopite mica, whose surface lattice is known to have a hexagonal symmetry, whereas the more widely used muscovite does not. Comparing collagen assembly on the two types of mica at different potassium concentrations revealed that potassium binds to the negatively charged mica surface and neutralizes it, thereby reducing the binding affinity of collagen and enhancing surface diffusion. These results suggest that collagen assembly on mica follows the surface adsorption, diffusion, nucleation, and growth pathway, where the growth direction is determined at the nucleation step. Comparison with other molecules that assemble similarly on mica supports generality of the proposed assembly mechanism, the knowledge of which will be useful for controlling the resulting surface morphologies.

  18. Nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan assembled layer-by-layer: An antibacterial surface for Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Nascimento, Vicente F; Murillo, Duber; Taketa, Thiago B; Sahoo, Prasana; de Souza, Alessandra A; Beppu, Marisa M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-01-20

    In this work, nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan (HA/CHI) assembled layer by layer were synthesized; their application as a potential antimicrobial material was demonstrated for the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium, here used as a model. For the synthesis, the influence of pH and ionic strength of these natural polymer stem-solutions on final characteristics of the HA/CHI nanofilms was studied in detail. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using widefield fluorescence microscopy. These results were correlated with the chemical properties of the nanofilms, studied by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, as well as with their morphology and surface properties characterized using SEM and AFM. The present findings can be extended to design and optimize HA/CHI nanofilms with enhanced antimicrobial behavior for other type of phytopathogenic gram-negative bacteria species, such as Xanthomonas citri, Xanthomas campestri and Ralstonia solanacearum. PMID:26572322

  19. Layer by Layer, Nano-particle "Only" Surface Modification of Filtration Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Ferrand, Luis

    Layer by Layer (LbL) deposition using primarily inorganic silica nanoparticles is employed for the modification of polymeric micro and ultrafiltration (MF/UF) membranes to produce thin film composites (TFC) with potential nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) capabilities.. A variety of porous substrate membranes with different membrane surface characteristics are employed, but exhibiting in common that wicking of water does not readily occur into the pore structure, including polycarbonate track etched (PCTE), polyethersulfone (PES) and sulfonated PES (SPEES) MF/UF membranes. Both spherical (cationic/anionic) and eccentric elongated (anionic) silica nanoparticles are deposited using conditions similar to those reported by Lee et al. Appropriate selection of the pH's for anionic and cationic particle deposition enables the construction of nanoparticle only layers 100--1200 nm in thickness atop the original membrane substrates. The surface layer thickness varies monotonically with the number of bilayers (anionic/cationic deposition cycles) as expected. The deposition process is optimized to eliminate drying induced cracking and to improve mechanical durability via thickness control and post-deposition hydro-thermal treatment. The hydrodynamic permeability of these TFC membranes is measured to evaluate their performance under typical NF operating conditions using dead-end permeation experiments and their performance compared quantitatively with realistic hydrodynamic models, with favorable results. For track etched polycarbonate MF substrates, surface modification causes a permeability reduction of approximately two orders of magnitude with respect to the bare substrates, to values comparable to those for typical commercial NF membranes. Good quantitative agreement with hydrodynamic models with no adjustable parameters was also established for this case, providing indirect confirmation that the LbL deposited surface layers are largely defect (crack) free

  20. Possible Albedo Proton Signature of Hydrated Lunar Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J. E.; Petro, N. E.; Pieters, C. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    We find evidence for a surface layer of hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high-energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and cannot be accounted for by either heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance), or by deeply buried (> 50 cm) hydrogenous material. The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons does not correlate with that of epithermal or high-energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in a thin (~ 1-10 cm) layer of hydrated regolith near the surface that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument thus provides critical measurements of volatile distributions within lunar regolith and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin platinum films on tungsten atomic layer deposition adhesion layers: Application to high surface area substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Clancey, Joel W.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Kukreja, Ratandeep S.; Kongkanand, Anusorn; George, Steven M.

    2015-01-15

    Platinum (Pt) atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually yields Pt nanoparticles during initial film growth. In contrast, deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt films is needed for many important applications, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. A continuous and high radius of curvature Pt film is more stable and has a higher area-specific activity than the Pt nanoparticles commonly used in PEM fuel cells. However, the Pt film must be ultrathin and have a large surface area to be cost effective. In this paper, a review of earlier Pt ALD studies on flat substrates is presented that demonstrates that tungsten, with a higher surface energy than platinum, can serve as an adhesion layer to achieve Pt ALD films that are continuous at ultrathin thicknesses of ∼1.5 nm. This work utilized MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the Pt ALD reactants. The deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt ALD films using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the reactants is then studied on two high surface area substrate materials: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed uniform and continuous Pt films with thicknesses of ∼4 nm on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. TEM with electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis revealed W ALD and Pt ALD films with thicknesses of ∼3 nm that were continuous and conformal on the high aspect ratio NSTF substrates. These results demonstrate that cost effective use of Pt ALD on high surface area substrates is possible for PEM fuel cells.

  2. Extravascular fibrin, plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitors, and airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Scott S.; Norton, Ryan J.; Rinaldi, Lisa M.; Bates, Jason H.T.; Sobel, Burton E.; Irvin, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness are not yet fully elucidated. One of the manifestations of airway inflammation is leakage of diverse plasma proteins into the airway lumen. They include fibrinogen and thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to form fibrin, a major component of thrombi. Fibrin inactivates surfactant. Surfactant on the airway surface maintains airway patency by lowering surface tension. In this study, immunohistochemically detected fibrin was seen along the luminal surface of distal airways in a patient who died of status asthmaticus and in mice with induced allergic airway inflammation. In addition, we observed altered airway fibrinolytic system protein balance consistent with promotion of fibrin deposition in mice with allergic airway inflammation. The airways of mice were exposed to aerosolized fibrinogen, thrombin, or to fibrinogen followed by thrombin. Only fibrinogen followed by thrombin resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with controls. An aerosolized fibrinolytic agent, tissue-type plasminogen activator, significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic airway inflammation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of fibrinogen and thrombin and their accumulation on the airway surface can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15232617

  3. Crystalline Bacterial Surface Layer (S-Layer) Opens Golden Opportunities for Nanobiotechnology in Textiles.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Narges; Chand, Nima; Rassa, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the successful recrystallization of bacterial S-layer arrays of the Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 at textile surfaces to create a novel method and material. Optimum bacterial growth was obtained at approximately 45 °C, pH 5.0, and 14 h pi. The cells were resuspended in guanidine hydrochloride and the 43 kDa S-protein was dialyzed and purified. The optimum reassembly on the polypropylene fabric surface in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflectance, and uniformity (spectrophotometry) was obtained at 30 °C, pH 5.0 for 30 minutes in the presence of 2 gr/l (liquor ratio; 1:40) of the S-protein. Overall, our data showed that the functional aspects and specialty applications of the fabric would be very attractive for the textile and related sciences, and result in advanced technical textiles. PMID:26552090

  4. Surface-imprinted nanostructured layer-by-layer film for molecular recognition of theophylline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jia; Liu, Zhihua; Fu, Long; Shi, Feng; Ma, Hongwei; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Zhang, Xi

    2008-10-21

    In this article we report the introduction of the cooperativity of various specific interactions combined with photo-cross-linking of the interlayers to yield binding sites that can realize better selectivity and imprinting efficiency of a surface molecularly imprinted LbL film (SMILbL), thus providing a new approach toward fabrication of nanostructured molecularly imprinted thin films. It involves preassembly of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) conjugated of the theophylline residue template via a disulfide bridge, denoted as PAAtheo 15, in solution, and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of PAAtheo 15 and a positively charged photoreactive diazo resin (DAR) to form multilayer thin film with designed architecture. After photo-cross-linking of the film and template removal, binding sites specific to 7-(beta-hydroxyethyl)theophylline (Theo-ol) molecules are introduced within the film. Binding assay demonstrates that the SMILbL has a high selectivity of SMILbL to Theo-ol over caffeine. A control experiment demonstrates that the selectivity of SMILbL derives from nanostructured recognition sites among the layers. The imprinting amount per unit mass of the film can be 1 order of magnitude larger than that of the conventional bulk molecular imprinting systems. As this concept of construction SMILbL can be easily extended to the other molecules by the following similar protocol: its applications in building many other different molecular recognition systems are greatly anticipated. PMID:18788771

  5. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  6. Layer-by-Layer Surface Molecular Imprinting on Polyacrylonitrile Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxuan; Cao, Bing; Jia, Peng; An, Junhu; Luo, Chao; Ma, Lijing; Chang, Jiao; Pan, Kai

    2015-06-25

    Surface molecular imprinting in layer-by-layer (SMI-LbL) film is known as a facile and effective strategy to build imprinting sites that are more accessible to template molecules compared with molecular imprinting in polymers. Herein, we accomplished the formation of SMI-LbL film on electrospun nanofibers for the first time. The SMI-LbL nanofibers were prepared by a template-induced LbL process on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber substrates, followed by postinfiltrating and photo-cross-linking of photosensitive agent 4,4'-diazostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt (DAS). The obtained nanofiber mat maintained the nanofibrous structure and showed rapid absorption and extraction of template molecules of meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphine (Por). The binding capacity of Por reached 2.1 mg/g when 3.5 bilayers were deposited on the nanofibers. After six cycles of extraction and reabsorption, the binding capacity of Por remained at 83%. Moreover, the absorption results of the targeted templated molecule of Por and the control molecule of Fast Green, which had a very similar chemical structure and charge status to Por, indicated the specific absorption for template molecule of Por. Thus, a surface molecular imprinted nanofiber mat with high selectivity of the templated molecule has been demonstrated. PMID:26038802

  7. Generic Nitric Oxide (NO) Generating Surface by Immobilizing Organoselenium Species via Layer-by-Layer Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Welby, Jenna L.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    A universal nitric oxide (NO) generating surface is assembled via Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition of sodium alginate (Alg) and organoselenium modified polyethyleneimine (SePEI) on quartz and polymeric substrates. The immobilized SePEI species is capable of catalytically decomposing S-nitrosothiol species (RSNO) to NO in the presence of thiol reducing agents (e.g., glutathione, cysteine, etc.). The stepwise buildup of the multilayer films is monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy, SEM and surface contact angle measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the stoichiometry between the polyanion and polycation, and also the presence of Se in the catalytic LbL film. A reductive annealing process is necessary to improve the stability of freshly coated multilayer films via chain rearrangement. Chemiluminescence measurements illustrate the ability of the LbL films to generate NO from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in the presence of S-glutathione (GSH). Enhanced NO fluxes can be achieved by increasing the number of catalytic (SePEI/Alg) bilayers coated on the substrates. Nitric oxide generation is observed even after prolonged contact with sheep whole blood. Preliminary applications of this LbL on silicone rubber tubings and polyurethane catheters reveal similar NO generation behavior from these biomedical grade polymeric substrates. PMID:18710268

  8. Characterization of cathode keeper wear by surface layer activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the erosion rates of the discharge cathode keeper in a 30 cm NSTAR configuration ion thruster were measured using a technique known as Surface Layer Activation (SLA). This diagnostic technique involves producing a radioactive tracer in a given surface by bombardment with high energy ions. The decrease in activity of the tracer material may be monitored as the surface is subjected to wear processes and correlated to a depth calibration curve, yielding the eroded depth. Analysis of the activities was achieved through a gamma spectroscopy system. The primary objectives of this investigation were to reproduce erosion data observed in previous wear studies in order to validate the technique, and to determine the effect of different engine operating parameters on erosion rate. The erosion profile at the TH 15 (23 kw) setting observed during the 8200 hour Life Demonstration Test (LDT) was reproduced. The maximum keeper erosion rate at this setting was determined to be 0.085 pm/hr. Testing at the TH 8 (1.4 kw) setting demonstrated lower erosion rates than TH 15, along with a different wear profile. Varying the keeper voltage was shown to have a significant effect on the erosion, with a positive bias with respect to cathode potential decreasing the erosion rate significantly. Accurate measurements were achieved after operating times of only 40 to 70 hours, a significant improvement over other erosion diagnostic methods.

  9. Modelling boundary layer flow over barnacle-fouled surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Macro-biofouling is a critical concern for the marine industry. However, there is little data on flow and drag over such surfaces. Accurate modelling of such multi-scale flows remains a big challenge. Such simulations are vital in providing insights into the fundamental flow physics, and they can be used to estimate the timing, need and effectiveness of measures used to counteract bio-fouling. This talk focuses on the use of a sharp-interface immersed boundary method coupled with a wall model and large-eddy simulations to carry out accurate simulations of a turbulent boundary layer flow over macro-fouled surfaces. For the current study, high resolution scans of barnacles were used to create simple geometrical representations. Simulations were then carried out to test how well these simpler geometric models mimic the flow over actual barnacles. Simulations of array of modeled barnacles, with different barnacle densities have also been carried out and we present results on the effect distribution density on the flow physics and drag on the surfaces. This work is funded by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0582.

  10. Exploring the bronzing effect at the surface of ink layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Mathieu; Mallet, Maxime; Deboos, Alexis; Chavel, Pierre; Kuang, Deng-Feng; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Besbes, Mondher; Cazier, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the optical phenomenon responsible for the colored shine that sometimes appears at the surface of ink layers in the specular direction, often called bronzing or gloss differential. It seems to come from the wavelength-dependent refractive index of the ink, which induces a wavelength-dependent reflectance of the ink-air interface. Our experiments on cyan and magenta inkjet inks confirm this theory. Complex refractive indices can be obtained from measurements of the spectral reflectance and transmittance of a transparency film coated with the ink. We propose a correction of the classical Clapper-Yule model in order to include the colored gloss in the prediction of the spectral reflectance of an inked paper. We also explored effects of scattering by the micrometric or nanometric roughness of the ink surface. The micrometric roughness, easy to model with a geometrical optics model, can predict the spreading of the colored gloss over a large cone. Electromagnetic models accounting for the effect of the nanometric roughness of the surface also predict the attenuation of short wavelengths observed under collimated illumination.

  11. Surface plasma source with anode layer plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Proposed plasma generation system can be used for high current negative ion beam production and for directed deposition by flux of sputtered neutrals and negative ions. The main mechanism of negative ion formation in surface plasma sources is the secondary emission from low work function surface bombarded by a flux of positive ion or neutrals. The emission of negative ions is enhanced significantly by introducing a small amount of cesium or other substance with low ionization potential. In the proposed source are used positive ions generated by Hall drift plasma accelerator (anode layer plasma accelerator or plasma accelerator with insulated channel, with cylindrical or race track configuration of emission slit). The target-emitter is bombarded by the ion beam accelerated in crossed ExB fields. Negative ions are extracted from the target surface with geometrical focusing and are accelerated by negative voltage applied between emitter and plasma, contacting with the plasma accelerator. Hall drift ion source has a special design with a space for passing of the emitted negative ions and sputtered particles through the positive ion source.

  12. Surface molecular imprinting in layer-by-layer films on silica particles.

    PubMed

    Gauczinski, Jan; Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Xi; Schönhoff, Monika

    2012-03-01

    An improvement to molecular imprinting in polymers, where bulk systems often suffer from slow dynamics of release and uptake, is the formation of thin films with imprinting sites that are more rapid to access by guest molecules. Based on our previous development of surface molecular imprinting layer-by-layer (LbL) films (SMILbL), the present paper presents selective imprinted sites in a surface film on dispersed silica particles, thus designing a SMILbL system with maximized active area and in addition allowing studies with bulk techniques. The multilayer is designed to include the template during the LbL buildup and to form a cross-linked network upon UV-irradiation for enhanced stability. A theophylline moiety is grafted to poly(acrylic acid) as the template, while a UV-sensitive diazo polycation cross-links the polymers after irradiation. Electrophoretic measurements prove the successful buildup of the multilayers by an alternating sign of the zeta potential. Template release is achieved by cleavage of the grafted template. The released amount of template is quantified in solution by (1)H NMR spectra and is in good agreement with the prediction from surface coverage calculations. Rebinding studies of template to the now empty imprinted binding sites show a high affinity for a theophylline derivative with a rebound amount on the order of the original template content. In contrast to theophylline, caffeine with a very similar chemical structure-only differing in one functional group-shows very different binding properties due to a thiol moiety in the binding site. Thus, a particle system with very selective molecular imprinting sites is demonstrated. PMID:22324368

  13. Layer-dependent surface potential of phosphorene and anisotropic/layer-dependent charge transfer in phosphorene-gold hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhu, Yi; Yan, Han; Pei, Jiajie; Myint, Ye Win; Zhang, Shuang; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    The surface potential and the efficiency of interfacial charge transfer are extremely important for designing future semiconductor devices based on the emerging two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene. Here, we directly measured the strong layer-dependent surface potential of mono- and few-layered phosphorene on gold, which is consistent with the reported theoretical prediction. At the same time, we used an optical way photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to probe charge transfer in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system. We firstly observed highly anisotropic and layer-dependent PL quenching in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system, which is attributed to the highly anisotropic/layer-dependent interfacial charge transfer.

  14. Amorphous chalcogenide layers and nanocomposites for direct surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor; Bohdan, Roland; Csarnovics, Istvan; Burunkova, Iulia; Kokenyesi, Sandor

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous, 200 - 3000 nm thick layers of chalcogenide glasses, 1 - 2 mm thick plane-parallel plates as well as nanocomposite structures, containing gold nanoparticles have been produced and used for in situ surface optical and geometrical relief fabrication by optical- or electron-, ion-beam recording. Investigations were focused on the formation of giant (height modulation from nanometers up to micrometers) geometrical reliefs and elements (dots, lines and diffractive elements) applicable in the 0.5 - 10 micrometer spectral range. Recording parameters were compared with available data on acrylic polymer nanocomposites. The mechanism of the recording processes, which include thermal, electron and mass-transport components were explained and the selection of the materials from As(Ge)-S(Se) binary systems with best recording parameters was done.

  15. GYROSCOPIC PUMPING IN THE SOLAR NEAR-SURFACE SHEAR LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Miesch, Mark S.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2011-12-10

    We use global and local helioseismic inversions to explore the prevailing dynamical balances in the solar near-surface shear layer (NSSL). The differential rotation and meridional circulation are intimately linked, with a common origin in the turbulent stresses of the upper solar convection zone. The existence and structure of the NSSL cannot be attributed solely to the conservation of angular momentum by solar surface convection, as is often supposed. Rather, the turbulent angular momentum transport accounts for the poleward meridional flow while the often overlooked meridional force balance is required to maintain the mid-latitude rotational shear. We suggest that the base of the NSSL is marked by a transition from baroclinic to turbulent stresses in the meridional plane which suppress Coriolis-induced circulations that would otherwise establish a cylindrical rotation profile. The turbulent angular momentum transport must be nondiffusive and directed radially inward. Inferred mean flows are consistent with the idea that turbulent convection tends to mix angular momentum but only if the mixing efficiency is inhomogeneous and/or anisotropic. The latitudinal and longitudinal components of the estimated turbulent transport are comparable in amplitude and about an order of magnitude larger than the vertical component. We estimate that it requires 2%-4% of the solar luminosity to maintain the solar NSSL against the inertia of the mean flow. Most of this energy is associated with the turbulent transport of angular momentum out of the layer, with a spin-down timescale of {approx}600 days. We also address implications of these results for numerical modeling of the NSSL.

  16. Gyroscopic Pumping in the Solar Near-surface Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2011-12-01

    We use global and local helioseismic inversions to explore the prevailing dynamical balances in the solar near-surface shear layer (NSSL). The differential rotation and meridional circulation are intimately linked, with a common origin in the turbulent stresses of the upper solar convection zone. The existence and structure of the NSSL cannot be attributed solely to the conservation of angular momentum by solar surface convection, as is often supposed. Rather, the turbulent angular momentum transport accounts for the poleward meridional flow while the often overlooked meridional force balance is required to maintain the mid-latitude rotational shear. We suggest that the base of the NSSL is marked by a transition from baroclinic to turbulent stresses in the meridional plane which suppress Coriolis-induced circulations that would otherwise establish a cylindrical rotation profile. The turbulent angular momentum transport must be nondiffusive and directed radially inward. Inferred mean flows are consistent with the idea that turbulent convection tends to mix angular momentum but only if the mixing efficiency is inhomogeneous and/or anisotropic. The latitudinal and longitudinal components of the estimated turbulent transport are comparable in amplitude and about an order of magnitude larger than the vertical component. We estimate that it requires 2%-4% of the solar luminosity to maintain the solar NSSL against the inertia of the mean flow. Most of this energy is associated with the turbulent transport of angular momentum out of the layer, with a spin-down timescale of ~600 days. We also address implications of these results for numerical modeling of the NSSL.

  17. Controlling surface enrichment in polymeric hole extraction layers to achieve high-efficiency organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Lim, Kyung-Geun; Park, Jong Hyeok; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2012-10-01

    Hole extraction in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can be modulated by a surface-enriched layer formed on top of the conducting polymer-based hole extraction layer (HEL). This tunes the surface work function of the HEL to better align with the ionization potential of the polymeric photoactive layer. Results show noticeable improvement in device power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) in OPVs. We achieved a 6.1 % PCE from the OPV by optimizing the surface-enriched layer.

  18. Water Surface Ripples Generated by the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Surface-Piercing Moving Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, N.; Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Free surface ripples created by subsurface turbulence along a surface-piercing moving wall are studied experimentally. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. One of the two 7.5-m-long belt sections between the rollers is in contact with the water in a large open-surface water tank and the water level is adjusted so that the top of the belt pierces the water free surface. The belt is launched from rest with a 3 g acceleration in order to quickly reach a steady state velocity. This belt motion creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along the side of a ship hull moving at the belt velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region. The water surface ripples generated by the subsurface turbulence are measured in a plane normal to the belt using a cinematic LIF technique. It is found that the overall RMS surface fluctuations increase linearly with belt speed and that the spatial distributions of the fluctuations show a sharp increase near the wall. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Airway Surface Dehydration by Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) in Cystic Fibrosis Is Due to Decreased Function of a Voltage-dependent Potassium Channel and Can Be Rescued by the Drug Pirfenidone*

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, Dahis; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Dennis, John S.; Tyrrell, Jean; Tarran, Robert; Salathe, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is not only elevated in airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, whose airways are characterized by abnormal ion transport and mucociliary clearance, but TGF-β1 is also associated with worse clinical outcomes. Effective mucociliary clearance depends on adequate airway hydration, governed by ion transport. Apically expressed, large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-dependent K+ (BK) channels play an important role in this process. In this study, TGF-β1 decreased airway surface liquid volume, ciliary beat frequency, and BK activity in fully differentiated CF bronchial epithelial cells by reducing mRNA expression of the BK γ subunit leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 26 (LRRC26) and its function. Although LRRC26 knockdown itself reduced BK activity, LRRC26 overexpression partially reversed TGF-β1-induced BK dysfunction. TGF-β1-induced airway surface liquid volume hyper-absorption was reversed by the BK opener mallotoxin and the clinically useful TGF-β signaling inhibitor pirfenidone. The latter increased BK activity via rescue of LRRC26. Therefore, we propose that TGF-β1-induced mucociliary dysfunction in CF airways is associated with BK inactivation related to a LRRC26 decrease and is amenable to treatment with clinically useful TGF-β1 inhibitors. PMID:26338706

  20. Surface Roughness and Dislocation Distribution in Compositionally Graded Relaxed SiGe Buffer Layer with Inserted Strained Si Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tae-Sik

    2005-03-01

    We report the experimental investigation of surface roughness and dislocation distribution of 1 μm-thick, compositionally graded, relaxed SiGe buffer layer with a final Ge surface content of 30%. Tensile-strained Si layers are inserted at various locations in the graded buffer during SiGe epitaxial growths. Slight reduction in surface roughness from about 10.3 nm to about 7.8 nm by inserting two 20 nm thick tensile-strained Si layers followed by SiGe growths. It turns out that majority of the residual surface roughness is developed during the SiGe growths on top of the topmost strain Si layer. The surface immediately after the growth of tensile strained Si is very flat with about 1.1 nm RMS roughness and without crosshatch morphology. Cross-sectional TEM shows clear signs of increased interaction between dislocation half-loops at the top surface of the strained Si layers. Our observation shows that although thin Si layers under tensile-strain are effective in reducing cross-hatch, they could in the meantime impede dislocation propagation leading to higher threading dislocation density. Considerations for an optimized scheme exploiting the flattening function of tensile-strained layers will be discussed.

  1. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, Scott B.; Zender, Charles S.

    2009-05-01

    Global ocean wind power has recently been assessed (W. T. Liu et al., 2008) using scatterometry-based 10 m winds. We characterize, for the first time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean surface, and account for the effects of surface layer stability. Accounting for realistic turbine height and atmospheric stability increases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and -4%, respectively. Our best estimate of mean global ocean wind power is 731 W m-2, about 50% greater than the 487 W m-2 based on previous methods. 80 m wind power is 1.2-1.5 times 10 m power equatorward of 30° latitude, between 1.4 and 1.7 times 10 m power in wintertime storm track regions and >6 times 10 m power in stable regimes east of continents. These results are relatively insensitive to methodology as wind power calculated using a fitted Weibull probability density function is within 10% of power calculated from discrete wind speed measurements over most of the global oceans.

  2. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.; Bilger, G.; Jones, D.; Symietz, I.

    2002-11-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (α,α) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction 1H( 15N,αγ) 12C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of marrow bone cells on the implanted sample surface with that of titanium.

  3. Characterization of Floating Surface Layers of Lipids and Lipopolymers by Surface-Sensitive Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Peter; Lösche, Mathias

    Nanotechnology and molecular (bio-)engineering are making ever deepening inroads into everybodys daily life. Physicochemical and biotechnological achievements in the design of physiologically active supramolecular assemblies have brought about the quest for their submolecular-level characterization. We employ surface-sensitive scattering techniques for the investigation of planar lipid membranes - floating monolayers on aqueous surfaces - to correlate structural, functional and dynamic aspects of biomembrane models. This chapter surveys recent work on the submolecular structure of floating phospholipid monolayers - where the advent of third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources has driven the development of realistic, submolecular-scale quasi-chemical models - as well as of more complex systems: cation binding to anionic lipid surfaces; conformational changes of lipopolymers undergoing phase transitions; the conformational organization of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositides, as examples of physiologically important lipids; and the adsorption of peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY) or solvents (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO) onto phospholipid surface layers.

  4. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  5. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  6. Ordering layers of [bmim][PF6] ionic liquid on graphite surfaces: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Maolin, Sha; Fuchun, Zhang; Guozhong, Wu; Haiping, Fang; Chunlei, Wang; Shimou, Chen; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-04-01

    Microscopic structures of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) [bmim][PF6] on hydrophobic graphite surfaces have been studied in detail by molecular dynamics simulation. It is clearly shown that both the mass and electron densities of the surface adsorbed ionic liquid are oscillatory, and the first peak adjacent to the graphite surface is considerably higher than others, corresponding to a solidlike IL bottom layer of 6 angstroms thick. Three IL layers are indicated between the graphite surface and the inner bulk IL liquid. The individually simulated properties of single-, double-, and triple-IL layers on the graphite surface are very similar to those of the layers between the graphite surface and the bulk liquid, indicating an insignificant effect of vapor-IL interface on the ordered IL layers. The simulation also indicates that the imidazolium ring and butyl tail of the cation (bmim+) of the IL bottom layer lie flat on the graphite surface.

  7. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  8. Surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus: expression, purification and X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael D; Chan, Anson C K; Nomellini, John F; Murphy, Michael E P; Smit, John

    2016-09-01

    Protein surface layers are self-assembling, paracrystalline lattices on the surface of many prokaryotes. Surface-layer proteins have not benefited from widespread structural analysis owing to their resistance to crystallization. Here, the successful expression of a truncated version of RsaA, the surface-layer protein from Caulobacter crescentus, from a Caulobacter protein-expression system is reported. The purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the truncated RsaA, the largest surface-layer protein studied to date and the first from a Gram-negative bacterium, are also reported. PMID:27599857

  9. Enrichment and association of lead and bacteria at particulate surfaces in a salt-marsh surface layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Lion, Leonard W.; Young, L.Y.; Leckie, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    The particle-laden surface layer (approx 150-370 mu m) and subsurface waters of a South San Francisco Bay salt marsh were sampled over 2 tidal cycles and analyzed for particle numbers and particulate-associated and total concentrations of Pb and bacteria. Laboratory studies examined the ability of a bacterial isolate from the surface layer and a bacterial 'film-former' to sorb Pb at environmentally significant concentrations in seawater. Degrees by which Pb concentrated in the surface layer relative to the subsurface strongly correlated with enrichments of surface layer bacteria (bacterioneuston). A significant fraction of the bacterioneuston and surface layer Pb were associated with particles. Particle-bound bacterioneuston may interact with Pb at particulate surfaces in this microenvironment.

  10. Wind induced mixing processes in the coastal surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe; Schaeffer, Amandine; Molcard, Anne; Forget, Philippe; Garreau, Pierre; Poitevin, Joel

    2010-05-01

    Mesoscale and submescale patterns participate in mixing processes in the coastal surface layer. A process oriented numerical investigation using MARS 3D code and high resolution atmospheric forcing using AROME is presented by comparison with HF radar measurements in the Gulf of Lions, Western Mediterranean Sea. As a result, wind reversal conditions have been observed to be responsible for inertial motion and anticyclonic eddy formation when vertical mixing due to internal waves is expected to erode the halocline. Acknowledgements : MeteoFrance and Ifremer support Amandine Schaeffer's PhD. This work is part of the GIRAC project in the framework of the Pole Mer http://polemerpaca.tvt.fr/ References : André G., Garreau P., Garnier V., Fraunie P., 2005. Modelled variability of the sea surface circulation in the North-western Mediterranean Sea and in the Gulf of Lions. Ocean Dynamics, 55: 294-308 André G., Garreau P., Fraunié P., (2009) Mesoscale slope current variability in the Gulf of Lions. Interpretation of in-situ measurements using a three-dimensional model, Cont. Shelf Res.29, 407-423 Bouttier F., 2007, "AROME, avenir de la prévision régionale", La Météorologie, 58, 12-20 Langlais C., Barnier B., Fraunié P. and Schiller A. 2009b: Resolving the diurnal variability of atmospheric forcing in a coastal ocean circulation model of the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean): impact on the thermodynamical state of the upper ocean. Submitted. Schaeffer A. Molcard A. Forget P. Fraunié P. Gareau P. Generation mechanism of sub-mesoscale eddy in the Gulf of Lions : radar observation and modelling. Submitted Xing J., A.M. Davies, P. Fraunié, Model studies of near-inertial motion on the continental shelf off northeast Spain : a 3D/2D model comparison study, 24p, J. Geophys. Res., 109, C01017, doi:10.1029/2003JC001822, 2004.

  11. The surface and through crack problems in layered orthotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Wu, Binghua

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for a relatively accurate calculation of Stress Intensity Factors in a laminated orthotropic plate containing a through or part-through crack. The laminated plate is assumed to be under bending or membrane loading and the mode 1 problem is considered. First three transverse shear deformation plate theories (Mindlin's displacement based first-order theory, Reissner's stress-based first-order theory, and a simple-higher order theory due to Reddy) are reviewed and examined for homogeneous, laminated and heterogeneous orthotropic plates. Based on a general linear laminated plate theory, a method by which the stress intensity factors can be obtained in orthotropic laminated and heterogeneous plates with a through crack is developed. Examples are given for both symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated plates and the effects of various material properties on the stress intensity factors are studied. In order to implement the line-spring model which is used later to study the surface crack problem, the corresponding plane elasticity problem of a two-bonded orthotropic plated containing a crack perpendicular to the interface is also considered. Three different crack profiles: an internal crack, an edge crack, and a crack terminating at the interface are considered. The effect of the different material combinations, geometries, and material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors and on the power of stress singularity for a crack terminating at the interface is fully examined. The Line Spring model of Rice and Levy is used for the part-through crack problem. The surface crack is assumed to lie in one of the two-layered laminated orthotropic plates due to the limitation of the available plane strain results. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reduced to Cauchy type of singular integral equations which are then solved numerically.

  12. Dual Nature of Heat Flux in Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of heat flux (H) with respect to the stability parameter (ζ) in stable surface layer (SSL) is analyzed with in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) theory. The analytical expressions of H are obtained as functions of wind speed (U) and wind shear (dU/dz) using the linear similarity functions and accordingly two cases, (i) U = δ (constant) and (ii) dU/dz = δ are considered. The mathematical analysis shows that the magnitude of H increases with ζ till it attains a maximum value at ζ =ζc and then starts decreasing with increasing stability suggesting the dual characteristic of heat flux with stability parameter. The point of maximum heat flux is found to be dependent on the roughness length (z0) as well as the height above the surface. An attempt has been made to analyze the sensitivity of this dual characteristic of H with ζ using the non-linear similarity functions. The analysis shows that the dual nature of H persists in the case of linear as well as non-linear similarity functions. However, the point of extremum appears to be dependent on the nature of the similarity functions. Turbulent data over a tropical site Ranchi (India) is analyzed to validate the observed nature of H with the theoretical nature as predicted by MOS. The analysis of observational data reveals the non-existence of any preferred stability state in SSL as speculated by Wang and Bras (2010, 2011) and supports the conclusions of Malhi 1995, Derbyshire 1999, van de Wiel et al. 2007, Basu et al. 2008, and van de Wiel et al. 2011. Thus, the non-uniqueness of MOS equations does not appear to be a mathematical artifact and it is consistent with the observations as far as the nature of heat flux with respect to stability parameter in SSL is concerned.

  13. Fructose transport-deficient Staphylococcus aureus reveals important role of epithelial glucose transporters in limiting sugar-driven bacterial growth in airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Garnett, James P; Braun, Daniela; McCarthy, Alex J; Farrant, Matthew R; Baker, Emma H; Lindsay, Jodi A; Baines, Deborah L

    2014-12-01

    Hyperglycaemia as a result of diabetes mellitus or acute illness is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory infection with Staphylococcus aureus. Hyperglycaemia increases the concentration of glucose in airway surface liquid (ASL) and promotes the growth of S. aureus in vitro and in vivo. Whether elevation of other sugars in the blood, such as fructose, also results in increased concentrations in ASL is unknown and whether sugars in ASL are directly utilised by S. aureus for growth has not been investigated. We obtained mutant S. aureus JE2 strains with transposon disrupted sugar transport genes. NE768(fruA) exhibited restricted growth in 10 mM fructose. In H441 airway epithelial-bacterial co-culture, elevation of basolateral sugar concentration (5-20 mM) increased the apical growth of JE2. However, sugar-induced growth of NE768(fruA) was significantly less when basolateral fructose rather than glucose was elevated. This is the first experimental evidence to show that S. aureus directly utilises sugars present in the ASL for growth. Interestingly, JE2 growth was promoted less by glucose than fructose. Net transepithelial flux of D-glucose was lower than D-fructose. However, uptake of D-glucose was higher than D-fructose across both apical and basolateral membranes consistent with the presence of GLUT1/10 in the airway epithelium. Therefore, we propose that the preferential uptake of glucose (compared to fructose) limits its accumulation in ASL. Pre-treatment with metformin increased transepithelial resistance and reduced the sugar-dependent growth of S. aureus. Thus, epithelial paracellular permeability and glucose transport mechanisms are vital to maintain low glucose concentration in ASL and limit bacterial nutrient sources as a defence against infection.

  14. Surface Passivation by Quantum Exclusion Using Multiple Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A semiconductor device has a multilayer doping to provide improved passivation by quantum exclusion. The multilayer doping includes a plurality M of doped layers, where M is an integer greater than 1. The dopant sheet densities in the M doped layers need not be the same, but in principle can be selected to be the same sheet densities or to be different sheet densities. M-1 interleaved layers provided between the M doped layers are not deliberately doped (also referred to as "undoped layers"). Structures with M=2, M=3 and M=4 have been demonstrated and exhibit improved passivation.

  15. Surface pressure fluctuations in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    The surface pressure fluctuations on a flat plate model at hypersonic Mach numbers of 5.2, 7.4 and 10.4 with an attached turbulent boundary layer were measured using flush mounted small piezoelectric sensors. A high frequency resolution of the pressure field was achieved using specially designed small piezoelectric sensors that had a good frequency response well above 300 KHz. The RMS pressures and non-dimensional energy spectra for all above Mach numbers are presented. The convective velocities, obtained from space time correlation considerations are equal to 0.7 U sub infinity. The results indicate the RMS pressures vary from 5 to 25 percent of the mean static pressures. The ratios of RMS pressure to dynamic pressure are less than the universally accepted subsonic value of 6 x 10/3. The ratio decreases in value as the Mach number or the dynamic pressure is increased. The ratio of RMS pressure to wall shear for Mach number 7.4 satisfies one smaller than or equal to p/tau sub w smaller than or equal to three.

  16. Planetary boundary layer response to surface temperature anomalies forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Xavier; Lapeyre, Guillaume; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that strong sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, on the scale of the western boundary currents, strongly affect the planetary boundary layer (PBL) but also all the troposphere. This renewed the interest of air-sea interactions at oceanic meso-scales. Mainly two mechanisms are proposed in the literature, the first one (due to Wallace et al 1989) is based on the destabilization of the PBL above SST anomalies, the second one (Lindzen and Nigam 1987) is based on the pressure anomalies linked to the atmosphere temperature adjustment to the SST. These two mechanisms predict different responses of the PBL to the SST. We did numerical simulations with a meso-scale atmospheric model (WRF) with the same configuration as the one described in Lambert et al 2013. The model is forced by a SST anomaly which is first a zonally or meridionally constant field and secondly a field of meso-scale structures. Firstly we studied the influence of the initial wind strength on the PBL response for the two different types of SST anomalies. We showed that the dominant mechanism can change according to weak or strong wind and to the orientation of the SST anomaly. Secondly after considering a dry atmosphere we switched on the humidity in our configuration. We studied how it influences the PBL response and whether the mechanism driving the PBL response is still the same as in the dry case.

  17. Physiological impact of abnormal lipoxin A₄ production on cystic fibrosis airway epithelium and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerard; Ringholz, Fiona; Buchanan, Paul; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation.

  18. Physiological Impact of Abnormal Lipoxin A4 Production on Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelium and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation. PMID:25866809

  19. Rate of evolution of the specific surface area of surface snow layers.

    PubMed

    Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Dominé, Florent

    2003-02-15

    The snowpack can impact atmospheric chemistry by exchanging adsorbed or dissolved gases with the atmosphere. Modeling this impact requires the knowledge of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow and its variations with time. We have therefore measured the evolution of the SSA of eight recent surface snow layers in the Arctic and the French Alps, using CH4 adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The SSA of fresh snow layers was found to decrease with time, from initial values in the range 613-1540 cm2/g to values as low as 257 cm2/g after 6 days. This is explained by snow metamorphism, which causes modifications in crystal shapes, here essentially crystal rounding and the disappearance of microstructures. A parametrization of the rate of SSA decrease is proposed. We fit the SSA decrease to an exponential law and find that the time constant alpha(exp) (day(-1)) depends on temperature according to alpha(exp) = 76.6 exp (-1708/7), with Tin kelvin. Our parametrization predicts that the SSA of a snow layer evolving at -40 degrees C will decrease by a factor of 2 after 14 days, while a similar decrease at -1 degrees C will only require 5 days. Wind was found to increase the rate of SSA decrease, but insufficient data did not allow a parametrization of this effect. PMID:12636262

  20. An ellipsometry study of silica nanoparticle layers at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Stocco, Antonio; Langevin, Dominique; Wei, Bingbo; Binks, Bernard P

    2009-11-01

    We have studied silica nanoparticle layers spread at the air/water interface. The surface pressure of the layers has been determined in a Langmuir trough via two orthogonal Wilhelmy plates. We observed significant differences in surface pressure according to the preparation protocol: layers spread then compressed or layers obtained after successive spreading steps. We also studied the two types of layers by multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry. We introduce a two-layer model which enables us to evaluate the radius of interfacial aggregates and their contact angle with the air/water interface. PMID:19830337

  1. Region-based geometric modelling of human airways and arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Songlin; Ye, Yong; Tu, Jiyuan; Subic, Aleksandar

    2010-03-01

    Anatomically precise geometric models of human airways and arterial vessels play a critical role in the analysis of air and blood flows in human bodies. The established geometric modelling methods become invalid when the model consists of bronchioles or small vessels. This paper presents a new method for reconstructing the entire airway tree and carotid vessels from point clouds obtained from CT or MR images. A novel layer-by-layer searching algorithm has been developed to recognize branches of the airway tree and arterial vessels from the point clouds. Instead of applying uniform accuracy to all branches regardless of the number of available points, the surface patches on each branch are constructed adaptively based on the number of available elemental points, which leads to the elimination of distortions occurring at small bronchi and vessels.

  2. Modification of surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing lifetime of neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. M. Dvoichenkova, O. A.; Evsin, A. E.

    2015-12-15

    The peculiarities of interaction of hydrogen ions with a titanium target and its surface oxide layer were studied. Two ways of modification of the surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing the lifetime of neutron tubes were proposed: (1) deposition of an yttrium oxide barrier layer on the target surface; (2) implementation of neutron tube work regime in which the target is irradiated with ions with energies lower than 1000 eV between high-energy ion irradiation pulses.

  3. Layer-by-layer construction of the heparin/fibronectin coatings on titanium surface:stability and functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guicai; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan

    Layer-by-layer assembly as a versatile bottom-up nanofabrication technique has been widely used in the development of biomimetic materials with superior mechanical and biological properties. In this study, layer-by-layer assembled heparin/fibronectin biofunctional films were fabricated on titanium (Ti) surface to enhance the blood anticoagulation and accelerate the endothelialization simultaneously. The wettability and chemical changes of the assembled films were investigated by static water contact angle measurement and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The morphology of modified Ti surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The real time assembly process was in-situ monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The stability of the films was evaluated by measuring the changes in wettability and the quantity of heparin and fibronectin on the surfaces. The anticoagulation properties of the films were quantitatively rated using Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) analysis. New peaks of hydroxyl and amino group were observed on the assembled Ti srufaces by FTIR. The contact angles varied among the films with different bilayer numbers, indicating the successful graft of the heparin and fibronectin layer-by-layer. QCM-D results showed that the frequency shift increased with the bilayer numbers, and the heparin and fibronectin could form multilayers. The assembly films were stable after incubation in PBS for 24 h based on the results of the contact angle measurement and the quantity of heparin and fibronectin analysis. APTT results suggested that the assembled films kept excellent antithrombotic properties. All these results revealed that the assembled heparin/fibronectin films with stabiltiy and anticoagulation property could be firmly formed on titanium surfaces. Our study further demonstrates that layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and fibronectin will provide a potential and effective tool for

  4. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  5. Effect of impression material on surface reactive layer when casting pure titanium in phosphate investment.

    PubMed

    Komasa, Y; Moriguchi, A; Asai, M; Nezumi, M; Kakimoto, K; Gonda, Y

    1998-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of impression materials used in preparation of pure titanium castings on the surface reactive layer. Surface roughness of the refractory models before and after firing was smaller when silicone rather than agar impression material was used. The surface roughness of castings prepared with T-invest varied little with the impression material. However, the surface roughness of the castings prepared with CD Titaninvest was less when silicone impression material was used. Surface hardness of the castings was slightly greater when agar impression material was used, and metallic texture analysis of the surface of the castings showed a chill layer and a columnar crystal layer extending from the surface toward the interior. A relatively non-corroded white layer and a markedly corroded black layer were observed in the chill layer, and their thickness was smaller when silicone impression material was used. Use of the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) to determine distribution of various elements in the superficial layer of the casting plates showed that the reactive layer contained less P and Si when silicone impression material was used rather than agar. NH4H2 PO4, which is a component of the bonding material in the investment, was present at a high concentration in the superficial layer of the agar impression material. This shows the importance of preparing refractory models with a non-water-absorbing impression material to obtain pure titanium casting plates with a smaller reactive layer.

  6. Antimicrobial and antioxidant surface modification of cellulose fibers using layer-by-layer deposition of chitosan and lignosulfonates.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Peng, Lincai

    2015-06-25

    To confer cellulose fibers antimicrobial and antioxidant activities, chitosan (CS)/lignosulfonates (LS) multilayers were constructed on fibers surfaces through layer-by-layer deposition technique. The formation of CS/LS multilayers on cellulose fibers surfaces was verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential measurement. The surface morphologies of CS/LS multilayers on fibers surfaces were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that characteristic element (i.e. N and S element) content increased with increasing bilayers number, the surface LS content increased linearly as a function of bilayers. Zeta potential of modified fibers was inversed after deposition of each layer. AFM phase images indicated that the cellulose microfibrils on fibers surfaces were gradually covered by granular LS aggregate. The antimicrobial testing results demonstrated that CS/LS multilayers modified fibers with CS in the outermost layer exhibited higher antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. The antioxidant testing results showed that antioxidant activity of CS/LS multilayers modified fibers was better than that of original fibers under the same oxidation conditions.

  7. Transverse surface waves in a layered structure with a functionally graded piezoelectric substrate and a hard dielectric layer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    2009-03-01

    As to an ideally layered structure with a functionally graded piezoelectric substrate (material parameters change continuously along the thickness direction) and a hard dielectric layer, the existence and propagation behavior of transverse surface waves is studied by analytical technique. The dispersion equations for the existence of the transverse surface waves with respect to phase velocity are obtained for electrically open and short circuit conditions, respectively. A detailed investigation of the effect of gradient coefficient on dispersion relation, electromechanical coupling factor and penetration depth is carried out. It is found by numerical examples that adjusting gradient coefficient makes the electromechanical coupling factor of the transverse surface waves achieve quite high values at some appropriate ratio values of the layer thickness to the wavelength, and at the same time, the penetration depth can be reduced to the same order as the wavelength.

  8. Turbulent structure of scalars in the eddy surface layer over land and sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent structure of scalars in the 'eddy surface layer' over land and sea. In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer (eddy surface layer), especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and corresponding fluxes. However, the structure of temperature and humidity fluctuations in the eddy surface layer shows quite different behaviour. In particular the efficiency of turbulent exchange of sensible and latent heat is observed to be more strongly enhanced than is consistent with standard similarity theory. Also the profiles of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and temperature fluctuation variance are found to depend on the height of the eddy surface layer and not the height above the surface. All these features are found to be similar in measurements at a marine site, a flat land site and during hurricane conditions (hurricane Fabian and Isabel). Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694.. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  9. An analysis of pollutant gas transport and absorption in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, J B; Sheth, B V; Mockros, L F

    1990-05-01

    A mathematical model of ozone absorption, or for any soluble gas that has similar transport properties, is developed for a branching network of liquid-lined cylinders. In particular, we investigate specific flow regimes for finite length tubes where boundary layer phenomena and entrance effects exist in high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe) number airways. The smaller airways which have lower Reynolds and Peclet number flows are modelled by incorporating the detailed analysis found in [10] and modifying it for airways which have alveolated surfaces. We also consider a reacting gas and treat specific regimes where the reaction front is located at the air-liquid interface, within the liquid or at the liquid-tissue interface. Asymptotic methods are used in regions of the tracheobronchial tree where Pe much less than 1 and Pe much greater than 1. In addition, the fact that the radial transport parameter gamma much less than 1 for this toxin, and others such as nitrous oxides, is employed to simplify the analysis. The ozone concentrations, airway absorption and tissue dose are examined as a function of airway generation for several values of the governing parameters. The general result is a maximal dosing in airway generations 17 to 18 that is much larger (up to an order of magnitude) than the predictions of previous theories.

  10. Exploratory investigation of the effect of porous surfaces on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Four different test surfaces were studied to determine the effect of porous walls on the characteristics of a hypersonic turbulent flat-plate boundary layer. The investigation was an attempt to decrease the surface shear of the boundary layer by transmitting fluctuating pressure energy through the wall and absorbing it in a cavity beneath the wall. Pitot surveys were made at two locations, schlieren photographs of the boundary layer were taken, and hot-wire measurements in the flow above the boundary layer were made to determine whether the surfaces affected the turbulent boundary layer. Neither an increase nor a decrease in surface shear or boundary-layer growth was detected. Tabulations of the pitot data are included.

  11. Distributions of surface-layer buoyance versus lifting condensation level over a heterogeneous land surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schrieber, K.; Zhang, Qing; Stull, R.

    1996-04-15

    Onset and coverage of small cumulus clouds depend on the relative abundance of surface-layer air parcels possessing favorable buoyancy and moisture - two variables that are coupled through the surface energy budget. This abundance is described using a joint frequency distribution (JFD) as a function of virtual potential temperature {theta}{sub v} and height of the lifting condensation level z{sub LCL}. It is shown analytically that the shape and spread of this JFD depends on the ranges of Bowen ratios and solar forcings (albedoes, cloud shading, etc.) that exist within a domain of heterogeneous land use. To sample the character of such JFDs in the real atmosphere, a case study is presented using turbulence data gathered by aircraft flying in the surface layer of southwest France. This case study includes 4 days of clear skies during the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment (HAPEX) of 1986. The full flight track during HAPEX overflew a wide range of land use including evergreen forest, corn, vineyards, pastures, and irrigated fields over varied topography. The JFDs from these full tracks are found to be quite complex, being frequently multimodal with a convoluted perimeter. However, when a full track is broken into segments, each over a subdomain of quasi-homogeneous land use, the resulting segment JFDs are mono-modal with simpler topology. Such a characterization of JFDs provides guidance toward eventual subgrid cumulus parameterization in large-scale forecast models, with associated impacts in aviation forecasting, pollutant venting and chemical reactions, verticle dispersion and turbulence modulation, and radiation balance in climate-change models. 48 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Interfacial layer effects on surface capacitances and electro-osmosis in electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Uematsu, Yuki; Netz, Roland R

    2016-02-13

    Many properties of the interfacial layer of water at surfaces differ significantly from those of bulk water. The consequences are most significant for the double-layer capacitance and the electrokinetic properties. We model the interfacial hydration layer by a modified dielectric constant and a modified local viscosity over a single interfacial width. Analytic expressions in the low-charge Debye-Hückel approximation are derived and shown to describe experimental surface capacitance and electro-osmotic data in a unified framework.

  13. Layered devices having surface curvature and method of constructing same

    DOEpatents

    Woodbury, Richard C.; Perkins, Raymond T.; Thorne, James M.

    1989-01-01

    A method of treating a substrate having first and second sides with corresponding oppositely facing first and second surfaces, to produce curvature in the first surface. The method includes the steps of removing material, according to a predetermined pattern, from the second side of the substrate, and applying a stress-producing film of material to at least one surface of the substrate to thereby cause the substrate to bend to produce the desired curvature in the first surface.

  14. Influence of ultrathin water layer on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palasantzas, G.; Zwol, P. J. van; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we investigate the influence of ultrathin water layer ({approx}1-1.5 nm) on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces. Adsorbed water is inevitably present on gold surfaces at ambient conditions as jump-up-to contact during adhesion experiments demonstrate. Calculations based on the Lifshitz theory give very good agreement with the experiment in the absence of any water layer for surface separations d > or approx. 10 nm. However, a layer of thickness h < or approx. 1.5 nm is allowed by the error margin in force measurements. At shorter separations, d < or approx. 10 nm, the water layer can have a strong influence as calculations show for flat surfaces. Nonetheless, in reality the influence of surface roughness must also be considered, and it can overshadow any water layer influence at separations comparable to the total sphere-plate rms roughness w{sub shp}+w.

  15. Turbulent boundary layer over solid and porous surfaces with small roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.; Collier, F.

    1982-01-01

    Skin friction and profiles of mean velocity, axial and normal turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress in the untripped boundary layer were measured directly on a large diameter, axisymmetric body with: (1) a smooth, solid surface; (2) a sandpaper-roughened, solid surface; (3) a sintered metal, porous surface; (4) a smooth, perforated titanium surface; (5) a rough solid surface made of fine, diffusion bonded screening, and (6) a rough, porous surface of the same screening. Results obtained for each of these surfaces are discussed. It is shown that a rough, porous wall simply does not influence the boundary layer in the same way as a rough solid wall. Therefore, turbulent transport models for boundary layers over porous surfaces either with or without injection or suction, must include both surface roughness and porosity effects.

  16. Overlap region in turbulent boundary layer over a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2010-11-01

    The one term non-linear outer layer in George & Castillo (1997, AMR 50, 689), based on their AIP argument, was matched with inner wall layer leading to power law velocity, which denied very existence of traditional log law, while Clauser (1956) patched same outer layer with inner wall log law. Jones, Nickles & Marusic (2008, JFM 616, 195) proposal that free stream velocity (in GC97) and friction velocity (in Coles 1956) are potentially valid scalings according to their theoretical criterion in the outer layer, is misleading, being not correct. Further, in Nishioka (2010, FDR 42, 45502-5) and Prandtl (1935, AT) the additive constant in power law velocity is singular at large Reynolds numbers is also not correct, and this constant is shown to be zero. In the present work, two terms outer layer expansion is considered where leading term scales with free steam velocity and first order with friction velocity. The leading term turns out to be a non-linear wake type equation through application of Izakson-Millikan- Kolmogorov hypothesis. The first order terms lead to alternate functional equations, arising from ratios of two successive derivatives of the functional equations, each of which admits two functional solutions, the power law velocity profile in addition to log law velocity profile. The comparison with extensive data on rough & smooth walls also provide strong support to present work.

  17. Adapting the Electrospinning Process to Provide Three Unique Environments for a Tri-layered In Vitro Model of the Airway Wall

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Jack C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.; Knox, Alan J.; Lewis, Mark P.; Rose, Felicity R.A.J.; Morris, Gavin E.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a highly adaptable method producing porous 3D fibrous scaffolds that can be exploited in in vitro cell culture. Alterations to intrinsic parameters within the process allow a high degree of control over scaffold characteristics including fiber diameter, alignment and porosity. By developing scaffolds with similar dimensions and topographies to organ- or tissue-specific extracellular matrices (ECM), micro-environments representative to those that cells are exposed to in situ can be created. The airway bronchiole wall, comprised of three main micro-environments, was selected as a model tissue. Using decellularized airway ECM as a guide, we electrospun the non-degradable polymer, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), by three different protocols to produce three individual electrospun scaffolds optimized for epithelial, fibroblast or smooth muscle cell-culture. Using a commercially available bioreactor system, we stably co-cultured the three cell-types to provide an in vitro model of the airway wall over an extended time period. This model highlights the potential for such methods being employed in in vitro diagnostic studies investigating important inter-cellular cross-talk mechanisms or assessing novel pharmaceutical targets, by providing a relevant platform to allow the culture of fully differentiated adult cells within 3D, tissue-specific environments. PMID:26275100

  18. Surface Passivation by Quantum Exclusion Using Multiple Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A semiconductor device has a multilayer doping to provide improved passivation by quantum exclusion. The multilayer doping includes at least two doped layers fabricated using MBE methods. The dopant sheet densities in the doped layers need not be the same, but in principle can be selected to be the same sheet densities or to be different sheet densities. The electrically active dopant sheet densities are quite high, reaching more than 1.times.10.sup.14 cm.sup.-2, and locally exceeding 10.sup.22 per cubic centimeter. It has been found that silicon detector devices that have two or more such dopant layers exhibit improved resistance to degradation by UV radiation, at least at wavelengths of 193 nm, as compared to conventional silicon p-on-n devices.

  19. Evaluation of Mercaptobenzothiazole Anticorrosive Layer on Cu Surface by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-05-01

    Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) anticorrosive layer on copper surface prepared in MBT solutions was analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The results showed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed on Cu2O layer in the MBT solution at temperatures higher than 50 °C. Additionally, it was confirmed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed in the MBT solution at room temperature by adding about 20 wt % acetone to the solution. From polishing experiments of MBT anticorrosive layer and benzotriazole (BTA) layer, it was revealed that MBT anticorrosive layer was physically stronger than BTA layer. It is considered that dishing amount in Cu chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) can be reduced by using MBT. However, MBT anticorrosive layer was not formed in the MBT solution including Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggesting that slurry should be composed without H2O2 in order to use MBT for Cu CMP.

  20. Submucosal gland secretions in airways from cystic fibrosis patients have normal [Na+] and pH but elevated viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Sujatha; Joo, Nam Soo; Reitz, Bruce; Wine, Jeffrey J.; Verkman, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Fluid and macromolecule secretion by submucosal glands in mammalian airways is believed to be important in normal airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An in situ fluorescence method was applied to measure the ionic composition and viscosity of freshly secreted fluid from airway glands. Fragments of human large airways obtained at the time of lung transplantation were mounted in a humidified perfusion chamber and the mucosal surface was covered by a thin layer of oil. Individual droplets of secreted fluid were microinjected with fluorescent indicators for measurement of [Na+], [Cl−], and pH by ratio imaging fluorescence microscopy and viscosity by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. After carbachol stimulation, 0.1–0.5 μl of fluid accumulated in spherical droplets at gland orifices in ≈3–5 min. In gland fluid from normal human airways, [Na+] was 94 ± 8 mM, [Cl−] was 92 ± 12 mM, and pH was 6.97 ± 0.06 (SE, n = 7 humans, more than five glands studied per sample). Apparent fluid viscosity was 2.7 ± 0.3-fold greater than that of saline. Neither [Na+] nor pH differed in gland fluid from CF airways, but viscosity was significantly elevated by ≈2-fold compared to normal airways. These results represent the first direct measurements of ionic composition and viscosity in uncontaminated human gland secretions and indicate similar [Na+], [Cl−], and pH to that in the airway surface liquid. The elevated gland fluid viscosity in CF may be an important factor promoting bacterial colonization and airway disease. PMID:11427704

  1. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

  2. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

  3. Layer-by-layer fabrication of supramolecular dyes on TiO2 surfaces for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Maguire, Shawn; Lye, Diane; Weck, Marcus; Lee, Stephanie

    We present a modular layer-by-layer approach based on metal coordination chemistry to assemble supramolecular dyes exhibiting increased absorption in the visible range on electrode surfaces. Specifically, palladiated bis-pincer complexes (Pd-BPCs) were employed as linkers between pyridyl-terminated organic molecules via dative bonding. By alternately immersing mesoporous TiO2-coated glass substrates in solutions containing dissolved zinc porphyin (ZnP) and Pd-BPCs, supramolecular dyes were assembled layer-by-layer on the TiO2 surfaces. UV-visible absorption spectra of these assembled structures revealed a linear increase in the Soret and Q bands of ZnP after each immersion of the substrate in the ZnP solution. Coordination of the ZnP layers with Pd-BPC resulted in a slight red shift (<10 nm) of the absorption bands. The modular nature of the assembly process afforded the incorporation of other pyridyl-terminated organic molecules in specific layers of the supramolecular assemblies. By assembling unique organic dyes that absorb different wavelengths of light, we expect to expand light absorption across the visible region of the solar spectrum for solar cell applications.

  4. Surface Layering at the Mercury-Electrolyte Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ocko, B.M.; Elsen, A.; Murphy, B.M.; Tamam, L.; Deutsch, M.; Kuzmenko, I.; Magnussen, O.M.

    2010-03-12

    X-ray reflectometry reveals atomic layering at a liquid-liquid interface--mercury in a 0.01 M NaF solution. The interface width exceeds capillary wave theory predictions and displays an anomalous dependence on the voltage applied across it, displaying a minimum positive of the potential of zero charge. The latter is explained by electrocapillary effects and an additional intrinsic broadening of the interface profile, tentatively assigned to polarization of the conduction electrons due to the electric field of the electrochemical double layer at the interface.

  5. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  6. Expansible apparatus for removing the surface layer from a concrete object

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Charles H.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing the surface layer from a concrete object. The method consists of providing a hole having a circular wall in the surface layer of the object, the hole being at least as deep as the thickness of the surface layer to be removed, and applying an outward wedging pressure on the wall of the hole sufficient to spall the surface layer around the hole. By the proper spacing of an appropriate number of holes, it is possible to remove the entire surface layer from an object. The apparatus consists of an elongated tubular-shaped body having a relatively short handle with a solid wall at one end, the wall of the remainder of the body containing a plurality of evenly spaced longitudinal cuts to form a relatively long expandable section, the outer end of the expandable section having an expandable, wedge-shaped spalling edge extending from the outer surface of the wall, perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body, and expanding means in the body for outwardly expanding the expandable section and forcing the spalling edge into the wall of a hole with sufficient outward pressure to spall away the surface layer of concrete. The method and apparatus are particularly suitable for removing surface layers of concrete which are radioactively contaminated.

  7. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Uğur, Sule S; Sarıışık, Merih; Aktaş, A Hakan; Uçar, M Ciğdem; Erden, Emre

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticle-based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values) were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL) process on cotton fabrics properties. PMID:20596450

  8. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticle–based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values) were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL) process on cotton fabrics properties. PMID:20596450

  9. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğur, Şule S.; Sarıışık, Merih; Aktaş, A. Hakan; Uçar, M. Çiğdem; Erden, Emre

    2010-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticle-based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC) by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values) were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL) process on cotton fabrics properties.

  10. Layer-by-layer modification of high surface curvature nanoparticles with weak polyelectrolytes using a multiphase solvent precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Ashvin T; You, Yil-Hwan; Choi, Jeong-Wan; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Meissner, Kenith E; McShane, Michael J

    2016-03-15

    The layer-by-layer modification of ≈5 nm mercaptocarboxylic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles was studied in an effort to illustrate effective means to overcome practical issues in handling and performing surface modification of such extremely small materials. To accomplish this, each layer deposition cycle was separated into a multi-step process wherein solution pH was controlled in two distinct phases of polyelectrolyte adsorption and centrifugation. Additionally, a solvent precipitation step was introduced to make processing more amenable by concentrating the sample and exchanging solution pH before ultracentrifugation. The pH-dependent assembly on gold nanoparticles was assessed after each layer deposition cycle by monitoring the plasmon peak absorbance location, surface charge, and the percentage of nanoparticles recovered. The selection of solution pH during the adsorption phase was found to be a critical parameter to enhance particle recovery and maximize surface charge when coating with weak polyelectrolytes. One bilayer was deposited with a high yield and the modified particles exhibited enhanced colloidal stability across a broad pH range and increased ionic strength. These findings support the adoption of this multi-step processing approach as an effective and generalizable approach to improve stability of high surface curvature particles. PMID:26771506

  11. Method for removing surface-damaged layers from nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fawley, R. W.

    1968-01-01

    Electrical discharge machining /EDM/ damaged layer can be effectively removed from Rene 41, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, and Monel K-500 by abrasive-grit blasting or electropolishing /at room temperature/ at a current density of 5A/inches squared in a water solution of phosphoric and sulfuric acids.

  12. Study of microstructure of surface layers of low-carbon steel after turning and ultrasonic finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Zh. G.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Perevalova, O. B.; Klimenov, V. A.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Profilometry and optical and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the microstructure of surface layers of a low-carbon ferrite-pearlite steel subjected to turning and ultrasonic finishing. It is shown that turning peaks and valleys have different microstructures, which stipulates manifestation of technological hereditary when processing surfaces of machined parts. Ultrasonic finishing causes the severe plastic deformation of the surface layer, which favors the elimination of a technological heredity that is acquired during turning.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition to Fine-Tune the Surface Properties and Diameters of Fabricated Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Mitsui, Toshiyuki; Farmer, Damon B.; Golovchenko, Jene; Gordon, Roy G.; Branton, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition of alumina enhanced the molecule sensing characteristics of fabricated nanopores by fine-tuning their surface properties, reducing 1/f noise, neutralizing surface charge to favor capture of DNA and other negative polyelectrolytes, and controlling the diameter and aspect ratio of the pores with near single Ångstrom precision. The control over the chemical and physical nature of the pore surface provided by atomic layer deposition produced a higher yield of functional nanopore detectors. PMID:24991194

  14. Analysis of strain transfer of six-layer surface-bonded fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan-bao; Qiu, Ye; Zhao, Hai-tao; Chen, Ji-an; Wang, Yue-ying; Fan, Zhen-min

    2012-06-20

    A theoretical analysis of strain transfer of six-layer surface-bonded fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) subjected to uniform axial stress is presented. The proposed six-layer structure consists of optical fiber, protective coating, adhesive layer, substrate layer, outer adhesive layer, and host material, which is different from the four-layer case of common acknowledgement. A theoretical formula of strain transfer rate from host material to optical fiber is established to provide an accurate theoretical prediction. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, influence parameters of the middle layers that affect the average strain transfer rate of the six-layer surface-bonded FBG are discussed. After the parametric study, a selection scheme of sensor parameters for numerical validation, which makes the average strain transfer rate approach unity, is determined. Good agreement is observed between numerical results and theoretical predictions. In the end, the six-layer model is extended to the general situation of multiple substrate layers, which lays a theoretical groundwork for the research and design of surface-bonded FBGs with substrate layers in the future.

  15. Effect of the interplay between protein and surface on the properties of adsorbed protein layers.

    PubMed

    Ouberai, Myriam M; Xu, Kairuo; Welland, Mark E

    2014-08-01

    Although protein adsorption to surface is a common phenomenon, investigation of the process is challenging due to the complexity of the interplay between external factors, protein and surface properties. Therefore experimental approaches have to measure the properties of adsorbed protein layers with high accuracy in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the process. To this end, we used a combination of two biosensing techniques, dual polarization interferometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. From this, we are able to extract surface coverage values, layer structural parameters, water content and viscoelastic properties to examine the properties of protein layers formed at the liquid/solid interface. Layer parameters were examined upon adsorption of proteins of varying size and structural properties, on surfaces with opposite polarity. We show that "soft" proteins such as unfolded α-synuclein and high molecular weight albumin are highly influenced by the surface polarity, as they form a highly diffuse and hydrated layer on the hydrophilic silica surface as opposed to the denser, less hydrated layer formed on a hydrophobic methylated surface. These layer properties are a result of different orientations and packing of the proteins. By contrast, lysozyme is barely influenced by the surface polarity due to its intrinsic structural stability. Interestingly, we show that for a similar molecular weight, the unfolded α-synuclein forms a layer with the highest percentage of solvation not related to surface coverage but resulting from the highest water content trapped within the protein. Together, these data reveal a trend in layer properties highlighting the importance of the interplay between protein and surface for the design of biomaterials. PMID:24780165

  16. An uptake of cationized ferritin by alveolar type I cells in airway-instilled goat lung: distribution of anionic sites on the epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Atwal, O S; Viel, L; Minhas, K J

    1990-07-01

    The present study has investigated ultrastructural localization of anionic sites on the luminal surface of the alveolar epithelium of goat lung by direct airway instillation of cationized ferritin (CF) in the cranial lobe of the right lung through a bronchoscope. The cationic probe decorated preferentially the luminal plasmalemmal vesicles and plasmalemma proper of alveolar type I cell. This indicated the presence of highly charged anionic microdomains at these binding sites. The ligand was internalized in the free plasmalemmal vesicles of alveolar type I cell within 2 min. Heavy decoration of vesicles at 5 min of perfusion indicated that the amount of CF internalization increased with its concentration in the alveoli. It is suggested that exposure of alveolar surface to several gases of ruminal-origin induces changes in the surface charge of luminal plasmalemma of alveolar type I cells. The significance of these anionic plasmalemmal sites is discussed in relation to the adjustment of osmotic pressure gradient across the alveolar-capillary membrane of the ruminant lung.

  17. An uptake of cationized ferritin by alveolar type I cells in airway-instilled goat lung: distribution of anionic sites on the epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Atwal, O S; Viel, L; Minhas, K J

    1990-07-01

    The present study has investigated ultrastructural localization of anionic sites on the luminal surface of the alveolar epithelium of goat lung by direct airway instillation of cationized ferritin (CF) in the cranial lobe of the right lung through a bronchoscope. The cationic probe decorated preferentially the luminal plasmalemmal vesicles and plasmalemma proper of alveolar type I cell. This indicated the presence of highly charged anionic microdomains at these binding sites. The ligand was internalized in the free plasmalemmal vesicles of alveolar type I cell within 2 min. Heavy decoration of vesicles at 5 min of perfusion indicated that the amount of CF internalization increased with its concentration in the alveoli. It is suggested that exposure of alveolar surface to several gases of ruminal-origin induces changes in the surface charge of luminal plasmalemma of alveolar type I cells. The significance of these anionic plasmalemmal sites is discussed in relation to the adjustment of osmotic pressure gradient across the alveolar-capillary membrane of the ruminant lung. PMID:2390765

  18. Evolution of the surface area of a snow layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanot, L.; Domine, F.

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gases can partition between the atmosphere and the snow surface. Because snow has a large surface-to-volume ratio, an important interaction potential between ice and atmospheric trace gases exists. Quantifying this partitioning requires the knowledge of the surface area (SA) of snow. Eleven samples were taken from a 50 cm thick snow fall at Col de Porte, near Grenoble (French Alps) between January 20 and February 4, 1998. Fresh snow and 3, 8, and 15-day-old snow were sampled at three different depths. Surface hoar, formed after the fall, was also sampled. Air and surface snow temperature, snow density, and snow fall rate were measured. Snow temperature always remained below freezing. Snow SA was measured using methane adsorption at 77.15 K. Values ranged from 2.25 m{sup 2}/g for fresh snow to 0.25 m{sup 2}/g for surface hoar and surface snow after 15 days. These values are much too high to be explained by the macroscopic aspect of snow crystals, and microstructures such as small rime droplets must have been present. Large decrease in SA with time were observed. The first meter of snowpack had a total surface area of about 50,000 m{sup 2} per m{sup 2} of ground. Reduction in SA will lead to the emission of adsorbed species by the snowpack, with possible considerable increase in atmospheric concentrations.

  19. Layered Gold and Titanium Dioxide Substrates for Improved Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Sensing.

    PubMed

    Strobbia, Pietro; Henegar, Alex J; Gougousi, Theodosia; Cullum, Brian M

    2016-08-01

    This manuscript describes a simple process for fabricating gold-based, multi-layered, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates that can be applied to a variety of different nanostructures, while still providing multi-layer enhancement factors comparable to those previously achieved only with optimized silver/silver oxide/silver substrates. In particular, gold multi-layered substrates generated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been fabricated and characterized in terms of their optimal performance, revealing multi-layer enhancements of 2.3-fold per spacer layer applied. These substrates were fabricated using TiO2 as the dielectric spacer material between adjacent gold layers, with ALD providing a conformal thin film with high surface coverage and low thickness. By varying the spacer layer thicknesses from sub-monolayer (non-contiguous) films through multiple TiO2 layer thick films, the non-monotonic spacer layer thickness response has been elucidated, revealing the importance of thin, contiguous dielectric spacer layers for optimal enhancement. Furthermore, the extended shelf life of these gold multi-layered substrates was characterized, demonstrating usable lifetimes (i.e. following storage in ambient conditions) of greater than five months, with the further potential for simple limited electrochemical regeneration even after this time. PMID:27329834

  20. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-02-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal.

  1. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers.

    PubMed

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-02-19

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal.

  2. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers.

    PubMed

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  3. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    PubMed Central

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  4. Transient Heat Transfer in a Semitransparent Radiating Layer with Boundary Convection and Surface Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Surface convection and refractive index are examined during transient radiative heating or cooling of a grey semitransparent layer with internal absorption, emission and conduction. Each side of the layer is exposed to hot or cold radiative surroundings, while each boundary is heated or cooled by convection. Emission within the layer and internal reflections depend on the layer refractive index. The reflected energy and heat conduction distribute energy across the layer and partially equalize the transient temperature distributions. Solutions are given to demonstrate the effect of radiative heating for layers with various optical thicknesses, the behavior of the layer heated by radiation on one side and convectively cooled on the other, and a layer heated by convection while being cooled by radiation. The numerical method is an implicit finite difference procedure with non-uniform space and time increments. The basic method developed in earlier work is expanded to include external convection and incident radiation.

  5. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Canlas, Christian P; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W; Winans, Randall E; Van Duyne, Richard P; Stair, Peter C; Notestein, Justin M

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al(2)O(3) (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with 'nanocavities' (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO(2) photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations. PMID:23174984

  6. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  7. Microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatment, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatments, and the method and apparatus for its preparation are disclosed. The structure is prepared by sequentially subjecting a uniformly surface treated structure to atomic oxygen treatment to remove an outer layer of surface treatment to a generally uniform depth, and then surface treating the so exposed layer with another surface treating agent. The atomic oxygen/surface treatment steps may optionally be repeated, each successive time to a lesser depth, to produce a microporous structure having multilayered surface treatments. The apparatus employs at least one side arm from a main oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  8. Microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatment, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatments, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof is presented. The structure is prepared by sequentially subjecting a uniformly surface-treated structure to atomic oxygen treatment to remove an outer layer of surface treatment to a generally uniform depth, and then surface treating the so exposed layer with another surface treating agent. The atomic oxygen/surface treatment steps may optionally be repeated, each successive time to a lesser depth, to produce a microporous structure having multilayered surface treatments. The apparatus employs at least one side arm from a main atomic oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  9. Surface double-layer structure in (110) oriented BiFeO{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tieying; Zhang, Xingmin; Gao, Xingyu; Li, Zhong; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Can; Feng, Yu; Guo, Haizhong; Jin, Kuijuan

    2014-11-17

    Surface double-layer structure different from the interior was found in BiFeO{sub 3} thin film grown on SrRuO{sub 3} covered SrTiO{sub 3} (110) substrate by pulsed laser deposition. It was shown that BiFeO{sub 3} film exhibits epitaxial phase with single domain. X-ray reflectivity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed a skin layer of less than 1 nm with a reduced electron density and different surface state. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction convinced a surface multi-domain structure of several nm beneath the surface skin layer. The double-layer near surface structure would be originated from the large depolarization field produced by the single-domain structure with strain.

  10. Cryoscanning electron microscopic study of the surface amorphous layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate the structure near the articular surface, frozen unfixed hydrated articular cartilage with subchondral bone from the pig knee was examined using a cryoscanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM). This method is considered to reduce the introduction of artefacts due to fixation and drying. An amorphous layer, without a collagen-fibril network or chondrocytes, covered most of the surface of the cartilage. This layer was termed the surface amorphous layer. It showed various appearances, which were classified into 4 groups. The average thickness of the layer did not differ among the 8 anatomical regions from which the specimens were taken. The thickness of the layer was found to correlate with the type of appearance of the layer. The 4 appearances associated with thicknesses in descending order are: 'streaked', 'foliate', 'spotted', and 'vestigial'. The surface layer observed in the cryo-SEM was thicker than that observed by a conventional SEM. This difference may be attributable to dehydration of the specimen used in specimen preparation for the latter technique. The layer was also observed in articular cartilage taken from human and rabbit knees. The layer was found to be unstable and to have very variable features. Its thickness and appearance may be influenced by various factors such as dehydration, fluid absorption or mechanical stress. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:7592006

  11. Inter-layer proton transfer with a heterogeneous reaction on ice surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Shin, Seokmin

    2008-02-01

    We report the results of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the reaction dynamics of a heterogeneous reaction between HCl and ClONO 2 on an ice surface. The constrained CPMD simulations showed that completely dissociated products are formed, and the most likely Cl-Cl distance is near 2.30 Å. The proton released from the reactant HCl is observed to be in the inter-layer region of the ice surface. It is also observed that an inter-layer proton transfer is possible on the protonated ice surface. These results illustrate the relationship between the heterogeneous reactions and the proton mobility between layers.

  12. Shear-induced surface alignment of polymer dispersed liquid crystal microdroplets on the boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Singh, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin films have been deposited on a glass substrate, utilizing the processes of polymerization and solvent evaporation induced phase separation. Liquid crystal microdroplets trapped on the upper surface of the thin film respond to the shear stress due to air or gas flow on the surface layer. Response to an applied step shear stress input on the surface layer has been measured by measuring the time response of the transmitted light intensity. Initial results on the measurements of the light transmission as a function of the air flow differential pressure indicate that these systems offer features suitable for boundary layer and gas flow sensors.

  13. Surface layering and melting in an ionic liquid studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mezger, Markus; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Reichert, Harald; Deutsch, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The molecular-scale structure of the ionic liquid [C18mim]+[FAP]− near its free surface was studied by complementary methods. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant soft X-ray reflectivity revealed a depth-decaying near-surface layering. Element-specific interfacial profiles were extracted with submolecular resolution from energy-dependent soft X-ray reflectivity data. Temperature-dependent hard X-ray reflectivity, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and infrared spectroscopy uncovered an intriguing melting mechanism for the layered region, where alkyl chain melting drove a negative thermal expansion of the surface layer spacing. PMID:23431181

  14. Three-layer model for the surface second-harmonic generation yield including multiple reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sean M.; Mendoza, Bernardo S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the three-layer model to calculate the surface second-harmonic generation (SSHG) yield. This model considers that the surface is represented by three regions or layers. The first layer is the vacuum region with a dielectric function ɛv(ω ) =1 from where the fundamental electric field impinges on the material. The second layer is a thin layer (ℓ ) of thickness d characterized by a dielectric function ɛℓ(ω ) , and it is in this layer where the SSHG takes place. The third layer is the bulk region denoted by b and characterized by ɛb(ω ) . Both the vacuum and bulk layers are semi-infinite. The model includes the multiple reflections of both the fundamental and the second-harmonic (SH) fields that take place at the thin layer ℓ . We obtain explicit expressions for the SSHG yield for the commonly used s and p polarizations of the incoming 1 ω and outgoing 2 ω electric fields, where no assumptions for the symmetry of the surface are made. These symmetry assumptions ultimately determine which components of the surface nonlinear second-order susceptibility tensor χ (-2 ω ;ω ,ω ) are different from zero, and thus contribute to the SSHG yield. Then, we particularize the results for the most commonly investigated surfaces, the (001), (110), and (111) crystallographic faces, taking their symmetries into account. We use the three-layer model and compare it against the experimental results of a Si(111)(1 ×1 ):H surface, as a test case, and use it to predict the SSHG yield of a Si(001)(2 ×1 ) surface.

  15. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... efforts to assist with breathing have failed. A hollow needle or tube can be inserted into the ...

  16. Surface Smoothing Effect and Characteristics of New 1,4-Phenylenediamine Polymer as Anode Buffer Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Koichiro; Ogata, Tomoyuki; Okabe, Kazuki; Tanaka, Futoshi; Hara, Masahiko

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a new 1,4-phenylenediamine polymer with suitable properties for the anode buffer layer of organic devices. The anode buffer layer composed of a polymer doped with an electron acceptor [tris(4-bromophenyl)aminium hexachloroantimonate] was found to improve the surface roughness of the anode, particularly when the layer was sufficiently baked at a high temperature to transform it into the glass phase. The phase transition of the layer into the glass phase also affected its electric properties. Despite that the baking temperature was higher than the decomposition temperature of the electron acceptor, the resistivity of the layer with a smooth surface was one order of magnitude lower than that of the undoped layer.

  17. Interactions between volume and surface EM waves in layered structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ushioda, S.

    1984-01-01

    Using light scattering spectroscopy, the interaction of Surface Plasmon Polariton SPP in silver films on a glass substrate is with the incident radiation and with optical phonons of an external medium in contact with the film. The mean free path and the field strength of SPP are determined. The same SPP plays an important role in light emitting tunnel junctions (LETJ) in which an electrical current is converted into Volume Electromagnetic Wave VEW. The efficiency of light emission from LETJ through a prism coupler rather than through surface roughness is discussed. The coupling between phonon surface polaritons (PhSP) and optical guided waves (OGW) in thin films of GaP is also examined.

  18. Evaluation of parameterization for turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat in stably stratified surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodemann, H.; Foken, Th.

    2003-04-01

    General Circulation Models calculate the energy exchange between surface and atmosphere by means of parameterisations for turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat in the surface layer. However, currently implemented parameterisations after Louis (1979) create large discrepancies between predictions and observational data, especially in stably stratified surface layers. This work evaluates a new surface layer parameterisation proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2002), which was specifically developed to improve energy flux predictions in stable stratification. The evaluation comprises a detailed study of important surface layer characteristics, a sensitivity study of the parameterisation, and a direct comparison to observational data from Antarctica and predictions by the Louis (1979) parameterisation. The stability structure of the stable surface layer was found to be very complex, and strongly influenced fluxes in the surface layer. The sensitivity study revealed that the new parameterisation depends strongly on the ratio between roughness length and roughness temperature, which were both observed to be very variable parameters. The comparison between predictions and measurements showed good agreement for momentum fluxes, but large discrepancies for heat fluxes. A stability dependent evaluation of selected data showed better agreement for the new parameterisation of Zilitinkevich et al. (2002) than for the Louis (1979) scheme. Nevertheless, this comparison underlines the need for more detailed and physically sound concepts for parameterisations of heat fluxes in stably stratified surface layers. Zilitinkevich, S. S., V. Perov and J. C. King (2002). "Near-surface turbulent fluxes in stable stratification: Calculation techniques for use in General Circulation Models." Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 128(583): 1571--1587. Louis, J. F. (1979). "A Parametric Model of Vertical Eddy Fluxes in the Atmosphere." Bound.-Layer Meteor. 17(2): 187--202.

  19. Enhanced surface plasmon resonance by Au nanoparticles immobilized on a dielectric SiO2 layer on a gold surface.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaeyeon; Na, Kyunga; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ki-Woo; Hyun, Jinho

    2009-09-28

    This paper introduces strategies for enhancement of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal by adopting colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a SiO(2) layer on a gold surface. AuNPs on SiO(2) on a gold surface were compared with an unmodified gold surface and a SiO(2) layer on a gold surface with no AuNPs attached. The modified surfaces showed significant changes in SPR signal when biomolecules were attached to the surface as compared with an unmodified gold surface. The detection limit of AuNPs immobilized on a SPR chip was 0.1 ng mL(-1) for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a cancer marker, as measured with a spectrophotometer. Considering that the conventional ELISA method can detect approximately 10 ng mL(-1) of PSA, the strategy described here is much more sensitive (approximately 100 fold). The enhanced shift of the absorption curve resulted from the coupling of the surface and particle plasmons by the SiO(2) layer and the AuNPs on the gold surface.

  20. Microhydrodynamics of flotation processes in the sea surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatika, Marianne; Zimmerman, William B.

    2001-10-01

    The uppermost surface of the ocean forms a peculiarly important ecosystem, the sea surface microlayer (SML). Comprising the top 1-1000 μm of the ocean surface, the SML concentrates many chemical substances, particularly those that are surface active. Important economically as a nursery for fish eggs and larvae, the SML unfortunately is also especially vulnerable to pollution. Contaminants that settle out from the air, have low solubility, or attach to floatable matter tend to accumulate in the SML. Bubbles contribute prominently to the dynamics of air-sea exchanges, playing an important role in geochemical cycling of material in the upper ocean and SML. In addition to the movement of bubbles, the development of a bubble cloud interrelates with the single particle dynamics of all other bubbles and particles. In the early sixties, several in situ oceanographic techniques revealed an "unbelievably immense" number of coastal bubbles of radius 15-300 μm. The spatial and temporal variation of bubble numbers were studied; acoustical oceanographers now use bubbles as tracers to determine ocean processes near the ocean surface. Sea state and rain noises have both been definitively ascribed to the radiation from huge numbers of infant micro bubbles [The Acoustic Bubble. Academic Press, San Diego]. Our research programme aims at constructing a hydrodynamic model for particle transport processes occurring at the microscale, in multi-phase flotation suspensions. Current research addresses bubble and floc microhydrodynamics as building blocks for a microscale transport model. This paper reviews sea surface transport processes in the microlayer and the lower atmosphere, and identifies those amenable to microhydrodynamic modelling and simulation. It presents preliminary simulation results including the multi-body hydrodynamic mobility functions for the modelling of "dynamic bubble filters" and floc suspensions. Hydrodynamic interactions versus spatial anisotropy and size of

  1. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm. PMID:26429141

  2. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm.

  3. Two-Layer Variable Infiltration Capacity Land Surface Representation for General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, L.

    1994-01-01

    A simple two-layer variable infiltration capacity (VIC-2L) land surface model suitable for incorporation in general circulation models (GCMs) is described. The model consists of a two-layer characterization of the soil within a GCM grid cell, and uses an aerodynamic representation of latent and sensible heat fluxes at the land surface. The effects of GCM spatial subgrid variability of soil moisture and a hydrologically realistic runoff mechanism are represented in the soil layers. The model was tested using long-term hydrologic and climatalogical data for Kings Creek, Kansas to estimate and validate the hydrological parameters. Surface flux data from three First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiments (FIFE) intensive field compaigns in the summer and fall of 1987 in central Kansas, and from the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observation Study (ABRACOS) in Brazil were used to validate the mode-simulated surface energy fluxes and surface temperature.

  4. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, P.A.; Ranga, V.; Stutts, M.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium.

  5. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  6. Scalable preparation of alginate templated-layered double hydroxide mesoporous composites with enhanced surface areas and surface acidities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Xu, Ting; Lei, Xiaodong; Xu, Sailong; Zhang, Fazhi

    2011-04-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydrotalcite-like layered clays, have previously been investigated as a potential solid alkaline catalyst. A necessary calcinations/rehydration procedure, however, is utilized to enhance surface area and catalytic activity of LDHs involved. Here we report on a scalable preparation of sodium alginate-templated MgAI-LDH (LDH/SA) mesoporous composites with high surface area and surface acidity. The powdery LDH/SA mesoporous composites are prepared using alginate as template by a scalable method of separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Comparison with the pristine MgAl-LDH shows that the obtained LDH/SA composites exhibit the greatly enhanced surface area and surface activity of surface acid sites at the elevated high temperatures which have scarcely been reported previously. Our results may allow designing a variety of mesoporous LDH-containing composites with potential applications in specific catalysis and purification processes.

  7. Surface modification of layered silicates. I. Factors affecting thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Vikas

    2012-12-01

    The resistance of modification molecules bound to montmorillonite platelet surfaces towards structural damage at high temperature is a major parameter guiding the formation of optimal interface between the filler and polymer phases in a nanocomposite material. As nanocomposites are generated by melt-blending of modified mineral and polymer, it is necessary to quantify the thermal resistance of the filler surface modification at the compounding conditions because different modifications differ in chain length, chemical structure, chain density, and thermal performance. A number of different alkyl ammonium modifications were exchanged on the montmorillonites with cation exchange capacities in the range 680-900 µequiv. g-1 and their thermal behaviour was characterised using high resolution thermogravimetric analysis. Quantitative comparisons between different modified minerals were achieved by comparing temperature at 10% weight loss as well peak degradation temperature. Various factors affecting thermal stability, such as length and density (or number) of alkyl chains in the modification, presence of excess modification molecules on the filler surface, the chemical structure of the surface modifications, etc. were studied. The TGA findings were also correlated with X-ray diffraction of the modified platelets.

  8. Surface modification of layered silicates. II. Factors affecting thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Vikas

    2012-12-01

    Different aluminosilicates, such as montmorillonite, vermiculite and mica, were surface-treated with a variety of organic modifiers to quantify factors affecting the thermal stability of the modified fillers. Montmorillonites with different cation exchange capacities were also used. Thermal characterisation was carried out via high resolution thermogravimetric analysis and the results were correlated with X-ray diffraction measurements. Modified substrates, such as montmorillonite, vermiculite and mica, differed in their thermal behaviour even when modified with the same surface modifiers. Phosphonium-based modifiers were the most thermally stable, compared to pyridinium and ammonium ions. Mixed brushes from the modifiers also influenced the thermal behaviour of the modified substrates. When further modified using physical adsorption or chemical reactions on the surface, the modified minerals also displayed alterations in the thermal behaviour of the fillers. The results can be used as a guide for the selection of surface modifiers in the nanocomposite synthesis process where compounding of the filler with the polymer at high temperature and shear is required.

  9. Compositions of surface layers formed on amalgams in air, water, and saline.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, T; Gnade, B E; Ferracane, J L; Okabe, T; Watari, F

    1993-12-01

    The surface layers formed on both a zinc-free and a zinc-containing dental amalgam after polishing and aging in air, water, or saline, were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the compositions of the surface layers which might govern the release of mercury from amalgam. The XPS data revealed that the formation of the surface layer on the zinc-containing amalgam was affected by the environment in which the amalgam was polished and aged, whereas that on the zinc-free amalgam was not affected. In addition, among the elements contained in amalgam, zinc was the most reactive with the environment, and was preferentially dissolved from amalgam into water or saline. Mercury atoms existed in the metallic state in the surface layer.

  10. Surface-segregated Si and Ge ultrathin films formed by Ag-induced layer exchange process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Masashi; Ohta, Akio; Araidai, Masaaki; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a new method of growing Si or Ge ultrathin films on a Ag(111) surface by using a Ag-induced layer exchange (ALEX) process toward the creation of 2D honeycomb sheets of Si and Ge, known as silicene and germanene, respectively. In the present paper, we clarify ALEX features, specifically the surface segregation of Si (or Ge) atoms from the underlying substrate, focusing on the annealing temperature and time. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrate that surface-segregated Si (or Ge) exists on the Ag surfaces after the epitaxial growth of the Ag layer on Si(111) [or Ge(111)] substrates; the amount of segregated Si (or Ge) can be controlled by a subsequent annealing. Also, we find that the segregation of an ultrathin Si or Ge layer proceeds at an interface between Ag and the AlO x capping layer.

  11. Determination of elastic properties of surface layers and coatings by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžek, M.; Sedlák, P.; Seiner, H.; Landa, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with determination of in-plane elastic constants of thin layers deposited on substrates. Modified resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is used to measure resonant spectra before and after layer deposition . These two spectra are compared and changes in the position of the resonant peaks are associated with layer properties. It is shown that for thin layers either the elastic moduli or the surface mass density can be determined, providing the complementary information (the surface mass density for the determination of the moduli, the elastic moduli for the determination of the surface mass density) is known. As an experimental demonstration of this approach, the elastic moduli of diamond-like-carbon film deposited on a silicon substrate and the surface mass density of a thin spray paint on a silicon substrate are determined.

  12. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy J. Turman, Bob Senft, Donna Sorensen, Neil R. Stinnett, Regan Greenly, John B. Thompson, Michael O. Buchheit, Rudolph G.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  13. Site-specific immobilization of protein layers on gold surfaces via orthogonal sortases.

    PubMed

    Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T

    2015-04-01

    We report a site-specific, sortase-mediated ligation to immobilize proteins layer-by-layer on a gold surface. Recombinant fluorescent proteins with a Sortase A recognition tag at the C-terminus were immobilized on peptide-modified gold surfaces. We used two sortases with different substrate specificities (Streptococcus pyogenes Sortase A and Staphylococcus aureus Sortase A) to immobilize layers of GFP and mCherry site-specifically on the gold surface. Surfaces were characterized using fluorescence and atomic force microscopy after immobilizing each layer of protein. Fluorescent micrographs showed that both protein immobilization on the modified gold surface and protein oligomerization are sortase-dependent. AFM images showed that either homogenous protein monolayers or layers of protein oligomers can be generated using appropriately tagged substrate proteins. Using Sortase A variants with orthogonal peptide substrate specificities, site-specific immobilization of appropriately tagged GFP onto a layer of immobilized mCherry was achieved without disruption of the underlying protein layer.

  14. Microstructures of Si surface layers implanted with Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.

    1993-12-31

    Microstructures of Si ion-implanted with Cu have been characterized by TEM after annealing. For 1.2 at.%, the Cu is trapped at planar defects, but for 10 at.%, {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si forms and Cu diffuses at its equilibrium solubility. These observations allow proper evaluation of the binding energies of Cu to previously formed internal cavities (2.2 eV) and {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si (1.7 eV). The 10 at.% Cu layer promotes oxidation of Si catalyzed by {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si. The microstructures also indicate that Si implanted with {approximately}2 at.% Cu reforms epitaxially with embedded defects after 8 hr at 700C, but for {approximately}10 at.% Cu, epitaxy is not recovered after 6 hours at 600C.

  15. Highly stable surface functionalization of microgas chromatography columns using layer-by-layer self-assembly of silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Shakeel, Hamza; Lovette, John; Rice, Gary W; Heflin, James R; Agah, Masoud

    2013-09-01

    A controllable and high-yield surface functionalization of silicon microchannels using layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of SiO2 nanoparticles (SNPs) is presented. The application of SNPs (45 nm average diameter) coating as a stationary phase for chromatographic separation is also demonstrated with surface functionalization using chloroalkylsilanes. This method facilitates a simple, low-cost, and parallel processing scheme that also provides homogeneous and stable nanoparticle-based stationary phases with ease of control over the coating thickness. The SNP-functionalized microfabricated columns with either single capillary channels (1 m long, 150 μm wide, 240 μm deep) or very narrow multicapillary channels (25 cm long, 30 μm wide, 240 μm deep, 16 parallel channels) successfully separated a multicomponent gas mixture with a wide range of boiling points with high reproducibility. PMID:23889461

  16. Nanostructured Hardening of Hard Alloys Surface Layers Through Electron Irradiation in Heavy Inert Gas Plasma Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Ivanov, K. V.; Mokhovikov, A. A.; Baohai, Yu; Hua, Xu Yun

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents research and experimental findings which prove that metal ceramic composite surface layer contains micro constituents’ hierarchies in the form of secondary nano sized inclusions inside ceramic phases. These inclusions have typical dimensions from several tens to several hundreds of nano meters. It has been shown that multi level structure-phase condition, developed in a nano sized area, effects physical and tribological properties of a metal ceramic composite surface layer.

  17. Near Surface Vapor Bubble Layers in Buoyant Low Stretch Burning of Polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale buoyant low stretch stagnation point diffusion flames over solid fuel (polymethylmethacrylate) were studied for a range of aerodynamic stretch rates of 2-12/ sec which are of the same order as spacecraft ventilation-induced stretch in a microgravity environment. An extensive layer of polymer material above the glass transition temperature is observed. Unique phenomena associated with this extensive glass layer included substantial swelling of the burning surface, in-depth bubble formation, and migration and/or elongation of the bubbles normal to the hot surface. The bubble layer acted to insulate the polymer surface by reducing the effective conductivity of the solid. The reduced in-depth conduction stabilized the flame for longer than expected from theory neglecting the bubble layer. While buoyancy acts to move the bubbles deeper into the molten polymer, thermocapillary forces and surface regression both act to bring the bubbles to the burning surface. Bubble layers may thus be very important in low gravity (low stretch) burning of materials. As bubbles reached the burning surface, monomer fuel vapors jetted from the surface, enhancing burning by entraining ambient air flow. Popping of these bubbles at the surface can expel burning droplets of the molten material, which may increase the fire propagation hazards at low stretch rates.

  18. Controlled surface functionality of magnetic nanoparticles by layer-by-layer assembled nano-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daheui; Son, Boram; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2015-04-01

    Over the past several years, the preparation of functionalized nanoparticles has been aggressively pursued in order to develop desired structures, compositions, and structural order. Among the various nanoparticles, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have shown great promise because the material generated using these MNPs can be used in a variety of biomedical applications and possible bioactive functionalities. In this study, we report the development of various functionalized MNPs (F-MNPs) generated using the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. To provide broad functional opportunities, we fabricated F-MNP bio-toolbox by using three different materials: synthetic polymers, natural polymers, and carbon materials. Each of these F-MNPs displays distinct properties, such as enhanced thickness or unique morphologies. In an effort to explore their biomedical applications, we generated basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded F-MNPs. The bFGF-loaded F-MNPs exhibited different release mechanisms and loading amounts, depending on the film material and composition order. Moreover, bFGF-loaded F-MNPs displayed higher biocompatibility and possessed superior proliferation properties than the bare MNPs and pure bFGF, respectively. We conclude that by simply optimizing the building materials and the nanoparticle's film composition, MNPs exhibiting various bioactive properties can be generated.Over the past several years, the preparation of functionalized nanoparticles has been aggressively pursued in order to develop desired structures, compositions, and structural order. Among the various nanoparticles, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have shown great promise because the material generated using these MNPs can be used in a variety of biomedical applications and possible bioactive functionalities. In this study, we report the development of various functionalized MNPs (F-MNPs) generated using the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. To provide

  19. Effect of Initial Microtopography and Ultrasonic Treatment Mode on Steel Surface Layer Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, K. V.; Lychagin, D. V.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents results of studies on the effect of pre-lathed surface micro-relief on surface micro-hardness after ultrasonic plastic treatment, as well as the effect of ultrasonic treatment on structure and properties of surface layers of steels 20 and 40X. The effect of ultrasonic treatment processing modes on roughness and micro-hardness of the surface layers was studied. It is shown that roughness values as well as form of ridges and grooves, obtained by pre-lathing, effect the growth of micro-hardness values after ultrasonic plastic treatment.

  20. Comparison of a carboxylated terthiophene surface with carboxymethylated dextran layer for surface plasmon resonance detection of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijing; Partridge, Ashton; Wu, Yinqiu

    2016-09-01

    Functionalization of a gold surface is usually accomplished by covalent binding via self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the gold surface, followed by attachment of flexible polymeric linker layers such as dextran hydrogels. However, these techniques require multiple steps and also have nonspecific interactions and steric problems. In this study, a self-assembled carboxylated terthiophene monolayer was formed onto a gold surface to create a sensitive and stable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing system. Compared with a commercial carboxymethyl dextran chip (CM5), the terthiophene SAM surface provided more than six times more antibody-binding signals and nearly three times the SPR assay sensitivity for progesterone (P4). PMID:27288558

  1. Comparison of a carboxylated terthiophene surface with carboxymethylated dextran layer for surface plasmon resonance detection of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijing; Partridge, Ashton; Wu, Yinqiu

    2016-09-01

    Functionalization of a gold surface is usually accomplished by covalent binding via self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the gold surface, followed by attachment of flexible polymeric linker layers such as dextran hydrogels. However, these techniques require multiple steps and also have nonspecific interactions and steric problems. In this study, a self-assembled carboxylated terthiophene monolayer was formed onto a gold surface to create a sensitive and stable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing system. Compared with a commercial carboxymethyl dextran chip (CM5), the terthiophene SAM surface provided more than six times more antibody-binding signals and nearly three times the SPR assay sensitivity for progesterone (P4).

  2. Surface damping effect of anchored constrained viscoelastic layers on the flexural response of simply supported structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, K. R.; Chen, G. D.

    2012-02-01

    Viscoelastic (VE) materials are commonly used to control vibration-induced fatigue in airframes and to suppress general vibration in various structures. This study investigates the effects of anchored constrained VE layers on the flexural response of simply supported Euler beams or plate strips under base excitations. Emphasis is placed on the development of two surface damping treatments: one VE layer anchored at one end, and two VE layers anchored at their different ends. Each anchorage is realized with a thin stiff layer in tension, such as a fiber reinforced polymer sheet, bonded to the surface of a VE layer and anchored to one end of the beam for maximum shear deformation in the constrained VE layer. Non-uniform shear deformation in VE layers is taken into account in the new solution formulation. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand and quantify the effects of various parameters on flexural responses of the structures. The minimum thickness of VE layers is mainly bounded by the relative stiffness between the VE layers and the constraining face layer. The performances of various configurations are compared and the two-end anchored configuration is found most effective in vibration suppression.

  3. Airway and lung pathology due to mucosal surface dehydration in β-Epithelial Na+ Channel-overexpressing mice: role of TNFα and IL-4Rα signaling, influence of neonatal development, and limited efficacy of glucocorticoid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Livraghi, Alessandra; Grubb, Barbara R.; Hudson, Elizabeth J.; Wilkinson, Kristen J.; Sheehan, John K.; Mall, Marcus A.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Boucher, Richard C.; Randell, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the epithelial Na+ channel β subunit (Scnn1b gene, βENaC protein) in transgenic (Tg) mouse airways dehydrates mucosal surfaces, producing mucus obstruction, inflammation, and neonatal mortality. Airway inflammation includes macrophage activation, neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and elevated KC, TNFα and chitinase levels. These changes recapitulate aspects of complex human obstructive airway diseases, but their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to identify pathways relevant to the development of Scnn1b-Tg mouse lung pathology. Genetic deletion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) or its receptor, TNFR1, had no measurable effect on the phenotype. Deletion of the interleukin-4 receptor alpha subunit (IL-4Rα) abolished transient mucous secretory cell (MuSC) abundance and eosinophilia normally observed in neonatal wild-type (WT) mice. Similarly, IL-4Rα deficiency decreased MuSC and eosinophils in neonatal Scnn1b-Tg mice, which correlated with improved neonatal survival. However, chronic lung pathology in adult Scnn1b-Tg mice was not affected by IL-4Rα status. Prednisolone treatment ablated eosinophilia and MuSC in adult Scnn1b-Tg mice, but did not decrease mucus plugging or neutrophilia. These studies demonstrate that: 1) normal neonatal mouse airway development entails an IL-4Rα-dependent, transient abundance of MuSC and eosinophils; 2) absence of IL-4Rα improved neonatal survival of Scnn1b-Tg mice, likely reflecting decreased formation of asphyxiating mucus plugs; and 3) in Scnn1b-Tg mice, neutrophilia, mucus obstruction, and airspace enlargement are IL-4Rα- and TNFα-independent, and only MuSC and eosinophilia are sensitive to glucocorticoids. Thus, manipulation of multiple pathways will likely be required to treat the complex pathogenesis caused by airway surface dehydration. PMID:19299736

  4. On the coupling between a supersonic boundary layer and a flexible surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between a two-dimensional, supersonic, laminar boundary layer and a flexible surface is studied using direct numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the plate equation. The flexible surface is forced to vibrate by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence emanated by a sound source located on the side of the flexible surface opposite to the boundary layer. The effect of the source excitation frequency on the surface vibration and boundary layer stability is analyzed. We find that, for frequencies near the fifth natural frequency of the surface or lower, large disturbances are introduced in the boundary layer which may alter its stability characteristics. The interaction between a stable two-dimensional disturbance of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type with the vibrating surface is also studied. We find that the disturbance level is higher over the vrating flexible surface than that obtained when the surface is rig id, which indicates a strong coupling between flow and structure. However, in the absence of the sound source the disturbance level over the rigid and flexible surfaces are identical. This result is due to the high frequency of the TS disturbance which does not couple with the flexible surface.

  5. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  6. A surface layer variance heat budget for ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucharel, Julien; Timmermann, Axel; Santoso, Agus; England, Matthew H.; Jin, Fei-Fei; Balmaseda, Magdalena A.

    2015-05-01

    Characteristics of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), such as frequency, propagation, spatial extent, and amplitude, strongly depend on the climatological background state of the tropical Pacific. Multidecadal changes in the ocean mean state are hence likely to modulate ENSO properties. To better link background state variations with low-frequency amplitude changes of ENSO, we develop a diagnostic framework that determines locally the contributions of different physical feedback terms on the ocean surface temperature variance. Our analysis shows that multidecadal changes of ENSO variance originate from the delicate balance between the background-state-dependent positive thermocline feedback and the atmospheric damping of sea surface temperatures anomalies. The role of higher-order processes and atmospheric and oceanic nonlinearities is also discussed. The diagnostic tool developed here can be easily applied to other tropical ocean areas and climate phenomena.

  7. Characterization and cell behavior of titanium surfaces with PLL/DNA modification via a layer-by-layer technique.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenli; Feng, Bo; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie

    2012-08-01

    This study describes the fabrication of two types of multilayered films onto titanium by layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly, using poly-L-lysine (PLL) as the cationic polyelectrolyte and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the anionic polyelectrolyte. The assembling process of each component was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal balance (QCM). Zeta potential of the LBL-coated microparticles was measured by dynamic light scattering. Titanium substrates with or without multilayered films were used in osteoblast cell culture experiments to study cell proliferation, viability, differentiation, and morphology. Results of AFM and QCM indicated the progressive build-up of the multilayered coatings. The surface morphology of three types of multilayered films showed elevations in the nanoscale range. The data of zeta potential showed that the surface terminated with PLL displayed positive charge while the surface terminated with DNA displayed negative charge. The proliferation of osteoblasts on modified titanium films was found to be greater than that on control (p < 0.05) after 3 and 7 days culture, respectively. Alamar blue measurement showed that the PLL/DNA-modified films have higher cell viability (p < 0.05) than the control. Still, the alkaline phosphatase activity assay revealed a better differentiated phenotype on three types of multilayered surfaces compared to noncoated controls. Collectively our results suggest that PLL/DNA were successfully used to surface engineer titanium via LBL technique, and enhanced its cell biocompatibility.

  8. Appearance of aldehydes in the surface layer of lake waters.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Agata; Nawrocki, Jacek; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents results concerning the changes in the content of aldehydes in samples of lake water collected near the lake surface. The study of lake waters was undertaken to explain which physicochemical parameters of the environment have the greatest influence on the level of aldehydes, which of the aldehydes are most often met in surface water and in what concentrations. We observed that formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and acetone were commonly present in surface water samples, while semi-volatile and poorly soluble aldehydes such as nonanal and decanal were observed seasonally. The contents of total aldehydes varied in a wide range, from 55 to 670 μg/l, and the concentration of total organic carbon varied significantly from 3 to 18 mg /l, but there was no evident correlation between them in all of samples. The total content of aldehydes did not depend on the meteorological parameters such as air temperature, UV radiation and ozone concentration; however, it was noted that the level of carbonyl concentration is related to the period of intense precipitation: in the period of very low precipitations, the highest contents of total aldehydes were determined in all of the water samples, and in the periods of intense precipitations, the content of total aldehydes was drastically smaller.

  9. Synthesis of superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} layers via combination of surface roughness and fluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Kyeong; Yeong Kim, Ji; Sub Kim, Sang

    2013-01-15

    We describe the preparation of superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} layers through a combination of surface roughness and fluorination. Electrospraying SiO{sub 2} precursor solutions that were prepared by a sol-gel route and included trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane as a fluorination source produced highly rough, fluorinated SiO{sub 2} layers. In sharp contrast to the fluorinated flat SiO{sub 2} layer, the fluorinated rough SiO{sub 2} layer showed much enhanced repellency toward liquid droplets of different surface tensions. The surface fraction and the work of adhesion of the superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} layers were determined, respectively, based on Cassie-Baxter and Young-Dupre equations. The satisfactory long-term stability for 30 days, the ultraviolet resistance and the thermal stability up to 400 {sup o}C of the superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} layers prepared in this work confirm a promising practical application. - Graphical abstract: A schematic illustration of the electrospray deposition used for preparing SiO{sub 2} layers. Shapes of liquid droplets of water, glycerol, coffee, juice and milk created on the fluorinated rough SiO{sub 2} layer deposited on a silicon wafer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} layers are realized by a combination of surface roughness and fluorination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorinated rough SiO{sub 2} layer shows enhanced repellency toward various liquid droplets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The wetting behavior is explained based on Cassie-Baxter and Young-Dupre equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} layers confirm a promising practical application.

  10. Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer and Its Application to Electromagnetic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    An important application of the atmospheric surface layer research is to characterize the near surface vertical gradients in temperature and humidity in order to predict radar and radio communication conditions in the environment. In this presentation, we will give an overview of a new research initiative funded under the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI): the Coupled Air-Sea Processes and EM Ducting Research (CASPER). The objective is to fully characterize the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as an electromagnetic (EM) propagation environment with the emphasis of spatial and temporal heterogeneities and surface wave/swell effects, both of which contravene the underlying assumptions of Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) used in coupled environmental forecast models. Furthermore, coastal variability in the inversion atop the MABL presents a challenge to forecast models and also causes practical issues in EM prediction models. These issues are the target of investigation of CASPER. CASPER measurement component includes two major field campaigns: CASPER-East (2015 Duck, NC) and CASPER-West (2018 southern California). This presentation will show the extensive measurements to be made during the CASPER -East field campaign with the focus on the marine atmospheric surface layer measurements with two research vessels, two research aircraft, surface flux buoy, wave gliders, ocean gliders, tethered balloons, and rawinsondes. Unlike previous research on the marine surface layer with the focus on surface fluxes and surface flux parameterization, CASPER field campaigns also emphasize of the surface layer profiles and the validation of the surface layer flux-profile relationship originally derived over land surfaces. Results from CASPER pilot experiment and preliminary results from CASPER-East field campaign will be discussed.

  11. Cloud layer thicknesses from a combination of surface and upper-air observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poore, Kirk D.; Wang, Junhong; Rossow, William B.

    1995-01-01

    Cloud layer thicknesses are derived from base and top altitudes by combining 14 years (1975-1988) of surface and upper-air observations at 63 sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Rawinsonde observations are employed to determine the locations of cloud-layer top and base by testing for dewpoint temperature depressions below some threshold value. Surface observations serve as quality checks on the rawinsonde-determined cloud properties and provide cloud amount and cloud-type information. The dataset provides layer-cloud amount, cloud type, high, middle, or low height classes, cloud-top heights, base heights and layer thicknesses, covering a range of latitudes from 0 deg to 80 deg N. All data comes from land sites: 34 are located in continental interiors, 14 are near coasts, and 15 are on islands. The uncertainties in the derived cloud properties are discussed. For clouds classified by low-, mid-, and high-top altitudes, there are strong latitudinal and seasonal variations in the layer thickness only for high clouds. High-cloud layer thickness increases with latitude and exhibits different seasonal variations in different latitude zones: in summer, high-cloud layer thickness is a maximum in the Tropics but a minimum at high latitudes. For clouds classified into three types by base altitude or into six standard morphological types, latitudinal and seasonal variations in layer thickness are very small. The thickness of the clear surface layer decreases with latitude and reaches a summer minimum in the Tropics and summer maximum at higher latitudes over land, but does not vary much over the ocean. Tropical clouds occur in three base-altitude groups and the layer thickness of each group increases linearly with top altitude. Extratropical clouds exhibit two groups, one with layer thickness proportional to their cloud-top altitude and one with small (less than or equal to 1000 m) layer thickness independent of cloud-top altitude.

  12. Influence of transverse surface waves on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Ash, R. L.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Wavy wall experiments using solid waves and progressive waves have been reported. For this paper, the major effects of waviness of the wall on the flow are identified as due to oscillatory curvature (convex-concavity) and oscillatory acceleration/deceleration of the flow, which imposes a highly nonequilibrium influence upon the turbulence structure. The theoretical analysis in this presentation takes into account proper turbulence modeling (including the nonequilibrium effects) for the wavy wall problem. The analysis proceeds in three stages: (1) inviscid solution for induced pressure due to the physical wall, (2) solution of a turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradients and curvature effects in the modeling from which the profile correction is computed, and (3) induced pressure computations for the corrected profile. The phase shift of pressure perturbations with respect to the physical wall can be predicted, and pressure drag and skin friction drag can be estimated, with nonlinear viscous effects included. Comparison of the theoretical estimates with experimental data are also presented.

  13. Polyethylenimine surface layer for enhanced virus immobilization on cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiliket, Ghania; Ladam, Guy; Nguyen, Quang Trong; Lebrun, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Thin regenerated cellulose films are prepared by hydrolysis of cellulose acetate (CA). A polycation, namely polyethylenimine (PEI), is then adsorbed onto the films. From QCM-D analysis, PEI readily adsorbs from a 0.1% w/v solution in NaCl 0.2 M (ca. 100 ng cm-2). Further PEI adsorption steps at higher PEI concentrations induce a linear growth of the PEI films, suggesting that free adsorption sites still exist after the initial adsorption. The adsorbed PEI chains are resistant to variations of the ionic strength up to NaCl 1 M. Promisingly, the adsorption of T4D bacteriophages are 15-fold more efficient onto the PEI-treated, compared to the native regenerated cellulose films, as measured by QCM-D. This confirms the strong affinity between the negatively charged viruses and PEI, even at low PEI concentration, probably governed by strong electrostatic attractive interactions. This result explains the remarkable improvement of the affinity of medical masks for virus droplets when one of their cellulose layers was changed by two-PEI-functionalized cellulose-based filters.

  14. Hematite Surface Activation by Chemical Addition of Tin Oxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Waldemir M; Souza, Flavio L

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of tin (Sn(4+) ) modification on the surface of hematite electrodes synthesized by an aqueous solution route at different times (2, 5, 10, 18, and 24 h) is investigated. As confirmed from X-ray diffraction results, the as-synthesized electrode exhibits an oxyhydroxide phase, which is converted into a pure hematite phase after being subjected to additional thermal treatment at 750 °C for 30 min. The tin-modified hematite electrode is prepared by depositing a solution of Sn(4+) precursor on the as-synthesized electrode, followed by thermal treatment under the same abovementioned conditions. This modification results in an enhancement of the photocurrent response for all hematite electrodes investigated and attains the highest values of around 1.62 and 2.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 and 1.4 V versus RHE, respectively, for electrodes obtained in short synthesis times (2 h). Contact angle measurements suggest that the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode provides a more hydrophilic surface, which favors a chemical reaction at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte. This result generates new perspectives for understanding the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode surface, which is in contrast with several studies previously reported; these studies state that the enhancement in photocurrent density is related to either the induction of an increased donor charge density or shift in the flat-band potential, which favors charge separation.

  15. Trapping and depth profile of tritium in surface layers of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, M.; Chen, Z.; Nisimura, K.; Akamaru, S.; Torikai, Y.; Hatano, Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Oya, Y.; Okuno, K.; Hino, T.

    2011-10-01

    Tritium amount retained in surface layers and release behavior from surface layers were examined using SS316L samples exposed to plasmas in the Large Helical Device and a commercial Cu-Be alloy plate. BIXS analyses and observation by SEM indicate that carbon and titanium deposited on the plasma-facing surface of the SS316L samples. Larger amount of tritium was trapped in the plasma-facing surface in comparison with the polished surface. Higher enrichment of tritium in surface layers was similarly found in the polished surface of both samples. The amount of surface tritium in both samples was almost same, while the bulk concentration of tritium in Cu-Be was much lower than that in SS316L. Tritium release from the SS316L and Cu-Be samples into water was examined by immersion experiments. Tritium elution was observed for both samples, but changes in the residual tritium amount in surface layers were different from each other.

  16. Relative Contribution of P5 and Hap Surface Proteins to Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae Interplay with the Host Upper and Lower Airways

    PubMed Central

    Viadas, Cristina; Ruiz de los Mozos, Igor; Valle, Jaione; Bengoechea, José Antonio; Garmendia, Junkal

    2015-01-01

    Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a major cause of opportunistic respiratory tract disease, and initiates infection by colonizing the nasopharynx. Bacterial surface proteins play determining roles in the NTHi-airways interplay, but their specific and relative contribution to colonization and infection of the respiratory tract has not been addressed comprehensively. In this study, we focused on the ompP5 and hap genes, present in all H. influenzae genome sequenced isolates, and encoding the P5 and Hap surface proteins, respectively. We employed isogenic single and double mutants of the ompP5 and hap genes generated in the pathogenic strain NTHi375 to evaluate P5 and Hap contribution to biofilm growth under continuous flow, to NTHi adhesion, and invasion/phagocytosis on nasal, pharyngeal, bronchial, alveolar cultured epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages, and to NTHi murine pulmonary infection. We show that P5 is not required for bacterial biofilm growth, but it is involved in NTHi interplay with respiratory cells and in mouse lung infection. Mechanistically, P5NTHi375 is not a ligand for CEACAM1 or α5 integrin receptors. Hap involvement in NTHi375-host interaction was shown to be limited, despite promoting bacterial cell adhesion when expressed in H. influenzae RdKW20. We also show that Hap does not contribute to bacterial biofilm growth, and that its absence partially restores the deficiency in lung infection observed for the ΔompP5 mutant. Altogether, this work frames the relative importance of the P5 and Hap surface proteins in NTHi virulence. PMID:25894755

  17. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  18. Surface Ages and Resurfacing Rates of the Polar Layered Deposits on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Plaut, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of the polar stratigraphy of Mars in terms of global climate changes is complicated by the significant difference in surface ages between the north and south polar layered terrains inferred from crater statistics. We have reassessed the cratering record in both polar regions using Viking Orbiter and Mariner 9 images. No craters have been found in the north polar layered terrain, but the surface of most of the south polar layered deposits appears to have been stable for many of the orbital/axial cycles that are thought to have induced global climate changes on Mars. The inferred surface age of the south polar layered deposits (about 10 Ma) is two orders of magnitude greater than the surface age of the north polar layered deposits and residual cap (at most 100 ka). Similarly, modeled resurfacing rates are at least 20 times greater in the north than in the south. These results are consistent with the hypotheses that polar layered deposit resurfacing rates are highest in areas covered by perennial ice and that the differences in polar resurfacing rates result from the 6.4 km difference in elevation between the polar regions. Deposition on the portion of the south polar layered deposits that is not covered by the perennial ice cap may have ceased about 5 million years ago when the obliquity of Mars no longer exceeded 40??. ?? 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C(6+) ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation. PMID:26931982

  20. Critical CuI buffer layer surface density for organic molecular crystal orientation change

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwangseok; Kim, Jong Beom; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Hyun Hwi

    2015-01-21

    We have determined the critical surface density of the CuI buffer layer inserted to change the preferred orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystals grown on the buffer layer. X-ray reflectivity measurements were performed to obtain the density profiles of the buffer layers and out-of-plane and 2D grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction measurements were performed to determine the preferred orientations of the molecular crystals. Remarkably, it was found that the preferred orientation of the CuPc film is completely changed from edge-on (1 0 0) to face-on (1 1 −2) by a CuI buffer layer with a very low surface density, so low that a large proportion of the substrate surface is bare.

  1. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C6+ ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation.

  2. Enhanced magneto-optical imaging of internal stresses in the removed surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agalidi, Yuriy; Kozhukhar, Pavlo; Levyi, Sergii; Turbin, Dmitriy

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes a software method of reconstructing the state of the removed surface layer by visualising internal stresses in the underlying layers of the sample. Such a problem typically needs to be solved as part of forensic investigation that aims to reveal original marking of a sample with removed surface layer. For example, one may be interested in serial numbers of weapons or vehicles that had the surface layer of metal removed from the number plate. Experimental results of studying gradient internal stress fields in ferromagnetic sample using the NDI method of magneto-optical imaging (MOI) are presented. Numerical modelling results of internal stresses enclosed in the surface marking region are analysed and compared to the experimental results of magneto-optical imaging (MOI). MOI correction algorithm intended for reconstructing internal stress fields in the removed surface layer by extracting stresses retained by the underlying layers is described. Limiting ratios between parameters of a marking font are defined for the considered correction algorithm. Enhanced recognition properties for hidden stresses left by marking symbols are experimentally verified and confirmed.

  3. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE LAYERS IN NITINOL USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Christopfel, R.; Mehta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol is a shape memory alloy whose properties allow for large reversible deformations and a return to its original geometry. This nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy has become a material used widely in the biomedical fi eld as a stent to open up collapsed arteries. Both ambient and biological conditions cause surface oxidation in these devices which in turn change its biocompatibility. The thickness of oxidized layers can cause fractures in the material if too large and can allow for penetration if too thin. Depending on the type and abundance of the chemical species on or near the surface, highly toxic metal ions can leak into the body causing cell damage or even cell death. Thus, biocompatibility of such devices is crucial. By using highly surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the surface of these structures, it is possible to decipher both layer composition and layer thickness. Two samples, both of which were mechanically polished, were investigated. Of the two samples, one was then exposed to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to mimic the chemical properties of blood, while the other remained unexposed. Although both samples were found to have oxide layers of appropriate thickness (on the order of a few nm), it was found that the sample exposed to the saline solution had a slightly thicker oxide layer and more signifi cantly, a phosphate layer very near the surface suggesting toxic metal components are well contained within the sample. These are considerable indications of a biocompatible device.

  4. ENaC inhibitors and airway re-hydration in cystic fibrosis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Althaus, Mike

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the chloride channel "cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator" (CFTR). The lack of functional CFTR in CF airways leads to impaired ion and fluid homeostasis of the fluid layer which lines the airway surfaces (ASL). The ASL is important for proper ciliary beat and clearance of mucus from the airways. According to the "low volume hypothesis", CF airway epithelia hyperabsorb sodium via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Although the contribution of ENaC to CF pathogenesis is still under debate, there is convincing data demonstrating that re-hydration of the ASL might improve mucociliary clearance in CF patients. ASL re-hydration might, amongst other things, be achieved by a block of airway transepithelial sodium absorption with inhibitors of ENaC. This mini-review article describes the role of ENaC in ASL fluid homeostasis and rehydration, and summarizes the current state of the art in the discovery and establishment of compounds which inhibit ENaC activity and may represent pharmacological tools for the treatment of CF. PMID:23547930

  5. Wave breaking turbulence in the ocean surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. M.; Gemmrich, J.; Schwendeman, M.; Zippel, S.; Moghimi, S.; Rogers, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of turbulent dissipation rate beneath ocean waves measured from a wave following, Lagrangian, reference frame. We find that the strong turbulence associated with wave breaking is isolated to a small region (nominally less than one meter) beneath the surface. However, this strong turbulence is advected vertically by the orbital motions of the dominant waves, and thus, in an Eulerian reference frame, the strong turbulence penetrates below the wave trough level. We also test several scalings for the turbulent dissipation rates caused by wave breaking, and we conclude that the conventional scaling by the cube of the wind speed (or wind friction velocity) is biased, particularly in high winds. A formulation using a transfer velocity associated with the short waves and the wind stress is more successful in scaling the observations.

  6. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  7. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Summary Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes. PMID:24991518

  8. Tunable Dipole Surface Plasmon Resonances of Silver Nanoparticles by Cladding Dielectric Layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaotong; Li, Dabing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren

    2015-07-28

    The tunability of surface plasmon resonance can enable the highest degree of localised surface plasmon enhancement to be achieved, based on the emitting or absorbing wavelength. In this article, tunable dipole surface plasmon resonances of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are realized by modification of the SiO2 dielectric layer thicknesses. SiO2 layers both beneath and over the Ag NPs affected the resonance wavelengths of local surface plasmons (LSPs). By adjusting the SiO2 thickness beneath the Ag NPs from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances shifted from 470 nm to 410 nm. Meanwhile, after sandwiching the Ag NPs by growing SiO2 before NPs fabrication and then overcoating the NPs with various SiO2 thicknesses from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances changed from 450 nm to 490 nm. The SiO2 cladding dielectric layer can tune the Ag NP surface charge, leading to a change in the effective permittivity of the surrounding medium, and thus to a blueshift or redshift of the resonance wavelength. Also, the quadrupole plasmon resonances were suppressed by the SiO2 cladding layer because the dielectric SiO2 can suppress level splitting of surface plasmon resonances caused by the Ag NP coupling effect.

  9. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m(2) depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  10. Research into preparation and properties of graded cemented carbides with face center cubic-rich surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Deng, Xin; Gong, Manfeng; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua

    2016-09-01

    This paper systematically investigated a set of functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides with modified surface layer (called fcc-rich surface layer in this study), which is mainly composed of fcc phases (Ti(CN) and TiN) and WC. Nitridation at liquid phase sintering temperature is the key process making this fcc-rich surface layer. The functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides synthesized in this study show 3 layer structure: the outer layer, i.e. the fcc-rich surface layer; the intermediate layer, which is characterized by abnormally large WC and high Co content; and the inner layer. It was found that TiC is the most critical component for the formation of fcc-rich surface layer. The higher content of TiC results in the thicker fcc-rich outer layer, higher (Ti(CN) and TiN) content in the outer layer, and higher hardness of the fcc-rich outer layer. The formation of this fcc-rich surface layer is mainly due to the nitridation process between Ti and N, which leads to the diffusion of Ti outwards (from the inside of the sample to the surface) and the subsequent migration of liquid cobalt inwards (from surface to the inside of the sample). The three-layer structure developed in this study provides the excellent combination of high wear resistance and high toughness, which is favorable for some applications.

  11. Layer-by-layer coating of bacteria with noble metal nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Mehmet; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Culha, Mustafa

    2009-12-01

    A simple layer-by-layer method to coat the bacterial cells with gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs and AgNPs) for the acquisition of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra is reported. First, the bacteria cell wall is coated with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), a positively charged polymer, and then with citrate reduced Au or AgNPs. In order to increase the stability of the coating, another layer of PAH is prepared on the surface. The SEM and AFM images indicate that the nanoparticles are in the form of both isolated and aggregated nanoparticles on the bacterial wall. The coating of bacterial cells with AgNPs or AuNPs not only serves for their preparation for SERS measurement but also helps to visualize the coated of bacterial cells under the ordinary white-light microscope objective due to efficient light-scattering properties of Au and AgNPs. A comparative study single versus aggregates of bacterial cells is also demonstrated for possible single bacterial detection with SERS. The two bacteria that differ in shape and cell wall biochemical structure, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus cohnii, Gram-negative and -positive, respectively, are used as models. The preliminary results reveal that the approach could be used for single bacterial cell identification.

  12. Improvement of the surface wettability of silicone hydrogel contact lenses via layer-by-layer self-assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hong; Cho, Hsien-Lung; Yeh, Yi-Hsing; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2015-12-01

    The surface wettability and anti-protein adsorption of a silicone-based hydrogel that was synthesized by a block copolymer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was improved via polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) immobilization. Polysaccharide PEMs of chitosan (CS, as a positive-charged agent) and hyaluronic acid (HA, as a negative-charged and anti-adhesive agent) were successfully assembled on the PDMS-PU-PEGMA silicone hydrogel in a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly manner. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dyeing data verified the progressive buildup of the PEM silicone hydrogel. The results showed that the contact angle of the silicone hydrogel decreased with an increase in the number of PEM grafting layers. Furthermore, after immobilizing five layers of CS/HA, the protein adsorption decreased from 78 ± 11 to 26 ± 4 μg/cm(2) for HSA and from 55 ± 10 to 20 ± 4 μg/cm(2) for lysozymes. This indicates that CS/HA PEM-immobilized silicone hydrogels can resist protein adsorption. Furthermore, these hydrogels were non-cytotoxic according to an in vitro L929 fibroblast assay. Overall, the results demonstrated that the modified silicone hydrogels exhibited hydrophilicity and anti-protein adsorption, as well as relatively high oxygen permeability and optical transparency. Therefore, they would be applicable as a contact lens material. PMID:26519935

  13. Surface layer composition of titania produced by various methods. The change of layer state under illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Daibova, E.; Kosova, N.; Zmeeva, O.

    2016-01-01

    The comparative analysis of experimental data over titanium dioxide powders prepared by various ways under ambient air is carried out. The results over TiO2 prepared by high-temperature heating of anatase, produced by burning of titanium micro particles and grinding of rutile crystal are used for that comparison. Water and carbon dioxide were the main products released from the surface of the titania powders. It was found that under UV irradiation absorbed by titania, in absent oxygen, water effectively reacts with lattice oxygen of titanium dioxide.

  14. Attachment of organic layers to conductive or semiconductive surfaces by reduction of diazonium salts.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Jean; Podvorica, Fetah

    2005-05-01

    Surface chemistry is the topic of this tutorial review. It describes the electrochemical reduction of aryl diazonium salts on carbon, silicon or metals which leads to the formation of an aromatic organic layer covalently bonded to the surface. The method which permits such a modification is set forth. The proof for the existence of the organic layer is brought forward. The grafting mechanism and the covalent bonding between the surface and the aryl group are discussed. The formation of mono or multilayers depending on the experimental conditions is rationalized. Finally some examples of the possible uses of this reaction are given.

  15. Capillary waves in an inhomogeneous three-layer liquid with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Grigor'ev, A. I.; Zav'yalov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    In the domain of capillary waves, a bicubic dispersion relation is derived and analyzed for surface and internal capillary-gravitational waves in a three-layer liquid with a free surface. It is shown that the ratio of the internal wave amplitudes to the surface wave amplitudes is fairly large if the trivial condition of a "homogeneous liquid" is discarded. The amplitude ratio between the internal waves themselves (generated at different interfaces) may be both greater and smaller than unity depending on the physical parameters of the system. Specifically, it strongly depends on the densities of the layers and their thicknesses.

  16. Layer-by-layer generation of PEG-based regenerable immunosensing surfaces for small-sized analytes.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Maria; Ben Haddada, Maroua; Méthivier, Christophe; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar; Boujday, Souhir

    2015-05-15

    Small molecules (haptens) like pharmaceuticals or peptides can serve as targets for antibody binding in competitive immunoassay-based flow-through assays. In this work, a strategy for preparing polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings for subsequent hapten immobilization on glass-type silica surfaces is presented and characterized in detail. Two substrates bearing terminal silanol groups were utilized, a glass slide and a silicon wafer. First, surfaces were thoroughly cleaned and pretreated to generate additional silanol groups. Then, a silane layer with terminal epoxy groups was created using 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GOPTS). Epoxy groups were used to bind a layer of diamino-poly(ethylene glycol) (DAPEG) with terminal amino groups. Finally, the low molecular weight compound diclofenac was bound to the surface to be used as model ligand for competitive biosensing of haptens. The elementary steps were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle measurement, grazing-angle attenuated total reflection (GA-ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The data collected using these techniques have confirmed the successive grafting of the molecular species, evidencing, that homogeneous monolayers were created on the silica surfaces and validated the proposed mechanism of functionalization. The resulting surfaces were used to investigate polyclonal anti-diclofenac antibodies recognition and reversibility using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements or an automated flow-through immunoassay with chemiluminescence (CL) read-out. For both techniques, recognition and reversibility of the antibody binding were observed. The stability of sensors over time was also assessed and no decrease in CL response was observed upon 14 days in aqueous solution. The herein presented strategy for surface functionalization can be used in the future as reproducible and reusable universal platform for hapten

  17. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans

    SciTech Connect

    Arbing, Mark A.; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    2012-09-05

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two 'homologous' tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-layer. The molecular features of our hexameric S-layer model recapitulate those visualized by medium resolution electron microscopy studies of microbial S-layers and greatly expand our molecular view of S-layer dimensions, porosity, and symmetry. The S-layer model reveals a negatively charged molecular sieve that presents both a charge and size barrier to restrict access to the cell periplasmic-like space. The {beta}-sandwich folds of the S-layer protein are structurally homologous to eukaryotic virus envelope proteins, suggesting that Archaea and viruses have arrived at a common solution for protective envelope structures. These results provide insight into the evolutionary origins of primitive cell envelope structures, of which the S-layer is considered to be among the most primitive: it also provides a platform for the development of self-assembling nanomaterials with diverse functional and structural properties.

  18. Seasonality of submesoscale flows in the ocean surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Christian E.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Brannigan, Liam; Lazar, Ayah; Marshall, David P.; George Nurser, A. J.; Damerell, Gillian; Heywood, Karen J.; Belcher, Stephen E.

    2016-03-01

    A signature of submesoscale flows in the upper ocean is skewness in the distribution of relative vorticity. Expected to result for high Rossby number flows, such skewness has implications for mixing, dissipation, and stratification within the upper ocean. An array of moorings deployed in the Northeast Atlantic for 1 year as part of the experiment of the Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study (OSMOSIS) reveals that relative vorticity is positively skewed during winter even though the scale of the Rossby number is less than 0.5. Furthermore, this skewness is reduced to zero during spring and autumn. There is also evidence of modest seasonal variations in the gradient Rossby number. The proposed mechanism by which relative vorticity is skewed is that the ratio of lateral to vertical buoyancy gradients, as summarized by the inverse gradient Richardson number, restricts its range during winter but less so at other times of the year. These results support recent observations and model simulations suggesting that the upper ocean is host to a seasonal cycle in submesoscale turbulence.

  19. Dynamics of cathode spots in low-pressure arc plasma removing oxide layer on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Liu, H. X.; Zhang, Y. C.; Li, H.; Zhu, X. D.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of cathode spots has been investigated in low-pressure arc plasma for removing oxide layer on low carbon steel surfaces. The motion of cathode spots was observed with a high speed camera, and the arc voltage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The spots move on clean steel surface as a random walk, and the low-frequency components dominated the voltage waveform. However, the spots on steel surfaces with oxide layer tend to burn on the rim of the eroded area formed in the previous arcing, and the low-frequency components decrease correspondingly. The "color" of the colored random noise for arc voltage varies from the approximate brown noise for clean steel surface to pink noise for thick oxide layer, where the edge effect of boundary is considered to play a significant role.

  20. The emergency airway.

    PubMed

    Goon, Serena S H; Stephens, Robert C M; Smith, Helen

    2009-12-01

    The 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario is a nightmare for all clinicians who manage airways. Cricothyroidotomy is one of several emergency airway management techniques. Cricothyroidotomy is a short-term solution which provides oxygenation, not ventilation, and is not a definitive airway. Although there are tests which can help predict whether an intubation will be difficult, they are not always good predictors. As the can't intubate, can't ventilate scenario is rare, cricothyroidotomy is an unfamiliar procedure to many. In this situation, expert help must be called for early on. In the meantime, it is vital that all other simple airway manoeuvres have been attempted, such as good positioning of the patient with head tilt and chin lift, and use of airway adjuncts like the oral (Guedel) airway or nasopharyngeal airway, and the laryngeal mask airway. However, if attempts to secure the airway are unsuccessful, there may be no other option than to perform a cricothyroidotomy. It is a difficult decision to make, but with increasing hypoxia, it is essential that one oxygenates the patient. Cricothyroidotomy provides an opening in the pace between the anterior inferior border of the thyroid cartilage and the anterior superior border of the cricoid cartilage, allowing access to the airway below the glottis. The anatomical considerations are important when performing this procedure (Ellis, 2009), and there are other scenarios when it is used. It is not without consequence, as with any procedure.

  1. Electronic absorption band broadening and surface roughening of phthalocyanine double layers by saturated solvent vapor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinhyun; Yim, Sanggyu

    2012-10-15

    Variations in the electronic absorption (EA) and surface morphology of three types of phthalocyanine (Pc) thin film systems, i.e. copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) single layer, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) single layer, and ZnPc on CuPc (CuPc/ZnPc) double layer film, treated with saturated acetone vapor were investigated. For the treated CuPc single layer film, the surface roughness slightly increased and bundles of nanorods were formed, while the EA varied little. In contrast, for the ZnPc single layer film, the relatively high solubility of ZnPc led to a considerable shift in the absorption bands as well as a large increase in the surface roughness and formation of long and wide nano-beams, indicating a part of the ZnPc molecules dissolved in acetone, which altered their molecular stacking. For the CuPc/ZnPc film, the saturated acetone vapor treatment resulted in morphological changes in mainly the upper ZnPc layer due to the significantly low solubility of the underlying CuPc layer. The treatment also broadened the EA band, which involved a combination of unchanged CuPc and changed ZnPc absorption.

  2. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  3. Surface roughness and dislocation density in InP/InGaAs layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Denis P.; Laframboise, Sylvain

    2004-12-01

    A subtle roughening of the surface of a buried 60 nm InGaAs epitaxial layer was detected using a combination of sample cleaving, selective chemical etching and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). In our technology, InGaAs is the photo-absorbing layer of Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) grown layers used in the monolithic integration of active photo detectors and a passive mux/demux. Conventional Photo-Luminescence (PL) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques used to monitor and optimize the growth of epitaxial layers did not show this microscopic surface roughness. The appearance of roughness in the InGaAs layer was linked to very large changes in the dislocation density of the layers grown over the rough surface. Increases of up to three orders of magnitude in the Etch Pit Density (EPD from 104 to 107 cm-2) were revealed using a standard Huber Etch. The Huber Etch also showed the preferred formation of "pairs" of dislocations threading out from a common point on the rough InGaAs surface. Changes in growth conditions resulted in the complete elimination of roughness and of excessive dislocation densities

  4. Laser-induced oxidation of titanium substrate: Analysis of the physicochemical structure of the surface and sub-surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Skowroński, Łukasz; Trzcinski, Marek; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl V.; Łazarek, Łukasz K.; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of the complex chemical structure of the layers made on titanium in the process of the heating of its surfaces in an atmospheric environment, by irradiating samples with a nanosecond-pulsed laser. The study was carried out for electroplated, high purity, polycrystalline titanium substrates using a Yb:glass fiber laser. All measurements were made for samples irradiated in a broad range of accumulated fluence, below the ablation threshold. It has been determined how the complex index of refraction of both the oxynitride layers and the substrate vary as a function of accumulated laser fluence. It was also shown that the top layer of the film produced on titanium, which is transparent, is not a pure TiO2 as had been supposed before. The XPS and XRD analyses confirmed the presence of nitrogen compounds and the existence of nonstoichiometric compounds. By sputtering of the sample's surface using an Ar+ ion gun, the changes in the concentration of individual elements as a function of the layer's cross-section were determined. Lastly, an analysis of the surface morphology has also been carried out, explaining why the layers crack and exfoliate from their substrate.

  5. Thin gold layer in NiCo and Ni electroforming process: optical surface characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, G.; Spiga, D.; Raimondi, L.; Pareschi, G.; Orlandi, A.; Borghi, G.; Missaglia, N.; Negri, B.

    2010-07-01

    Mandrel replication by NiCo electroforming is an upgrade of the well-suited X-ray mirrors manufacturing process with pure Nickel. In this process, a Gold layer deposited on the mandrel acts as release agent and, at the same time, as reflective coating. To increase the optical performances of X-ray mirrors, the replicated optical surface is meant to reproduce the smooth topography of the mandrel: a surface degradation is commonly observed, indeed. A factor leading to surface smoothness worsening can be the spontaneous roughness growth of the Gold layer itself; therefore, the optical quality of the reflecting surface might be improved by optimizing the Gold layer thickness. A preliminary study, aimed at investigating the effects of Gold thickness reduction (< 100 nm Vs. the usual 200 nm), had already been dealt in the spectral range 0.02-1000 μm: measurements performed on flat electroformed samples showed that the Gold thickness reduction chiefly affects the roughness around 1 μm. Here we presents a study of the effectiveness of a Gold layer with reduced (< 100 nm) thickness in the NiCo X-ray mirrors electroforming, aimed at surface micro-roughness mitigation. The characterization, in the spectral range 0.02-1000 μm, of 3 X-ray mirrors manufactured utilizing Gold layers with different thickness values from a flight mandrel is reported. The performed investigation is organized as follows: (a) characterization of the flight mandrel; (b) dependence of the micro-roughness from different Gold layers thicknesses supported by XRD study; (c) comparison of the micro-roughness of mirrors manufactured in NiCo in Ni, with the same Gold layer thickness. As a conclusive remark the effects of the Gold layer thinning on the angular degradation at high energy are reported.

  6. A critical study of the role of the surface oxide layer in titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular understanding of the role which the surface oxide layer of the adherend plays in titanium bonding is studied. The effects of Ti6-4 adherends pretreatment, bonding conditions, and thermal aging of the lap shear specimens were studied. The use of the SEM/EDAX and ESCA techniques to study surface morphology and surface composition was emphasized. In addition, contact angles and both infrared and visible reflection spectroscopy were used in ancillary studies.

  7. A Numerical Model of Viscoelastic Layer Entrainment by Airflow in Cough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin M.

    2008-07-01

    Coughing is an alternative mode of ensuring mucus clearance in the lung when normal cilia induced flow breaks down. A numerical model of this process is presented with the following aspects. (1) A portion of the airway comprising the first three bronchus generations is modeled as radially reinforced elastic tubes. Elasticity equations are solved to predict airway deformation under effect of airway pressure. (2) The compressible, turbulent flow induced by rapid lung contraction is modeled by direct numerical simulation for Reynolds numbers in the range 5,000-10,000 and by Large Eddy Simulation for Reynolds numbers in the range 5,000-40,000. (3) A two-layer model of the airway surface liquid (ASL) covering the airway epithelial layer is used. The periciliary liquid (PCL) in direct contact with the epithelial layer is considered to be a Newtonian fluid. Forces modeling cilia beating can act upon this layer. The mucus layer between the PCL and the interior airflow is modeled as an Oldroyd-B fluid. The overall computation is a fluid-structure interaction simulation that tracks changes in ASL thickness and airway diameters that result from impulsive airflow boundary conditions imposed at bronchi ends. In particular, the amount of mucus that is evacuated from the system is computed as a function of cough intensity and mucus rheological properties.

  8. Layer-by-layer Grafting of Titanium Phosphate onto Mesoporous Silica SBA-15 Surfaces: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhen; Zhang, Jianan; Jiao, Jian; Yin, Hongfeng; Yan, Wenfu; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Yu, Jihong; Dai, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Metal phosphates have many applications in catalysis, separation, and proton conduction, but their small surface areas and/or constrained pore structures limit their utilization. Here, we report two new methods for the liquid-phase grafting of titanium phosphate onto mesoporous silica (SBA-15) surfaces: (1) alternate grafting of Ti(OPri)4 and then POCl3 and (2) one-pot grafting of titanium phosphate formed in situ by employing Ti(OPri)4 (a base) and POCl3 (an acid) as an appropriate acid-base pair . Both the size of mesopores and the content of titanium phosphate can be changed by increasing the number of modification cycles in a stepwise (or layer-by-layer) fashion. The obtained products were characterized by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorptiondesorption, transmission electron microscopy, 31P and 29Si magic-angle spinning NMR, and NH3 temperatureprogrammed desorption, and their performance in acid catalysis and metal ion adsorption was investigated. This work provides new methodologies for the general synthesis of supported metal phosphates with large surface areas, ordered nanoporous structures, and acid properties.

  9. Relevance of glycosylation of S-layer proteins for cell surface properties.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-06-01

    Elucidating the building principles and intrinsic features modulating certain water-associated processes (e.g., surface roughness in the nanometer scale, surface hydration and accompanied antifouling property, etc.) of surface structures from (micro)organisms is nowadays a highly challenging task in fields like microbiology, biomimetic engineering and (bio)material sciences. Here, we show for the first time the recrystallization of the wild-type S-layer glycoprotein wtSgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and its recombinantly produced non-glycosylated form, rSgsE, on gold sensor surfaces. Whereas the proteinaceous lattice of the S-layer proteins is forming a rigid layer on the sensor surface, the glycan chains are developing an overall soft, highly dissipative film. Interestingly, to the wtSgsE lattice almost twice the amount of water is bound and/or coupled in comparison with the non-glycosylated rSgsE with the preferred region being the extending glycan residues. The present results are discussed in terms of the effect of the glycan residues on the recrystallization, the adjoining hydration layer, and the nanoscale roughness and fluidic behavior. The latter features may turn out to be one of the most general ones among bacterial and archaeal S-layer lattices. PMID:25818946

  10. Intestinal Diffusion Barrier: Unstirred Water Layer or Membrane Surface Mucous Coat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithson, Kenneth W.; Millar, David B.; Jacobs, Lucien R.; Gray, Gary M.

    1981-12-01

    The dimensions of the small intestinal diffusion barrier interposed between luminal nutrients and their membrane receptors were determined from kinetic analysis of substrate hydrolysis by integral surface membrane enzymes. The calculated equivalent thickness of the unstirred water layer was too large to be compatible with the known dimensions of rat intestine. The discrepancy could be reconciled by consideration of the mucous coat overlying the intestinal surface membrane. Integral surface membrane proteins could not be labeled by an iodine-125 probe unless the surface coat was first removed. The mucoprotein surface coat appears to constitute an important diffusion barrier for nutrients seeking their digestive and transport sites on the outer intestinal membrane.

  11. Effects of mixed discrete surface charges on the electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe

    2012-08-01

    Adsorption of surface coions and charge reversal are induced at the electrical double layer of a wall charged with positive and negative surface sites next to an electrolyte solution. While for the considered surface charge density these effects are found over a wide range of conditions, they are not observed for the typically employed surface models in equivalent conditions. Important consequences in electrophoresis experiments for different colloids with equal effective surface charge density are foreseen. This study is carried out by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Surface (S)-layer proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans and their utility as vehicles for surface localization of functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans contains two major surface (S)-layer proteins, Hpi and SlpA. The Hpi protein was shown to (a) undergo specific in vivo cleavage, and (b) closely associate with the SlpA protein. Using a non-specific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, PhoN as a reporter, the Surface Layer Homology (SLH) domain of SlpA was shown to bind deinococcal peptidoglycan-containing cell wall sacculi. The association of SlpA with Hpi on one side and peptidoglycan on the other, localizes this protein in the 'interstitial' layer of the deinoccocal cell wall. Gene chimeras of hpi-phoN and slh-phoN were constructed to test efficacy of S-layer proteins, as vehicles for cell surface localization in D. radiodurans. The Hpi-PhoN protein localized exclusively in the membrane fraction, and displayed cell-based phosphatase activity in vivo. The SLH-PhoN, which localized to both cytosolic and membrane fractions, displayed in vitro activity but no cell-based in vivo activity. Hpi, therefore, emerged as an efficient surface localizing protein and can be exploited for suitable applications of this superbug.

  13. Surface stress, thickness, and mass of the first few layers of polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masaya; Itakura, Akiko N; Igarashi, Shinichi; Büscher, Karsten; Gutmann, Jochen S; Graf, Karlheinz; Berger, Rüdiger

    2008-04-01

    The effects of surface stress and mass loading upon the adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto flexible silicon micromechanical cantilever sensors (MCSs) were studied in situ. A self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptoethylamine chloride (2-MEA) on gold was used to achieve single-side adsorption on the MCS. Such a preparation gave a positive surface potential, whereas a bare SiOx surface gave a negative surface potential. Wide scan X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the adsorption of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) followed the general rule expected from the electrostatic interaction between the substrate and the polyelectrolyte, whereas the adsorption polyethyleneimine (PEI) did not. The adsorption of PAH on SiO(x) from a 3 mM water solution containing 1 M NaCl was associated with a deflection of the MCS toward the polyelectrolyte monolayer (tensile surface stress) owing to the hydrogen bonding between neighboring amino groups. Here, a surface stress change of 1.4 +/- 0.1 N/m was estimated. The adsorption of PSS from a 3 mM water solution containing 1 M NaCl on a 2-MEA surface induced a deflection of the MCS away from the polyelectrolyte layer (compressive stress), toward the SiO(x) side. Here, a surface stress change of 3.1 +/- 0.3 N/m was determined. The formation of a PAH layer on top of the PSS layer resulted in a deflection of the MCS toward the PAH layer. This indicated that the adjacent PSS layer was deswelling, corresponding to a surface stress change of 0.5 +/- 0.1 N/m.

  14. Influence of surface forcing on near-surface and mixing layer turbulence in the tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ward, Brian; Vialard, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    An autonomous upwardly-moving microstructure profiler was used to collect measurements of the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ε) in the tropical Indian Ocean during a single diurnal cycle, from about 50 m depth to the sea surface. This dataset is one of only a few to resolve upper ocean ε over a diurnal cycle from below the active mixing layer up to the air-sea interface. Wind speed was weak with an average value of ~5 m s-1 and the wave field was swell-dominated. Within the wind and wave affected surface layer (WWSL), ε values were on the order of 10-7-10-6 W kg-1 at a depth of 0.75 m and when averaged, were almost a factor of two above classical law of the wall theory, possibly indicative of an additional source of energy from the wave field. Below this depth, ε values were closer to wall layer scaling, suggesting that the work of the Reynolds stress on the wind-induced vertical shear was the major source of turbulence within this layer. No evidence of persistent elevated near-surface ε characteristic of wave-breaking conditions was found. Profiles collected during night-time displayed relatively constant ε values at depths between the WWSL and the base of the mixing layer, characteristic of mixing by convective overturning. Within the remnant layer, depth-averaged values of ε started decaying exponentially with an e-folding time of 47 min, about 30 min after the reversal of the total surface net heat flux from oceanic loss to gain.

  15. Computer graphic visualization of orbiter lower surface boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Hartung, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Computer graphic techniques are applied to the processing of Shuttle Orbiter flight data in order to create a visual presentation of the extent and movement of the boundary-layer transition front over the orbiter lower surface during entry. Flight-measured surface temperature-time histories define the onset and completion of the boundary-layer transition process at any measurement location. The locus of points which define the spatial position of the boundary-layer transition front on the orbiter planform is plotted at each discrete time for which flight data are available. Displaying these images sequentially in real-time results in an animated simulation of the in-flight boundary-layer transition process.

  16. Aerodynamically-driven condensate layer thickness distributions on isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Gunes, D.; Nazih-Anous, N.

    1983-01-01

    A simple yet rather general mathematical model is presented for predicting the distribution of condensate layer thickness when aerodynamic shear is the dominant mechanism of liquid flow along the surface. The Newtonian condensate film is treated using well-known thin-layer (lubrication theory) approximations, and condensate supply is taken to be the result of either convective diffusion or inertial impaction. Illustrative calculations for a circular cylinder in a crossflow at Re = 100,000 reveal the consequences of alternate condensate arrival mechanisms and the existence of thicker reverse-flow films behind the position of gas boundary-layer separation. The present formulation is readily generalized to include transient liquid layer flows on noncircular objects of variable surface temperature, as encountered in turbine-blade materials testing or operation.

  17. Electrical conductivity of reconstructed Si(111) surface with sodium-doped C{sub 60} layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukanov, D. A. Saranin, A. A.; Ryzhkova, M. V.; Borisenko, E. A.; Zotov, A. V.

    2015-01-05

    Electrical conductance of sodium-doped C{sub 60} ultra-thin layers (1–6 monolayers) grown on the Na-adsorbed Si(111)√3 × √3-Au surface has been studied in situ by four-point probe technique, combined with low-energy electron diffraction observations. Evidence of conductance channel formation through the C{sub 60} ultrathin layer is demonstrated as a result of Na dosing of 3 and 6 monolayers thick C{sub 60} layers. The observed changes in surface conductivity can be attributed to the formation of fulleride-like NaC{sub 60} and Na{sub 2}C{sub 60} compound layers.

  18. Study of the amorphization of surface silicon layers implanted by low-energy helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, A. A.; Myakon'kikh, A. V.; Oreshko, A. P.; Shemukhin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation by (2-5)-keV helium ions to a dose of D = 6 × 1015-5 × 1017 cm-2 have been studied by highresolution X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and spectral ellipsometry. It is found that the joint application of these methods makes it possible to determine the density depth distribution ρ( z) in an implanted layer, its phase state, and elemental composition. Treatment of silicon substrates in helium plasma to doses of 6 × 1016 cm-2 leads to the formation of a 20- to 30-nm-thick amorphized surface layer with a density close to the silicon density. An increase in the helium dose causes the formation of an internal porous layer.

  19. Hard Coat Layers by PE-CVD Process for the Top Surface of Touch Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunishi, T.; Sato, N.; Yazawa, K.

    2013-06-01

    In order to protect surface from damages, the high pencil hardness and the high abrasion resistance are required for the hard coat layers on polyethylene telephthalate (PET) films for the application of touch panel surface. We have already found that the UV-curing-hard-coat-polymer (UHP) coated PET films show the poor abrasion resistance, while they have the high pencil hardness. It reveals that the abrasion resistance of hard coat layers of the UHP is not simply dependent on the pencil hardness. In this work, we have studied to improve the abrasion resistance of SiOC films as hard coat layers, which were formed by PE-CVD process on UHP coated PET. The abrasion resistance was evaluated by Taber abrasion test. PE-CVD hard coat layers which formed on UHP coater PET films have showed the better abrasion resistance and have the possibility of substitution to the thin glass sheets for touch panel application.

  20. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  1. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Ananta R. E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com; Thoms, Brian D.; Nepal, Neeraj; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  2. Synergistic effects of the Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer and nisin on bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Prado-Acosta, Mariano; Ruzal, Sandra M; Allievi, Mariana C; Palomino, María Mercedes; Sanchez Rivas, Carmen

    2010-02-01

    We have previously described a murein hydrolase activity for the surface layer (S-layer) of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356. Here we show that, in combination with nisin, this S-layer acts synergistically to inhibit the growth of pathogenic Gram-negative Salmonella enterica and potential pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. In addition, bacteriolytic effects were observed for the Gram-positive species tested. We postulate that the S-layer enhances the access of nisin into the cell membrane by enabling it to cross the cell wall, while nisin provides the sudden ion-nonspecific dissipation of the proton motive force required to enhance the S-layer murein hydrolase activity. PMID:19948852

  3. Anomalous hexagonal superstructure of aluminum oxide layer grown on NiAl(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krukowski, Pawel; Chaunchaiyakul, Songpol; Minagawa, Yuto; Yajima, Nami; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    A modified method for the fabrication of a highly crystallized layer of aluminum oxide on a NiAl(110) surface is reported. The fabrication method involves the multistep selective oxidation of aluminum atoms on a NiAl(110) surface resulting from successive oxygen deposition and annealing. The surface morphology and local electronic structure of the novel aluminum oxide layer were investigated by high-resolution imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy. In contrast to the standard fabrication method of aluminum oxide on a NiAl(110) surface, the proposed method produces an atomically flat surface exhibiting a hexagonal superstructure. The superstructure exhibits a slightly distorted hexagonal array of close-packed bright protrusions with a periodicity of 4.5 ± 0.2 nm. Atomically resolved STM imaging of the aluminum oxide layer reveals a hexagonal arrangement of dark contrast spots with a periodicity of 0.27 ± 0.02 nm. On the basis of the atomic structure of the fabricated layer, the formation of α-Al2O3(0001) on the NiAl(110) surface is suggested.

  4. Mechanism of Layer-by-Layer Oxidation of Si(001) Surfaces by Two-Dimensional Oxide-Island Nucleation at SiO2/Si Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Baba, Toshio; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2000-04-01

    We have studied the mechanism of layer-by-layer oxidation of Si(001) surfaces. The layer-by-layer oxidation was confirmed and precisely monitored by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM). By combining SREM and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) methods, we investigated the change in atomic-scale roughness at SiO2/Si(001) interfaces during the oxidation. We found that, while the oxide interface is atomically flat after the oxidation of each layer is complete, nanometer-scale oxide islands with a single atomic height are densely nucleated at the interface during the oxidation of each layer. We also observed an oscillation in the intensity of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) spots during the top-layer oxidation. These results clearly indicate that the layer-by-layer oxidation proceeds by the nucleation of nanometer-scale oxide islands at the interfaces and by their preferential lateral island growth.

  5. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  6. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  7. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  8. Effect of irradiation by argon ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gumarov, A. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Luchkin, A. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Yanilkin, I. V.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2016-09-01

    Effect of zirconium irradiation by 1 keV Ar+ ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer is studied. It is shown that deuterium trapping under subsequent irradiation of the Ar-treated sample by deuterium atoms of thermal energies in D2 + 30at.% O2 gas mixture is 2 times less than trapping in the untreated sample. Besides, irradiation of the untreated sample by D-atoms provokes desorption of ≈25% of hydrogen contained therein, whereas hydrogen desorption from the ion-treated zirconium surface does not occur. It is proposed that oxygen depletion of the surface oxide layer, caused by ion bombardment, is a reason of mitigation of the hydrogen transport through this layer in both directions.

  9. Transport numbers in the surface layers of asymmetric membranes from initial time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Compan, V.; Lopez, M.L. ); Sorensen, T.S. ); Garrido, J. )

    1994-09-08

    The initial time asymmetry potentials of two ultra filtration membranes (cellulose acetate and polysulfone membranes) were measured in electrochemical cells using Ag/AgCl electrodes and NaCl solutions. The concentration in the two electrode chambers differed slightly by a fixed concentration difference. Either the membranes were brought to equilibrium with the left-hand solution and subsequently exposed to the right-hand solution at the right-hand face, or the procedure was reversed. From such measurements it is possible to evaluate the transport numbers corresponding to each of the two surface layers of the membrane under conditions such that the effects of autoprotolysis of water and of foreign ions may be neglected. These measurements permit a description of each of the surface layers of the membranes and make possible an electrochemical characterization of the asymmetry of ultrafiltration membranes. The asymmetry is given by the difference between surface layer transport numbers. 31 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Manufacture of silicon-based devices having disordered sulfur-doped surface layers

    DOEpatents

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2008-04-08

    The present invention provides methods of fabricating a radiation-absorbing semiconductor wafer by irradiating at least one surface location of a silicon substrate, e.g., an n-doped crystalline silicon, by a plurality of temporally short laser pulses, e.g., femtosecond pulses, while exposing that location to a substance, e.g., SF.sub.6, having an electron-donating constituent so as to generate a substantially disordered surface layer (i.e., a microstructured layer) that incorporates a concentration of that electron-donating constituent, e.g., sulfur. The substrate is also annealed at an elevated temperature and for a duration selected to enhance the charge carrier density in the surface layer. For example, the substrate can be annealed at a temperature in a range of about 700 K to about 900 K.

  11. Cobalt on rhenium(0001) an example of thermally activated layer intermixing and surface alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parschau, M.; Christmann, K.

    1999-03-01

    The growth and morphology of cobalt thin films deposited onto a Re(0001) surface at 300, 400 and 550 K were followed in the coverage range 0 ML< Θ<6 ML by combined low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The interaction phenomena are complex and depend strongly on temperature. At 300 K, cobalt nucleates homogeneously on terraces and heterogeneously at steps forming dendritic islands. Larger cobalt coverages lead to incomplete layer growth. Interdiffusion and alloying play a minor role only at 300 K, but become dominant for T>400 K in that different (2×2) phases form within the first Re-Co bilayer, one within the rhenium substrate surface, the others within the cobalt islands. The (2×2) phases can be associated with Re/Co surface alloys of different stoichiometry, depending on cobalt coverage. As the cobalt coverages exceed two monolayers (ML), genuine but incomplete cobalt layers grow. Within the third and fourth cobalt layer, periodic triangular features with a lattice constant of ~28 Å appear in STM, followed by a Moiré pattern for Θ>4 ML. Both structures produce an incomplete (10×10) LEED pattern. After growth of the fifth or sixth layer the lattice misfit is overcome, and cobalt essentially grows layer-by-layer in a pseudo Frank-van der Merwe mechanism, the details being strongly temperature-dependent.

  12. Initial growth process of Co (Pd) layers on a Pd (Co) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizawa, N. Porquez, J. G.; Munekata, H.; Kitamoto, Y.

    2015-05-07

    The deposition process of ultra-thin Co and Pd layers is studied using DC magnetron sputtering and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is found that observation with AFM in the air atmosphere is reliable to discuss nucleation of Co and Pd crystallites. It is discussed that a Co ultra-thin layer is formed primarily through the process of two-dimensional island formation, whereas a Pd ultra-thin layer is formed through the process of mixed two- and three-dimensional island formation. On the basis of those results, Co/Pd multilayers having a flat top surface are prepared successfully.

  13. Influence of the sensitivity of an optical resonator with a surface layer by its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiger, Gustav; Weigel, Thomas; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, optical resonators have emerged as a promising tool for highly sensitive measurements. Especially for label-free measurements of biological substances, the resonators have to be functionalized by additional surface layers. Since the properties of the resonator, like the refractive index of the core and the layer as well as the layer thickness or the core radius can deeply in fluence the sensitivity. For this reason, a geometrical optics based theory is used to investigate the dependence of the resonance wavelength on the resonator properties.

  14. Resonance oscillation damping of a scanning microscope probe by a near-surface viscous liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslenikov, I. I.; Reshetov, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    Viscous liquid layer motion between a probe with a tip shaped as a paraboloid of revolution and a surface is considered for semicontact-mode operation of a scanning probe microscope. The presence of a viscous liquid layer leads to energy dissipation and is one of the factors responsible for the decrease in the probe oscillation amplitude. The Reynolds equation for viscous liquid motion is used to obtain an analytic solution to the problem. The formula derived for the loss is compared with experimental data obtained for probes and layers with various curvature radii and viscosities.

  15. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, P A; Ranga, V; Stutts, M J

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium. This interpretation was supported by electron microscopy, which showed that the tracer molecule horseradish peroxidase was present in the intercellular spaces of tracheal epithelium from ozone-exposed, but not air-exposed (control), animals. However, when the tracheas were excised after ozone

  16. Turbulent dusty boundary layer in an ANFO surface-burst explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Ferguson, R. E.; Chien, K. Y.; Collins, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the results of numerical simulations of the dusty, turbulent boundary layer created by a surface burst explosion. The blast wave was generated by the detonation of a 600-T hemisphere of ANFO, similar to those used in large-scale field tests. The surface was assumed to be ideally noncratering but contained an initial loose layer of dust. The dust-air mixture in this fluidized bed was modeled as a dense gas (i.e., an equilibrium model, valid for very small-diameter dust particles). The evolution of the flow was calculated by a high-order Godunov code that solves the nonsteady conservation laws. Shock interactions with dense layer generated vorticity near the wall, a result that is similar to viscous, no-slip effects found in clean flows. The resulting wall shear layer was unstable, and rolled up into large-scale rotational structures. These structures entrained dense material from the wall layer and created a chaotically striated flow. The boundary layer grew due to merging of the large-scale structures and due to local entrainment of the dense material from the fluidized bed. The chaotic flow was averaged along similarity lines (i.e., lines of constant values of x = r/Rs and y = z/Rs where R(sub s) = ct(exp alpha)) to establish the mean-flow profiles and the r.m.s. fluctuating-flow profiles of the boundary layer.

  17. Turbulent dusty boundary layer in an ANFO surface-burst explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Ferguson, R.E.; Chien, K.Y.; Collins, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the results of numerical simulations of the dusty, turbulent boundary layer created by a surface burst explosion. The blast wave was generated by the detonation of a 600-T hemisphere of ANFO, similar to those used in large-scale field tests. The surface was assumed to be ideally noncratering but contained in initial loose layer of dust. The dust-air mixture in this fluidized bed was modeled as a dense gas (i.e., an equilibrium model, valid for very small-diameter dust particles). The evolution of the flow was calculated by a high-order Godunov code that solves the nonsteady conservation laws. Shock interactions with dense layer generated vorticity near the wall -- similar to viscous, no-slip effects found in clean flows. The resulting will shear layer was unstable, and rolled up into large-scale rotational structures. These structures entrained dense material from the wall layer and created a chaotically striated flow. The boundary layer grew due to merging of the large-scale structures and due to local entrainment of the dense material from the fluidized bed. The chaotic flow was averaged along similarity lines (i.e., lines of constant values of x = r/Rs and y = z/Rs where R{sub s} = ct{sup {alpha}}) to establish the mean-flow profiles and the r.m.s. fluctuating-flow profiles of the boundary layer.

  18. Tribological Properties of the Fe-Al-Cr Alloyed Layer by Double Glow Plasma Surface Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xixi; Yao, Zhengjun; Zhang, Pingze; Zhou, Keyin; Wang, Zhangzhong

    2016-09-01

    A Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer was deposited onto the surface of Q235 low-carbon steel via double glow plasma surface metallurgy (DGPSM) to improve the steel's wear resistance. After the DGPSM treatment, the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer grown on the Q235 low-carbon steel was homogeneous and compact and had a thickness of 25 µm. The layer was found to be metallurgically adhered to the substrate. The frictional coefficient and specific wear rate of the sample with a Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer (treated sample) were both lower than those of the bare substrate (untreated sample) at the measured temperatures (25, 250 and 450 °C). The results indicated that the substrate and the alloyed layer suffered oxidative wear and abrasive wear, respectively, and that the treated samples exhibited much better tribological properties than did the substrate. The formation of Fe2AlCr, Fe3Al(Cr), FeAl(Cr), Fe(Cr) sosoloid and Cr23C6 phases in the alloyed layer dramatically enhanced the wear resistance of the treated sample. In addition, the alloyed layer's oxidation film exhibited a self-healing capacity with lubrication action that also contributed to the improvement of the wear resistance at high temperature. In particular, at 450 °C, the specific wear rate of treated sample was 2.524 × 10-4 mm3/N m, which was only 45.2% of the untreated sample.

  19. Tribological Properties of the Fe-Al-Cr Alloyed Layer by Double Glow Plasma Surface Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xixi; Yao, Zhengjun; Zhang, Pingze; Zhou, Keyin; Wang, Zhangzhong

    2016-07-01

    A Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer was deposited onto the surface of Q235 low-carbon steel via double glow plasma surface metallurgy (DGPSM) to improve the steel's wear resistance. After the DGPSM treatment, the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer grown on the Q235 low-carbon steel was homogeneous and compact and had a thickness of 25 µm. The layer was found to be metallurgically adhered to the substrate. The frictional coefficient and specific wear rate of the sample with a Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer (treated sample) were both lower than those of the bare substrate (untreated sample) at the measured temperatures (25, 250 and 450 °C). The results indicated that the substrate and the alloyed layer suffered oxidative wear and abrasive wear, respectively, and that the treated samples exhibited much better tribological properties than did the substrate. The formation of Fe2AlCr, Fe3Al(Cr), FeAl(Cr), Fe(Cr) sosoloid and Cr23C6 phases in the alloyed layer dramatically enhanced the wear resistance of the treated sample. In addition, the alloyed layer's oxidation film exhibited a self-healing capacity with lubrication action that also contributed to the improvement of the wear resistance at high temperature. In particular, at 450 °C, the specific wear rate of treated sample was 2.524 × 10-4 mm3/N m, which was only 45.2% of the untreated sample.

  20. Cryoscanning electron microscopy of loaded articular cartilage with special reference to the surface amorphous layer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1996-04-01

    The surface layer (i.e. the surface lamina) of articular cartilage, which is devoid of a collagen fibril network or cells, was investigated in the pig and human. It overlies the collagenous main part of the articular cartilage which contains chondrocytes and is thought to be important biomechanically. In order to examine morphological changes in this layer when under load, knee articular cartilage of the pig, along with the underlying subchondral bone, was compressed with a cylindrical indenter. The specimen was frozen by immersion in liquid nitrogen to maintain the loaded condition and was then freeze-fractured at the indented region. The fracture face was examined with a cryoscanning electron microscope. The surface layer was compressed beneath the indenter regardless of loading pressure or period and was expanded around the indenter to form a triangular bulge in cross section. The height of the bulge was related to the applied pressure and not to the loading period. Recovery of the cartilage from indentation was also examined. Immediately after removal of the indenter, the bulge of the surface layer moved back into the previously indented region. The region was covered by a thick surface layer after 2 s. The response of the surface layer to and recovery from indentation was largely instantaneous and elastic. Under heavy load conditions, the main part of the cartilage under the indenter was observed to have a striped pattern which was made up of bands of densely packed collagen fibrils with fibrillar networks remaining between them. These morphological findings agree well with previously reported biomechanical hypotheses and can be explained by the flow of interstitial fluid provoked by stress application. PMID:8621329

  1. Surface modification induced phase transformation and structure variation on the rapidly solidified recast layer of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-Hung; Haung, Chiung-Fang; Shyu, Shih-Shiun; Chou, Yen-Ru; Lin, Ming-Hong; Peng, Pei-Wen; and others

    2015-08-15

    In this study, neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO{sub 4}) as a laser source with different scanning speeds was used on biomedical Ti surface. The microstructural and biological properties of laser-modified samples were investigated by means of optical microscope, electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, surface roughness instrument, contact angle and cell cytotoxicity assay. After laser modification, the rough volcano-like recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure and wave-like recast layer with nanoporous structure were generated on the surfaces of laser-modified samples, respectively. It was also found out that, an α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition occurred on the recast layers of laser-modified samples. The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. Moreover, the cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that laser-modified samples did not influence the cell adhesion and proliferation behaviors of osteoblast (MG-63) cell. The laser with 50 mm/s scanning speed induced formation of rough volcano-like recast layer accompanied with micro-/nanoporous structure, which can promote cell adhesion and proliferation of MG-63 cell on Ti surface. The results indicated that the laser treatment was a potential technology to enhance the biocompatibility for titanium. - Highlights: • Laser induced the formation of recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure on Ti. • An α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition was observed within the recast layer. • The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. • Laser-modified samples exhibit good biocompatibility to osteoblast (MG-63) cell.

  2. The surface location of individual residues in a bacterial S-layer protein.

    PubMed

    Kinns, Helen; Howorka, Stefan

    2008-03-21

    Bacterial surface layer (S-layer) proteins self-assemble into large two-dimensional crystalline lattices that form the outermost cell-wall component of all archaea and many eubacteria. Despite being a large class of self-assembling proteins, little is known about their molecular architecture. We investigated the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 to identify residues located at the subunit-subunit interface and to determine the S-layer's topology. Twenty-three single cysteine mutants, which were previously mapped to the surface of the SbsB monomer, were subjected to a cross-linking screen using the photoactivatable, sulfhydryl-reactive reagent N-[4-(p-azidosalicylamido)butyl]-3'-(2'-pyridyldithio)propionamide. Gel electrophoretic analysis on the formation of cross-linked dimers indicated that 8 out of the 23 residues were located at the interface. In combination with surface accessibility data for the assembled protein, 10 residues were assigned to positions at the inner, cell-wall-facing lattice surface, while 5 residues were mapped to the outer, ambient-exposed lattice surface. In addition, the cross-linking screen identified six positions of intramolecular cross-linking within the assembled protein but not in the monomeric S-layer protein. Most likely, these intramolecular cross-links result from conformational changes upon self-assembly. The results are an important step toward the further structural elucidation of the S-layer protein via, for example, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Our approach of identifying the surface location of residues is relevant to other planar supramolecular protein assemblies. PMID:18262545

  3. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  4. Surface modulation of complex stiffness via layer-by-layer assembly as a facile strategy for selective cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Zhang, He; Hu, Mi; Chen, Xia-chao; Ren, Ke-feng; Wang, Jin-lei; Ji, Jian

    2015-02-01

    In-stent restenosis and thrombosis are the main severe problems that occur after the percutaneous vascular intervention. The competition between endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role during these pathological changes. The regulation of this competition offers new opportunities to design biomaterials in the cardiovascular fields. Bioactive molecules have been typically employed to increase EC adhesion and thereafter to enhance EC competitiveness; however, this method is associated with limitations from the point of view of practical and industrial applications. Herein, we present an approach to enhance EC competitiveness over that of SMC through the selective EC adhesion, which is achieved by modulating a complex surface stiffness based on the technique of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. This complex stiffness can be achieved by regulating the thickness of multilayer films coordinating with a rigid underlying substrate. The selective cell adhesion is attributed to changes in the complex surface stiffness and a different intrinsic property between ECs and SMCs. This study provides a facile and broadly applicable approach for the purpose of the enhancement of EC competitiveness over that of SMC, which has great potential for the development of cell-based functional biomaterials in the cardiovascular field. PMID:26218126

  5. INDUCED SPUTUM DERIVES FROM THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: CONFIRMATION USING A RADIOLABELED AEROSOL BOLUS DELIVERY TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indirect evidence suggests that induced sputum derives from the surfaces of the bronchial airways. To confirm this experimentally, we employed a radiolabeled aerosol bolus delivery technique that preferentially deposits aerosol in the central airways in humans. We hypothesized th...

  6. Phase composition and structure of femtosecond laser-produced oxide layer on VT6 alloy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Yu R.; Zhidkov, M. V.; Golosov, E. V.; Vershinina, T. N.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ligachev, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of femtosecond laser irradiation on the formation of an oxide layer on the surface of VT6 titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) is studied. The structure, chemical and phase composition have been studied by x-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The formation features of an oxide layer, which contains TiO2-rutile, TiO2-anatase Al2TiO5-aluminum titanate, Ti3O5-titanium oxide and TiO-titanium monoxide on the femtosecond laser-irradiation modified surface have been analyzed.

  7. Puzzling evidence for surface superconductivity in the layered dichalcogenide Cu10%TiSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy-Bertrand, F.; Michon, B.; Marcus, J.; Marcenat, C.; Kačmarčík, J.; Klein, T.; Cercellier, H.

    2016-04-01

    We report on specific heat and magnetotransport measurements performed on superconducting Cu10%TiSe2 single crystals. We show that superconductivity persists in transport measurements up to magnetic fields HR well above the upper critical field Hc2 deduced from the calorimetric measurements. Surprisingly this "surface" superconductivity is present for all magnetic field orientations, either parallel or perpendicular to the layers. For H‖ab, the temperature dependence of the HR/Hc2 ratio can be well reproduced by solving the Ginzburg-Landau equations in presence of a surface layer with reduced superconducting properties. Unexpectedly this temperature dependence does not depend on the field orientation.

  8. Surface layer ozone and nitric oxides in the Arctic: The inuence of boundary layer dynamics, snowpack chemistry, surface exchanges, and seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Brie A.

    The snowpack is a region of active chemistry. Aqueous chemistry in a quasi-liquid layer on snow grains and gas-phase chemical reactions in snow interstitial air can lead to the production or destruction of important trace gases. Physical transport parameters such as wind pumping and diffusion affect the vertical distribution of gases within the snowpack. The resulting emission or uptake of trace gases at the atmosphere-snowpack interface can have significant in uence on the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. In this work the dynamic interactions between the snowpack and atmosphere are examined from multiple perspectives. The primary focus is on ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the Arctic, a region undergoing widespread environmental change. To investigate an ice-sheet location with year round snow cover, data from a two-year campaign at Summit, Greenland are implemented. At Summit this study examines (1) the processes contributing to vigorous chemistry in snow interstitial air, and (2) the role of the boundary layer over snow in determining surface layer NOx. Physical and chemical processes are shown to contribute to distinct seasonal and diurnal cycles of O3, NO, and NO2 in the snowpack. Boundary layer depths estimated from sonic anemometer turbulence quantities are used alongside sodar-derived values to show that the depth of the stable to weakly stable boundary layer at Summit was not a primary factor in determining NO x in early summer. Motivated by observations of an increase in the length of the snow-free season in the Arctic in recent decades, data from a one-year experiment at the seasonally-snow covered location of Toolik Lake, AK are also incorporated. This study shows the first observations of springtime ozone depletion events at a location over 200 km from the coast in the Arctic. FLEXPART analysis is used to illustrate that these inland events are linked to transport conditions. Lastly at this location, eddy-covariance O3 uxes were calculated to

  9. Layer-by-layer TiO(2)/WO(3) thin films as efficient photocatalytic self-cleaning surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patrocinio, Antonio Otavio T; Paula, Leonardo F; Paniago, Roberto M; Freitag, Janna; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2014-10-01

    New TiO2/WO3 films were produced by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and successfully applied as self-cleaning photocatalytic surfaces. The films were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates from the respective metal oxide nanoparticles obtained by the sol-gel method. Thirty alternative immersions in pH = 2 TiO2 and pH = 10 WO3 sols resulted in ca. 400 nm thick films that exhibited a W(VI)/Ti(IV) molar ratio of 0.5, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy, along with atomic force images, showed that the resulting layers are constituted by aggregates of very small nanoparticles (<20 nm) and exhibited nanoporous and homogeneous morphology. The electronic and optical properties of the films were investigated by UV-vis spectrophotometry and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The films behave as nanoscale heterojunctions, and the presence of WO3 nanoparticles caused a decrease in the optical band gap of the bilayers compared to that of pure LbL TiO2 films. The TiO2/WO3 thin films exhibited high hydrophilicity, which is enhanced after exposition to UV light, and they can efficiently oxidize gaseous acetaldehyde under UV(A) irradiation. Photonic efficiencies of ξ = 1.5% were determined for films constituted by 30 TiO2/WO3 bilayers in the presence of 1 ppm of acetaldehyde, which are ∼2 times higher than those observed for pure LbL TiO2 films. Therefore, these films can act as efficient and cost-effective layers for self-cleaning, antifogging applications.

  10. Layer-by-layer TiO(2)/WO(3) thin films as efficient photocatalytic self-cleaning surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patrocinio, Antonio Otavio T; Paula, Leonardo F; Paniago, Roberto M; Freitag, Janna; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2014-10-01

    New TiO2/WO3 films were produced by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and successfully applied as self-cleaning photocatalytic surfaces. The films were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates from the respective metal oxide nanoparticles obtained by the sol-gel method. Thirty alternative immersions in pH = 2 TiO2 and pH = 10 WO3 sols resulted in ca. 400 nm thick films that exhibited a W(VI)/Ti(IV) molar ratio of 0.5, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy, along with atomic force images, showed that the resulting layers are constituted by aggregates of very small nanoparticles (<20 nm) and exhibited nanoporous and homogeneous morphology. The electronic and optical properties of the films were investigated by UV-vis spectrophotometry and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The films behave as nanoscale heterojunctions, and the presence of WO3 nanoparticles caused a decrease in the optical band gap of the bilayers compared to that of pure LbL TiO2 films. The TiO2/WO3 thin films exhibited high hydrophilicity, which is enhanced after exposition to UV light, and they can efficiently oxidize gaseous acetaldehyde under UV(A) irradiation. Photonic efficiencies of ξ = 1.5% were determined for films constituted by 30 TiO2/WO3 bilayers in the presence of 1 ppm of acetaldehyde, which are ∼2 times higher than those observed for pure LbL TiO2 films. Therefore, these films can act as efficient and cost-effective layers for self-cleaning, antifogging applications. PMID:25216058

  11. Surface-layer response over shrub-steppe canopy during springtime

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Shaw, W.J.

    1994-03-01

    The exchange of energy and trace gases between the atmosphere and heterogeneous surfaces is gaining increasing attention in the scientific community. An observational study of surface energetics and atmospheric response was undertaken in 1992 to provide data for model application to semi-arid climates and for the evaluation of various models. The objectives of this field study were to quantify surface-layer fluxes over a mixed canopy in a semi-arid climate, to quantify canopy and soil energetics during the transition from moist winter conditions to dry summer conditions, and to investigate parameterization of surface exchange processes in a mixed canopy setting.

  12. Surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Naoko; Vella, Kate; Hamilton, Bryan; Shivji, Mahmood; Soloviev, Alexander; Matt, Silvia; Tartar, Aurélien; Perrie, William

    2016-01-01

    Certain marine bacteria found in the near-surface layer of the ocean are expected to play important roles in the production and decay of surface active materials; however, the details of these processes are still unclear. Here we provide evidence supporting connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean, slicks on the sea surface, and a distinctive feature in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the sea surface. From DNA analyses of the in situ samples using pyrosequencing technology, we found the highest abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial taxa in the near-surface layer below the slick. Our study suggests that production of surfactants by marine bacteria takes place in the organic-rich areas of the water column. Produced surfactants can then be transported to the sea surface and form slicks when certain physical conditions are met. This finding has potential applications in monitoring organic materials in the water column using remote sensing techniques. Identifying a connection between marine bacteria and production of natural surfactants may provide a better understanding of the global picture of biophysical processes at the boundary between the ocean and atmosphere, air-sea exchange of greenhouse gases, and production of climate-active marine aerosols. PMID:26753514

  13. Surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Naoko; Vella, Kate; Hamilton, Bryan; Shivji, Mahmood; Soloviev, Alexander; Matt, Silvia; Tartar, Aurélien; Perrie, William

    2016-01-01

    Certain marine bacteria found in the near-surface layer of the ocean are expected to play important roles in the production and decay of surface active materials; however, the details of these processes are still unclear. Here we provide evidence supporting connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean, slicks on the sea surface, and a distinctive feature in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the sea surface. From DNA analyses of the in situ samples using pyrosequencing technology, we found the highest abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial taxa in the near-surface layer below the slick. Our study suggests that production of surfactants by marine bacteria takes place in the organic-rich areas of the water column. Produced surfactants can then be transported to the sea surface and form slicks when certain physical conditions are met. This finding has potential applications in monitoring organic materials in the water column using remote sensing techniques. Identifying a connection between marine bacteria and production of natural surfactants may provide a better understanding of the global picture of biophysical processes at the boundary between the ocean and atmosphere, air-sea exchange of greenhouse gases, and production of climate-active marine aerosols. PMID:26753514

  14. The sll1951 Gene Encodes the Surface Layer Protein of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Sll1951 is the surface layer (S-layer) protein of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. This large, hemolysin-like protein was found in the supernatant of a strain that was deficient in S-layer attachment. An sll1951 deletion mutation was introduced into Synechocystis and was easily segregated to homozygosity under laboratory conditions. By thin-section and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy, a ∼30-nm-wide S-layer lattice covering the cell surface was readily visible in wild-type cells but was absent in the Δsll1951 strain. Instead, the Δsll1951 strain displayed a smooth lipopolysaccharide surface as its most peripheral layer. In the presence of chaotropic agents, the wild type released a large (>150-kDa) protein into the medium that was identified as Sll1951 by mass spectrometry of trypsin fragments; this protein was missing in the Δsll1951 strain. In addition, Sll1951 was prominent in crude extracts of the wild type, indicating that it is an abundant protein. The carotenoid composition of the cell wall fraction of the Δsll1951 strain was similar to that of the wild type, suggesting that the S-layer does not contribute to carotenoid binding. Although the photoautotrophic growth rate of the Δsll1951 strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, the viability of the Δsll1951 strain was reduced upon exposure to lysozyme treatment and hypo-osmotic stress, indicating a contribution of the S-layer to the integrity of the Synechocystis cell wall. This work identifies the S-layer protein in Synechocystis and shows that, at least under laboratory conditions, this very abundant, large protein has a supportive but not a critical role in the function of the cyanobacterium. PMID:24078613

  15. Critical heat flux maxima resulting from the controlled morphology of nanoporous hydrophilic surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault-Friend, Melanie; Azizian, Reza; Bucci, Matteo; McKrell, Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Rubner, Michael; Cohen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Porous hydrophilic surfaces have been shown to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) in boiling heat transfer. In this work, the separate effects of pore size and porous layer thickness on the CHF of saturated water at atmospheric pressure were experimentally investigated using carefully engineered surfaces. It was shown that, for a fixed pore diameter (˜20 nm), there is an optimum layer thickness (˜2 μm), for which the CHF value is maximum, corresponding to ˜115% enhancement over the value for uncoated surfaces. Similarly, a maximum CHF value (˜100% above the uncoated surface CHF) was observed while changing the pore size at a constant layer thickness (˜1 μm). To explain these CHF maxima, we propose a mechanistic model that can capture the effect of pore size and pore thickness on CHF. The good agreement found between the model and experimental data supports the hypothesis that CHF is governed by the competition between capillary wicking, viscous pressure drop and evaporation, as well as conduction heat transfer within the porous layer. The model can be used to guide the development of engineered surfaces with superior boiling performance.

  16. Experimental data and model for the turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnson, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine how boundary layer turbulence is affected by strong convex curvature. The data gathered on the behavior of the Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero. Two experiments were performed at delta/R approximately 0.10, and one at weaker curvature with delta/R approximately 0.05. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. When the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions. A simple turbulence model, which was based on the theory that the Prandtl mixing length in the outer layer should scale on the velocity gradient layer, was shown to account for the slow recovery.

  17. Gallium nitride surface protection during RTA annealing with a GaOxNy cap-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalfaoui, Wahid; Oheix, T.; Cayrel, F.; Benoit, R.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E.; Alquier, D.

    2016-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is generally considered a good candidate for power electronic devices such as Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs). Nevertheless, GaN has a strong sensitivity to high temperature treatments and a cap-layer is mandatory to protect the material surface during annealing at high temperature such as post-implantation treatments. In this work, an oxidized gallium nitride layer (GaOxNy) was generated with Oxford PECVD equipment using a N2O plasma treatment to protect the GaN surface during a rapid thermal annealing (RTA), in the range of 1000 °C-1150 °C for a few minutes. Before annealing, c-TLM patterns were processed on the GaOxNy/GaN sample to characterize its sheet resistance. After the N2O plasma treatment, the sample exhibited lower sheet resistance, indicating a better n-type conduction of the GaOxNy layer due to an excess of free carriers, compared to the as-grown GaN layer. The GaOxNy/GaN surface was then annealed at 1150 °C for 3 min and observed through AFM imaging. The surface exhibited a good quality with a low roughness, nevertheless, a low density of small hexagonal pits appeared after annealing. Finally, studies to determine an efficient etching process of the GaOxNy cap-layer were conducted using both chemical and physical approaches. We observed that efficient etching of the layer was achieved using a heated hydrofluoridric acid (HF 25%) solution. To conclude, GaOxNy has proved to be an efficient cap-layer for GaN protection at high temperature.

  18. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets.

  19. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  20. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them.

  1. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  2. Analysis of corrosion layers in ancient Roman silver coins with high resolution surface spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keturakis, Christopher J.; Notis, Ben; Blenheim, Alex; Miller, Alfred C.; Pafchek, Rob; Notis, Michael R.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the microchemistry of surface corrosion layers on ancient silver alloy coins is important both in terms of understanding the nature of archaeological environmental conditions to which these ancient coins were exposed and also to help in their conservation. In this present study, five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE-244 CE) were used as test vehicles to measure their immediate surface microchemistry and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (HS-LEIS, 0.3 nm depth analysis), High Resolution-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS, 1-3 nm depth analysis) and High Resolution-Raman Spectroscopy (HR-Raman, ∼1000 nm depth analysis). Additional information about the deeper corrosion layers, up to ∼300-1000 nm, was provided by dynamic HS-LEIS and HR-Raman spectroscopy. While not archeologically significant, the use of these coins of small commercial value provides data that is more representative of the weaker signals typically obtained from ancient corroded objects, which can be in stark contrast to pristine data often obtained from carefully prepared alloys of known composition. The oldest coins, from 225 to 214 BCE, possessed an outermost surface layer containing Cu2O, Na, Al, Pb, and adsorbed hydrocarbons, while the more recent coins, from 98 to 244 CE, contained Cu2O, Ag, N, F, Na, Al, S, Cl, and adsorbed hydrocarbons in similar corresponding surface layers. It thus appears that alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu2O layer. Depth profiling revealed the presence of K, Na, Cl, and S as key corrosion components for both sets of coins with S, most likely as Ag2S, concentrated towards the surface while the Cl, most likely as AgCl, penetrated deeper. Schema to understand the overall chemistry of the corrosion layers present on these silver alloy coins were developed from the equipment limitations encountered and are presented.

  3. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; Prasanna Kumar, S.; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Rao, R. R.; Neetu, S.; Hegde, Akshay

    2016-08-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable impacts on climate and postmonsoon tropical cyclones. Lack of systematic measurements from the BoB in the past prevented a thorough investigation of the SLTI spatiotemporal variability, their formation mechanisms, and their contribution to the surface temperature variations. The present study benefits from the recent Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA) buoys located in BoB along 90°E at 4°N, 8°N, 12°N, and 15°N over the 2006-2014 period. Analysis of data from these RAMA buoys indicates that SLTI forms after the summer monsoon and becomes fully developed during winter (December-February). SLTI exhibits a strong geographical dependency, with more frequent (80% times during winter) and intense inversions (amplitude, ΔT ˜ 0.7°C) occurring only in the northern BoB compared to central and southern Bay. SLTI also exhibits large interannual and intraseasonal variations, with intraseasonal amplitude significantly larger (ΔT ˜ 0.44°C) than the interannual amplitude (˜0.26°C). Heat budget analysis of the mixed layer reveals that the net surface heat loss is the most dominant process controlling the formation and maintenance of SLTI. However, there are instances of episodic advection of cold, low-saline waters over warm-saline waters leading to the formation of SLTI as in 2012-2013. Vertical processes contribute significantly to the mixed layer heat budget during winter, by warming the surface layer through entrainment and vertical diffusion.

  4. Deformation characteristics of the near-surface layers of zirconia ceramics implanted with aluminum ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghyngazov, S. A.; Vasiliev, I. P.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Chernyavski, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion treatment on the phase composition and mechanical properties of the near-surface layers of zirconium ceramic composition 97 ZrO2-3Y2O3 (mol%) was studied. Irradiation of the samples was carried out by accelerated ions of aluminum with using vacuum-arc source Mevva 5-Ru. Ion beam had the following parameters: the energy of the accelerated ions E = 78 keV, the pulse current density Ji = 4mA / cm2, current pulse duration equal τ = 250 mcs, pulse repetition frequency f = 5 Hz. Exposure doses (fluence) were 1016 и 1017 ion/cm2. The depth distribution implanted ions was studied by SIMS method. It is shown that the maximum projected range of the implanted ions is equal to 250 nm. Near-surface layers were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at fixed glancing incidence angle. It is shown that implantation of aluminum ions into the ceramics does not lead to a change in the phase composition of the near-surface layer. The influence of implanted ions on mechanical properties of ceramic near-surface layers was studied by the method of dynamic nanoindentation using small loads on the indenter P=300 mN. It is shown that in ion- implanted ceramic layer the processes of material recovery in the deformed region in the unloading mode proceeds with higher efficiency as compared with the initial material state. The deformation characteristics of samples before and after ion treatment have been determined from interpretation of the resulting P-h curves within the loading and unloading sections by the technique proposed by Oliver and Pharr. It was found that implantation of aluminum ions in the near-surface layer of zirconia ceramics increases nanohardness and reduces the Young's modulus.

  5. Roughness Characterization of and Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over flat Snow Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromke, C.; Guala, M.; Manes, C.; Walter, B.; Lehning, M.

    2009-12-01

    The surface roughness is essential for all turbulent exchange processes within the lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer. Consequently, a proper representation of the surfaces roughness is needed in every mathematical description of near surface mass-, energy- and momentum exchange processes. Considering the vertical mean velocity profile of turbulent boundary layer flow, this is done by assigning an aerodynamic roughness length z0 to the surface. We followed two procedures to describe the roughness of freshly fallen snow surfaces. First, photographs of snow surfaces have been taken and evaluated using digital image analysis giving snow surface contour line coordinates. Applying structure functions to the snow surface coordinates and statistical fitting procedures, resulted in classes of surface characteristic length scales and scaling exponents. These results allow to identify the deposition process of snow fall as scaling exponents corresponded to that of Ballistic Deposition. Moreover, the resulting characteristic length scales can be assigned to typical particle size and aggregation size length scales consistent with results found by Lowe et al. (2007) and Manes et al. (2008). Second, aerodynamic roughness lengths z0 have been estimated from log-law fitting of velocity profiles over the snow surfaces measured in the SLF cold atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. The aerodynamic roughness lengths found are in general agreement with available literature data and suggest the presence of aerodynamically rough regimes with flow independent z0. In the synthesis of both approaches, we found evidence for a linear relationship between one class of surface characteristic length scales, which is associated with typical snow particle sizes, and aerodynamic roughness lengths z0. The correlation with the aggregation length scale is weaker for the few (4) samples analyzed thus far. The relatively weak pronounced scale separation between particle and aggregation size

  6. Surface morphology and Raman spectroscopy of thin layers of antimony and bismuth chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk'yanova, L. N.; Bibik, A. Yu.; Aseev, V. A.; Usov, O. A.; Makarenko, I. V.; Petrov, V. N.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Kutasov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The phonon spectra in thin layers of bismuth telluride and solid solutions of Bi2- x Sb x Te3- y Se y of different composition, belonging to three-dimensional topological insulators, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy, and the morphology of an interlayer van der Waals (0001) surface in them has been studied by semicontact atomic force microscopy at room temperature. The analysis of the Raman spectra and the intensity ratio of active and inactive longitudinal optical modes depending on the composition, morphology of the interlayer surface, and thickness of the layers enabled the estimation of the effect of topological surface states of Dirac fermions, associated with the strengthening of the electron-phonon interaction as a result of resonance Raman scattering, and the identification of the compositions, in which the contribution of topological surface states becomes dominant.

  7. Neutrally Stratified Turbulent Ekman Boundary Layer: Universal Similarity for a Transitional Rough Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2009-08-01

    The geostrophic Ekman boundary layer for large Rossby number ( Ro) has been investigated by exploring the role played by the mesolayer (intermediate layer) lying between the traditional inner and outer layers. It is shown that the velocity and Reynolds shear stress components in the inner layer (including the overlap region) are universal relations, explicitly independent of surface roughness. This universality of predictions has been supported by observations from experiment, field and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for fully smooth, transitionally rough and fully rough surfaces. The maxima of Reynolds shear stresses have been shown to be located in the mesolayer of the Ekman boundary layer, whose scale corresponds to the inverse square root of the friction Rossby number. The composite wall-wake universal relations for geostrophic velocity profiles have been proposed, and the two wake functions of the outer layer have been estimated by an eddy viscosity closure model. The geostrophic drag and cross-isobaric angle predictions yield universal relations, which are also supported by extensive field, laboratory and DNS data. The proposed predictions for the geostrophic drag and the cross-isobaric angle compare well with data for Rossby number Ro ≥ 105. The data show low Rossby number effects for Ro < 105 and higher-order effects due to the mesolayer compare well with the data for Ro ≥ 103.

  8. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun’s Near-Surface Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Benjamin J.; Hindman, Bradley W.; Toomre, Juri

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the Sun’s sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10-40 m s-1 (or equivalently 1-3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of downflows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the downflows have a Rossby radius of deformation equal to the depth of the shear layer and we suggest that this equality may not be coincidental.

  9. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  10. The formation of gradient submicrocrystalline structure at nickel surface layers under ultrasonic impact treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, V.; Kuznetsov, P.; Pochivalov, Yu.; Belyaeva, I.; Rakhmatulina, T.; Shumakova, D.

    2015-10-01

    Submicrocrystalline nickel produced by ultrasonic impact treatment was studied using scanning tunnel and optical microscopy. The size and grain boundary energy distributions were obtained depending on the distance from surface. It was found that regardless of processing mode ultrasonic impact treatment led to refinement of the thin surface layer comparable with initial grain size. Analysis of cumulative distribution functions for relative boundary energy allows us to study energy redistribution under treatment and qualitatively estimate low-angle and high-angle boundaries contributions.

  11. Spectroscopic detection of atom-surface interactions in an atomic-vapor layer with nanoscale thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, K. A.; Keaveney, J.; Hughes, I. G.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Adams, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    We measure the resonance line shape of atomic-vapor layers with nanoscale thickness confined between two sapphire windows. The measurement is performed by scanning a probe laser through resonance and collecting the scattered light. The line shape is dominated by the effects of Dicke narrowing, self-broadening, and atom-surface interactions. By fitting the measured line shape to a simple model we discuss the possibility to extract information about the atom-surface interaction.

  12. Effects of surface source/sink distributions on the flux-gradient similarity in the unstable surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Qing; Cai, Xuhui; Kang, Ling; Zhang, Hongsheng; Song, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the micrometeorological measurements at a heterogeneous farmland in the North China Plain, this study focused on the effects of surface source/sink distributions on the flux-gradient similarity theory in the unstable surface layer. Firstly, the quality of the micrometeorological measurements was evaluated by the analysis of the surface energy balance closure and the integral turbulence characteristics. In general, a 22 % deficit of energy balance was found at this site, with the sum of sensible and latent heat being smaller than the available energy. The normalized standard deviations of turbulent quantities behaved in accordance with Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. However, slight departures from the classical formulations might be caused by the surface heterogeneity. Then, the applicability of flux-gradient similarity over the heterogeneous surface was examined. The observed normalized wind gradients agreed with the classical universal function established over homogeneous surface. However, due to the effects of surface source/sink distributions, the observed normalized humidity and temperature gradients deviated from the classical universal functions. Our study shows that the classical universal functions, when adjusted by a coefficient considering the effects of surface heterogeneity, can be utilized to estimate fluxes via gradient method even though over the heterogeneous surface. This adjustment coefficient was found to decrease linearly from unity with the increase of the absolute value of the vertical flux divergence.

  13. Using of standard marine radar for determination of a water surface and an atmosphere near-surface layer parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatov, Nikolay A.; Bakhanov, Victor V.; Ermoshkin, Aleksei V.; Kazakov, Vasily I.; Kemarskaya, Olga N.; Titov, Victor I.; Troitskaya, Yulia I.

    2014-10-01

    At present time radar methods of the seas and oceans diagnostics are actively developing. Using of the radar stations based on satellites and planes allows to receive information on a sea surface and a atmosphere near-surface layer with coverage of big water surface areas independently of day time. The developed methods of satellite radio images processing can be applied to marine radar stations. In Institute of Applied Physics RAS works on sea surface diagnostics systems development on the basis of standard marine radar are actively conducted. Despite smaller coverage of the territory in comparison with satellite data, marine radar have possibility to record spatially temporary radar images and to receive information on a surrounding situation quickly. This work deals with results of the researches which were conducted within the international expedition in the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2012 on a route Rotterdam (Netherlands) - Ushuaya (Argentina) - Antarctica — Ushuaya. During this expedition a complex measurements of a sea surface, a atmosphere near-surface layer parameters and subsurface currents in the wide range of hydroweather conditions, including the storm were carried out. The system developed in IAP RAS on the basis of a marine radar ICOM MR-1200RII and the ADC (Analog Digital Converter) block for data recording on the personal computer was used. Display of a non-uniform near-surface current on sea surface radar images in storm conditions is shown. By means of the high-speed anemometer and meteorological station the measurements of the atmosphere parameters were carried out. Comparison of the anemometer data with calculated from radar images is carried out. Dependence of radar cross section from wind speed in the wide range of wind speeds, including storm conditions is investigated. Possibility of marine radar using for surface waves intensity and ice situation estimates also as icebergs detection is shown.

  14. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Asta, Mark D; Xin, Huolin L; Doeff, Marca M

    2014-03-27

    The present study sheds light on the long-standing challenges associated with high-voltage operation of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Using correlated ensemble-averaged high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially resolved electron microscopy and spectroscopy, here we report structural reconstruction (formation of a surface reduced layer, to transition) and chemical evolution (formation of a surface reaction layer) at the surface of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 particles. These are primarily responsible for the prevailing capacity fading and impedance buildup under high-voltage cycling conditions, as well as the first-cycle coulombic inefficiency. It was found that the surface reconstruction exhibits a strong anisotropic characteristic, which predominantly occurs along lithium diffusion channels. Furthermore, the surface reaction layer is composed of lithium fluoride embedded in a complex organic matrix. This work sets a refined example for the study of surface reconstruction and chemical evolution in battery materials using combined diagnostic tools at complementary length scales.

  15. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, P.; OKA, M.; TOGUCHIDA, J.; KOBAYASHI, M.; UCHIDA, E.; NAKAMURA, T.; TANAKA, K.

    2001-01-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the ‘lamina splendens’ which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at −10 °C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 μm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  16. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Oka, M; Toguchida, J; Kobayashi, M; Uchida, E; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-09-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the 'lamina splendens' which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at -10 degrees C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 microm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  17. A unified account of perceptual layering and surface appearance in terms of gamut relativity.

    PubMed

    Vladusich, Tony; McDonnell, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    When we look at the world--or a graphical depiction of the world--we perceive surface materials (e.g. a ceramic black and white checkerboard) independently of variations in illumination (e.g. shading or shadow) and atmospheric media (e.g. clouds or smoke). Such percepts are partly based on the way physical surfaces and media reflect and transmit light and partly on the way the human visual system processes the complex patterns of light reaching the eye. One way to understand how these percepts arise is to assume that the visual system parses patterns of light into layered perceptual representations of surfaces, illumination and atmospheric media, one seen through another. Despite a great deal of previous experimental and modelling work on layered representation, however, a unified computational model of key perceptual demonstrations is still lacking. Here we present the first general computational model of perceptual layering and surface appearance--based on a boarder theoretical framework called gamut relativity--that is consistent with these demonstrations. The model (a) qualitatively explains striking effects of perceptual transparency, figure-ground separation and lightness, (b) quantitatively accounts for the role of stimulus- and task-driven constraints on perceptual matching performance, and (c) unifies two prominent theoretical frameworks for understanding surface appearance. The model thereby provides novel insights into the remarkable capacity of the human visual system to represent and identify surface materials, illumination and atmospheric media, which can be exploited in computer graphics applications.

  18. On the development of boundary layer secondary circulations resulting from horizontally varying surface heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    During the last decade there has been a surge in efforts to understand the processes at work in the inhomogeneous atmospheric boundary layer. Much of the interest in the problem has been driven by increasingly urgent needs to develop accurate assessments of man`s Contribution to climate change. It has been argued that subgrid-scale secondary circulations in the boundary layer can cause significant errors in parameterized turbulent surface fluxes. Such circulations -- variously termed ``inland breezes``, ``lake breezes``, ``snow breezes``, or ``nonclassical mesoscale circulations`` are becoming widely discussed and modeled. Because surface fluxes are part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models, it is important to understand when these circulations occur and what their effects are on overall turbulent transfer. What are not yet clear are the combinations of the ambient wind and the horizontal scale and intensity of surface flux variability under which we may expect boundary layer secondary circulations to occur. Several authors have modeled the development of these circulations for ad hoc situations of alternating surface characteristics, and SA have developed one parameterization relating the scale of surface heat flux variability and the ambient wind to the evolution of NCMCs. In this paper we present observations, collected in a region of inhomogeneous surface fluxes, that suggest the development of a ``farm breeze``, and we develop an alternative scaling argument to that of SA that better represents our measurement conditions.

  19. Non-linear boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani Reffet

    1995-01-01

    The process by which a laminar boundary layer internalizes the external disturbances in the form of instability waves is known as boundary-layer receptivity. The objective of the present research was to determine the effect of acoustic excitation on boundary-layer receptivity for a flat plate with distributed variable-amplitude surface roughness through measurements with a hot-wire probe. Tollmien-Schlichting mode shapes due to surface roughness receptivity have also been determined, analyzed, and shown to be in agreement with theory and other experimental work. It has been shown that there is a linear relationship between the surface roughness and receptivity for certain roughness configurations with constant roughness wavelength. In addition, strong non-linear receptivity effects exist for certain surface roughness configurations over a band where the surface roughness and T-S wavelength are matched. The results from the present experiment follow the trends predicted by theory and other experimental work for linear receptivity. In addition, the results show the existence of non-linear receptivity effects for certain combinations of surface roughness elements.

  20. Non-linear boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani Reffet; Selby, Gregory V.

    1995-01-01

    The process by which a laminar boundary layer internalizes the external disturbances in the form of instability waves is known as boundary-layer receptivity. The objective of the present research was to determine the effect of acoustic excitation on boundary-layer receptivity for a flat plate with distributed variable-amplitude surface roughness through measurements with a hot-wire probe. Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) mode shapes due to surface-roughness receptivity have also been determined, analyzed, and shown to be in agreement with theory and other experimental work. It has been shown that there is a linear relationship between the surface roughness and receptivity for certain roughness configurations with constant roughness wavelength. In addition, strong nonlinear receptivity effects exist for certain surface roughness configurations over a band where the surface roughness and T-S wavelength are matched. The results from the present experiment follow the trends predicted by theory and other experimental work for linear receptivity. In addition, the results show the existence of nonlinear receptivity effects for certain combinations of surface roughness elements.

  1. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M.; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Asta, Mark D.; Xin, Huolin L.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-03-01

    The present study sheds light on the long-standing challenges associated with high-voltage operation of LiNixMnxCo1-2xO2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Using correlated ensemble-averaged high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially resolved electron microscopy and spectroscopy, here we report structural reconstruction (formation of a surface reduced layer, to transition) and chemical evolution (formation of a surface reaction layer) at the surface of LiNixMnxCo1-2xO2 particles. These are primarily responsible for the prevailing capacity fading and impedance buildup under high-voltage cycling conditions, as well as the first-cycle coulombic inefficiency. It was found that the surface reconstruction exhibits a strong anisotropic characteristic, which predominantly occurs along lithium diffusion channels. Furthermore, the surface reaction layer is composed of lithium fluoride embedded in a complex organic matrix. This work sets a refined example for the study of surface reconstruction and chemical evolution in battery materials using combined diagnostic tools at complementary length scales.

  2. The mechanical properties of a surface-modified layer on poly(dimethylsiloxane)

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K. L.; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Takayama, Shuichi; Thouless, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    Surface-modification of the elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) by exposure to oxygen plasma for four minutes creates a thin, stiff film. In this study, the thickness and mechanical properties of this surface-modified layer were determined. Using the phase image capabilities of a tapping-mode atomic-force microscope, the surface-modified region was distinguished from the bulk PDMS; specifically, it suggested a graded surface layer to a depth of about 200 nm. Load-displacement data for elastic indentation using a compliant AFM cantilever was analyzed as a plate bending on an elastic foundation to determine the elastic modulus of the surface (37 MPa). An applied uniaxial strain generated a series of parallel nano-cracks with spacing on the order of a few microns. Numerical analyses of this cracking phenomenon showed that the depth of these cracks was in the range of 300–600 nm and that the surface layer was extremely brittle, with its toughness in the range of 0.1–0.3 J/m2. PMID:19779588

  3. In situ ellipsometry of surface layer of non-metallic transparent materials during its finish processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Oleksandr Y.; Poperenko, Leonid V.

    2006-10-01

    For modern technology applications it is important to develop non-contact methods of control of the modification of dielectric materials surface layer. The aim of the work is to determine the level of roughness changes in the surface layer of non-metallic material, optical glass BK-7, and to control it by in situ ellipsometry. The probing light spot was formed at a second (lower) reflective surface of the plate being studied during its mechanical processing at direct observation of these changes. The fine mechanical polishing was carried out for 2 hours by using the grinding-polishing machine installed directly on the sample table of ellipsometer LEF-3M. The angle of light incidence was close to 70 degree. The ellipsometric parameters, were determined within the mechanically processed area. For this purpose, the probing light beam passed two times through the sample and then returned to the initial (air) medium, where its polarization state was studied. The polarized beam falls on lower plate surface polished by conventional technology using grinding-polishing CeO 2-based instrument "Aquapol" (grain size 1 micron). The time dependences of the ellipsometric parameters during the surface layer treatment were studied. In these dependences the tendency of changes of ellipsometric parameters indicates the surface roughness enhancement.

  4. A unified account of perceptual layering and surface appearance in terms of gamut relativity.

    PubMed

    Vladusich, Tony; McDonnell, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    When we look at the world--or a graphical depiction of the world--we perceive surface materials (e.g. a ceramic black and white checkerboard) independently of variations in illumination (e.g. shading or shadow) and atmospheric media (e.g. clouds or smoke). Such percepts are partly based on the way physical surfaces and media reflect and transmit light and partly on the way the human visual system processes the complex patterns of light reaching the eye. One way to understand how these percepts arise is to assume that the visual system parses patterns of light into layered perceptual representations of surfaces, illumination and atmospheric media, one seen through another. Despite a great deal of previous experimental and modelling work on layered representation, however, a unified computational model of key perceptual demonstrations is still lacking. Here we present the first general computational model of perceptual layering and surface appearance--based on a boarder theoretical framework called gamut relativity--that is consistent with these demonstrations. The model (a) qualitatively explains striking effects of perceptual transparency, figure-ground separation and lightness, (b) quantitatively accounts for the role of stimulus- and task-driven constraints on perceptual matching performance, and (c) unifies two prominent theoretical frameworks for understanding surface appearance. The model thereby provides novel insights into the remarkable capacity of the human visual system to represent and identify surface materials, illumination and atmospheric media, which can be exploited in computer graphics applications. PMID:25402466

  5. A Unified Account of Perceptual Layering and Surface Appearance in Terms of Gamut Relativity

    PubMed Central

    Vladusich, Tony; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    When we look at the world—or a graphical depiction of the world—we perceive surface materials (e.g. a ceramic black and white checkerboard) independently of variations in illumination (e.g. shading or shadow) and atmospheric media (e.g. clouds or smoke). Such percepts are partly based on the way physical surfaces and media reflect and transmit light and partly on the way the human visual system processes the complex patterns of light reaching the eye. One way to understand how these percepts arise is to assume that the visual system parses patterns of light into layered perceptual representations of surfaces, illumination and atmospheric media, one seen through another. Despite a great deal of previous experimental and modelling work on layered representation, however, a unified computational model of key perceptual demonstrations is still lacking. Here we present the first general computational model of perceptual layering and surface appearance—based on a boarder theoretical framework called gamut relativity—that is consistent with these demonstrations. The model (a) qualitatively explains striking effects of perceptual transparency, figure-ground separation and lightness, (b) quantitatively accounts for the role of stimulus- and task-driven constraints on perceptual matching performance, and (c) unifies two prominent theoretical frameworks for understanding surface appearance. The model thereby provides novel insights into the remarkable capacity of the human visual system to represent and identify surface materials, illumination and atmospheric media, which can be exploited in computer graphics applications. PMID:25402466

  6. Fabrication of nanocrystalline surface composite layer on Cu plate under ball collisions.

    PubMed

    Romankov, S; Park, Y C; Yoon, J M

    2014-10-01

    It was demonstrated that the severe plastic deformation of a surface induced by repeated ball collisions can be effectively used for fabrication of the nanocrystalline surface composite layers. The Cu disk was fixed at the top of a vibration chamber and ball treated. Al, Zr, Ni, Co and Fe were introduced into a Cu plate as contaminants from the grinding media one after the other by 15-min ball treatment. The composite structure was formed as a result of mechanical intermixing of the components. The particle size in as-fabricated layer ranged from 2 nm to 20 nm, with average values of about 7 nm. As-fabricated layer contained non-equilibrium multicomponent solid solution based on FCC Cu crystal structure, Zr-based phase, nanosized steel debris and amorphous phase. The hardness of the as-fabricated composite was almost ten times that of the initial Cu plate. PMID:25942932

  7. Electron microscopy of an aluminum layer grown on the vicinal surface of a gallium arsenide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lovygin, M. V. Borgardt, N. I.; Kazakov, I. P.; Seibt, M.

    2015-03-15

    A thin Al layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a misoriented GaAs (100) substrate is studied by transmission electron microscopy. Electron diffraction data and bright-field, dark-field, and high-resolution images show that, in the layer, there are Al grains of three types of crystallographic orientation: Al (100), Al (110), and Al (110)R. The specific structural features of the interfaces between the differently oriented grains and substrate are studied by digital processing of the high-resolution images. From quantitative analysis of the dark-field images, the relative content and sizes of the differently oriented grains are determined. It is found that atomic steps at the substrate surface cause an increase in the fraction and sizes of Al (110)R grains and a decrease in the fraction of Al (100) grains, compared to the corresponding fractions and sizes in the layer grown on a singular substrate surface.

  8. [XPS characterization of auto-reconditioning layer on worn metal surfaces].

    PubMed

    Yang, He; Zhang, Zheng-ye; Li, Sheng-hua; Jin, Yuan-sheng

    2005-06-01

    An auto-reconditioner package for in situ reconditioning of worn surfaces of machinery parts under normal running was applied to diesel engines of DF locomotives. A reconditioning layer was generated on the cylinder bore after running a mileage of 300,000 km, and no wear was measured for the piston rings and cylinder bores. Evaluations with SEM, nanohardness tester and XPS indicated that the protective layer assumed a thickness of 8-10 microm, a nano-hardness twice as high as that of the cast iron substrate, and a main elemental composition of Fe, O and C corresponding to the existence of Fe3O4 and Fe3C. A possible formation mechanism of the protective layer was suggested based on the mechanochemical activation of metal surfaces and the catalytic activation of the auto-reconditioner molecules.

  9. Surface-Engineered Graphene Quantum Dots Incorporated into Polymer Layers for High Performance Organic Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Kyu; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Myung Jin; Bae, Sukang; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Du, Qing Guo; Wang, Dong Hwan; Park, Jong Hyeok; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs), a newly emerging 0-dimensional graphene based material, have been widely exploited in optoelectronic devices due to their tunable optical and electronic properties depending on their functional groups. Moreover, the dispersibility of GQDs in common solvents depending on hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity can be controlled by chemical functionalization, which is particularly important for homogeneous incorporation into various polymer layers. Here we report that a surface-engineered GQD-incorporated polymer photovoltaic device shows enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE), where the oxygen-related functionalization of GQDs enabled good dispersity in a PEDOT:PSS hole extraction layer, leading to significantly improved short circuit current density (Jsc) value. To maximize the PCE of the device, hydrophobic GQDs that are hydrothermally reduced (rGQD) were additionally incorporated in a bulk-heterojunction layer, which is found to promote a synergistic effect with the GQD-incorporated hole extraction layer. PMID:26392211

  10. Surface acoustic wave resonators on a ZnO-on-Si layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Schwartz, S. S.; Gunshor, R. L.; Pierret, R. F.

    1983-02-01

    The adaptation of surface acoustic wave resonator technology to a ZnO-on-Si layered medium is presented. Several distributed reflector schemes are considered, including shorted and isolated metallic strips, as well as grooves etched in the ZnO layer. In the case of etched groove reflectors, a first-order velocity perturbation arises due to the dispersive nature of the layered medium. Unique resonator design considerations result from the reflector array velocity and reflectivity characteristics. Transverse mode resonances are characterized and their effect on resonator response eliminated by a novel transducer design. A technique for temperature compensating the devices by use of a thermal SiO2 layer is discussed.

  11. Quantification of the effect of oil layer thickness on entrainment of surface oil.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Dijkstra, Klaas; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-07-15

    This study quantifies the effect of oil layer thickness on entrainment and dispersion of oil into seawater, using a plunging jet with a camera system. In contrast to what is generally assumed, we revealed that for the low viscosity "surrogate MC252 oil" we used, entrainment rate is directly proportional to layer thickness. Furthermore, the volume of stably suspended small oil droplets increases with energy input (plunge height) and is mostly proportional to layer thickness. Oil pre-treated with dispersants (dispersant-oil ratio ranges from 1:50 to 1:300) is greatly entrained in such large amounts of small droplets that quantification was impossible with the camera system. Very low interfacial tension causes entrainment by even minor secondary surface disturbances. Our results indicate that the effect of oil layer thickness should be included in oil entrainment and dispersion modelling. PMID:26002094

  12. Figure of merit enhancement of surface plasmon resonance sensors using absentee layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoyang; Zhao, Xin; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Shujing; Yin, Liang; Ding, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    By adding an absentee layer on the top of the metallic layer, the figure of merit (FOM) of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor with Kretschmann configuration was enhanced, without changing the resonance angle and the reflectance at the resonance angle. Comparing with a traditional SPR sensor, the FOM of the SPR sensor with an absentee layer composed of either 1367 nm thick KCl or 235 nm thick Si3N4 can be improved by 5.53% or 11.41%, respectively. The enhancement of the FOM should be attributed to the faster decrease of the full width at half-maximum than the sensitivity after an absentee layer was applied in the SPR sensor. PMID:27607256

  13. Surface recombination velocity and diffusion length of minority carriers in heavily doped silicon layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam-induced current and the dependence of the effective diffusion length of the minority carriers on the penetration depth of the electron beam were employed for the analysis of the carrier recombination characteristics in heavily doped silicon layers. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of P-diffused Si layers will be presented together with a three dimensional mapping of minority carrier lifetime in ion implanted Si. Layers heavily doped with As exhibit improved recombination characteristics as compared to those of the layers doped with P.

  14. Surface state and normal layer effects in high T{sub c} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.A.; Ledvij, M.; Liu, Samuel H.

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the conducting CuO{sub 2} (S) layers, most high-{Tc}, superconductors also contain other conducting (N) layers, which are only superconducting due to the proximity effect. The combination of S and N layers can give rise to complicated electronic densities of states, leading to quasilinear penetration depth and NMR relaxation rate behavior at low temperatures. Surface states can also complicate the analysis of tunneling and photoemission measurements. Moreover, geometrical considerations and inhomogeneously trapped flux are possible explanations of the paramagnetic Meissner effect and of corner and ring SQUID experiments. Hence, all of the above experiments could be consistent with isotropic s-wave superconductive within the S layers.

  15. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  16. Influence of substrate preparation on the shaping of the topography of the surface of nanoceramic oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bara, Marek; Kubica, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The paper discusses the shaping mechanism and changes occurring in the structure and topography of the surface of nanoceramic oxide layers during their formation. The paper presents the influence of substrate preparation on the surface topography of oxide layers. The layers were produced via hard anodizing on the EN AW-5251 aluminum alloy. The layers obtained were subjected to microscope examinations, image and chemical composition analyses, and stereometric examinations. Heredity of substrate properties in the topography of the surface of nanoceramic oxide layers formed as a result of electrochemical oxidation has been shown.

  17. Microconstituents of the Modified Surface Layer of Austenitic Steel With Nanofibres of Aluminium Oxyhydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, M. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Zhuravkov, S. P.; Dementyev, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    In the paper the authors provide the results of experimental study of the effect caused by introduction of nanostructured fibres of aluminium oxyhydroxide into the surface layer of austenitic steel upon its microconstituents. The authors show that, due to introduction of given fibres dendrite size is reduced and equilibrium structure is formed.

  18. Recrystallization of bacterial S-layers on flat polyelectrolyte surfaces and hollow polyelectrolyte capsules.

    PubMed

    Toca-Herrera, José Luis; Krastev, Rumen; Bosio, Vera; Küpcü, Seta; Pum, Dietmar; Fery, Andreas; Sára, Margit; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2005-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer (PE) deposition and S-layer technology have been combined to make novel robust biomimetic surfaces and membranes. Isolated subunits of the bacterial cell surface layer from Bacillus sphaericus CCM2177 SbpA was self-assembled on PE multilayer supports, with the composition of the multilayer playing a crucial role in determining the structure of the resulting supported protein layers. Flat substrates were studied using atomic force microscopy and neutron reflectometry; protein on suitable PE combinations showed a crystalline structure with lattice constants equal to those found in vivo on bacterial surfaces. The mechanical stability of the S-layer is higher when recrystallized on PEs than directly on silicon supports. The recrystallization process was subsequently used to coat colloidal particles, permitting the determination of zeta potentials before and after coating. Hollow capsules could also be coated in the same way, as proven by various techniques. Our results suggest that electrostatic interactions via divalent cations are important for the assembly process. The results also demonstrate that the versatility of the PE multilayer membranes can be successfully combined with the well-defined surface chemistry and structure of 2D protein crystals.

  19. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  20. A SIMPLE, EFFICIENT SOLUTION OF FLUX-PROFILE RELATIONSHIPS IN THE ATMOSPHERIC SURFACE LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This note describes a simple scheme for analytical estimation of the surface layer similarity functions from state variables. What distinguishes this note from the many previous papers on this topic is that this method is specifically targeted for numerical models where simplici...

  1. Structure fragmentation of a surface layer of commercial purity titanium during ultrasonic impact treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kozelskaya, Anna Kazachenok, Marina Sinyakova, Elena Pochivalov, Yurii Perevalova, Olga; Panin, Alexey Hairullin, Rustam

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of surface layer fragmentation of titanium specimens subjected to ultrasonic impact treatment is investigated by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is shown that the twin boundaries Σ7b and Σ11b are unable to be strong obstacles for propagation of dislocations and other twins.

  2. Nanoindentation of the surface layer of Hadfield's steel after sliding friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Sizova, O. V.

    2007-12-01

    We have measured the nanohardness of a deformed near-surface layer of Hadfield’s steel upon friction testing. The phenomenon of shape recovery upon indentation has been observed, which is retained for several days after tribological tests. It s suggested that the strained material exhibits behavior analogous to nonlinear elasticity.

  3. Profiles of the structure characteristic of temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, V. A.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    The results of measurement of the structure characteristic of air temperature C 2/T in the atmospheric surface layer at the three height levels in the summer period are analyzed. Ultrasonic anemometers-thermometers were used for the measurements. The vertical profiles of C 2/T are systematized, and empirical models are developed for some types of profiles.

  4. Correction of localized shape errors on optical surfaces by altering the localized density of surface or near-surface layers

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude

    2005-01-18

    Figure errors are corrected on optical or other precision surfaces by changing the local density of material in a zone at or near the surface. Optical surface height is correlated with the localized density of the material within the same region. A change in the height of the optical surface can then be caused by a change in the localized density of the material at or near the surface.

  5. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  6. Formation of tubes during self-assembly of bacterial surface layers.

    PubMed

    Bobeth, Manfred; Blecha, Andreas; Blüher, Anja; Mertig, Michael; Korkmaz, Nuriye; Ostermann, Kai; Rödel, Gerhard; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2011-12-20

    Based on experimental studies on tube formation during self-assembly of bacterial surface (S)-layers, a mechanistic model for describing the underlying basic mechanisms is proposed and the effect of process parameters on growth velocity and tube radius is investigated. The S-layer is modeled as a curved sheet with discrete binding sites for the association of monomers distributed along the S-layer edges. Reported changes of the tube radius owing to genetic protein modifications are explained within the framework of continuum mechanics. S-layer growth velocity and shape development are analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation in their dependence on the attachment and detachment frequencies of monomers at the S-layer. For curved S-layer patches, a criterion for the formation of S-layer tubes is derived. Accordingly, tubes can form only within a certain range of the initial monomer concentration. Furthermore, the effect of calcium ion concentration on tube formation is discussed, including recent experimental findings on the calcium effect. PMID:22029537

  7. Layers: A molecular surface peeling algorithm and its applications to analyze protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2015-11-01

    We present an algorithm ‘Layers’ to peel the atoms of proteins as layers. Using Layers we show an efficient way to transform protein structures into 2D pattern, named residue transition pattern (RTP), which is independent of molecular orientations. RTP explains the folding patterns of proteins and hence identification of similarity between proteins is simple and reliable using RTP than with the standard sequence or structure based methods. Moreover, Layers generates a fine-tunable coarse model for the molecular surface by using non-random sampling. The coarse model can be used for shape comparison, protein recognition and ligand design. Additionally, Layers can be used to develop biased initial configuration of molecules for protein folding simulations. We have developed a random forest classifier to predict the RTP of a given polypeptide sequence. Layers is a standalone application; however, it can be merged with other applications to reduce the computational load when working with large datasets of protein structures. Layers is available freely at http://www.csb.iitkgp.ernet.in/applications/mol_layers/main.

  8. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Farmer, D. K.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-08-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment) must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA) concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  9. Association of Kidney Function with Changes in the Endothelial Surface Layer

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Martijn J.C.; Khairoun, Meriem; Lee, Dae Hyun; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Eskens, Bart J.M.; Boels, Margien G.S.; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W.G.E.; Rops, Angelique L.W.M.M.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reinders, Marlies E.J.; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives ESRD is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. Because the endothelial glycocalyx (endothelial surface layer) governs interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, perturbation could influence disease progression. This study used a novel noninvasive sidestream–darkfield imaging method, which measures the accessibility of red blood cells to the endothelial surface layer in the microcirculation (perfused boundary region), to investigate whether renal function is associated with endothelial surface layer dimensions. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Perfused boundary region was measured in control participants (n=10), patients with ESRD (n=23), participants with normal kidney function after successful living donor kidney transplantation (n=12), and patients who developed interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy after kidney transplantation (n=10). In addition, the endothelial activation marker angiopoietin-2 and shed endothelial surface layer components syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin were measured using ELISA. Results Compared with healthy controls (1.82±0.16 µm), ESRD patients had a larger perfused boundary region (+0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.46 to <0.01; P<0.05), which signifies loss of endothelial surface layer dimensions. This large perfused boundary region was accompanied by higher circulating levels of syndecan-1 (+57.71; 95% confidence interval, 17.38 to 98.04; P<0.01) and soluble thrombomodulin (+12.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 25.46; P<0.001). After successful transplantation, the perfused boundary region was indistinguishable from healthy controls (without elevated levels of soluble thrombomodulin or syndecan-1). In contrast, however, patients who developed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy showed a large perfused boundary region (+0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.09 to 0.63; P<0.01) and higher levels of endothelial activation markers. In addition, a significant correlation

  10. In situ Determination of Surface Tension-to-Shear Viscosity Ratio for Quasiliquid Layers on Ice Crystal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Asakawa, Harutoshi; Nagashima, Ken; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Sazaki, Gen

    2015-12-18

    We have experimentally determined the surface tension-to-shear viscosity ratio (the so-called characteristic velocity) of quasiliquid layers (QLLs) on ice crystal surfaces from their wetting dynamics. Using an advanced optical microscope, whose resolution reaches the molecular level in the height direction, we directly observed the coalescent process of QLLs and followed the relaxation modes of their contact lines. The relaxation dynamics is known to be governed by the characteristic velocity, which allows us to access the physical properties of QLLs in a noninvasive way. Here we quantitatively demonstrate that QLLs, when completely wetting ices, have a thickness of 9±3  nm and an approximately 200 times lower characteristic velocity than bulk water, whereas QLLs, when partially wetting ices, have a velocity that is 20 times lower than the bulk. This indicates that ice crystal surfaces significantly affect the physical properties of QLLs localized near the surfaces at a nanometer scale.

  11. LDV measurement of boundary layer on rotating blade surface in wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takao; Kamada, Yasunari; Murata, Junsuke; Suzuki, Daiki; Kaga, Norimitsu; Kagisaki, Yosuke

    2014-12-01

    Wind turbines generate electricity due to extracting energy from the wind. The rotor aerodynamics strongly depends on the flow around blade. The surface flow on the rotating blade affects the sectional performance. The wind turbine surface flow has span-wise component due to span-wise change of airfoil section, chord length, twisted angle of blade and centrifugal force on the flow. These span-wise flow changes the boundary layer on the rotating blade and the sectional performance. Hence, the thorough understanding of blade surface flow is important to improve the rotor performance. For the purpose of clarification of the flow behaviour around the rotor blade, the velocity in the boundary layer on rotating blade surface of an experimental HAWT was measured in a wind tunnel. The velocity measurement on the blade surface was carried out by a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). As the results of the measurement, characteristics of surface flow are clarified. In optimum tip speed operation, the surface flow on leading edge and r/R=0.3 have large span-wise velocity which reaches 20% of sectional inflow velocity. The surface flow inboard have three dimensional flow patterns. On the other hand, the flow outboard is almost two dimensional in cross sectional plane.

  12. Enhanced Durability of Antisticking Layers by Recoating a Silica Surface with Fluorinated Alkylsilane Derivatives by Chemical Vapor Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Akihiro; Sakai, Nobuji; Matsui, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2010-06-01

    Adsorbed monolayers from (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)trimethoxysilane (FAS3), (tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl)trimethoxysilane (FAS13), (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trimethoxysilane (FAS17), and (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trichlorosilane (FAS17-Cl) were formed by chemical vapor surface modification (CVSM) on silica lens surfaces cleaned by exposure to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at 172 nm. Changes in monolayer-modified lens surfaces concomitant with repeating a cycle of curing to induce the radical polymerization of a UV-curable resin and detaching the UV-cured resin were monitored by contact angle measurement with water and atomic force microscopy to investigate the property of the adsorbed monolayers as antisticking layers in UV nanoimprint lithography. A decrease of the contact angle for water with increasing the number of repeated cycles was mainly responsible for the removal of surface impurities in the form of nanoparticles on detaching the cured resin repeatedly. It was found that recoating the silica lens surface with monolayers from FAS13, FAS17, and FAS17-Cl after cleaning by VUV-light exposure resulted in the suppression of the decrease in the contact angle. These results indicate that the durability of an antisticking layer in UV nanoimprint lithography is markedly improved by the recoating.

  13. The catalytic properties of sub-surface H layers on Cu(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2011-09-01

    The formation of the hydrogenic sub-surface layer during the early stages of silane dosing on Cu(1 1 1) has been shown to be due to the interaction between the 1t2 state of the silane molecule and the Cu 3d surface band. The concurrently formed delocalised Cu 4s/4p surface band has been seen to interact with the 2a1 state of the silane molecule. The electronic structure of the hydrogenated Cu(1 1 1) surface shows that the hydrogen ion cores induce a rotation of the surface Cu 3d states and a repolarisation of the more diffuse Cu 4s and 4p surface states.

  14. Grafting of PMMA brushes layer on Cu surface to create a stable superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Cai, Junyan; Li, Ming

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes were grafted on Cu micro-cone structured substrate by a simple one-step cathodic electro-initiated polymerization method which was carried out in aqueous solution at room temperature in the open air. The PMMA brushes were continuous, uniform and thickness-controllable, and it covalently bonded to the Cu surface. In the brushes, nitrophenyl moieties acted as cross-linker between PMMA chains. After removed from the solution followed by treated with water, the PMMA brushes (basically a hydrophilic material)/micro-cone structured Cu surface was hydrophilic with water contact angle (CA) of 74.4°. However, it exhibited superhydrophobicity by treating it in the acetone. The conversion from hydrophilic surface to superhydrophobic one may due to rearrangement of nitrophenyl moieties and PMMA chains at the topmost of the brushes. In addition, its water CA increased with grafting time of the brushes from 145° to about 166°, because there was no available space in thinner film for group reorientation. The surface was conversed to hydrophilic again after treated with hot water, but it was still superhydrophobic after treated in water at room temperature. This revealed that the group reorientation also easily occurred in hot water like in the acetone. More importantly, the surface retained good superhydrophobic stability in acidic environment and in long-time storage. Furthermore, the superhydrophobic surface had excellent resistance that can provide effective protection for the bare Cu substrate.

  15. Surface Layer Accretion in Transitional and Conventional Disks: From Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    "Transitional" T Tauri disks have optically thin holes with radii gsim10 AU, yet accrete up to the median T Tauri rate. Multiple planets inside the hole can torque the gas to high radial speeds over large distances, reducing the local surface density while maintaining accretion. Thus multi-planet systems, together with reductions in disk opacity due to grain growth, can explain how holes can be simultaneously transparent and accreting. There remains the problem of how outer disk gas diffuses into the hole. Here it has been proposed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) erodes disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays. In contrast to previous work, we find that the extent to which surface layers are MRI-active is limited not by ohmic dissipation but by ambipolar diffusion, the latter measured by Am: the number of times a neutral hydrogen molecule collides with ions in a dynamical time. Simulations by Hawley & Stone showed that Am ~ 100 is necessary for ions to drive MRI turbulence in neutral gas. We calculate that in X-ray-irradiated surface layers, Am typically varies from ~10-3 to 1, depending on the abundance of charge-adsorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose properties we infer from Spitzer observations. We conclude that ionization of H2 by X-rays and cosmic rays can sustain, at most, only weak MRI turbulence in surface layers 1-10 g cm-2 thick, and that accretion rates in such layers are too small compared to observed accretion rates for the majority of disks.

  16. The boundary layer over turbine blade models with realistic rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Hugh M., Jr.

    The impact of turbine blade surface roughness on aerodynamic performance and heat loads is well known. Over time, as the turbine blades are exposed to heat loads, the external surfaces of the blades become rough. Also, for film-cooled blades, surface degradation can have a significant impact on film-cooling effectiveness. Many studies have been conducted on the effects of surface degradation/roughness on engine performance but most investigations have modeled the rough surfaces with uniform or two-dimensional roughness patterns. The objective of the present investigation is to conduct measurements that will reveal the influence of realistic surface roughness on the near-wall behavior of the boundary layer. Measurements have been conducted at the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory with a laser Doppler velocimeter. A flat plate model of a turbine blade has been developed that produces a transitional boundary layer, elevated freestream turbulence and an accelerating freestream in order to simulate conditions on the suction side of a high-pressure turbine blade. Boundary layer measurements have been completed over a smooth plate model and over a model with a strip of realistic rough surface. The realistic rough surface was developed by scaling actual turbine blade surface data that was provided by U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. The results indicate that bypass transition occurred very early in the flow over the model and that the boundary layer remained unstable throughout the entire length of the test plate; the boundary layer thickness and momentum thickness Reynolds numbers increased over the rough patch; and the shape factor increased over the rough patch but then decreased downstream of the patch relative to the smooth plate case; in the rough patch case the flow experienced two transition reversals with laminar-like behavior achieved by the end of the test plate; streamwise turbulence

  17. Degradation Characteristics of MgO Based Magnetic Tunnel Junction Caused by Surface Roughness of Ta/Ru Buffer Layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Min; Choi, Chul Min; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Lee, Jeong Yong; Mitani, Seiji; Song, Yun-Heub

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how surface roughness of a Ta/Ru buffer layer affects the degradation characteristics on MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). MTJs with worse surface roughness on the buffer layer showed increased resistance drift and degraded time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) characteristics. We suggest that this resulted from reduced MgO thickness on the MTJ with worse surface roughness on the buffer layer, which was estimated by the TDDB and analytic approach. As a result, surface roughness of the buffer layer is a critical factors that impacts the reliability of MTJs, and it should be controlled to have the smallest roughness value as possible. PMID:27398503

  18. Engineering topological superconductors using surface atomic-layer/molecule hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2015-08-28

    Surface atomic-layer (SAL) superconductors consisting of epitaxially grown metal adatoms on a clean semiconductor surface have been recently established. Compared to conventional metal thin films, they have two important features: (i) space-inversion symmetry-breaking throughout the system and (ii) high sensitivity to surface adsorption of foreign species. These potentially lead to manifestation of the Rashba effect and a Zeeman field exerted by adsorbed magnetic organic molecules. After introduction of the archetypical SAL superconductor Si(111)-(√7 × √3)-In, we describe how these features are utilized to engineer a topological superconductor with Majorana fermions and discuss its promises and expected challenges. PMID:26234824

  19. Inversion layer on the Ge(001) surface from the four-probe conductance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Lis, Jakub Zuzak, Rafal; Such, Bartosz; Szymonski, Marek

    2014-07-28

    We report four-probe conductance measurements with sub-micron resolution on atomically clean Ge(001) surfaces. A qualitative difference between n-type and p-type crystals is observed. The scaling behavior of the resistance on n-type samples indicates two-dimensional current flow, while for the p-type crystal a three-dimensional description is appropriate. We interpret this in terms of the formation of an inversion layer at the surface. This result points to the surface states, i.e., dangling bonds, as the driving force behind band bending in germanium. It also explains the intrinsic character of band bending in germanium.

  20. Reduction of microbial contamination on the surfaces of layer houses using slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Ni, L; Cao, W; Zheng, W C; Zhang, Q; Li, B M

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) in reducing pathogens on pure cultures and on cotton fabric surfaces in the presence of organic matter and estimate its efficacy in comparison with povidone iodine solution for reducing pathogenic microorganisms on internal surfaces of layer houses. Pure cultures of E.coli, S.enteritidis, and S.aureus and cotton fabric surfaces inoculated with these strains were treated with SAEW in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). In the absence of BSA, complete inactivation of all strains in pure cultures and on cotton fabric surfaces was observed after 2.5 and 5 min treatment with SAEW at 40 mg/L of available chlorine concentration (ACC), respectively. The bactericidal efficiency of SAEW increased with increasing ACC, but decreased with increasing BSA concentration. Then, the surfaces of the layer houses were sprayed with SAEW at 60, 80, and 100 mg/L of ACC and povidone iodine using the automated disinfection system at a rate of 110 mL/m(2), respectively. Samples from the floor, wall, feed trough, and egg conveyor belt surfaces were collected with sterile cotton swabs before and after spraying disinfection. Compared to tap water, SAEW and povidone iodine significantly reduced microbial populations on each surface of the layer houses. SAEW with 80 or 100 mg/L of ACC showed significantly higher efficacy than povidone iodine for total aerobic bacteria, staphylococci, coliforms, or yeasts and moulds on the floor and feed trough surfaces (P < 0.05). SAEW was more effective than povidone iodine at reducing total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and yeasts and moulds on the wall surface. Additionally, SAEW had similar bactericidal activity with povidone iodine on the surface of the egg conveyor belt. Results suggest that SAEW exerts a higher or equivalent bactericidal efficiency for the surfaces compared to povidone iodine, and it may be used as an effective alternative

  1. Stability studies of plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof; Stepczyńska, Magdalena; Malinowski, Rafał; Rytlewski, Piotr; Jagodziński, Bartłomiej; Żenkiewicz, Marian

    2016-07-01

    The article presents results of research on the stability of oxygen plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers. The modified samples were aged for three, six or nine weeks. The studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy, goniometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies have shown that the plasma modification has significant impact on the geometric structure and chemical composition of the surface, wettability and surface energy of tested polymers. The modification effects are not permanent. It has been observed that over time the effects of plasma modification fade. Studies have shown that modifying effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone.

  2. Structure of ultrathin oxide layers on metal surfaces from grazing scattering of fast atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H.; Seifert, J.; Blauth, D.; Busch, M.; Schüller, A.; Wethekam, S.

    2009-10-01

    The structure of ultrathin oxide layers grown on metal substrates is investigated by grazing scattering of fast atoms from the film surface. We present three recent experimental techniques which allow us to study the structure of ordered oxide films on metal substrates in detail. (1) A new variant of a triangulation method with fast atoms based on the detection of emitted electrons, (2) rainbow scattering under axial surface channeling conditions, and (3) fast atom diffraction (FAD) for studies on the structure of oxide films. Our examples demonstrate the attractive features of grazing fast atom scattering as a powerful analytical tool in surface physics.

  3. Rapid deposition of transparent super-hydrophobic layers on various surfaces using microwave plasma.

    PubMed

    Irzh, Alexander; Ghindes, Lee; Gedanken, Aharon

    2011-12-01

    We report herein on a very fast and simple process for the fabrication of transparent superhydrophobic surfaces by using microwave (MW) plasma. It was found that the reaction of various organic liquids in MW argon plasma yields hydrophobic polymeric layers on a large assortment of surfaces, including glass, polymeric surfaces, ceramics, metals, and even paper. In most cases, these polymers are deposited as a rough layer composed of 10-15 nm nanoparticles (NPs). This roughness, together with the chemical hydrophobic nature of the coated materials, is responsible for the superhydrophobic nature of the surface. The typical reaction time of the coating procedure was 1-10 s. The stability of these superhydrophobic surfaces was examined outdoors, and was found to last 2-5 days under direct exposure to the environment and to last 2 months when the sample was protected by a quartz cover. A detailed characterization study of the chemical composition of the layers followed using XPS, solid-state NMR, and IR measurements. Modifications were introduced in the products leading to a substantial improvement in the stability of the products outdoors.

  4. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  5. Immobilized liquid layers: A new approach to anti-adhesion surfaces for medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sotiri, Irini; Overton, Jonathan C; Waterhouse, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Surface fouling and undesired adhesion are nearly ubiquitous problems in the medical field, complicating everything from surgeries to routine daily care of patients. Recently, the concept of immobilized liquid (IL) interfaces has been gaining attention as a highly versatile new approach to antifouling, with a wide variety of promising applications in medicine. Here, we review the general concepts behind IL layers and discuss the fabrication strategies on medically relevant materials developed so far. We also summarize the most important findings to date on applications of potential interest to the medical community, including the use of these surfaces as anti-thrombogenic and anti-bacterial materials, anti-adhesive textiles, high-performance coatings for optics, and as unique platforms for diagnostics. Although the full potential and pitfalls of IL layers in medicine are just beginning to be explored, we believe that this approach to anti-adhesive surfaces will prove broadly useful for medical applications in the future. PMID:27022136

  6. Measurement of surface adhesion force of adhesion promoter and release layer for UV-nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae-Geun; Lee, Dong-Il; Kim, Ki-Don; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2009-02-01

    In this work, we investigated the effect of surface treatment as release layer and adhesion promoter for UV-Nanoimprint lithography and measured the surface adhesion force by using tensile separation force of Instron equipment. Several Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of 3-Acryloxypropyl methyl dichlorosilane (APMDS) 3-Aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTS), and 3-Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTS) as adhesion promoters and (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)trichlorosilane (FOTS) as release layer were fabricated by vapor deposition method and were compared with oxygen plasma treatment. APMDS could strongly improve the adhesion force between UV-curable acrylate resin and silicon substrate because of strong covalent bonding. Finally, we could successfully fabricate various imprint patterns by using proper surface treatment of SAMs.

  7. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  8. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems.

  9. The Role of Bacterial Secretion Systems in the Virulence of Gram-Negative Airway Pathogens Associated with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Depluverez, Sofie; Devos, Simon; Devreese, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal inherited disorder in Caucasians. It is caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in the CFTR ion channel causes a dramatic change in the composition of the airway surface fluid, leading to a highly viscous mucus layer. In healthy individuals, the majority of bacteria trapped in the mucus layer are removed and destroyed by mucociliary clearance. However, in the lungs of patients with CF, the mucociliary clearance is impaired due to dehydration of the airway surface fluid. As a consequence, patients with CF are highly susceptible to chronic or intermittent pulmonary infections, often causing extensive lung inflammation and damage, accompanied by a decreased life expectancy. This mini review will focus on the different secretion mechanisms used by the major bacterial CF pathogens to release virulence factors, their role in resistance and discusses the potential for therapeutically targeting secretion systems. PMID:27625638

  10. Preparation and characterization of ultrathin dual-layer ionic liquid lubrication film assembled on silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jibin; Wang, Liping; Mo, Yufei; Xue, Qunji

    2011-02-15

    A novel ultrathin dual-layer film, which contained both bonded and mobile phases in ionic liquids (ILs) layer, was fabricated successfully on a silicon substrate modified by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The formation and surface properties of the films were analyzed using ellipsometer, water contact angle meter, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, multi-functional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope. Meanwhile, the adhesive and nanotribological behaviors of the films were evaluated by a homemade colloidal probe. A ball-on-plate tribometer was used to evaluate the microtribological performances of the films. Compared with the single-layer ILs film deposited directly on the silicon surface, the as-prepared dual-layer film shows the improved tribological properties, which is attributed to the special chemical structure and outstanding physical properties of the dual-layer film, i.e., the strong adhesion between bonded phase of ILs and silicon substrate via the chemical bonding with SAM, the interlinked hydrogen bonds among the molecules, and two-phase structure composed of steady bonded phase with load-carrying capacity and flowable mobile phase with self-replenishment property. PMID:21111428

  11. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jing; Aisawa, Sumio; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Kudo, Takahiro; Mori, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag+ ion to Ag0. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  12. Mechanisms of Acid and Base Secretion by the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the main functions of the airway epithelium is to inactivate and remove infectious particles from inhaled air and thereby prevent infection of the distal lung. This function is achieved by mucociliary and cough clearance and by antimicrobial factors present in the airway surface liquid (ASL). There are indications that airway defenses are affected by the pH of the ASL and historically, acidification of the airway surfaces has been suggested as a measure of airway disease. However, even in health, the ASL is slightly acidic, and this acidity might be part of normal airway defense. Only recently research has focused on the mechanisms responsible for acid and base secretion into the ASL. Advances resulted from research into the airway disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) after it was found that the CFTR C1- channel conducts HCO3- and, therefore, may contribute to ASL pH. However, the acidity of the ASL indicated parallel mechanisms for H+ secretion. Recent investigations identified several H+ transporters in the apical membrane of the airway epithelium. These include H+ channels and ATP-driven H+ pumps, including a non-gastric isoform of the H+-K+ ATPase and a vacuolar-type H+ ATPase. Current knowledge of acid and base transporters and their potential roles in airway mucosal pH regulation is reviewed here. PMID:17091214

  13. Surface mixed layer deepening through wind shear alignment in a seasonally stratified shallow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B. J.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Inertial oscillations are a ubiquitous feature of the surface ocean. Here we combine new observations with a numerical model to investigate the role of inertial oscillations in driving deepening of the surface mixed layer in a seasonally stratified sea. Observations of temperature and current structure, from a mooring in the Western Irish Sea, reveal episodes of strong currents (>0.3 m s-1) lasting several days, resulting in enhanced shear across the thermocline. While the episodes of strong currents are coincident with windy periods, the variance in the shear is not directly related to the wind stress. The shear varies on a subinertial time scale with the formation of shear maxima lasting several hours occurring at the local inertial period of 14.85 h. These shear maxima coincide with the orientation of the surface current being at an angle of approximately 90° to the right of the wind direction. Observations of the water column structure during windy periods reveal deepening of the surface mixed layer in a series of steps which coincide with a period of enhanced shear. During the periods of enhanced shear gradient, Richardson number estimates indicate Ri-1 ≥ 4 at the base of the surface mixed layer, implying the deepening as a result of shear instability. A one-dimensional vertical exchange model successfully reproduces the magnitude and phase of the shear spikes as well as the step-like deepening. The observations and model results therefore identify the role of wind shear alignment as a key entrainment mechanism driving surface mixed layer deepening in a shallow, seasonally stratified sea.

  14. Atomic-layer electroless deposition: a scalable approach to surface-modified metal powders.

    PubMed

    Cappillino, Patrick J; Sugar, Joshua D; El Gabaly, Farid; Cai, Trevor Y; Liu, Zhi; Stickney, John L; Robinson, David B

    2014-04-29

    Palladium has a number of important applications in energy and catalysis in which there is evidence that surface modification leads to enhanced properties. A strategy for preparing such materials is needed that combines the properties of (i) scalability (especially on high-surface-area substrates, e.g. powders); (ii) uniform deposition, even on substrates with complex, three-dimensional features; and (iii) low-temperature processing conditions that preserve nanopores and other nanostructures. Presented herein is a method that exhibits these properties and makes use of benign reagents without the use of specialized equipment. By exposing Pd powder to dilute hydrogen in nitrogen gas, sacrificial surface PdH is formed along with a controlled amount of dilute interstitial hydride. The lattice expansion that occurs in Pd under higher H2 partial pressures is avoided. Once the flow of reagent gas is terminated, addition of metal salts facilitates controlled, electroless deposition of an overlayer of subnanometer thickness. This process can be cycled to create thicker layers. The approach is carried out under ambient processing conditions, which is an advantage over some forms of atomic layer deposition. The hydride-mediated reaction is electroless in that it has no need for connection to an external source of electrical current and is thus amenable to deposition on high-surface-area substrates having rich, nanoscale topography as well as on insulator-supported catalyst particles. STEM-EDS measurements show that conformal Rh and Pt surface layers can be formed on Pd powder with this method. A growth model based on energy-resolved XPS depth profiling of Rh-modified Pd powder is in general agreement. After two cycles, deposits are consistent with 70-80% coverage and a surface layer with a thickness from 4 to 8 Å.

  15. Cool Indonesian throughflow as a consequence of restricted surface layer flow.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Arnold L; Susanto, R Dwi; Vranes, Kevin

    2003-10-23

    Approximately 10 million m3 x s(-1) of water flow from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian seas. Within the Makassar Strait, the primary pathway of the flow, the Indonesian throughflow is far cooler than estimated earlier, as pointed out recently on the basis of ocean current and temperature measurements. Here we analyse ocean current and stratification data along with satellite-derived wind measurements, and find that during the boreal winter monsoon, the wind drives buoyant, low-salinity Java Sea surface water into the southern Makassar Strait, creating a northward pressure gradient in the surface layer of the strait. This surface layer 'freshwater plug' inhibits the warm surface water from the Pacific Ocean from flowing southward into the Indian Ocean, leading to a cooler Indian Ocean sea surface, which in turn may weaken the Asian monsoon. The summer wind reversal eliminates the obstructing pressure gradient, by transferring more-saline Banda Sea surface water into the southern Makassar Strait. The coupling of the southeast Asian freshwater budget to the Pacific and Indian Ocean surface temperatures by the proposed mechanism may represent an important negative feedback within the climate system. PMID:14574409

  16. Plasma-enhanced deposition of antifouling layers on silicone rubber surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongquan

    In food processing and medical environments, biofilms serve as potential sources of contamination, and lead to food spoilage, transmission of diseases or infections. Because of its ubiquitous and recalcitrant nature, Listeria monocytogenes biofilm is especially hard to control. Generating antimicrobial surfaces provide a method to control the bacterial attachment. The difficulty of silver deposition on polymeric surfaces has been overcome by using a unique two-step plasma-mediated method. First silicone rubber surfaces were plasma-functionalized to generate aldehyde groups. Then thin silver layers were deposited onto the functionalized surfaces according to Tollen's reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that silver particles were deposited. By exposing the silver coated surfaces to L. monocytogenes, it was demonstrated that they were bactericidal to L. monocytogenes. No viable bacteria were detected after 12 to 18 h on silver-coated silicone rubber surfaces. Another antifouling approach is to generate polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin layer instead of silver on polymer surfaces. Covalent bond of PEG structures of various molecular weights to cold-plasma-functionalized polymer surfaces, such as silicone rubber, opens up a novel way for the generation of PEG brush-like or PEG branch-like anti-fouling layers. In this study, plasma-generated surface free radicals can react efficiently with dichlorosilane right after plasma treatment. With the generation of halo-silane groups, this enables PEG molecules to be grafted onto the modified surfaces. XPS data clearly demonstrated the presence of PEG molecules on plasma-functionalized silicone rubber surfaces. AFM images showed the changed surface morphologies as a result of covalent attachment to the surface of PEG molecules. Biofilm experiment results suggest that the PEG brush-like films have the potential ability to be the next

  17. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun's Near-Surface Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindman, Bradley; Greer, Benjamin; Toomre, Juri

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the Sun's sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3-D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10 - 30 m s-1 (or equivalently 1 - 3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of down flows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the transit time is roughly equal to a solar rotation period and we suggest this equality may not be coincidental.

  18. New strategy to create ultra-thin surface layer of grafted amphiphilic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Lazutin, A A; Govorun, E N; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2015-05-14

    It was found first that macromolecules made of amphiphilic monomer units could form spontaneously an ultra-thin layer on the surface which the macromolecules are grafted to. The width of such layer is about double size of monomer unit consisting of hydrophilic A (repulsive) and hydrophobic (attractive) B beads. The hydrophilic A beads are connected in a polymer chain while hydrophobic B beads are attached to A beads of the backbone as side groups. Three characteristic regimes are distinguished. At low grafting density, the macromolecules form ultra-thin micelles of the shape changing with decrease of distance d between grafting points as following: circular micelles-prolonged micelles-inverse micelles-homogeneous bilayer. Those micelles have approximately constant height and specific top-down A-BB-A structure. At higher grafting density, the micelles start to appear above the single bilayer of amphiphilic macromolecules. The thickness of grafted layer in these cases is different in different regions of grafting surface. Only at rather high density of grafting, the height of macromolecular layer becomes uniform over the whole grafting surface. The study was performed by computer modeling experiments and confirmed in framework of analytical theory.

  19. Secondary emission from dust grains with a surface layer: comparison between experimental and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richterová, I.; Pavlů, J.; Němeček, Z.; Šafránková, J.; Žilavý, P.

    2006-01-01

    The motion, coalescence, and other processes in dust clouds are determined by the dust charge. Since dust grains in the space are bombarded by energetic electrons, the secondary emission is an important process contributing to their charge. It is generally expected that the secondary emission yield is related to surface properties of the bombarded body. However, it is well known that secondary emission from small bodies is determined not only by their composition but an effect of dimension can be very important when the penetration depth of primary electrons is comparable with the grain size. It implies that the secondary emission yield can be influenced by the substrate material if the surface layer is thin enough. We have developed a simple Monte Carlo model of secondary emission that was successfully applied on the dust stimulants from glass and melamine formaldehyde (MF) resin and matched very well experimental results. In order to check the influence of surface layers, we have modified the model for spheres covered by a layer with different material properties. The results of model simulations are compared with measurements on MF spheres covered by a nickel layer.

  20. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  1. Surface Ages and Resurfacing Rates of the Polar Layered Deposits on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Plaut, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The martian polar layered deposits (PLD) are probably the best source of information about the recent climate history of Mars, but their origin and the mechanisms of accumulation are still a mystery. The polar layers are sedimentary deposits that most planetary scientists believe are composed of water ice and varying amounts of wind-blown dust, but their composition is poorly constrained. Interpretation of the observed polar stratigraphy in terms of global climate changes is complicated by the significant difference in surface ages between the north and south PLD inferred from crater statistics. While no craters have been found in the north PLD, the surface of the south PLD appears to have been stable for many of the orbital/axial cycles that are thought to have induced global climate changes on Mars. Using medium-resolution Viking imagery, Plaut et al. found at least 15 impact craters in the southern layered deposits and concluded that their surface is 120 +/- 40 million years old. In contrast, Cutts et al. found no fresh impact craters larger than about 300 meters in summertime images of the north polar layered deposits. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Faraday instability of a two-layer liquid film with a free upper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototsky, Andrey; Bestehorn, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We study the linear stability of a laterally extended flat two-layer liquid film under the influence of external vertical vibration. The first liquid layer rests on a vibrating solid plate and is overlaid by a second layer of immiscible fluid with deformable upper surface. Surface waves, excited as the result of the Faraday instability, can be characterized by a time-dependent relative amplitude of the displacements of the liquid-liquid and the liquid-gas interfaces. The in-phase displacements are associated with a zigzag (barotropic) mode and the antiphase displacement corresponds to the varicose thinning mode. We numerically determine the stability threshold in the vibrated two-layer film and compute the dispersion relation together with the decay rates of the surface waves in the absence of vibration. The in-phase and the antiphase displacements are strongly coupled in the vibrated system. The interplay between the Faraday and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the system with heavier fluid on top of a lighter fluid is analyzed.

  3. Growing season boundary layer climate and surface exchanges in a subarctic lichen woodland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, David R.; Moore, Kathleen E.

    1994-01-01

    Between June and August 1990, observations were made at two surface micrometeorological towers near Schefferville Quebec (54 deg 52 min N, 66 deg 40.5 min W), one in a fen and one in the subarctic lichen woodland, and at four surface climatological stations. Data from these surface stations were supplemented by regular radiosonde launches. Supporting measurements of radiative components and soil temperatures allowed heat and moisture balances to be obtained at two sites. The overall surface meteorological experiment design and results of micrometeorological observations made on a 30-m tower in the lichen woodland are presented here. Seasonal variation in the heat and water vapor transport characteristics illustrate the marked effect of the late summer climatological shift in air mass type. During the first half of the summer, average valley sidewalls only 100 m high are sufficient to channel winds along the valley in the entire convective boundary layer. Channeling effects at the surface, known for some time at the long-term climate station in Schefferville, are observed both at ridge top and in the valley, possibly the response of the flow to the NW-SE orientation of valleys in the region. Diurnal surface temperature amplitude at ridge top (approximately equal to 10 C) was found to be half that observed in the valley. Relatively large differences in precipitation among these stations and the climatological station at Schefferville airport were observed and attributed to the local topography. Eddy correlation observations of the heat, moisture and momentum transports were obtained from a 30-m tower above a sparse (approximately equal to 616 stems/ha) black spruce lichen woodland. Properties of the turbulent surface boundary layer agree well with previous wind tunnel studies over idealized rough surfaces. Daytime Bowen ratios of 2.5-3 are larger than those reported in previous studies. Surface layer flux data quality was assessed by looking at the surface layer heat

  4. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Robert A; Noordhoek, Roseanna

    2010-03-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon frequently encounters and manages difficult airways. Knowledge of and calm progression by practitioner and staff through different means to ventilate and manage a difficult airway are crucial. Practitioners should become comfortable with different types of alternative or rescue airways in order to intervene quickly in case of emergent or unanticipated airway compromise.

  5. Snow specific surface area simulation using the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Bartlett, P. A.; Langlois, A.

    2012-12-01

    Snow grain size is a key parameter for modeling microwave snow emission properties and the surface energy balance because of its influence on the snow albedo, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. A model of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow was implemented in the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) version 3.4. This offline multilayer model (CLASS-SSA) simulates the decrease of SSA based on snow age, snow temperature and the temperature gradient under dry snow conditions, whereas it considers the liquid water content for wet snow metamorphism. We compare the model with ground-based measurements from several sites (alpine, Arctic and sub-Arctic) with different types of snow. The model provides simulated SSA in good agreement with measurements with an overall point-to-point comparison RMSE of 8.1 m2 kg-1, and a RMSE of 4.9 m2 kg-1 for the snowpack average SSA. The model, however, is limited under wet conditions due to the single-layer nature of the CLASS model, leading to a single liquid water content value for the whole snowpack. The SSA simulations are of great interest for satellite passive microwave brightness temperature assimilations, snow mass balance retrievals and surface energy balance calculations with associated climate feedbacks.

  6. Surface layer response to topographic solar shading in Antarctica's dry valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katurji, Marwan; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Zhong, Shiyuan

    2013-11-01

    The effects of topographic shading on local flow transitioning and atmospheric surface layer properties are investigated using observational data from the Miers Valley, one of the dry valleys of Antarctica. A unique data set was collected during a 9 day period in the summer of 2012 using an eddy covariance system and a sound detection and ranging that provided vertical profiles of wind and turbulence characteristics in the surface layer and the lower part of the boundary layer within the Miers Valley. This data set is ideal for investigating the dynamics of flow transitioning due to topographic shading, without the atmosphere experiencing complete darkness. The lack of atmospheric humidity, soil moisture, and surface vegetation in the dry valleys creates an atmosphere within which the microclimatic responses are amplified, and as a result, the valley atmosphere is extremely sensitive to solar radiation. The entire measured valley boundary layer (up to 250 m above ground level) feels the transition from an unstable to a stable stratification as the surface temperature drops by 10°C in response to the topographic shading. Wavelet analysis reveals the dynamics of flow deceleration, stagnation, and oscillations as the flow transitions from an unstable to a stable boundary layer. The larger air mass (along valley) scales to the longer terrain fetch, and as the shade is cast over the valley, it retains some of the longer wavelengths of the flow. The cross-valley component influenced by the slopes is quicker to adjust to short-period oscillations and takes around three more hours before it couples with the oscillatory pattern of the along-valley flow.

  7. Dual-layered-coated mechanically-durable superomniphobic surfaces with anti-smudge properties.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Palanikkumaran; Bhushan, Bharat; Yun, Kyungsung; Kondo, Hirofumi

    2013-11-01

    Bio-inspired surfaces that exhibit high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis for various liquids and demonstrate mechanical durability and anti-smudge properties are of interest for various applications. The fabrication of such surfaces has often involved complex or expensive processes, required techniques that may not be suitable for various substrates and particles, may require surface post-treatment, or may lack durability. Dual layered coatings of roughness-induced superomniphobic surfaces that demonstrate good mechanical durability were fabricated on glass substrates using hydrophobic SiO2 nanoparticles and low surface energy fluorobinders using dip coating and spray coating techniques. The particle-to-binder ratio was optimized for contact angles of interest. The mechanical durability of these coatings was examined under mechanical rubbing action. The anti-smudge properties were examined by wiping an artificially contaminated coating using oil-impregnated microfiber cloth.

  8. The effect of surface modification on the ion-exchange properties of layered aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Yuchs, S.E.; Wasserman, S.R.

    1996-10-01

    Layered aluminosilicates and clay type minerals have been shown to have varying degrees of ion-exchange capacity. In this paper, the ion-exchange capacities of untreated and surface modified montmorillonite clays will be discussed. The effects of extent of surface modification, type of modifier, and type of exchangeable ion will also be discussed. Physical properties, including X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, XAS and EXAFS, of the modified and native materials will be compared. These surface modification reactions have been shown to yield novel materials with very low ion leachability. Various leach test results from several encapsulated metal ion-exchanged materials will be detailed. This surface modification method may yield materials suitable for intermediate-term storage of hazardous metal ions.

  9. Observations of a shock and a recombination layer at the contact surface of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Ip, W.-H.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on observations in the vicinity of the contact surface of the Comet Halley, obtained by the Giotto ion mass spectrometer, with emphasis placed on two specific events observed in this region on the inbound pass. One was a burst of energized ions (about 20 eV) of 2-sec duration observed two seconds before the contact surface was encountered, which coincided with a pulse in magnetic field strength interpreted by Neubauer (1988) as a fast-mode shock traveling away from the contact surface. The second was a sharp spike in ion densities observed at the contact surface by the mass analyzer, centered approximately at the inner edge of the contact surface. This ion-density spike is interpreted as a boundary layer into which the radial ionospheric flow enters and piles up; the density increase is limited by recombination.

  10. Cooling of the magma ocean due to accretional disruption of the surface insulating layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho

    1992-12-01

    Planetary accretion has been considered as a process to heat planets. Some fraction of the kinetic energy of incoming planetesimals is trapped to heat the planetary interior (Kaula, 1979; Davies, 1984). Moreover, blanketing effect of a primary atmosphere (Hayashi et al., 1979; Sasaki, 1990) or a degassed atmosphere (Abe and Matsui, 1986; Zahnle et al., 1988) would raise the surface temperature of the Earth-size planets to be higher than the melting temperature. The primordial magma ocean was likely to be formed during accretion of terrestrial planets. In the magma ocean, if crystallized fractions were heavier than melt, they would sink. But if solidified materials were lighter than the melt (like anorthosite of the lunar early crust) they would float to form a solid shell surrounding the planet. (In an icy satellite, solidified water ice should easily float on liquid water because of its small density.) The surface solid lid would prevent efficient convective heat transfer and slow the interior cooling. Consider that the accretion of planetesimals still continues in this cooling stage. Shock disruption at planetesimal impact events may destroy the solid insulating layer. Even if the layer survives impacts, the surface layer is finally overturned by Rayleigh-Taylor instability, since accreting materials containing metals are heavier than the surface solidified lid of silicates.

  11. Boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface imperfections of a deterministic or random nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic receptivity of a Blasius boundary layer in the presence of distributed surface irregularities is investigated analytically. It is shown that, out of the entire spatial spectrum of the surface irregularities, only a small band of Fourier components can lead to an efficient conversion of the acoustic input at any given frequency to an unstable eigenmode of the boundary layer flow. The location, and width, of this most receptive band of wavenumbers corresponds to a relative detuning of O(R sub l.b.(exp -3/8)) with respect to the lower-neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration, R sub l.b. being the Reynolds number based on a typical boundary-layer thickness at the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. Surface imperfections in the form of discrete mode waviness in this range of wavenumbers lead to initial instability amplitudes which are O(R sub l.b.(exp 3/8)) larger than those caused by a single, isolated roughness element. In contrast, irregularities with a continuous spatial spectrum produce much smaller instability amplitudes, even compared to the isolated case, since the increase due to the resonant nature of the response is more than that compensated for by the asymptotically small band-width of the receptivity process. Analytical expressions for the maximum possible instability amplitudes, as well as their expectation for an ensemble of statistically irregular surfaces with random phase distributions, are also presented.

  12. Microbial flora of the mouse ileum mucous layer and epithelial surface.

    PubMed Central

    Rozee, K R; Cooper, D; Lam, K; Costerton, J W

    1982-01-01

    We have developed new methods to minimize fluid shear during preparation of specimens for electron microscopy and to retain the mucous blanket that covers the tissue surface of the ileum in mice. We also used general stabilization by nonspecific antibodies to minimize the collapse of the mucous layer during dehydration for electron microscopy. These methods allowed us to visualize the gradual progression of the mucous blanket from a thin diaphanous layer in newborn animals to a very thick (ca. 50 micrometers), coherent structure in older animals that contained a mixed population of bacteria and protozoa. Some bacteria, notably filamentous forms, were patently anchored to the epithelial tissue but projected into the mucous blanket, whereas others clearly existed within the mucous blanket and were unattached to the epithelial surface. Similarly, some protozoa were firmly attached to the tissue surface, whereas others were suspended in the viscous mucous blanket. In an adult animal, the mucous blanket was a very thick layer which actually occluded most of the tissue surface and contained a rich variety of bacteria and protozoa. Images PMID:7103492

  13. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  14. Observational study of atmospheric surface layer and coastal weather in northern Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Dhrubajyoti; Sadr, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric surface layer is the interaction medium between atmosphere and Earth's surface. Better understanding of its turbulence nature is essential in characterizing the local weather, climate variability and modeling of turbulent exchange processes. The importance of Middle East region, with its unique geographical, economical and weather condition is well recognized. However, high quality micrometeorological observational studies are rare in this region. Here we show experimental results from micrometeorological observations from an experimental site in the coastal region of Qatar during August-December 2015. Measurements of winds are obtained from three sonic anemometers installed on a 9 m tower placed at Al Ghariyah beach in northern Qatar (26.08 °N, 51.36 °E). Different surface layer characteristics is analyzed and compared with earlier studies in equivalent weather conditions. Monthly statistics of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity and heat index are made from concurrent observations from sonic anemometer and weather station to explore variations with surface layer characteristics. The results also highlights potential impact of sea breeze circulation on local weather and atmospheric turbulence. The observed daily maximum temperature and heat index during morning period may be related to sea breeze circulations. Along with the operational micrometeorological observation system, a camera system and ultrasonic wave measurement system are installed recently in the site to study coastline development and nearshore wave dynamics. Overall, the complete observational set up is going to provide new insights about nearshore wind dynamics and wind-wave interaction in Qatar.

  15. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  16. Fracture Analysis of a Functionally Graded Two-Layer Strip with a Surface Crack Intersecting the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Licheng; Noda, Naotake

    2008-02-15

    The crack problem for a functionally graded two-layer strip under an in-plane load is investigated. The functionally graded layer is assumed to contain a surface crack intersecting the interface. An auxiliary function related to two layers is used. By using integral transform methods, the singular integral equation is obtained. The parameter influences on the stress intensity factors (SIFs) are studied.

  17. Self limiting atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on perovskite surfaces: a reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Devika; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Sarkar, Shaibal K.

    2016-03-01

    The feasibility of self-saturated atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on an organolead halide perovskite (MAPbI3-xClx) surface through a well known trimethylaluminium (TMA)-water (H2O) chemistry is studied. Though the sequential dosages of reactants form films on the perovskite surfaces, a self saturated growth is never observed. Self-saturation leads to the degradation of the material. Both experimental and density functional theory calculations are carried out for complete understanding of the growth mechanism of self-limiting Al2O3 on the perovskite surface.The feasibility of self-saturated atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on an organolead halide perovskite (MAPbI3-xClx) surface through a well known trimethylaluminium (TMA)-water (H2O) chemistry is studied. Though the sequential dosages of reactants form films on the perovskite surfaces, a self saturated growth is never observed. Self-saturation leads to the degradation of the material. Both experimental and density functional theory calculations are carried out for complete understanding of the growth mechanism of self-limiting Al2O3 on the perovskite surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional QCM results, FTIR spectra and DFT results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06974b

  18. Surface reactions during the atomic layer deposition of high-kappa dielectrics on III-V semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liwang

    The quality of the dielectric/semiconductor interface is one of the most critical parameters for the fabrication of high-speed and low-power-consumption III-V semiconductor based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), as it determines the device performance. This dissertation contains investigations of the deposition and interface of binary oxide films on GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces aiming at understanding the removal of the surface native oxides during certain atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. To accomplish that, two complementary experimental approaches have been used. Initially, films were deposited in a conventional ALD reactor and characterized ex situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The systems examined were Ta2O 5 on GaAs(100) surfaces from pentakis(dimethylamino) tantalum (Ta(N(CH 3)2)5, PDMAT) and TiO2 on GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces from tetrakis(dimethylamino) titanium (Ti(N(CH 3)2)4, TDMAT). For these systems, deposition at the optimal ALD temperature resulted in practically sharp interfaces. Indium oxides were found to diffuse through ~ 6 nm of TiO2 film and accumulate on the topmost film layer. For the ALD of Ta2O5 on GaAs(100) surfaces, native oxide removal was enhanced at deposition temperatures above the ALD window; for ALD of TiO2 on both GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces, native oxide removal was enhanced as the deposition temperatures increased up to 250 A°C, while oxidation of the interface was observed for deposition above 300 A°C due to the formation of noncontinuous films. To elucidate the surface reactions occurring during the deposition, an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy apparatus was constructed and used to investigate the surface reactions during the ALD of TiO2 and HfO2 on GaAs(100) surfaces. The

  19. Relaxation of surface tension in the free-surface boundary layer of simple Lennard-Jones liquids.

    PubMed

    Lukyanov, A V; Likhtman, A E

    2013-01-21

    In this paper we use molecular dynamics to answer a classical question: how does the surface tension on a liquid/gas interface appear? After defining surface tension from the first principles and performing several consistency checks, we perform a dynamic experiment with a single simple liquid nanodroplet. At time zero, we remove all molecules of the interfacial layer, creating a fresh bare interface with the bulk arrangement of molecules. After that the system evolves towards equilibrium, and the expected surface tension is re-established. We found that the system relaxation consists of three distinct stages. First, the mechanical balance is quickly re-established. During this process the notion of surface tension is meaningless. In the second stage, the surface tension equilibrates, and the density profile broadens to a value which we call "intrinsic" interfacial width. During the third stage, the density profile continues to broaden due to capillary wave excitations, which does not however affect the surface tension. We have observed this scenario for monatomic Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquid as well as for binary LJ mixtures at different temperatures, monitoring a wide range of physical observables.

  20. The effect of multiple layers of linens on surface interface pressure: results of a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Rachel; Lachenbruch, Charlie; Vangilder, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Underpads and layers of linens are frequently placed under patients who are incontinent, have other moisture-related issues, and/or are immobile and cannot reposition independently. Many of these patients are also at risk for pressure ulcers and placed on pressure-redistribution surfaces. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of linens and incontinence pads on interface pressure. Interface sacral pressures were measured (mm Hg) using a mannequinlike pelvic indenter that has pressure transducers integrated into the unit and is covered with a soft flesh-like elastomer. The indenter was loaded to simulate a median-weight male (80 kg/176 lb), and the testing was performed at head-of bed (HOB) angles of 0°, 30°, and 45°. Two different surfaces, a high performance low-air-loss support (LAL) surface and a standard foam support surface, were used and covered with a fitted sheet (FS) only or a combination of the FS and various incontinence pads and transfer sheets. Linen combinations typically used for relatively immobile patients (n = 4), moisture management (n = 4), and moisture management and immobility (n = 1) were tested, as was the heavy use of linens/pads (nine layers, n = 1). All combinations were tested 10 times at HOB angles of 0°, 30°, and 45°. The highest pressure observed was recorded (peak pressure). Ninety five percent (95%) confidence interval (CI) surrounding the mean of the 10 trials for each combination was calculated using the t-distribution; differences between means for all surface combinations were determined using one-way ANOVA with follow-up Fisher Hayter test. Results indicated that each incontinence pad, transfer sheet, or combination of linens significantly increased the mean peak sacral pressure when compared to a single FS on both the low-air-loss surface and the foam surface, regardless of the head-of-bed angle. The magnitude of peak sacral interface pressure increase for the LAL surface at 30° head-of-bed angle was 20

  1. Microeukaryotic diversity in marine environments, an analysis of surface layer sediments from the East Sea.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Je; Park, Byoung-Joon; Pham, Vinh Hoa; Yoon, Dae-No; Kim, Si-Kwan; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2008-06-01

    Molecular techniques, based on clone library of 18S rRNA gene, were employed to ascertain the diversity of microeukaryotic organisms in sediments from the East Sea. A total of 261 clones were recovered from surface sediments. Most of the clone sequences (90%) were affiliated with protists, dominated by Ciliates (18%) and Dinoflagellates (19%) of Alveolates, phototrophic Stramenopiles (11%), and Cercozoa (20%). Many of the clones were related to uncultivated eukaryotes clones retrieved from anoxic environments with several highly divergent 18S rRNA gene sequences. However, no clones were related to cultivated obligate anaerobic protists. Protistan communities between subsurface layers of 1 and 9 cm shared 23% of total phylotypes which comprised 64% of total clones retrieved. Analysis of diversity indices and rarefaction curve showed that the protistan community within the 1 cm layer exhibited higher diversity than the 9 cm layer. Our results imply that diverse protists remain to be uncovered within marine benthic environments.

  2. Effect of Ti adhesive layer on individual gold nanodisk surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Ghosh, Pijush; French, David; Bauman, Stephen; Herzog, Joseph B.

    We investigate localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold nanodisks of various diameter and height fabricated on extremely thin Ti adhesive layers. Dark field scattering measurements reveal significant dependence of SPR in the size nano structures and polarization of the light. Comparisons of peak resonance extracted from spectra using Gaussian fitting of different Ti adhesive layer thickness indicates significant red shifting and damping of the plasmon mode. Experimental results are supported by numerical simulation based on three dimensional finite element time domain analysis. From the simulation and experimental results we quantitatively developed optimized model equation of resonance mode of the nanodisks with respect to adhesive layer thickness and broadening effect of the line shape. Such optimized model is very helpful in guiding targeted nanofabrication such as gold nanodisk antennas or biosensors.

  3. Some physicochemical properties of surface layer soils shelterbelts in agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskulska, R.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    Shelterbelts belong to very efficient biogeochemical barriers. They decrease the migration of chemical compounds between ecosystems. The investigations were carried out in the Chlapowski's Agroecological Park in Turew situated 40 km South-West of Poznań, Poland. This area is located on loamy soils, which contains 70% cultivated fields and 14% shelterbelts and small afforestations. The shelterbelts represent different ages and the content of plants as well as humus quantity in surface layer. The first one is 100-year-old shelterbelt, where predominant species is Crataegus monogyna Jacq., Quercus rober L., and Fraxinus excelsior (L.) and is characterized by a well-developed humus level. The other one is 14-year-old shelterbelt. It includes 13 species of trees and revealed a small amount of humus. The soil under both shelterbelts is mineral, grey-brown podzolic in surface layer compound from light loamy sands and weakly loamy sands. The soil samples were taken from surface layer (0-20 cm). pH 1N KCl, hydrolytic acidity, cation-exchange capacity, total proper area, total organic carbon and dissociation constants were determined in soils. The study showed that the soil under shelterbelts revealed acidic properties. It was observed that soils of 100-year-old shelterbelt characterizing lowest values pH = 4.2 revealed highest values of hydrolytic acidity equaled to 7.8 cmol(+)ṡkg-1. The physicochemical properties of investigated soils shoved specific surface areas (22.8 m2ṡg-1), cationic sorptive capacity (12.9 cmol(+)ṡkg-1). TOC (1.6%) 100-year-old shelterbelt was higher than in 14-year-old shelterbelt. The dissociation constants were determined by potentiometric titration. This investigation revealed that the pK value was the highest in the humus of 100-year-old shelterbelt (pKa = 3.1). However, soils of 14-year-old shelterbelt characterized by the lovest pK equaled to 2.8. The surface layer soils shelterbelts in agricultural landscape with good humus development

  4. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  5. Formation of amorphous Ti alloy layers by excimer laser mixing of Ti on AISI 304 stainless-steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.; Nastasi, M.; Zocco, T. G.; Martin, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    We used excimer laser radiation at 308 nm to mix thin layers of Ti into AISI 304 stainless steel. Different numbers of shots at a fluence about twice the threshold for melting varied the amount of mixing. When mixing is sufficiently complete, an amorphous surface layer is formed with Ti substituting for Fe on a one-to-one basis in the alloy. The laser mixing process, unlike Ti ion implantation, does not result in high incorporation of C in the processed layer, although some C from surface and interface contamination is incorporated into the surface layer.

  6. Optimised 3D surface measurement of hydroxyapatite layers using adapted white light scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Montaner, Denis; Pramatarova, Lilyana; Zanev, Zenko

    2006-09-01

    Biomineralization is intensively studied at present due to its importance in the formation of bones, teeth, cartilage, etc. Hydroxyapatite is one of the most common natural biomaterials and the primary structural component of bones and teeth. We have grown bio-like hydroxyapatite layers in-vitro on stainless steel, silicon and silica glass by using a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated aqueous solution resembling the ion composition of human blood plasma). Using classical techniques such as stylus profiling, AFM or SEM, it was found difficult, destructive or time-consuming to measure the topography, thickness and profile of the heterogeneous, thick and rough hydroxyapatite layers. White light scanning interferometry, on the other hand, has been found to be particularly useful for analyzing such bio-like layers, requiring no sample preparation and being rapid and non-destructive. The results have shown a typical layer thickness of up to 20 μm and a rms roughness of 4 μm. The hydroxyapatite presents nonetheless a challenge for this technique because of its semi-translucence, high roughness and the presence of cavities within its volume. This results in varying qualities of fringe pattern depending on the area, ranging from classical fringes on smooth surfaces, to complex speckle-like fringes on rough surfaces, to multiple fringe signals along the optical axis in the presence of buried layers. In certain configurations this can affect the measurement precision. In this paper we present the latest results for optimizing the measurement conditions in order to reduce such errors and to provide additional useful information concerning the layer.

  7. Thermal Stress of Surface Oxide Layer on Micro Solder Bumps During Reflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key Chung, C.; Zhu, Z. X.; Kao, C. R.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-bumps are now being developed with diameters smaller than 10 μm. At these dimensions, only very small amounts of solder are used to form the interconnections. Surface oxidation of such small micro-bumps is a critical issue. The key question is whether the oxide film on the solder bumps acts as a barrier to formation of solder joints. In this work, the mechanical stability of the oxide layer on solder bumps was investigated. Solder bumps with 35- μm radii were heated for different times. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layer on the solder bumps. Solder bumps with known oxide layer thicknesses were then heated in a low-oxygen environment (<50 ppm) until they melted. The mechanical stability of the oxide layer was observed by use of a high-speed camera. Results showed that a 14-nm-thick oxide layer on a solder bump of radius 35 μm was able to withstand the molten solder without cracking, leading to a non-wetting solder joint. A thermal stress model of the surface oxide layer revealed that the stress varied substantially with bump size and temperature, and increased almost linearly with temperature. Upon melting, the thermal stress on the oxide increased abruptly, because of the higher thermal expansion of molten solder compared with its solid state. On the basis of the experimental results and the thermal stress model of the oxide film, the maximum oxide thickness that can be tolerated to form a solder joint was determined, e.g. 14 nm oxide can support liquid solder, and thus lead to a non-wetting condition. This work provided a new method of determination of the maximum stress of oxide film for solder joint formation.

  8. Double Diffusive Layering In The Early Earth's Mantle- Consequences For Thermal History And Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Dude, S.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal history of the Earth, it's chemical differentiation and also the reaction of the interior with the atmosphere is largely determined by convective processes within the Earth's mantle. A simple physical model, resembling the situation, shortly after core formation, consists of a compositionally stably stratified mantle, due to magma ocean differentiation , which is heated from below and/or cooled from above. Additionally internal heat sources will serve to power the mantle dynamics. Under such circumstances double diffusive convection will eventually lead to self organized layer formation, even without the existence of jumps is material properties. We have conducted 2D and 3D numerical experiments in Cartesian and spherical geometry, taking into account mantle realistic values, especially a strong temperature dependent viscosity. The experiments show that in a wide parameter rage distinct convective layers evolve in this scenario. The layering strongly controls the heat loss from the core. In the most intensely explored scenario, convection starts at the core-mantle boundary and a stack of layers grow from the lower mantle to the top. Mobilization of the surface occurs after a time span of about 2.5 Gyears. We observe several events of intermittent breakdown of individual layers. This can potentially explain periods of strongly increasing heat flow at the Earth's surface. Alternative models of magma ocean differentiation suggest a freezing of the magma ocean from below. Under such conditions an initially unstable situation may emerge. We observe an initial Rayleigh Taylor instability, again followed by a phase of layered convection, as described above.

  9. Fine-scale wavelike structures in the surface-based turbulent layer at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petenko, Igor; Argentini, Stefania; Kallistratova, Margarita; Mastrantonio, Giangiuseppe; Casasanta, Giampietro; Sozzi, Roberto; Conidi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    A long-term experiment to study the spatial and temporal structure of thermal turbulence in the extremely stable boundary layer was carried out at the Concordia station, Dome C in Antarctica during 2012. The atmospheric boundary layer at this site during the winter is strongly stably stratified with temperature inversions reaching a strength 35°C in 100-200 m. Despite high static stability, intense thermal turbulence occurs sometimes in the surface layer extending from the surface to heights of a few - a few tens of metres. The spatial and temporal structure of the turbulence was observed by an advanced high-resolution sodar in the height range from 2 m to 150 m with vertical resolution ≈ 2 m and time resolution of 2 s. The variation and statistics of the depth of the surface-based turbulent layer (STL) is determined for the entire winter period. The median value of the STL depth is found to be l6 m, while the depth of the inversion layer is of 125 m. The wind speed is a parameter that affects the formation and development of the STL. Typical patterns of turbulence structure as shown by the sodar echograms are analysed and classified. Wave activity within the STL is observed for a significant part of the time; the time scales that characterize these undulation processes are determined. Often regular trains of waves with periods of 30-60 s and a periodicity of 5-10 minutes are observed. Some characteristics of the wavelike structures (form, spatial and temporal scales) are determined and the correlation with meteorological parameters is analysed. The Richardson number estimated using the vertical profiles of temperature and wind velocity from the 45-m meteorological tower, indicates that in some cases significant turbulence may occurr even when Ri is larger than the critical value equal to 0.25.

  10. Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

    2014-04-01

    A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

  11. Modulation of the Surface-Layer Protein of Clostridium difficile through Cwp84 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major D; Janda, Kim D

    2016-07-01

    Cysteine protease Cwp84 is responsible for surface-layer processing in Clostridium difficile and was also shown to cleave several human extracellular matrix components in vitro. To enable the facile identification and characterization of Cwp84 inhibitors, we developed a fluorogenic 10-mer peptide based on the enzyme's natural substrate SlpA that is amenable for use in FRET-based high-throughput screening. The design of substrate-mimetic inhibitors led to epoxysuccinate 8c, which displayed an inactivation efficiency (kinact/KI) of (4.7 ± 0.3) × 10(4) M(-1) min(-1). Further evaluation of 8c demonstrated its ability to inhibit fibronectin cleavage and, more importantly, subvert surface-layer biogenesis in C. difficile. PMID:27626098

  12. Bulk and surface acoustic waves in solid-fluid Fibonacci layered materials.

    PubMed

    Quotane, I; El Boudouti, E H; Djafari-Rouhani, B; El Hassouani, Y; Velasco, V R

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the propagation and localization of acoustic waves in quasi-periodic structures made of solid and fluid layers arranged according to a Fibonacci sequence. We consider two types of structures: either a given Fibonacci sequence or a periodic repetition of a given sequence called Fibonacci superlattice. Various properties of these systems such as: the scaling law and the self-similarity of the transmission spectra or the power law behavior of the measure of the energy spectrum have been highlighted for waves of sagittal polarization in normal and oblique incidence. In addition to the allowed modes which propagate along the system, we study surface modes induced by the surface of the Fibonacci superlattice. In comparison with solid-solid layered structures, the solid-fluid systems exhibit transmission zeros which can break the self-similarity behavior in the transmission spectra for a given sequence or induce additional gaps other than Bragg gaps in a periodic structure.

  13. Observation of ice-like water layers at an aqueous protein surface.

    PubMed

    Meister, Konrad; Strazdaite, Simona; DeVries, Arthur L; Lotze, Stephan; Olijve, Luuk L C; Voets, Ilja K; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-12-16

    We study the properties of water at the surface of an antifreeze protein with femtosecond surface sum frequency generation spectroscopy. We find clear evidence for the presence of ice-like water layers at the ice-binding site of the protein in aqueous solution at temperatures above the freezing point. Decreasing the temperature to the biological working temperature of the protein (0 °C to -2 °C) increases the amount of ice-like water, while a single point mutation in the ice-binding site is observed to completely disrupt the ice-like character and to eliminate antifreeze activity. Our observations indicate that not the protein itself but ordered ice-like water layers are responsible for the recognition and binding to ice.

  14. Electrical double-layer effects on the deposition of zeolite A on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Oonkhanond, Bovornlak; Mullins, Michael E

    2005-04-01

    Zeolite particles formed from an aluminosilicate solution possess a negative surface charge due to the substitution of aluminum atoms into a SiO4 tetrahedral structure making it difficult to form a continuous layer in solution. The particle interactions with surfaces and each other can be studied using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy between zeolite-zeolite and zeolite-substrate on various materials can be estimated in this fashion. The zeolite LTA particles show a stronger repulsion interaction on all substrates and on the each other as compared to the ZSM-5 particles. This repulsive energy also increases as the particles size increases. This results in the formation of conglomerate in the solution rather than forming an adhered layer on the substrate.

  15. Boundary layer transition detection on the X-15 vertical fin using surface-pressure-fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, T. L.; Banner, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    A flush-mounted microphone on the vertical fin of an X-15 airplane was used to investigate boundary layer transition phenomenon during flights to peak altitudes of approximately 70,000 meters. The flight results were compared with those from wind tunnel studies, skin temperature measurements, and empirical prediction data. The Reynolds numbers determined for the end of transition were consistent with those obtained from wind tunnel studies. Maximum surface-pressure-fluctuation coefficients in the transition region were about an order of magnitude greater than those for fully developed turbulent flow. This was also consistent with wind tunnel data. It was also noted that the power-spectral-density estimates of the surface-pressure fluctuations were characterized by a shift in power from high frequencies to low frequencies as the boundary layer changed from turbulent to laminar flow. Large changes in power at the lowest frequencies appeared to mark the beginning of transition.

  16. Observation of ice-like water layers at an aqueous protein surface

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Konrad; Strazdaite, Simona; DeVries, Arthur L.; Lotze, Stephan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Voets, Ilja K.; Bakker, Huib J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of water at the surface of an antifreeze protein with femtosecond surface sum frequency generation spectroscopy. We find clear evidence for the presence of ice-like water layers at the ice-binding site of the protein in aqueous solution at temperatures above the freezing point. Decreasing the temperature to the biological working temperature of the protein (0 °C to −2 °C) increases the amount of ice-like water, while a single point mutation in the ice-binding site is observed to completely disrupt the ice-like character and to eliminate antifreeze activity. Our observations indicate that not the protein itself but ordered ice-like water layers are responsible for the recognition and binding to ice. PMID:25468976

  17. Surface damage in TiC coating layers on PDX wall armor tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Y.; Hoven, H.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Wallura, E.; Nickel, H.; Kugel, H.; Ulrickson, M.

    1987-02-01

    Surface damage and material redepositions are investigated on 17 graphite tile surface of the PDX wall armor exposed to more than 6500 shots of neutral beam injection (NBI) shine-through and more than 700 shots of direct NBI. Titanium deposition layers, from 0.1 to 7 μm in thickness, redeposited metal droplets, or micro-projections with diameters of less than 2-3 μm and a number density at around 10 8/cm 2, are observed on the tile front faces. Aligned wedge-shaped pits are observed at all micro-projections, which are likely due to shadowed Ti-deposition at redeposited metal droplets by Ti-getter evaporation. Blistering observed in both the TiC coating and Ti-deposition layers is due to plasma shine-through D 0 beam irradiations to a fluence of more than 2 × 10 19 at./cm 2.

  18. Airborne measurements of surface layer turbulence over the ocean during cold air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Shien; Yeh, Eueng-Nan

    1987-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of surface layer turbulence for the near-shore cloud street regions over the Atlantic Ocean were examined using 50-m level data of airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks. The present study, performed for the Mesoscale Air-Sea Exchange (MASEX) experiment, extends and completes the preliminary analyses of Chou and Yeh (1987). In the inertial subrange, a near 4/3 ratio was observed between velocity spectra normal to and those along the aircraft heading. A comparison of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets with those of Wyngaard and Cote (1971) and Caughey and Wyngaard (1979) data indicates that the turbulent kinetic energy in the surface layer is dissipated less in the MASEX data than in data obtained by the previous groups.

  19. Bulk and surface acoustic waves in solid-fluid Fibonacci layered materials.

    PubMed

    Quotane, I; El Boudouti, E H; Djafari-Rouhani, B; El Hassouani, Y; Velasco, V R

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the propagation and localization of acoustic waves in quasi-periodic structures made of solid and fluid layers arranged according to a Fibonacci sequence. We consider two types of structures: either a given Fibonacci sequence or a periodic repetition of a given sequence called Fibonacci superlattice. Various properties of these systems such as: the scaling law and the self-similarity of the transmission spectra or the power law behavior of the measure of the energy spectrum have been highlighted for waves of sagittal polarization in normal and oblique incidence. In addition to the allowed modes which propagate along the system, we study surface modes induced by the surface of the Fibonacci superlattice. In comparison with solid-solid layered structures, the solid-fluid systems exhibit transmission zeros which can break the self-similarity behavior in the transmission spectra for a given sequence or induce additional gaps other than Bragg gaps in a periodic structure. PMID:25819878

  20. Extremely low surface recombination velocities in black silicon passivated by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, Martin; Kroll, Matthias; Kaesebier, Thomas; Tuennermann, Andreas; Salzer, Roland; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2012-05-07

    We investigate the optical and opto-electronic properties of black silicon (b-Si) nanostructures passivated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The b-Si nanostructures significantly improve the absorption of silicon due to superior anti-reflection and light trapping properties. By coating the b-Si nanostructures with a conformal layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by atomic layer deposition, the surface recombination velocity can be effectively reduced. We show that control of plasma-induced subsurface damage is equally important to achieve low interface recombination. Surface recombination velocities of S{sub eff}<13 cm/s have been measured for an optimized structure which, like the polished reference, exhibits lifetimes in the millisecond range.

  1. A photo-triggered layered surface coating producing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Doris; Monteiro, Isa P; Huang, David; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-12-01

    We report a photoactive surface coating which produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with near infrared (NIR) light. The coating is assembled layer-by-layer, and consists of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly-l-lysine (PLL) modified with the photoactive molecule pheophorbide a. Pheophorbide a loading can be fine-tuned by varying the number of bilayers, yielding stable materials with the capacity to generate repeated and/or prolonged light-triggered ROS release. Light irradiation of the photoactive surface coatings provides a versatile platform for the spatiotemporal control of events at the material-tissue interface, such as bacterial colonization, platelet adhesion, and mammalian cell attachment.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Mach 2.25 Turbulent Boundary Layer Over A Compliant Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoich, Christopher; Bodony, Daniel; Geubelle, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Future high-speed air vehicles will be lightweight, flexible, and reusable, and thus susceptible to dynamic coupling between the boundary layer and vehicle surface. Current analysis techniques of boundary layer properties based on rigid surface assumptions may be invalid in this flight regime, and experimental approaches are difficult and expensive. Analyses involving accurate numerical predictions are therefore needed to provide data in this high-speed, coupled environment. Results of a Mach 2.25 turbulent boundary layer evolving over a thin, compliant panel are investigated using direct numerical simulation in the fluid coupled to a geometrically non-linear, thermomechanical finite element solver for the solid. The coupled response of the boundary layer-panel system are presented and compared to the rigid panel case. Panel deformation and fluid flow modification due to the presence of the compliant panel are analyzed, with a particular interest in the influence of panel motion on turbulence statistics. The maximum panel deformation extends through the viscous sublayer while space-time data show that the solid supports waves that may be useful for sensing and control. Supported by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Air Vehicles Directorate under contract number FA8650-06-2-3620.

  3. Electrochemical Examination of the Structure of Thin Hydrogel Layers Anchored to Regular and Microelectrode Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaniewska, Klaudia; Karbarz, Marcin; Ziach, Krzysztof; Siennicka, Alicja; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hyk, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    For the examination of hydrogel structure, thin layers of thermoresponsive gels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPA) and copolymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) (p(NIPA-co-AS)) were successfully anchored to microelectrode and regular electrode surfaces using the electrochemically induced free radical polymerization. The obtained layers were stable and covered the entire surface of the electrodes. Electroactive probes 1,1'-ferrocenedimethanol (Fc(CH2OH)2) and synthesized derivatives of ferrocene modified with polyethylene glycol units (Fc-PEGn) of various length (n = 4, 9, 75, and 135) were employed for studying the volume phase transition of the thin hydrogel layers and for the determination of their structural parameters. The quantitative information on the structural parameters of the hydrogel layers was derived from the obstruction model for diffusion using the voltammetrically determined diffusion coefficients for the model redox probe Fc(CH2OH)2. An approach to the determination of the effective radii of the gel openings (channels) for pNIPA and p(NIPA-co-AS) microlayers was developed. The obtained results were matched with the experimental results and allowed derivation of quantitative conclusions. The voltammograms obtained with modified electrodes in solutions containing Fc-PEG4, Fc-PEG9, and Fc-PEG75 were well defined and of appropriate height. However, the voltammograms recorded for Fc-PEG135, the hydrodynamic radius of which exceeded the size of the gel channels, were at the baseline level. PMID:27518807

  4. Electrochemical Examination of the Structure of Thin Hydrogel Layers Anchored to Regular and Microelectrode Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaniewska, Klaudia; Karbarz, Marcin; Ziach, Krzysztof; Siennicka, Alicja; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hyk, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    For the examination of hydrogel structure, thin layers of thermoresponsive gels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPA) and copolymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) (p(NIPA-co-AS)) were successfully anchored to microelectrode and regular electrode surfaces using the electrochemically induced free radical polymerization. The obtained layers were stable and covered the entire surface of the electrodes. Electroactive probes 1,1'-ferrocenedimethanol (Fc(CH2OH)2) and synthesized derivatives of ferrocene modified with polyethylene glycol units (Fc-PEGn) of various length (n = 4, 9, 75, and 135) were employed for studying the volume phase transition of the thin hydrogel layers and for the determination of their structural parameters. The quantitative information on the structural parameters of the hydrogel layers was derived from the obstruction model for diffusion using the voltammetrically determined diffusion coefficients for the model redox probe Fc(CH2OH)2. An approach to the determination of the effective radii of the gel openings (channels) for pNIPA and p(NIPA-co-AS) microlayers was developed. The obtained results were matched with the experimental results and allowed derivation of quantitative conclusions. The voltammograms obtained with modified electrodes in solutions containing Fc-PEG4, Fc-PEG9, and Fc-PEG75 were well defined and of appropriate height. However, the voltammograms recorded for Fc-PEG135, the hydrodynamic radius of which exceeded the size of the gel channels, were at the baseline level.

  5. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to determine if the formation of the generally observed layer of large porosity adjacent to the as-nitride surfaces of reaction bonded silicon nitrides could be prevented during processing. Isostatically pressed test bars were prepared from wet vibratory milled Si powder. Sintering and nitriding were each done under three different conditions:(1) bars directly exposed to the furnance atmosphere; (2) bars packed in Si powder; (3) bars packed in Si3N4 powder. Packing the bars in either Si of Si3N4 powder during sintering retarded formation of the layer of large porosity. Only packing the bars in Si prevented formation of the layer during nitridation. The strongest bars (316 MPa) were those sintered in Si and nitrided in Si3N4 despite their having a layer of large surface porosity; failure initiated at very large pores and inclusions. The alpha/beta ratio was found to be directly proportional to the oxygen content; a possible explanation for this relationship is discussed.

  6. The onset of sub-surface oxidation induced by defects in a chemisorbed oxygen layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jonathan; Li, Liang; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-02-28

    We investigate the onset of internal oxidation of a Cu(110) surface induced by oxygen subsurface adsorption via defects in the Cu(110)–(2 × 1)–O chemisorbed layer. The presence of a boundary formed by merged add-row structure domains due to a mismatch of half unit-cell leads to preferred oxygen adsorption at the subsurface tetrahedral sites. The resulting distorted Cu–O tetrahedra along the domain boundary have comparable bond length and angles to those of the bulk oxide phase of Cu{sub 2}O. Our results indicate that the presence of defects in the oxygen-chemisorbed adlayer can lead to the internal oxidation via the formation of Cu{sub 2}O-like tetrahedra in between the topmost and second outermost atomic layers at the oxygen coverage θ = 0.53 and the second and third outermost atomic layers at θ = 0.56. These results show that the internal oxidation of a metal surface can occur in the very beginning of the oxygen chemisorption process enabled by the presence of defects in the oxygen chemisorbed layer.

  7. Onset of Convection Due to Surface Tension Variations in Multicomponent and Binary Fluid Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    2000-01-01

    Under certain conditions, such as in thin liquid films or microgravity, surface tension variations along a free surface can induce convection. Convection onset due to surface tension variation is important to many terrestrial technological processes in addition to microgravity materials processing applications. Examples include coating, drying crystallization, solidification, liquid surface contamination, and containerless processing. In double-diffusive and multicomponent systems, the spatial variations of surface tension are associated with two or more stratifying agencies, respectively. For example, both temperature and species (concentration) gradients are associated with convection in the solidification of binary alloys or salt ponds. The direction of the two (or more) gradients has a profound effect on the nature of the flow at or slightly beyond the onset of convection. Our recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center focused on characterizing surface-tension-induced onset of convection, often referred to as Marangoni-Benard convection. Exact solutions for the stationary neutral stability of multicomponent fluid layers with interfacial deformation were derived. These solutions also permit the computation of a boundary curve that separates the long and finite wavelength instabilities. Computing points along this boundary using the exact solution (when possible) is more efficient than the typical numerical approaches, such as finite difference or spectral methods. Above the curve, a long wavelength instability was predicted, suggesting that convection would occur principally through one large flow cell in the layer, whereas below the curve, finite wavelength instabilities occur which suggest multiple finite-sized circulation cells. For many common liquids with layer depths greater than 100 mm, finite wave instability is predicted under terrestrial conditions; however, with little exception, long wavelength instability is predicted in microgravity for the

  8. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  9. The effect of a defective BSF layer on solar cell open circuit voltage. [Back Surface Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    A straightforward analysis of special limiting cases has permitted the determination of the range of possible open circuit voltage losses due to a defective BSF (back surface field) layer. An important result of the analysis is the finding that it is possible to have a fully effective BSF region, regardless of the spatial distribution of the defective areas, as long as the total defective area is reduced below certain limits. Distributed defects were found to be much more harmful than lumped defects.

  10. 3D Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Near-Surface Layer of the Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Dean, Cayla

    2015-04-01

    Convective rains in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) produce lenses of freshened water on the ocean surface. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. As a type of organized structure, gravity currents in the upper layer of the ocean may also interact with, and be shaped by, the ambient oceanic environment and atmospheric conditions. Among the important factors are the background stratification, wind stress, wind/wave mixing and spatially coherent organized motions in the near-surface layer of the ocean. Under certain conditions, a resonant interaction between a propagating freshwater lens and internal waves in the underlying pycnocline (e.g., barrier layer) may develop, whereas interaction with wind stress may produce an asymmetry in the freshwater lens and associated mixing. These two types of interactions working in concert may explain the series of sharp frontal interfaces, which have been observed in association with freshwater lenses during TOGA COARE. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the Aquarius and SMOS satellite image formation. Available near-surface data from field experiments served as a guidance for numerical simulations. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of freshwater lenses are essential within a certain range of wind/wave conditions and the freshwater influx in the surface layer of the ocean.

  11. Phosphorus speciation of forest-soil organic surface layers using P K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Prietzel, Jörg; Thieme, Jürgen; Paterson, David

    2012-02-07

    The phosphorus (P) speciation of organic surface layers from two adjacent German forest soils with different degree of water-logging (Stagnosol, Rheic Histosol) was analyzed by P K-edge XANES and subsequent Linear Combination Fitting. In both soils, {approx} 70% of the P was inorganic phosphate and {approx} 30% organic phosphate; reduced P forms such as phosphonate were absent. The increased degree of water-logging in the Histosol compared to the Stagnosol did not affect P speciation.

  12. Phosphorus Speciation of Forest-soil Organic Surface Layers using P K-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    J Prietzel; J Thieme; D Paterson

    2011-12-31

    The phosphorus (P) speciation of organic surface layers from two adjacent German forest soils with different degree of water-logging (Stagnosol, Rheic Histosol) was analyzed by P K-edge XANES and subsequent Linear Combination Fitting. In both soils, {approx}70% of the P was inorganic phosphate and {approx}30% organic phosphate; reduced P forms such as phosphonate were absent. The increased degree of water-logging in the Histosol compared to the Stagnosol did not affect P speciation.

  13. Fabrication of photoluminescent Si-based layers by air optical breakdown near the silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Meunier, M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel "dry" method for the fabrication of Si/SiO x nanostructures exhibiting strong visible photoluminescence (PL) is introduced. The method consists in the treatment of a silicon target surface by air breakdown plasma produced by a CO 2 laser radiation in atmospheric air. The treatment leads to the formation of a thin porous layer on the silicon wafer, which exhibits a 1.9-2.0 eV PL. Possible mechanisms of nanostructure formation and PL origin are discussed.

  14. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface