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Sample records for airway trypsin-like protease

  1. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  2. Conformational selection in trypsin-like proteases

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Nicola; Vogt, Austin D.; Gohara, David W.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    For over four decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of protein allostery. Defining the mechanism broadens our understanding of the system and impacts our ability to design effective drugs and new therapeutics. Recent kinetics studies demonstrate that trypsin-like proteases exist in equilibrium between two forms: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other with the active site occluded (E*). Analysis of the structural database confirms existence of the E* and E forms and vouches for the allosteric nature of the trypsin fold. Allostery in terms of conformational selection establishes an important paradigm in the protease field and enables protein engineers to expand the repertoire of proteases as therapeutics. PMID:22664096

  3. Allostery in trypsin-like proteases suggests new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) are a large family of enzymes responsible for digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, development, fertilization, apoptosis and immunity. A current paradigm posits that the irreversible transition from an inactive zymogen to the active protease form enables productive interaction with substrate and catalysis. Analysis of the entire structural database reveals two distinct conformations of the active site: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other occluded by the collapse of a specific segment (E*). The allosteric E*-E equilibrium provides a reversible mechanism for activity and regulation in addition to the irreversible zymogen to protease conversion and points to new therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting or activating the enzyme. In this review, we discuss relevant examples, with emphasis on the rational engineering of anticoagulant thrombin mutants.

  4. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserved in all the viral protease sequences. Secondary structure analysis of aligned sequences suggests the location of the component strands of the twin beta-barrel trypsin fold in the viral proteases. Unexpectedly, the 2a and 3c subclasses of viral cysteine proteases are, respectively, homologous to the small and large structural subclasses of trypsin-like serine proteases. This classification allows the molecular mapping of residues from viral sequences onto related tertiary structures; we precisely identify amino acids that are strong determinants of specificity for both small and large viral cysteine proteases. Images PMID:3186696

  5. Occurrence of trypsin-like protease in cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton).

    PubMed

    Josephrajkumar, A; Chakrabarty, Romit; Thomas, George

    2005-08-01

    Occurrence of trypsin-like protease in fresh cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) seeds, as evidenced by the benzoyl-arg-p-nitroanilide (BApNA) hydrolyzing ability of the seed enzyme preparation under alkaline condition is reported for the first time. The enzyme has a pH and temperature optima as 8 and 45 degrees C, respectively. It is inhibited by aprotinin and phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the presence of serine residues at the active site. The enzyme had a V(max) of 98.01 nmoles p-nitroaniline released per min per mg protein and K(m) of 0.0684 mM with BApNA as substrate. Addition of aprotinin (75.75 microM) increased K(m) value by three-folds, whereas the V(max) was reduced by 23%.

  6. Crystallographic and kinetic evidence of allostery in a trypsin-like protease.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weiling; Chen, Zhiwei; Gandhi, Prafull S; Vogt, Austin D; Pozzi, Nicola; Pelc, Leslie A; Zapata, Fatima; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-07-26

    Protein allostery is based on the existence of multiple conformations in equilibrium linked to distinct functional properties. Although evidence of allosteric transitions is relatively easy to identify by functional studies, structural detection of a pre-existing equilibrium between alternative conformations remains challenging even for textbook examples of allosteric proteins. Kinetic studies show that the trypsin-like protease thrombin exists in equilibrium between two conformations where the active site is either collapsed (E*) or accessible to substrate (E). However, structural demonstration that the two conformations exist in the same enzyme construct free of ligands has remained elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of the thrombin mutant N143P in the E form, which complements the recently reported structure in the E* form, and both the E and E* forms of the thrombin mutant Y225P. The side chain of W215 moves 10.9 Å between the two forms, causing a displacement of 6.6 Å of the entire 215-217 segment into the active site that in turn opens or closes access to the primary specificity pocket. Rapid kinetic measurements of p-aminobenzamidine binding to the active site confirm the existence of the E*-E equilibrium in solution for wild-type and the mutants N143P and Y225P. These findings provide unequivocal proof of the allosteric nature of thrombin and lend strong support to the recent proposal that the E*-E equilibrium is a key property of the trypsin fold. PMID:21707111

  7. Development of Trypsin-Like Serine Protease Inhibitors as Therapeutic Agents: Opportunities, Challenges, and their Unique Structure-Based Rationales.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guyan; Bowen, J Phillip

    2016-01-01

    There has been a revolution in the development of effective, small-molecule anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. Numerous trypsin-like serine proteases have been under active pursuit as therapeutic targets. Important examples include thrombin, factor VIIa, factor Xa, and β-tryptase with indications ranging from thrombosis and inflammation to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Trypsin-like serine proteases exhibit a highly similar tertiary folding pattern, especially for the region near the substrate binding pocket that includes the conserved catalytic triad consisting of histidine 57, aspartic acid 102, and serine 195. A rich collection of X-ray structures for many trypsin-like serine proteases is available, which greatly facilitated the optimization of small organic inhibitors as therapeutic agents. The present review surveyed those inhibitors disclosed in peer-reviewed scientific journals and patent publications with a special focus on structural features and protein-inhibitor interactions that implicated the inhibitor optimization process. The role played by the residue 190 of trypsin-like serine proteases is critical. While many inhibitors without a basic group have progressed into the clinic for ones with alanine 190, the task for those with serine 190 remains extremely challenging, if not impossible. In addition to warfarin, heparin, and low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), treatment options have expanded with the development and approval of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The NOACs are superior to vitamin K antagonists in terms of rapid onset, pharmacokinetics, drug/food interactions, and regular coagulation monitoring; but one serious drawback is the lack of an effective antidote at this time. Apixaban (Eliquis), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and edoxaban (Savaysa) are the new Xa inhibitors that have been recently approved by the U.S. FDA and are in current clinical practice. These drugs bind to the active site of factor Xa (f

  8. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of trypsin-like serine protease from triangle-shell pearl mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongquan; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Yurong; Liu, Qiaolin; Li, Yaoguo; Yi, Zili; Chen, Kaijian; Xiao, Tiaoyi

    2014-10-01

    Trypsin-like serine protease (TLS) is ubiquitous in animals and plays a number of diverse roles, including dietary protein digestion, hemolymph coagulation, antimicrobial activity and immune responses, among others. This study reports the isolation of a 1048 bp full-length cDNA sequence of TLS from triangle-shell pearl mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii), including a 12 bp 5' UTR (untranslated region), a 172 bp 3' UTR, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 864 bp by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatic analysis shows that the gene belongs to the trypsin-like serine protease superfamily, and contains a 15 residues N-terminal signal peptide and a conserved C-terminal domain. In comparison to other serine proteases, the catalytic triad were identified as His-98, Asp-149, and Ser-240. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) showed a broad expression of the TLS gene in ten tested tissues. Time-course expression analysis demonstrated that the expression level of the TLS mRNA was significantly up-regulated in eight tested tissues (liver, intestine, gill, heart, axe foot, adductor muscle, kidney and gonad), but down-regulated in mantle and stomach after Aeromonas hydrophila injection. This is one of the results indicate that TLS may be involved in innate defense reactions against A. hydrophila in triangle-shell pearl mussel. PMID:25149589

  9. Clonidine displacement from type 1 imidazoline receptor by p-aminobenzamidine, the prototype of trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina; Marino, Maria; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2002-11-01

    p-Aminobenzamidine inhibits competitively the catalytic activity of enzymes that recognize preferentially the L-arginyl side chain and related structures. Notably, p-aminobenzamidine is considered as the prototype of trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, p-aminobenzamidine inhibits the catalytic activity of nitric oxide synthase type I and type II as well as copper amine oxidase. Taking into account the structural similarity between p-aminobenzamidine, agmatine (the putative endogenous ligand of the membrane type 1 imidazoline receptor (I1-R)), and N-amidino-2-hydroxypyrrolidine (the product of agmatine oxidation by copper amine oxidase), the [3H]clonidine displacement from I1-R in rat heart membranes by p-aminobenzamidine was investigated. p-Aminobenzamidine is as effective as agmatine and N-amidino-2-hydroxypyrrolidine and more effective than the antihypertensive drug clonidine to displace [3H]clonidine from I1-R. Therefore, trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors structurally related to p-aminobenzamidine should be administrated under careful control. PMID:12587981

  10. Peptide affinity labels for thrombin and other trypsin-like proteases

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, Elliott N.; Kettner, Charles A.

    1982-03-09

    A peptide affinity label of the formula (I): ##STR1## wherein X is a radical capable of acting as a leaving group in a nucleophilic substitution reaction; A is an aromatic amino acid residue; B is H, or a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl group, or aryl; Y is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, aroyl, C.sub.1 -C.sub.6 acyl, and Q--(A)--.sub.n, wherein Q=hydrogen, aroyl, or C.sub.1 -C.sub.6 acyl, n=1-10, A is an amino acid residue selected from the aliphatic, hydroxy-containing, carboxylic acid group, and amide-thereof-containing, aromatic, sulfur-containing and imino-containing amino acids; and wherein J is selected from the group consisting of --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --,--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.dbd.CH-- and --CH(OH)--CH.sub.2. The affinity label is useful for irreversibly inactivating thrombin and trypsin-like enzymes and may be used as a potential anticlotting agent.

  11. Peptide affinity labels for thrombin and other trypsin-like proteases

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, E.N.; Kettner, C.A.

    1982-03-09

    A peptide affinity label is disclosed of the formula (I): as given in the patent wherein X is a radical capable of acting as a leaving group in a nucleophilic substitution reaction; A is an aromatic amino acid residue; B is H, or a C[sub 1]--C[sub 4] alkyl group, or aryl; Y is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, aroyl, C[sub 1]--C[sub 6] acyl, and Q--(A)--[sub n], wherein Q = hydrogen, aroyl, or C[sub 1]--C[sub 6] acyl, n = 1--10, A is an amino acid residue selected from the aliphatic, hydroxy-containing, carboxylic acid group, and amide-thereofcontaining, aromatic, sulfur-containing and imino-containing amino acids; and wherein J is selected from the group consisting of --CH[sub 2]--, --CH[sub 2]--CH[sub 2]--, --CH[sub 2]--CH[sub 2]--CH[sub 2]--, --CH[double bond]CH-- and --CH(OH)--CH[sub 2]. The affinity label is useful for irreversibly inactivating thrombin and trypsin-like enzymes and may be used as a potential anticlotting agent. 2 figs.

  12. Purification and characterization of an extracellular trypsin-like protease of Fusarium oxysporum var. lini.

    PubMed

    Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Andrade, Milton Hercules Guerra; Rodrigues, Roberta Dias; Castro, Ieso Miranda

    2002-01-01

    An alkaline serineprotease, capable of hydrolyzing Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide, was secreted by Fusarium oxysporum var. lini grown in the presence of gelatin as the sole nitrogen and carbon source. The protease was purified 65-fold to electrophoretic homogenity from the culture supernatant in a three-step procedure comprising QSepharose chromatography, affinity chromatography, and FPLC on a MonoQ column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified protein indicated an estimated molecular mass of 41 kDa. The protease had optimum activity at a reaction temperature of 45 degrees C and showed a rapid decrease of activity at 48 degrees C. The optimum pH was around 8.0. Characterization of the protease showed that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations increased the activity, which was not inhibited by EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. The enzyme activity on Nalpha-benzoyl-DL arginine p-nitroanilide was inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochloride, aprotinin, 3-4 dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone. The enzyme is also inhibited by substrate concentrations higher than 2.5 x 10(-4)M. The protease had a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.16 mM and a V(max) of 0.60 mumol released product.min(-1).mg(-1) enzyme when assayed in a non-inhibiting substrate concentration. The activity on Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide was competitively inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochoride. A K(i) value of 0.04 mM was obtained.

  13. Purification and characterization of an extracellular trypsin-like protease of Fusarium oxysporum var. lini.

    PubMed

    Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Andrade, Milton Hercules Guerra; Rodrigues, Roberta Dias; Castro, Ieso Miranda

    2002-01-01

    An alkaline serineprotease, capable of hydrolyzing Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide, was secreted by Fusarium oxysporum var. lini grown in the presence of gelatin as the sole nitrogen and carbon source. The protease was purified 65-fold to electrophoretic homogenity from the culture supernatant in a three-step procedure comprising QSepharose chromatography, affinity chromatography, and FPLC on a MonoQ column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified protein indicated an estimated molecular mass of 41 kDa. The protease had optimum activity at a reaction temperature of 45 degrees C and showed a rapid decrease of activity at 48 degrees C. The optimum pH was around 8.0. Characterization of the protease showed that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations increased the activity, which was not inhibited by EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. The enzyme activity on Nalpha-benzoyl-DL arginine p-nitroanilide was inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochloride, aprotinin, 3-4 dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone. The enzyme is also inhibited by substrate concentrations higher than 2.5 x 10(-4)M. The protease had a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.16 mM and a V(max) of 0.60 mumol released product.min(-1).mg(-1) enzyme when assayed in a non-inhibiting substrate concentration. The activity on Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide was competitively inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochoride. A K(i) value of 0.04 mM was obtained. PMID:16233307

  14. Characterization of p-aminobenzamidine-based sorbent and its use for high-performance affinity chromatography of trypsin-like proteases.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Suzuki, Takao; Hasegawa, Masazumi; Kato, Yoshio; Sasaki, Hiroo; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2003-08-15

    An affinity sorbent, hydrophilic polymer-based carrier of different pore size (Toyopearl) with immobilized p-aminobenzamidine (ABA), has been prepared. Its basic properties and some applications for protein purification were studied. ABA, which is a synthetic inhibitor for trypsin-like proteases, was covalently immobilized to Toyopearl by reductive amination. The ligand density and binding capacity for porcine trypsin varied depending on the pore size of Toyopearl. The maximum binding capacity of the immobilized p-aminobenzamidine Toyopearl (ABA-Toyopearl) for trypsin was more than 40 mg/ml gel. ABA-Toyopearl thus obtained was very stable below pH 8 and was successfully used for high-performance affinity chromatography of trypsin-like proteases such as trypsin, thrombin, tissue-type plasminogen activator or urokinase in a single step at 25 degrees C. PMID:13677653

  15. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  16. Limiting the Number of Potential Binding Modes by Introducing Symmetry into Ligands: Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors for Trypsin-Like Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Furtmann, Norbert; Häußler, Daniela; Scheidt, Tamara; Stirnberg, Marit; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-01-11

    In the absence of X-ray data, the exploration of compound binding modes continues to be a challenging task. For structure-based design, specific features of active sites in different targets play a major role in rationalizing ligand binding characteristics. For example, dibasic compounds have been reported as potent inhibitors of various trypsin-like serine proteases, the active sites of which contain several binding pockets that can be targeted by cationic moieties. This results in several possible orientations within the active site, complicating the binding mode prediction of such compounds by docking tools. Therefore, we introduced symmetry in bi- and tribasic compounds to reduce conformational space in docking calculations and to simplify binding mode selection by limiting the number of possible pocket occupations. Asymmetric bisbenzamidines were used as starting points for a multistage and structure-guided optimization. A series of 24 final compounds with either two or three benzamidine substructures was ultimately synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of five serine proteases, leading to potent symmetric inhibitors for the pharmaceutical drug targets matriptase, matriptase-2, thrombin and factor Xa. This study underlines the relevance of ligand symmetry for chemical biology.

  17. 1,2,5-Thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1 dioxide: a powerful scaffold for probing the S' subsites of (chymo)trypsin-like serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Groutas, W C; Epp, J B; Kuang, R; Ruan, S; Chong, L S; Venkataraman, R; Tu, J; He, S; Yu, H; Fu, Q; Li, Y H; Truong, T M; Vu, N T

    2001-01-01

    The 1,2,5-thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1 dioxide scaffold (I) embodies a motif that allows it to dock to the active site of (chymo)trypsin-like proteases in a predictable and substrate-like fashion. Consequently, inhibitors derived from this heterocyclic scaffold interact with both the S and S' subsites of an enzyme. Exploitation of binding interactions with both the S and S' subsites of a target enzyme may lead to compounds with greatly enhanced enzyme selectivity and inhibitory potency. This preliminary report describes the use of a series of compounds having the heterocyclic scaffold linked to various amino acids to probe the S' subsites of human leukocyte elastase (HLE), proteinase 3 (PR 3), and cathepsin G (Cat G). For comparative purposes, a series of compounds derived from a related scaffold, isothiazolidin-3-one 1,1 dioxide (II), was also generated. Several of the compounds were found to be highly potent and selective time-dependent inhibitors of HLE, PR 3, and Cat G. PMID:11361013

  18. The impacts of classical insect hormones on the expression profiles of a new digestive trypsin-like protease (TLP) from the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Sui, Y-P; Wang, J-X; Zhao, X-F

    2009-08-01

    Trypsin proteinases perform important roles in the protein digestion of an insect midgut. A 1042 bp full-length cDNA was cloned from Helicoverpa armigera. The gene encoded a 32 kDa protein, with a predicted isoelectric point of 5.7. The amino acid sequence of the protein had a trypsin-like serine protease domain, and the gene was named Ha-TLP. The expression of the gene was tissue-specific and the transcript of Ha-TLP existed only in the midgut and was not found in the head-thorax, integument, fat body and haemocytes from 5th instar larvae, with similar expression levels between those in feeding larvae and in molting larvae. In the midgut, the gene transcription level declined from 6th instar 72 h after the larvae entered the wandering stage, and disappeared from 6th instar at 96 h until the pupal stage. By immunohistochemistry, Ha-TLP was detected in the cytoplasm of the midgut epithelial cells of the 6th instar feeding stage worms. The expression of Ha-TLP could be up-regulated by a juvenile hormone (JH) analog methoprene and down-regulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). These facts indicate that Ha-TLP was involved in food digestion during larval growth and probably up-regulated by JH and suppressed by extra 20E in vivo.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of trypsin-like proteases from the gastric fluid of the marine crab Cancer pagurus

    SciTech Connect

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Redecke, Lars; Saborowski, Reinhard; Betzel, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Two trypsins from the gastric fluid of the marine crab C. pagurus were purified and crystallized and X-ray data were collected to 0.97 and 3.2 Å resolution. The digestive fluid of the marine crab Cancer pagurus (Decapoda, Brachyura) contains highly stable proteases which display enhanced activity in aqueous mixtures of organic solvents. Three trypsins were isolated from the gastric fluid and two of them, C.p.TryII and C.p.TryIII, were purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. Diffraction data were collected at a synchrotron to 0.97 and 3.2 Å resolution, respectively. The crystal of C.p.TryII belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.06, b = 62.00, c = 71.66 Å. Based on the Matthews coefficient, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit is suggested. In contrast, crystals of C.p.TryIII, which belong to the cubic space group P2{sub 1}3 with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 215.4 Å, are assumed to contain 12 molecules per asymmetric unit.

  20. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

    PubMed

    Kesic, Matthew J; Meyer, Megan; Bauer, Rebecca; Jaspers, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2), whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs) to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility. PMID

  1. Exposure to Ozone Modulates Human Airway Protease/Antiprotease Balance Contributing to Increased Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kesic, Matthew J.; Meyer, Megan; Bauer, Rebecca; Jaspers, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2), whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs) to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility. PMID

  2. Airway protease/antiprotease imbalance in atopic asthmatics contributes to increased Influenza A virus cleavage and replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Asthmatics are more susceptible to influenza infections, yet mechanisms mediating this enhanced susceptibility are unknown. Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein binds to sialic acid residues on the host cells. HA requires cleavage to allow fusion of the viral HA with host cell membrane, which is mediated by host trypsin-like serine protease. We show data here demonstrating that the protease:antiprotease ratio is increased in the nasal mucosa of asthmatics and that these changes were associated with increased proteolytic activation of influenza. These data suggest that disruption of the protease balance in asthmatics enhances activation and infection of influenza virus. PMID:22992220

  3. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa1

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K.; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M.; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    While type 2 immune responses to environmental antigens are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. Here we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were produced quickly in the lungs of naïve mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and TSLP sensitized naïve animals to an innocuous airway antigen OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE antibody and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same antigen. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naïve animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  4. Virulence testing and extracellular subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) activity during propagule production of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus isolates from whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Moguel, Judith; González-Barajas, Margarita; Mier, Teresa; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío; Aranda, Eduardo; Toriello, Conchita

    2007-03-01

    To properly characterize several isolates of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, a fungal entomopathogen of whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and other insect pests for biocontrol purposes, virulence towards Trialeurodes vaporariorum, and subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) protease activity during propagule production were investigated in monospore cultures (MCs). The virulence of three MCs towards second instar whiteflies was measured and expressed as lethal median concentration (LC50). Number and widthlength ratio of propagules (blastospores, hyphal bodies, short hyphae, submerged conidia) and extracellular proteolytic activity was determined simultaneously in liquid medium. Total protease activity was assayed with azocasein, Pr1 and Pr2 activity was determined with the substrates N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide and N-Benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-pnitroanilide, respectively. Natural variability in virulence, propagule production and cuticle-degrading proteases among isolates was observed. Bioassays showed a LC50 of 1.1 x 1,000, 2.5 x 10,000 and 7.6 x 10,000 conidia/ml for MCs EH-506/3, EH-503/3 and EH-520/3, respectively, EH-506/3 being the most virulent isolate. Isolate EH-503/3 produced the highest yield of propagules (7.7 x 10000000 propagules/ml), followed by EH-520/3 with 6.4 x 10000000 and EH-506/3 with 1.0 x 10000000 propagules/ml. Subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) activity was present in the three MCs. Subtilisin-like (Pr1) activity was highest (745.7 UPr1/ml at 120 h) in the most virulent isolate, EH-506/3, pointing at Pr1 as a phenotypic marker of virulence for P. fumosoroseus. EH-506/3 appears to be a good candidate for whitefly biocontrol due to its high virulence, Pr1 concentration and rapid transition to blastospores in submerged liquid medium.

  5. Trypsin-like serine peptidase profiles in the egg, larval, and pupal stages of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus, a ubiquitous mosquito, is one of the main vectors of dengue and yellow fever, representing an important threat to public health worldwide. Peptidases play key roles in processes such as digestion, oogenesis, and metamorphosis of insects. However, most of the information on the proteolytic enzymes of mosquitoes is derived from insects in the adult stages and is often directed towards the understanding of blood digestion. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of active peptidases from the preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus. Methods Ae. albopictus eggs, larvae, and pupae were analyzed using zymography with susbtrate-SDS-PAGE. The pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, the proteolytic activities of larval instars were assayed using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results The proteolytic profile of the larval stage was composed of 8 bands ranging from 17 to 130 kDa. These enzymes displayed activity in a broad range of pH values, from 5.5 to 10.0. The enzymatic profile of the eggs was similar to that of the larvae, although the proteolytic bands of the eggs showed lower intensities. The pupal stage showed a complex proteolytic pattern, with at least 6 bands with apparent molecular masses ranging from 30 to 150 kDa and optimal activity at pH 7.5. Peptidases from larval instars were active from 10°C to 60°C, with optimal activity at temperatures between 37°C and 50°C. The proteolytic profile of both the larval and pupal stages was inhibited by phenyl-methyl sulfonyl-fluoride (PMSF) and Nα-Tosyl L-lysine chloromethyl ketone hydrochloride (TLCK), indicating that the main peptidases expressed during these developmental stages are trypsin-like serine peptidases. Conclusion The preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus exhibited a complex profile of trypsin-like serine peptidase activities. A comparative analysis of the active peptidase profiles revealed differential expression

  6. Digestive proteinases of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) larvae: purification and characterization of a trypsin-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B; Elpidina, E N

    2005-03-01

    A new trypsin-like proteinase was purified to homogeneity from the posterior midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and gel filtration on Superdex-75. The isolated enzyme had molecular mass of 25.5 kD and pI 7.4. The enzyme was also characterized by temperature optimum at 55 degrees C, pH optimum at 8.5, and K(m) value of 0.04 mM (for hydrolysis of Bz-Arg-pNA). According to inhibitor analysis the enzyme is a trypsin-like serine proteinase stable within the pH range of 5.0-9.5. The enzyme hydrolyzes peptide bonds formed by Arg or Lys residues in the P1 position with a preference for relatively long peptide substrates. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, IVGGSSISISSVPXQIXLQY, shares 50-72% identity with other insect trypsin-like proteinases, and 44-50% identity to mammalian trypsins. The isolated enzyme is sensitive to inhibition by plant proteinase inhibitors and it can serve as a suitable target for control of digestion in this stored product pest.

  7. Alternaria Fungus Induces the Production of GM-CSF, Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 and Calcium Signaling in Human Airway Epithelium through Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies suggest that host immune responses to environmental fungi may play an important role in the development of allergic diseases, such as human asthma. Epithelium is considered an active participant in allergic inflammation. We previously reported that aspartate protease from Alternaria induces the activation and degranulation of human eosinophils that are mediated through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). However, our current knowledge on the innate immune responses of epithelium to environmental fungi is very limited. We investigated the responses of epithelium to fungi and the mechanisms of these responses. Methods Human airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and Calu-3 (both from American Type Culture Collection) were incubated with PAR-2 peptides and extracts of various fungi. The cellular responses, including GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, eotaxin, eotaxin-2 and RANTES production as well as increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), were examined. To characterize the proteases involved in these responses, protease inhibitors such as pepstatin A and alkalo-thermophilic Bacillus inhibitor (ATBI), HIV protease inhibitors and 4-amidinophenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride were used. To investigate the role of PAR-2, PAR-2-agonistic and PAR-2-antagonistic peptides were used. Results PAR-2-activating peptide, but not the control peptide, induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production; these cellular responses were accompanied by a quick and marked increase in [Ca2+]i. Among 7 common environmental fungi, only Alternaria induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production and increased [Ca2+]i response. Both cytokine production and increased [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited by PAR-2 antagonist peptide and by aspartate protease inhibitors (pepstatin A, ritonavir, nelfinavir and ATBI), but not by the PAR-2 control peptide or by other protease inhibitors. Conclusions Aspartate proteases from Alternaria induce cytokine production and

  8. Proteolytic profiling and comparative analyses of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in preimaginal stages of Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatu s, a widespread insect in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, is a vector of multiple arboviruses and parasites, and is considered an important risk to human and veterinary health. Proteolytic enzymes play crucial roles in the insect physiology including the modulation of embryonic development and food digestion. Therefore, these enzymes represent important targets for the development of new control strategies. This study presents zymographic characterization and comparative analysis of the proteolytic activity found in eggs, larval instars and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods The proteolytic profiles of eggs, larvae and pupa of Cx. quinquefasciatus were characterized by SDS-PAGE co-polymerized with 0.1% gelatin, according to the pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity. In addition, the proteolytic activities were characterized in solution using 100 μM of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results Comparison of the proteolytic profiles by substrate-SDS-PAGE from all preimaginal stages of the insect revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in the peptidase expression among eggs, larvae and pupae. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that the proteolytic activity from preimaginal stages is mostly due to trypsin-like serine peptidases that display optimal activity at alkaline pH. In-solution, proteolytic assays of the four larval instars using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC in the presence or absence of a trypsin-like serine peptidase inhibitor confirmed the results obtained by substrate-SDS-PAGE analysis. The trypsin-like serine peptidases of the four larval instars were functional over a wide range of temperatures, showing activities at 25°C and 65°C, with an optimal activity between 37°C and 50°C. Conclusion The combined use of zymography and in-solution assays, as performed in this study, allowed for a more detailed analysis of the repertoire of proteolytic

  9. [Extracellular proteases of mycelial fungi as participants of pathogenic processes].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Matveeva, A R; Fatkhullina, G N; Beliakova, G A; Kolomiets, T M; Kovalenko, E D; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2008-01-01

    The interest in proteases secreted by mycelial fungi is due to several reasons of which one of the most important is their involvement in the initiation and development of the pathogenic process. A comparison of saprophytic and phytopathogenic mycelial fungi revealed one characteristic feature, namely, the appearance of a new trypsin-like activity in phytopathogens that is absent in saprophytes. To clear up the question of whether the degree of pathogenicity of a fungus is related to the activity of secreted trypsin-like protease, several species of Fusarium of various pathogenicity were compared. In two species, F. sporotrichioides (which causes ear fusa-riosis of rye) and F. heterosporum (the causative agent of root rot in wheat), a clear correlation between the activity and pathogenicity was revealed: the more pathogenetic F. sporotrichioides exhibited a higher extracellular trypsin-like activity than the less pathogenetic species F. heterosporum. Thus, the presence of trypsin-like activity in a saprotroph-pathogen pair may be an indicator of the pathogenicity of a fungus; in some cases, the value of this activity may indicate the degree of its pathogenicity. This suggests that trypsin-like proteases specific to phytopathogens are directly involved in the pathogenetic process, probably, through interaction with the "sentry" protein or the product of the resistance gene. PMID:18672678

  10. [Extracellular proteases of mycelial fungi as participants of pathogenic processes].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Matveeva, A R; Fatkhullina, G N; Beliakova, G A; Kolomiets, T M; Kovalenko, E D; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2008-01-01

    The interest in proteases secreted by mycelial fungi is due to several reasons of which one of the most important is their involvement in the initiation and development of the pathogenic process. A comparison of saprophytic and phytopathogenic mycelial fungi revealed one characteristic feature, namely, the appearance of a new trypsin-like activity in phytopathogens that is absent in saprophytes. To clear up the question of whether the degree of pathogenicity of a fungus is related to the activity of secreted trypsin-like protease, several species of Fusarium of various pathogenicity were compared. In two species, F. sporotrichioides (which causes ear fusa-riosis of rye) and F. heterosporum (the causative agent of root rot in wheat), a clear correlation between the activity and pathogenicity was revealed: the more pathogenetic F. sporotrichioides exhibited a higher extracellular trypsin-like activity than the less pathogenetic species F. heterosporum. Thus, the presence of trypsin-like activity in a saprotroph-pathogen pair may be an indicator of the pathogenicity of a fungus; in some cases, the value of this activity may indicate the degree of its pathogenicity. This suggests that trypsin-like proteases specific to phytopathogens are directly involved in the pathogenetic process, probably, through interaction with the "sentry" protein or the product of the resistance gene.

  11. Cathepsin B contributes to Na+ hyperabsorption in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cultures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chong Da; Hobbs, Carey; Sameni, Mansoureh; Sloane, Bonnie F; Stutts, M Jackson; Tarran, Robert

    2014-12-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, the absence of functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator results in Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) hyposecretion and triggers Na(+) hyperabsorption through the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), which contribute to reduced airway surface liquid (ASL) pH and volume. Prostasin, a membrane-anchored serine protease with trypsin-like substrate specificity has previously been shown to activate ENaC in CF airways. However, prostasin is typically inactive below pH 7.0, suggesting that it may be less relevant in acidic CF airways. Cathepsin B (CTSB) is present in both normal and CF epithelia and is secreted into ASL, but little is known about its function in the airways. We hypothesized that the acidic ASL seen in CF airways may stimulate CTSB to activate ENaC, contributing to Na(+) hyperabsorption and depletion of CF ASL volume. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, CTSB triggered α- and γENaC cleavage and induced an increase in ENaC activity. In bronchial epithelia from both normal and CF donor lungs, CTSB localized to the apical membrane. In normal and CF human bronchial epithelial cultures, CTSB was detected at the apical plasma membrane and in the ASL. CTSB activity was significantly elevated in acidic ASL, which correlated with increased abundance of ENaC in the plasma membrane and a reduction in ASL volume. This acid/CTSB-dependent activation of ENaC was ameliorated with the cell impermeable, CTSB-selective inhibitor CA074, suggesting that CTSB inhibition may have therapeutic relevance. Taken together, our data suggest that CTSB is a pathophysiologically relevant protease that activates ENaC in CF airways. PMID:25260629

  12. Trypsin-like enzymes during fertilization in the shrimp Rhynchocinetes typus.

    PubMed

    Rios, M; Barros, C

    1997-04-01

    The spermatozoon of Rhynchocinetes typus is atypical because it is nonmotile and lacks head and tail. The body has a rigid spike. Neither an acrosome-like structure nor changes during gamete interaction which could be interpreted as an acrosome reaction have been observed in this species. Nevertheless, the spermatozoon exerts a lytic effect on the extracellular envelope of the egg, and in this way it penetrates through egg-coats, forming a channel. In this research we found that crude spermatozoa extracts analyzed by gelatin SDS-PAGE developed one band of protease activity that was completely inhibited by SBTI (soybean trypsin inhibitor) and pAB (p-aminobenzamidine). In sperm extracts an enzymatic activity was determined, using BAEE (N-benzoil-L-arginine ethyl ester), but not ATEE, as substrate. This activity was inhibited by SBTI and pAB. We observed that in vitro fertilization was inhibited by spermatozoon incubation with the trypsin inhibitors SBTI, PMSF (phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride), and pAB. Additionally, we observed that when whole isolated egg-coats were incubated with sperm extract and then analyzed by SDS--PAGE, one band of the egg-coats disappeared. These results have been interpreted as sperm trypsinlike enzyme participation in R. typus sperm passage through the egg-coats. PMID:9094104

  13. The synthesis, kinetic characterization and application of biotinylated aminoacylchloromethanes for the detection of chymotrypsin and trypsin-like serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, G; Bailie, J R; Halliday, I M; Nelson, J; Walker, B

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of two biotinylated affinity labels for chymotrypsin and trypsin-like serine proteinases is described, along with their kinetic characterization and application to the detection of these proteinases after PAGE and Western blotting. Thus the chloromethane analogues biotinylphenylalanylchloromethane (Bio-Phe-CH2Cl; reagent 1) and biotinylarginylchloromethane (Bio-Arg-CH2Cl, reagent 2), have been shown to be potent active-site-directed inactivators of chymotrypsin and trypsin respectively. The apparent overall second-order rate constants (kobs./[I]) for the inactivation of chymotrypsin and trypsin by reagent 1 (approximately 4.9 x 10(3) M-1.min-1) and reagent 2 (approximately 1.0 x 10(5) M-1.min-1) respectively are comparable with those obtained by other workers with simple urethane-protected analogues and demonstrates that the presence of the bulky biotinyl moiety is compatible with inhibitor effectiveness. Samples of chymotrypsin and trypsin that have been inactivated by reagents 1 and 2 respectively and which have been subjected to SDS/PAGE and Western blotting can be revealed with a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase label. We can presently detect down to 20 ng of inactivated proteinase by using this system. The utility of the arginine derivative for the detection of the plasma trypsin-like proteinases plasmin and thrombin has also been demonstrated, thus holding out the possibility that this reagent may find general application as an active-site-directed label for this class of proteinase. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1575691

  14. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H.; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available Taenia solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to E. granulosus Ag5 protein. The Taenia solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis. PMID:21893105

  15. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available T. solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to Echinococcus granulosus Ag5 protein. The T. solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis.

  16. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  17. Human tryptase epsilon (PRSS22), a new member of the chromosome 16p13.3 family of human serine proteases expressed in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, G W; Yasuda, S; Madhusudhan, M S; Li, L; Yang, Y; Krilis, S A; Sali, A; Stevens, R L

    2001-12-28

    Probing of the GenBank expressed sequence tag (EST) data base with varied human tryptase cDNAs identified two truncated ESTs that subsequently were found to encode overlapping portions of a novel human serine protease (designated tryptase epsilon or protease, serine S1 family member 22 (PRSS22)). The tryptase epsilon gene resides on chromosome 16p13.3 within a 2.5-Mb complex of serine protease genes. Although at least 7 of the 14 genes in this complex encode enzymatically active proteases, only one tryptase epsilon-like gene was identified. The trachea and esophagus were found to contain the highest steady-state levels of the tryptase epsilon transcript in adult humans. Although the tryptase epsilon transcript was scarce in adult human lung, it was present in abundance in fetal lung. Thus, the tryptase epsilon gene is expressed in the airways in a developmentally regulated manner that is different from that of other human tryptase genes. At the cellular level, tryptase epsilon is a major product of normal pulmonary epithelial cells, as well as varied transformed epithelial cell lines. Enzymatically active tryptase epsilon is also constitutively secreted from these cells. The amino acid sequence of human tryptase epsilon is 38-44% identical to those of human tryptase alpha, tryptase beta I, tryptase beta II, tryptase beta III, transmembrane tryptase/tryptase gamma, marapsin, and Esp-1/testisin. Nevertheless, comparative protein structure modeling and functional studies using recombinant material revealed that tryptase epsilon has a substrate preference distinct from that of its other family members. These data indicate that the products of the chromosome 16p13.3 complex of tryptase genes evolved to carry out varied functions in humans.

  18. A Selective Irreversible Inhibitor of Furin Does Not Prevent Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Exotoxin A-Induced Airway Epithelial Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Brian; Hamilton, Robert A.; Martin, S. Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial and viral pathogens (or their toxins), including Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, require processing by host pro-protein convertases such as furin to cause disease. We report the development of a novel irreversible inhibitor of furin (QUB-F1) consisting of a diphenyl phosphonate electrophilic warhead coupled with a substrate-like peptide (RVKR), that also includes a biotin tag, to facilitate activity-based profiling/visualisation. QUB-F1 displays greater selectivity for furin, in comparison to a widely used exemplar compound (furin I) which has a chloromethylketone warhead coupled to RVKR, when tested against the serine trypsin-like proteases (trypsin, prostasin and matriptase), factor Xa and the cysteine protease cathepsin B. We demonstrate QUB-F1 does not prevent P. aeruginosa exotoxin A-induced airway epithelial cell toxicity; in contrast to furin I, despite inhibiting cell surface furin-like activity to a similar degree. This finding indicates additional proteases, which are sensitive to the more broad-spectrum furin I compound, may be involved in this process. PMID:27459298

  19. Dual origin of gut proteases in Formosan subterranean termites (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; Xue, Qing-Gang; La Peyre, Jerome F; Delatte, Jennifer; Husseneder, Claudia

    2011-07-01

    Cellulose digestion in lower termites, mediated by carbohydrases originating from both termite and endosymbionts, is well characterized. In contrast, limited information exists on gut proteases of lower termites, their origins and roles in termite nutrition. The objective of this study was to characterize gut proteases of the Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). The protease activity of extracts from gut tissues (fore-, mid- and hindgut) and protozoa isolated from hindguts of termite workers was quantified using hide powder azure as a substrate and further characterized by zymography with gelatin SDS-PAGE. Midgut extracts showed the highest protease activity followed by the protozoa extracts. High level of protease activity was also detected in protozoa culture supernatants after 24 h incubation. Incubation of gut and protozoa extracts with class-specific protease inhibitors revealed that most of the proteases were serine proteases. All proteolytic bands identified after gelatin SDS-PAGE were also inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Finally, incubation with chromogenic substrates indicated that extracts from fore- and hindgut tissues possessed proteases with almost exclusively trypsin-like activity while both midgut and protozoa extracts possessed proteases with trypsin-like and subtilisin/chymotrypsin-like activities. However, protozoa proteases were distinct from midgut proteases (with different molecular mass). Our results suggest that the Formosan subterranean termite not only produces endogenous proteases in its gut tissues, but also possesses proteases originating from its protozoan symbionts.

  20. Characterization of midgut trypsin-like enzymes and three trypsinogen cDNAs from the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y C; Baker, J E

    1999-12-01

    Protein digestion in the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), results from the action of a complex of serine proteinases present in the midgut. In this study we partially characterized trypsin-like enzyme activity against N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (BApNA) in midgut preparations and cloned and sequenced three cDNAs for trypsinogen-like proteins. BApNAase activity in R. dominica midgut was significantly reduced by serine proteinase inhibitors and specific inhibitors of trypsin, whereas BApNAase activity was not sensitive to specific inhibitors of chymotrypsin or aspartic proteinases. However, trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) inhibited BApNAase activity by about 30%. BApNAase was most active in a broad pH range from about pH 7 to 9.5. The gut of R. dominica is a tubular tract approximately 2.5 mm in length. BApNAase activity was primarily located in the midgut region with about 1.5-fold more BApNAase activity in the anterior region compared to that in the posterior region. Proteinases with apparent molecular masses of 23-24 kDa that were visualized on casein zymograms following electrophoresis were inhibited by TLCK. Three cDNAs for trypsinogen-like proteins were cloned and sequenced from mRNA of R. dominica midgut. The full cDNA sequences consisted of open reading frames encoding 249, 293, and 255 amino acid residues for RdoT1, RdoT2, and RdoT3, respectively. cDNAs RdoT1, RdoT2, and RdoT3 shared 77-81% sequence identity. The three encoded trypsinogens shared 54-62% identity in their amino acid sequences and had 16-18 residues of signal peptides and 12-15 residues of activation peptides. The three predicted mature trypsin-like enzymes had molecular masses of 23.1, 28, and 23.8 kDa for RdoT1, RdoT2, and RdoT3, respectively. Typical features of these trypsin-like enzymes included the conserved N-terminal residues IVGG62-65, the catalytic amino acid triad of serine proteinase active sites

  1. Role of trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192 in the enzymatic and cytotonic activities of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Messer, R J; Cieplak, W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin have suggested that proteolytic cleavage plays an important role in the expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity. Specifically, several studies have implicated a trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192, which lies within an exposed region subtended by a disulfide bond in the intact A subunit, in toxicity. To investigate the role of this modification in the enzymatic and cytotonic properties of heat-labile enterotoxin, the response of purified, recombinant A subunit to tryptic activation and the effect of substituting arginine 192 with glycine on the activities of the holotoxin were examined. The recombinant A subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin exhibited significant levels of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity that were only nominally increased (approximately twofold) by prior limited trypsinolysis. The enzymatic activity also did not appear to be affected by auto-ADP-ribosylation that occurs during the high-level synthesis of the recombinant A subunit in E. coli. A mutant form of the holotoxin containing the arginine 192-to-glycine substitution exhibited levels of cytotonic activity for CHO cells that were similar to that of the untreated, wild-type holotoxin but exhibited a marked delay in the ability to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in Caco-2 cells. The results indicate that trypsin-like cleavage of the A subunit of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin at arginine 192 is not requisite to the expression of enzymatic activity by the A subunit and further reveal that this modification, although it enhances the biological and enzymatic activities of the toxin, is not absolutely required for the enterotoxin to elicit cytotonic effects. Images PMID:7927684

  2. A mutant trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae, created by site-directed mutagenesis, improves affinity chromatography for protein trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Kikuchi, N; Nagata, K; Yoshida, N

    1996-08-01

    The Ser-170 residue of a trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae (SFT), which is considered to be the active-site serine, was replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the affinity chromatography step for a Kazal-type trypsin inhibitor pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). The resulting mutant SFT, designated as [S170A]SFT, was expressed in Streptomyces lividans and purified to homogeneity. [S170A]SFT was catalytically inactive, but still had the ability to bind tightly to PSTI and to soybean trypsin inhibitor with dissociation constants of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and 1.9 x 10(-8) M respectively. We further demonstrated that recombinant human PSTI secreted into Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture broth could be purified to homogeneity with a one-step [S170A]SFT-affinity column. The purified PSTI contained no molecules intramolecularly cleaved by active trypsin, which are found when trypsin-affinity chromatography is used for the purification. This eliminated the need for further separation of intact PSTI from intramolecularly cleaved PSTI by high-performance liquid chromatography, thus simplifying and improving its purification process.

  3. Induction of CXC chemokines in A549 airway epithelial cells by trypsin and staphylococcal proteases − a possible route for neutrophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, F; von Eiff, C; Stoll, W; Becker, K; Rudack, C

    2006-01-01

    While various microorganisms have been recovered from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, the inflammatory impact of virulence factors, in particular proteases from Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci on the nasal epithelium, has not yet been investigated. Expression of CXC chemokines was determined in the epithelium of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis by immunohistochemistry. In a cell culture system of A549 respiratory epithelial cells, chemokine levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after stimulation with supernatants originating from three different staphylococcal strains or with trypsin, representing a serine protease. Inhibition experiments were performed with prednisolone, with the serine protease inhibitor 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonylfluoride (AEBSF) and with the nuclear transcription factor (NF)-κΒ inhibitor (2E)-3-[[4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]sulphonyl]-2-propenenitrite (BAY) 11–7085. Electromobility shift assays (EMSA) were used to demonstrate NF-κB-dependent protein synthesis. CXC chemokines interleukin (IL)-8, growth-related oncogene alpha (GRO-α) and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2) were expressed in the patients’ epithelium whereas epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant 78 (ENA-78) was rarely detected. In A549 cells, chemokines IL-8, ENA-78 and GRO-α but not GCP-2 were induced by trypsin and almost equal levels were induced by staphylococcal supernatants. IL-8, GRO-α and ENA-78 synthesis was suppressed almost completely by AEBSF and BAY 11–7085, whereas prednisolone reduced chemokine levels differentially dependent on the supernatant added. CXC chemokines were detectable in the epithelium of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Staphylococcal serine proteases induced CXC chemokines in A549 cells, probably by the activation of proteases activated receptors, and thus might potentially be involved in neutrophilic inflammation in chronic sinusitis. PMID:16734624

  4. Membrane-anchored serine proteases in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas; Wu, Qingyu

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases of the trypsin-like family have long been recognized to be critical effectors of biological processes as diverse as digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and immunity. In recent years, a subgroup of these enzymes has been identified that are anchored directly to plasma membranes, either by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain (Type I), an amino-terminal transmembrane domain with a cytoplasmic extension (Type II or TTSP), or through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Recent biochemical, cellular, and in vivo analyses have now established that membrane-anchored serine proteases are key pericellular contributors to processes vital for development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This chapter will review our current knowledge of the biological and physiological functions of these proteases, their molecular substrates, and their contributions to disease. PMID:21238933

  5. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Silva, Simone; Montoya, Teodoro Ignacio; Suzuki, Ayako; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Wieslander, Cecilia Karin; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Word, Ruth Ann; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/-) mice. PRSS3 was (a) localized in epithelial secretions, (b) detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/-) and wild type mice, and (c) cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin) and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/-) epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice. PMID:23437119

  6. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  7. 3C-like protease of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus: identification of cleavage sites in the ORF1 polyprotein and analysis of cleavage specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, C; Sibilia, M; Boniotti, M B; Rossi, C; Thiel, H J; Meyers, G

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, a positive-stranded RNA virus of the family Caliciviridae, encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease as part of a large polyprotein. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, the protease releases itself from larger precursors by proteolytic cleavages at its N and C termini. Both cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequence analysis of the cleavage products. Cleavage at the N terminus of the protease occurred with high efficiency at an EG dipeptide at positions 1108 and 1109. Cleavage at the C terminus of the protease occurred with low efficiency at an ET dipeptide at positions 1251 and 1252. To study the cleavage specificity of the protease, amino acid substitutions were introduced at the P2, P1, and P1' positions at the cleavage site at the N-terminal boundary of the protease. This analysis showed that the amino acid at the P1 position is the most important determinant for substrate recognition. Only glutamic acid, glutamine, and aspartic acid were tolerated at this position. At the P1' position, glycine, serine, and alanine were the preferred substrates of the protease, but a number of amino acids with larger side chains were also tolerated. Substitutions at the P2 position had only little effect on the cleavage efficiency. Cell-free expression of the C-terminal half of the ORF1 polyprotein showed that the protease catalyzes cleavage at the junction of the RNA polymerase and the capsid protein. An EG dipeptide at positions 1767 and 1768 was identified as the putative cleavage site. Our data show that rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease that is similar to 3C proteases with regard to function and specificity but is more similar to 2A proteases with regard to size. PMID:7474137

  8. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  9. Characterization of the molecular features and expression patterns of two serine proteases in Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wontae; Bae, Sungwoo; Kim, Ayoung; Park, Kwanho; Lee, Sangbeom; Choi, Youngcheol; Han, Sangmi; Park, Younghan; Koh, Youngho

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the molecular scavenging capabilities of the larvae of Hermetia illucens, two serine proteases (SPs) were cloned and characterized. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 were suggested that Hi-SP1 may be a chymotrypsin- and Hi-SP2 may be a trypsin-like protease. Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 3-D homology models revealed that a catalytic triad, three disulfide bonds, and a substrate-binding pocket were highly conserved, as would be expected of a SP. E. coli expressed Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 showed chymotrypsin or trypsin activities, respectively. Hi-SP2 mRNAs were consistently expressed during larval development. In contrast, the expression of Hi-SP1 mRNA fluctuated between feeding and molting stages and disappeared at the pupal stages. These expression pattern differences suggest that Hi-SP1 may be a larval specific chymotrypsin-like protease involved with food digestion, while Hi-SP2 may be a trypsin-like protease with diverse functions at different stages.

  10. Differential protease activity augments polyphagy in Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Chikate, Y R; Tamhane, V A; Joshi, R S; Gupta, V S; Giri, A P

    2013-06-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and other polyphagous agricultural pests are extending their plant host range and emerging as serious agents in restraining crop productivity. Dynamic regulation, coupled with a diversity of digestive and detoxifying enzymes, play a crucial role in the adaptation of polyphagous insects. To investigate the functional intricacy of serine proteases in the development and polyphagy of H. armigera, we profiled the expression of eight trypsin-like and four chymotrypsin-like phylogenetically diverse mRNAs from different life stages of H. armigera reared on nutritionally distinct host plants. These analyses revealed diet- and stage-specific protease expression patterns. The trypsins expressed showed structural variations, which might result in differential substrate specificity and interaction with inhibitors. Protease profiles in the presence of inhibitors and their mass spectrometric analyses revealed insight into their differential activity. These findings emphasize the differential expression of serine proteases and their consequences for digestive physiology in promoting polyphagy in H. armigera. PMID:23432026

  11. Proteolytic Activation of the Protease-activated Receptor (PAR)-2 by the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Serine Protease Testisin*

    PubMed Central

    Driesbaugh, Kathryn H.; Buzza, Marguerite S.; Martin, Erik W.; Conway, Gregory D.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Antalis, Toni M.

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of seven-transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptors that are activated by multiple serine proteases through specific N-terminal proteolytic cleavage and the unmasking of a tethered ligand. The majority of PAR-activating proteases described to date are soluble proteases that are active during injury, coagulation, and inflammation. Less investigation, however, has focused on the potential for membrane-anchored serine proteases to regulate PAR activation. Testisin is a unique trypsin-like serine protease that is tethered to the extracellular membrane of cells through a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of PAR-2 is a substrate for testisin and that proteolytic cleavage of PAR-2 by recombinant testisin activates downstream signaling pathways, including intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. When testisin and PAR-2 are co-expressed in HeLa cells, GPI-anchored testisin specifically releases the PAR-2 tethered ligand. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous testisin in NCI/ADR-Res ovarian tumor cells reduces PAR-2 N-terminal proteolytic cleavage. The cleavage of PAR-2 by testisin induces activation of the intracellular serum-response element and NFκB signaling pathways and the induction of IL-8 and IL-6 cytokine gene expression. Furthermore, the activation of PAR-2 by testisin results in the loss and internalization of PAR-2 from the cell surface. This study reveals a new biological substrate for testisin and is the first demonstration of the activation of a PAR by a serine protease GPI-linked to the cell surface. PMID:25519908

  12. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  13. Enabling Low Cost Biopharmaceuticals: A Systematic Approach to Delete Proteases from a Well-Known Protein Production Host Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Christopher P.; Huuskonen, Anne; Wahl, Ramon; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Kanerva, Anne; Hänninen, Anna-Liisa; Salovuori, Noora; Penttilä, Merja; Natunen, Jari; Ostermeier, Christian; Helk, Bernhard; Saarinen, Juhani; Saloheimo, Markku

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei has tremendous capability to secrete proteins. Therefore, it would be an excellent host for producing high levels of therapeutic proteins at low cost. Developing a filamentous fungus to produce sensitive therapeutic proteins requires that protease secretion is drastically reduced. We have identified 13 major secreted proteases that are related to degradation of therapeutic antibodies, interferon alpha 2b, and insulin like growth factor. The major proteases observed were aspartic, glutamic, subtilisin-like, and trypsin-like proteases. The seven most problematic proteases were sequentially removed from a strain to develop it for producing therapeutic proteins. After this the protease activity in the supernatant was dramatically reduced down to 4% of the original level based upon a casein substrate. When antibody was incubated in the six protease deletion strain supernatant, the heavy chain remained fully intact and no degradation products were observed. Interferon alpha 2b and insulin like growth factor were less stable in the same supernatant, but full length proteins remained when incubated overnight, in contrast to the original strain. As additional benefits, the multiple protease deletions have led to faster strain growth and higher levels of total protein in the culture supernatant. PMID:26309247

  14. Construction of dengue virus protease expression plasmid and in vitro protease assay for screening antiviral inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huiguo; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne human pathogens of global significance causing ~390 million cases annually worldwide. The virus infections cause in general a self-limiting disease, known as dengue fever, but occasionally also more severe forms, especially during secondary infections, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome causing ~25,000 deaths annually. The DENV genome contains a single-strand positive sense RNA, approximately 11 kb in length. The 5'-end has a type I cap structure. The 3'-end has no poly(A) tail. The viral RNA has a single long open reading frame that is translated by the host translational machinery to yield a polyprotein precursor. Processing of the polyprotein precursor occurs co-translationally by cellular proteases and posttranslationally by the viral serine protease in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to yield three structural proteins (capsid (C), precursor membrane (prM), and envelope (E) and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5). The active viral protease consists of both NS2B, an integral membrane protein in the ER, and the N-terminal part of NS3 (180 amino acid residues) that contains the trypsin-like serine protease domain having a catalytic triad of H51, D75, and S135. The C-terminal part of NS3, ~170-618 amino acid residues, encodes an NTPase/RNA helicase and 5'-RNA triphosphatase activities; the latter enzyme is required for the first step in 5'-capping. The cleavage sites of the polyprotein by the viral protease consist of two basic amino acid residues such as KR, RR, or QR, followed by short chain amino acid residues, G, S, or T. Since the cleavage of the polyprotein by the viral protease is absolutely required for assembly of the viral replicase, blockage of NS2B/NS3pro activity provides an effective means for designing dengue virus (DENV) small-molecule therapeutics. Here we describe the screening of small-molecule inhibitors against DENV2 protease. PMID

  15. Identification and properties of proteases from an Acanthamoeba isolate capable of producing granulomatous encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Goldsworthy, Graham; Lightfoot, Mary; Jarroll, Edward L; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Background Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba is often a fatal human disease. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of Acanthamoeba encephalitis remain unclear. In this study, the role of extracellular Acanthamoeba proteases in central nervous system pathogenesis and pathophysiology was examined. Results Using an encephalitis isolate belonging to T1 genotype, we observed two major proteases with approximate molecular weights of 150 KD and 130 KD on SDS-PAGE gels using gelatin as substrate. The 130 KD protease was inhibited with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) suggesting that it is a serine protease, while the 150 KD protease was inhibited with 1, 10-phenanthroline suggesting that it is a metalloprotease. Both proteases exhibited maximal activity at neutral pH and over a range of temperatures, indicating their physiological relevance. These proteases degrade extracellular matrix (ECM), which provide structural and functional support to the brain tissue, as shown by the degradation of collagen I and III (major components of collagenous ECM), elastin (elastic fibrils of ECM), plasminogen (involved in proteolytic degradation of ECM), as well as casein and haemoglobin. The proteases were purified partially using ion-exchange chromatography and their effects were tested in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Neither the serine nor the metalloprotease exhibited HBMEC cytotoxicity. However, the serine protease exhibited HBMEC monolayer disruptions (trypsin-like) suggesting a role in blood-brain barrier perturbations. Conclusion Overall, these data suggest that Acanthamoeba proteases digest ECM, which may play crucial role(s) in invasion of the brain tissue by amoebae. PMID:16672059

  16. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  17. Crystal structure of bovine duodenase, a serine protease, with dual trypsin and chymotrypsin-like specificities.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, V Z; Zamolodchikova, T S; Pangborn, W A; Duax, W L

    2000-10-01

    The three-dimensional structure of duodenase, a serine protease from bovine duodenum mucosa, has been determined at 2.4A resolution. The enzyme, which has both trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like activities, most closely resembles human cathepsin G with which it shares 57% sequence identity and similar specificity. The catalytic Ser195 in duodenase adopts the energetically favored conformation typical of serine proteinases and unlike the strained state typical of lipase/esterases. Of several waters in the active site of duodenase, the one associated with Ser214 is found in all serine proteinases and most lipase/esterases. The conservation of the Ser214 residue in serine proteinase, its presence in the active site, and participation in a hydrogen water network involving the catalytic triad (His57, Asp107, and Ser195) argues for its having an important role in the mechanism of action. It may be referred to as a fourth member of the catalytic triad. Duodenase is one of a growing family of enzymes that possesses trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like activity. Not long ago, these activities were considered to be mutually exclusive. Computer modeling reveals that the S1 subsite of duodenase has structural features compatible with effective accommodation of P1 residues typical of trypsin (Arg/Lys) and chymotrypsin (Tyr/Phe) substrates. The determination of structural features associated with functional variation in the enzyme family may permit design of enzymes with a specific ratio of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:10944388

  18. Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Responses Induced by Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Biologically Active Proteases from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ayan; Tapader, Rima; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Ghosh, Amit; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Proteases in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis. V. cholerae secretes Zn-dependent hemagglutinin protease (HAP) and calcium-dependent trypsin-like serine protease (VesC) by using the type II secretion system (TIISS). Our present studies demonstrated that these proteases are also secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and transported to human intestinal epithelial cells in an active form. OMV-associated HAP induces dose-dependent apoptosis in Int407 cells and an enterotoxic response in the mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay, whereas OMV-associated VesC showed a hemorrhagic fluid response in the MIL assay, necrosis in Int407 cells, and an increased interleukin-8 (IL-8) response in T84 cells, which were significantly reduced in OMVs from VesC mutant strain. Our results also showed that serine protease VesC plays a role in intestinal colonization of V. cholerae strains in adult mice. In conclusion, our study shows that V. cholerae OMVs secrete biologically active proteases which may play a role in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses. PMID:26930702

  19. Purification, characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease from bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, A J; Shoshani, I; Minuth, M; Awad, J A; Elce, J S; Johnson, R A

    1995-03-01

    We previously reported the extraction of a factor from bovine sperm that activated adenylyl cyclases of rat brain and human platelets, and identified it as a trypsin-like protease that was referred to as "ninhibin." This proteolytic activity was purified to near homogeneity from an alkaline extract of washed sperm particles by sequential chromatography on p-aminobenzamidine agarose and CM-Sephadex. Purification was greater than 100-fold with nearly 30% recovery of protease activity exhibiting a major band of approximately 40 kDa. An approximately 45-kDa form of the protease was also evident in crude extracts and was preferentially isolated when the enzyme was prepared in the presence of a mixture of protease inhibitors. The larger form of the protease was substantially less effective in stimulating adenylyl cyclase than was the smaller form; it is likely to be a zymogen form from which the smaller, more active form is derived. Purified forms of acrosin and ninhibin exhibited similar mobilities on PAGE, similar capacities for activating adenylyl cyclase, similar patterns of proteolytic fragmentation, and similar immunoblot patterns obtained with an antibody against purified bovine acrosin. More importantly, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of bovine ninhibin was found to be identical with that of bovine acrosin and caprine acrosin and more than 75% identical with porcine acrosin. The data support the conclusion that the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease previously referred to as ninhibin is, in fact, acrosin. PMID:7756444

  20. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  1. Epicutaneous Allergic Sensitization by Cooperation between Allergen Protease Activity and Mechanical Skin Barrier Damage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Sakiko; Takai, Toshiro; Iida, Hideo; Maruyama, Natsuko; Ochi, Hirono; Kamijo, Seiji; Nishioka, Izumi; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2016-07-01

    Allergen sources such as mites, insects, fungi, and pollen contain proteases. Airway exposure to proteases induces allergic airway inflammation and IgE/IgG1 responses via IL-33-dependent mechanisms in mice. We examined the epicutaneous sensitization of mice to a model protease allergen, papain; the effects of tape stripping, which induces epidermal barrier dysfunction; and the atopic march upon a subsequent airway challenge. Papain painting on ear skin and tape stripping cooperatively promoted dermatitis, the skin gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, up-regulation of serum total IgE, and papain-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Epicutaneous sensitization induced T helper (Th) 2 cells and Th17 differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Ovalbumin and protease inhibitor-treated papain induced no or weak responses, whereas the co-administration of ovalbumin and papain promoted ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Wild-type and IL-33-deficient mice showed similar responses in the epicutaneous sensitization phase. The subsequent airway papain challenge induced airway eosinophilia and maintained high papain-specific IgE levels in an IL-33-dependent manner. These results suggest that allergen source-derived protease activity and mechanical barrier damage such as that caused by scratching cooperatively promote epicutaneous sensitization and skin inflammation and that IL-33 is dispensable for epicutaneous sensitization but is crucial in the atopic march upon a subsequent airway low-dose encounter with protease allergens. PMID:26987428

  2. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  3. NMR analysis of a novel enzymatically active unlinked dengue NS2B-NS3 protease complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mee; Gayen, Shovanlal; Kang, CongBao; Joy, Joma; Huang, Qiwei; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Ang, Melgious Jin Yan; Lim, Huichang Annie; Hung, Alvin W; Li, Rong; Noble, Christian G; Lee, Le Tian; Yip, Andy; Wang, Qing-Yin; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Hill, Jeffrey; Shi, Pei-Yong; Keller, Thomas H

    2013-05-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen responsible for an estimated 100 million human infections annually. The viral genome encodes a two-component trypsin-like protease that contains the cofactor region from the nonstructural protein NS2B and the protease domain from NS3 (NS3pro). The NS2B-NS3pro complex plays a crucial role in viral maturation and has been identified as a potential drug target. Using a DENV protease construct containing NS2B covalently linked to NS3pro via a Gly4-Ser-Gly4 linker ("linked protease"), previous x-ray crystal structures show that the C-terminal fragment of NS2B is remote from NS3pro and exists in an open state in the absence of an inhibitor; however, in the presence of an inhibitor, NS2B complexes with NS3pro to form a closed state. This linked enzyme produced NMR spectra with severe signal overlap and line broadening. To obtain a protease construct with a resolved NMR spectrum, we expressed and purified an unlinked protease complex containing a 50-residue segment of the NS2B cofactor region and NS3pro without the glycine linker using a coexpression system. This unlinked protease complex was catalytically active at neutral pH in the absence of glycerol and produced dispersed cross-peaks in a (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum correlation spectrum that enabled us to conduct backbone assignments using conventional techniques. In addition, titration with an active-site peptide aldehyde inhibitor and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement studies demonstrated that the unlinked DENV protease exists predominantly in a closed conformation in solution. This protease complex can serve as a useful tool for drug discovery against DENV.

  4. Enterokinase, the initiator of intestinal digestion, is a mosaic protease composed of a distinctive assortment of domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, Y; Yuan, X; Wu, Q; McCourt, D W; Sadler, J E

    1994-01-01

    Enterokinase is a protease of the intestinal brush border that specifically cleaves the acidic propeptide from trypsinogen to yield active trypsin. This cleavage initiates a cascade of proteolytic reactions leading to the activation of many pancreatic zymogens. The full-length cDNA sequence for bovine enterokinase and partial cDNA sequence for human enterokinase were determined. The deduced amino acid sequences indicate that active two-chain enterokinase is derived from a single-chain precursor. Membrane association may be mediated by a potential signal-anchor sequence near the amino terminus. The amino terminus of bovine enterokinase also meets the known sequence requirements for protein N-myristoylation. The amino-terminal heavy chain contains domains that are homologous to segments of the low density lipoprotein receptor, complement components C1r and C1s, the macrophage scavenger receptor, and a recently described motif shared by the metalloprotease meprin and the Xenopus A5 neuronal recognition protein. The carboxyl-terminal light chain is homologous to the trypsin-like serine proteases. Thus, enterokinase is a mosaic protein with a complex evolutionary history. The amino acid sequence surrounding the amino terminus of the enterokinase light chain is ITPK-IVGG (human) or VSPK-IVGG (bovine), suggesting that single-chain enterokinase is activated by an unidentified trypsin-like protease that cleaves the indicated Lys-Ile bond. Therefore, enterokinase may not be the "first" enzyme of the intestinal digestive hydrolase cascade. The specificity of enterokinase for the DDDDK-I sequence of trypsinogen may be explained by complementary basic-amino acid residues clustered in potential S2-S5 subsites. Images PMID:8052624

  5. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  6. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  7. Cloning and sequencing of two genes, prtA and prtB, from Myxococcus xanthus, encoding PrtA and PrtB proteases, both of which are required for the protease activity.

    PubMed

    Quillet, L; Bensmail, L; Barray, S; Guespin-Michel, J

    1997-10-01

    The sequence of a 1955-bp TaqI DNA fragment from Myxococcus xanthus was determined. This fragment contains two complete genes, designated prtA and prtB. The prtA and prtB ORFs extend over 828 and 798 bp, respectively. They are separated only by 3 nt and appear to be present in a polycistronic transcriptional unit. A typical lipoprotein signal sequence is present at the N terminus of the two deduced polypeptides. The aa sequence of PrtA shows a high degree of identity to the region adjacent to the Ser residue belonging to the catalytic triad of serine proteases from Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. It also exhibits features characteristic of trypsin-like serine proteases in that it contains the same pattern of variable and conserved regions. The deduced aa sequence of PrtB reveals a signature zinc-binding consensus motif (HEXXHXXGXXH/Met-turn) characteristic of the class of metalloproteases called metzincins. Plasmids containing prtA, prtB, or both were constructed. Protease activity studies of Escherichia coli clones containing these plasmids showed that both genes are necessary for this activity, whatever their cis or trans position. As prtB produces a putative membrane-bound lipoprotein of 266 aa, the protease activation must occur at the membrane level.

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of midgut serine proteases in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Isoe, Jun; Rascón, Alberto A; Kunz, Susan; Miesfeld, Roger L

    2009-12-01

    Digestion of blood meal proteins by midgut proteases provides anautogenous mosquitoes with the nutrients required to complete the gonotrophic cycle. Inhibition of protein digestion in the midgut of blood feeding mosquitoes could therefore provide a strategy for population control. Based on recent reports indicating that the mechanism and regulation of protein digestion in blood fed female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is more complex than previously thought, we used a robust RNAi knockdown method to investigate the role of four highly expressed midgut serine proteases in blood meal metabolism. We show by Western blotting that the early phase trypsin protein (AaET) is maximally expressed at 3 h post-blood meal (PBM), and that AaET is not required for the protein expression of three late phase serine proteases, AaLT (late trypsin), AaSPVI (5G1), and AaSPVII. Using the trypsin substrate analog BApNA to analyze in vitro enzyme activity in midgut extracts from single mosquitoes, we found that knockdown of AaSPVI expression caused a 77.6% decrease in late phase trypsin-like activity, whereas, knockdown of AaLT and AaSPVII expression had no significant effect on BApNA activity. In contrast, injection of AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII dsRNA inhibited degradation of endogenous serum albumin protein using an in vivo protease assay, as well as, significantly decreased egg production in both the first and second gonotrophic cycles (P < 0.001). These results demonstrate that AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII all contribute to blood protein digestion and oocyte maturation, even though AaSPVI is the only abundant midgut late phase serine protease that appears to function as a classic trypsin enzyme. PMID:19883761

  9. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... efforts to assist with breathing have failed. A hollow needle or tube can be inserted into the ...

  10. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  11. Nucleotide release by airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Sesma, Juliana I; Seminario, Lucia; Esther, Charles R; Kreda, Silvia M

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic events regulating the airways' innate defenses are initiated by the release of purines from the epithelium, which occurs constitutively and is enhanced by chemical or mechanical stimulation. While the external triggers have been reviewed exhaustively, this chapter focuses on current knowledge of the receptors and signaling cascades mediating nucleotide release. The list of secreted purines now includes ATP, ADP, AMP and nucleotide sugars, and involves at least three distinct mechanisms reflecting the complexity of airway epithelia. First, the constitutive mechanism involves ATP translocation to the ER/Golgi complex as energy source for protein folding, and fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the plasma membrane. Second, goblet cells package ATP with mucins into granules, which are discharged in response to P2Y(2)R activation and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. Finally, non-mucous cells support a regulated mechanism of ATP release involving protease activated receptor (PAR)-elicited G(12/13) activation, leading to the RhoGEF-mediated exchange of GDP for GTP on RhoA, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Together, these pathways provide fine tuning of epithelial responses regulated by purinergic signaling events. PMID:21560042

  12. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  13. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA.

  14. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA. PMID:25882520

  15. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The emergency airway.

    PubMed

    Goon, Serena S H; Stephens, Robert C M; Smith, Helen

    2009-12-01

    The 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario is a nightmare for all clinicians who manage airways. Cricothyroidotomy is one of several emergency airway management techniques. Cricothyroidotomy is a short-term solution which provides oxygenation, not ventilation, and is not a definitive airway. Although there are tests which can help predict whether an intubation will be difficult, they are not always good predictors. As the can't intubate, can't ventilate scenario is rare, cricothyroidotomy is an unfamiliar procedure to many. In this situation, expert help must be called for early on. In the meantime, it is vital that all other simple airway manoeuvres have been attempted, such as good positioning of the patient with head tilt and chin lift, and use of airway adjuncts like the oral (Guedel) airway or nasopharyngeal airway, and the laryngeal mask airway. However, if attempts to secure the airway are unsuccessful, there may be no other option than to perform a cricothyroidotomy. It is a difficult decision to make, but with increasing hypoxia, it is essential that one oxygenates the patient. Cricothyroidotomy provides an opening in the pace between the anterior inferior border of the thyroid cartilage and the anterior superior border of the cricoid cartilage, allowing access to the airway below the glottis. The anatomical considerations are important when performing this procedure (Ellis, 2009), and there are other scenarios when it is used. It is not without consequence, as with any procedure.

  17. Inhibitors of HGFA, Matriptase, and Hepsin Serine Proteases: A Nonkinase Strategy to Block Cell Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenfu; Harris, Peter K W; Jones, Darin E; Chugani, Ryan; Kim, Tommy; Agarwal, Manjula; Shen, Wei; Wildman, Scott A; Janetka, James W

    2014-11-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor activators (HGFA), matriptase, and hepsin are S1 family trypsin-like serine proteases. These proteases proteolytically cleave the single-chain zymogen precursors, pro-HGF (hepatocyte growth factor), and pro-MSP (macrophage stimulating protein) into active heterodimeric forms. HGF and MSP are activating ligands for the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), c-MET and RON, respectively. We have discovered the first substrate-based ketothiazole inhibitors of HGFA, matriptase and hepsin. The compounds were synthesized using a combination of solution and solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Compounds were tested for protease inhibition using a kinetic enzyme assay employing fluorogenic peptide substrates. Highlighted HGFA inhibitors are Ac-KRLR-kt (5g), Ac-SKFR-kt (6c), and Ac-SWLR-kt (6g) with K is = 12, 57, and 63 nM, respectively. We demonstrated that inhibitors block the conversion of native pro-HGF and pro-MSP by HGFA with equivalent potency. Finally, we show that inhibition causes a dose-dependent decrease of c-MET signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. This preliminary investigation provides evidence that HGFA is a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer and other tumor types driven by c-MET and RON. PMID:25408834

  18. Inhibitors of HGFA, Matriptase, and Hepsin Serine Proteases: A Nonkinase Strategy to Block Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor activators (HGFA), matriptase, and hepsin are S1 family trypsin-like serine proteases. These proteases proteolytically cleave the single-chain zymogen precursors, pro-HGF (hepatocyte growth factor), and pro-MSP (macrophage stimulating protein) into active heterodimeric forms. HGF and MSP are activating ligands for the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), c-MET and RON, respectively. We have discovered the first substrate-based ketothiazole inhibitors of HGFA, matriptase and hepsin. The compounds were synthesized using a combination of solution and solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Compounds were tested for protease inhibition using a kinetic enzyme assay employing fluorogenic peptide substrates. Highlighted HGFA inhibitors are Ac-KRLR-kt (5g), Ac-SKFR-kt (6c), and Ac-SWLR-kt (6g) with Kis = 12, 57, and 63 nM, respectively. We demonstrated that inhibitors block the conversion of native pro-HGF and pro-MSP by HGFA with equivalent potency. Finally, we show that inhibition causes a dose-dependent decrease of c-MET signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. This preliminary investigation provides evidence that HGFA is a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer and other tumor types driven by c-MET and RON. PMID:25408834

  19. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  20. Exclusive rewards in mutualisms: ant proteases and plant protease inhibitors create a lock-key system to protect Acacia food bodies from exploitation.

    PubMed

    Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro; Svatos, Ales; Farías-Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Heil, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Myrmecophytic Acacia species produce food bodies (FBs) to nourish ants of the Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus group, with which they live in an obligate mutualism. We investigated how the FBs are protected from exploiting nonmutualists. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the FB proteomes and consecutive protein sequencing indicated the presence of several Kunitz-type protease inhibitors (PIs). PIs extracted from Acacia FBs were biologically active, as they effectively reduced the trypsin-like and elastase-like proteolytic activity in the guts of seed-feeding beetles (Prostephanus truncatus and Zabrotes subfasciatus), which were used as nonadapted herbivores representing potential exploiters. By contrast, the legitimate mutualistic consumers maintained high proteolytic activity dominated by chymotrypsin 1, which was insensitive to the FB PIs. Larvae of an exploiter ant (Pseudomyrmex gracilis) taken from Acacia hosts exhibited lower overall proteolytic activity than the mutualists. The proteases of this exploiter exhibited mainly elastase-like and to a lower degree chymotrypsin 1-like activity. We conclude that the mutualist ants possess specifically those proteases that are least sensitive to the PIs in their specific food source, whereas the congeneric exploiter ant appears partly, but not completely, adapted to consume Acacia FBs. By contrast, any consumption of the FBs by nonadapted exploiters would effectively inhibit their digestive capacities. We suggest that the term 'exclusive rewards' can be used to describe situations similar to the one that has evolved in myrmecophytic Acacia species, which reward mutualists with FBs but safeguard the reward from exploitation by generalists by making the FBs difficult for the nonadapted consumer to use.

  1. SPINK5 knockdown in organotypic human skin culture as a model system for Netherton syndrome: effect of genetic inhibition of serine proteases kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shirley; Olt, Sabine; Schoefmann, Nicole; Stuetz, Anton; Winiski, Anthony; Wolff-Winiski, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS; OMIM 256500) is a genetic skin disease resulting from defects in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 (SPINK5) gene, which encodes the protease inhibitor lympho-epithelial Kazal type inhibitor (LEKTI). We established a SPINK5 knockdown skin model by transfecting SPINK5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) into normal human epidermal keratinocytes, which were used together with fibroblast-populated collagen gels to generate organotypic skin cultures. This model recapitulates some of the NS skin morphology: thicker, parakeratotic stratum corneum frequently detached from the underlying epidermis and loss of corneodesmosomes. As enhanced serine protease activity has been implicated in the disease pathogenesis, we investigated the impact of the kallikreins KLK5 [stratum corneum trypsin-like enzyme (SCTE)] and KLK7 [stratum corneum chymotrypsin-like enzyme (SCCE)] on the SPINK5 knockdown phenotype by generating double knockdowns in the organotypic model. Knockdown of KLK5 or KLK7 partially ameliorated the epidermal architecture: increased epidermal thickness and expression of desmocollin 1 (DSC1), desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and (pro)filaggrin. Thus, inhibition of serine proteases KLK5 and KLK7 could be therapeutically beneficial in NS.

  2. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    PubMed

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality. PMID:27564672

  3. Maggot excretion products from the blowfly Lucilia sericata contain contact phase/intrinsic pathway-like proteases with procoagulant functions.

    PubMed

    Kahl, M; Gökçen, A; Fischer, S; Bäumer, M; Wiesner, J; Lochnit, G; Wygrecka, M; Vilcinskas, A; Preissner, K T

    2015-08-01

    For centuries, maggots have been used for the treatment of wounds by a variety of ancient cultures, as part of their traditional medicine. With increasing appearance of antimicrobial resistance and in association with diabetic ulcers, maggot therapy was revisited in the 1980s. Three mechanisms by which sterile maggots of the green bottle fly Lucilia sericata may improve healing of chronic wounds have been proposed: Biosurgical debridement, disinfecting properties, and stimulation of the wound healing process. However, the influence of maggot excretion products (MEP) on blood coagulation as part of the wound healing process has not been studied in detail. Here, we demonstrate that specific MEP-derived serine proteases from Lucilia sericata induce clotting of human plasma and whole blood, particularly by activating contact phase proteins factor XII and kininogen as well as factor IX, thereby providing kallikrein-bypassing and factor XIa-like activities, both in plasma and in isolated systems. In plasma samples deficient in contact phase proteins, MEP restored full clotting activity, whereas in plasma deficient in either factor VII, IX, X or II no effect was seen. The observed procoagulant/intrinsic pathway-like activity was mediated by (chymo-) trypsin-like proteases in total MEP, which were significantly blocked by C1-esterase inhibitor or other contact phase-specific protease inhibitors. No significant influence of MEP on platelet activation or fibrinolysis was noted. Together, MEP provides contact phase bypassing procoagulant activity and thereby induces blood clotting in the context of wound healing. Further characterisation of the active serine protease(s) may offer new perspectives for biosurgical treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:25948398

  4. Maggot excretion products from the blowfly Lucilia sericata contain contact phase/intrinsic pathway-like proteases with procoagulant functions.

    PubMed

    Kahl, M; Gökçen, A; Fischer, S; Bäumer, M; Wiesner, J; Lochnit, G; Wygrecka, M; Vilcinskas, A; Preissner, K T

    2015-08-01

    For centuries, maggots have been used for the treatment of wounds by a variety of ancient cultures, as part of their traditional medicine. With increasing appearance of antimicrobial resistance and in association with diabetic ulcers, maggot therapy was revisited in the 1980s. Three mechanisms by which sterile maggots of the green bottle fly Lucilia sericata may improve healing of chronic wounds have been proposed: Biosurgical debridement, disinfecting properties, and stimulation of the wound healing process. However, the influence of maggot excretion products (MEP) on blood coagulation as part of the wound healing process has not been studied in detail. Here, we demonstrate that specific MEP-derived serine proteases from Lucilia sericata induce clotting of human plasma and whole blood, particularly by activating contact phase proteins factor XII and kininogen as well as factor IX, thereby providing kallikrein-bypassing and factor XIa-like activities, both in plasma and in isolated systems. In plasma samples deficient in contact phase proteins, MEP restored full clotting activity, whereas in plasma deficient in either factor VII, IX, X or II no effect was seen. The observed procoagulant/intrinsic pathway-like activity was mediated by (chymo-) trypsin-like proteases in total MEP, which were significantly blocked by C1-esterase inhibitor or other contact phase-specific protease inhibitors. No significant influence of MEP on platelet activation or fibrinolysis was noted. Together, MEP provides contact phase bypassing procoagulant activity and thereby induces blood clotting in the context of wound healing. Further characterisation of the active serine protease(s) may offer new perspectives for biosurgical treatment of chronic wounds.

  5. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  6. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus.

  7. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  8. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  9. Effect of acute and chronic alcohol treatment and their superimposition on lysosomal, cytoplasmic, and proteosomal protease activities in rat skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koll, M; Ahmed, S; Mantle, D; Donohue, T M; Palmer, T N; Simanowski, U A; Seltz, H K; Peters, T J; Preedy, V R

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol can be considered as a nutritional toxin when ingested in excess amounts and leads to skeletal muscle myopathy. We hypothesized that altered protease activities contribute to this phenomenon, and that differential effects on protease activities may occur when: (1) rats at different stages in their development are administered alcohol in vivo; (2) acute ethanol treatment is superimposed on chronic alcohol-feeding in vivo; and (3) muscles are exposed to alcohol and acetaldehyde in vivo and in vitro. In acute studies, rats weighing approximately 0.1 kg (designated immature) or approximately 0.25 kg (designated mature) body weight (BW) were dosed acutely with alcohol (75 mmol/kg BW; intraperitoneal [IP], 2.5 hours prior to killing) or identically treated with 0.15 mol/L NaCl as controls. In chronic studies, rats (approximately 0.1 kg BW) were fed between 1 to 6 weeks, with 35% of dietary energy as ethanol, controls were identically treated with isocaloric glucose. Other studies included administration of cyanamide (aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) in vivo or addition of alcohol and acetaldehyde to muscle preparations in vitro. At the end of the treatments, cytoplasmic (alanyl-, arginyl-, leucyl-, prolyl-, tripeptidyl-aminopeptidase and dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV), lysosomal (cathepsins B, D, H, and L, dipeptidyl aminopeptidase I and II), proteasomal (chymotrypsin-, trypsin-like, and peptidylglutamyl peptide hydrolase activities) and Ca(2+)-activated (micro- and milli-calpain and calpastatin) activities were assayed. (1) Acute alcohol dosage in mature rats reduced the activities of alanyl-, arginyl- and leucyl aminopeptidase (cytoplasmic), dipeptidyl aminopeptidase II (lysosomal), and the chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like activities (proteosomal). No significant effects were observed in similarly treated immature rats. (2) Alcohol feeding in immature rats did not alter the activities of any of the enzymes assayed at 6 weeks. (3) In immature rats, activities of

  10. Clinical application of expectorant therapy in chronic inflammatory airway diseases (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, TING; ZHOU, XIANGDONG

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a significant clinical and pathological feature of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Its clinical presentations include recurrent coughing and phlegm. Airway mucus is closely associated with the occurrence, development and prognosis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases and critically affects the lung function, quality of life, hospitalization rate and mortality of patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Therefore, expectorant therapies targeting the potential mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion have been the focus of numerous studies. Conventional expectorants are mainly mucoactive medicines, including nausea-stimulating expectorants, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and proteases and nucleases. In addition, certain traditional Chinese herbal medicines and non-mucoactive agents, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists and macrolide antibiotics, have also shown expectorant effects. Several novel medicines for expectorant therapy have emerged, including cholesterol-lowering statins, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, stanozolol, surfactants, flavonoids, tachykinin receptor antagonists, protease inhibitors, cytokine antagonists and purinergic agonists. With the increasing number of multidisciplinary studies, the effectiveness of expectorant therapy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases has been confirmed. Therefore, the development of novel expectorants and the standardization of expectorant therapy are the direction and focus of future studies, thus benefiting patients who have a chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:24660026

  11. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Robert A; Noordhoek, Roseanna

    2010-03-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon frequently encounters and manages difficult airways. Knowledge of and calm progression by practitioner and staff through different means to ventilate and manage a difficult airway are crucial. Practitioners should become comfortable with different types of alternative or rescue airways in order to intervene quickly in case of emergent or unanticipated airway compromise.

  12. Atomic resolution crystal structure of HV-BBI protease inhibitor from amphibian skin in complex with bovine trypsin.

    PubMed

    Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Debowski, Dawid; Legowska, Anna; Malicki, Stanislaw; Golik, Przemyslaw; Karna, Natalia; Rolka, Krzysztof; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Protease inhibitors of the Bowman-Birk (BBI) family are commonly found in plants and animals where they play a protective role against invading pathogens. Here, we report an atomic resolution (1Å) crystal structure of a peptide inhibitor isolated from a skin secretion of a Chinese bamboo odorous frog Huia versabilis (HV-BBI) in complex with trypsin. HV-BBI shares significant similarities in sequence with a previously described inhibitor from a diskless-fingered odorous frog Odorrana graham (ORB). However, the latter is characterized by more than a 16,000 fold higher Ki against trypsin than HV-BBI. Comparative analysis of trypsin cocrystal structures of HV-BBI and ORB and additionally that of Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor (SFTI-1) together with accessory information on the affinities of inhibitor variants allowed us to pinpoint the inhibitor moiety responsible for the observed large difference in activity and also to define the extent of modifications permissible within the common protease-binding loop scaffold of BBI inhibitors. We suggest that modifications outside of the inhibitory loop permit the evolution of specificity toward different enzymes characterized by trypsin-like specificity. PMID:25546528

  13. Crystal structure of the 3C protease from Southern African Territories type 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingjie; Leen, Eoin N; Maree, Francois F; Curry, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is dependent on the virus-encoded 3C protease (3C(pro)). As in other picornaviruses, 3C(pro) performs most of the proteolytic processing of the polyprotein expressed from the large open reading frame in the RNA genome of the virus. Previous work revealed that the 3C(pro) from serotype A-one of the seven serotypes of FMDV-adopts a trypsin-like fold. On the basis of capsid sequence comparisons the FMDV serotypes are grouped into two phylogenetic clusters, with O, A, C, and Asia 1 in one, and the three Southern African Territories serotypes, (SAT-1, SAT-2 and SAT-3) in another, a grouping pattern that is broadly, but not rigidly, reflected in 3C(pro) amino acid sequences. We report here the cloning, expression and purification of 3C proteases from four SAT serotype viruses (SAT2/GHA/8/91, SAT1/NIG/5/81, SAT1/UGA/1/97, and SAT2/ZIM/7/83) and the crystal structure at 3.2 Å resolution of 3C(pro) from SAT2/GHA/8/91. PMID:27168976

  14. Crystal structure of the 3C protease from Southern African Territories type 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingjie; Leen, Eoin N.; Maree, Francois F.

    2016-01-01

    The replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is dependent on the virus-encoded 3C protease (3Cpro). As in other picornaviruses, 3Cpro performs most of the proteolytic processing of the polyprotein expressed from the large open reading frame in the RNA genome of the virus. Previous work revealed that the 3Cpro from serotype A—one of the seven serotypes of FMDV—adopts a trypsin-like fold. On the basis of capsid sequence comparisons the FMDV serotypes are grouped into two phylogenetic clusters, with O, A, C, and Asia 1 in one, and the three Southern African Territories serotypes, (SAT-1, SAT-2 and SAT-3) in another, a grouping pattern that is broadly, but not rigidly, reflected in 3Cpro amino acid sequences. We report here the cloning, expression and purification of 3C proteases from four SAT serotype viruses (SAT2/GHA/8/91, SAT1/NIG/5/81, SAT1/UGA/1/97, and SAT2/ZIM/7/83) and the crystal structure at 3.2 Å resolution of 3Cpro from SAT2/GHA/8/91. PMID:27168976

  15. Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata seeds enhances the action of bradykinin-related peptides.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Morales Álvares, Alice; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Trindade, Neidiane Rosa; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Silva, Luciano Paulino; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2014-10-30

    The hydrolysis of bradykinin (Bk) by different classes of proteases in plasma and tissues leads to a decrease in its half-life. Here, Bk actions on smooth muscle and in vivo cardiovascular assays in association with a protease inhibitor, Black eyed-pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) and also under the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin were evaluated. Two synthetic Bk-related peptides, Bk1 and Bk2, were used to investigate the importance of additional C-terminal amino acid residues on serine protease activity. BTCI forms complexes with Bk and analogues at pH 5.0, 7.4 and 9.0, presenting binding constants ranging from 103 to 104 M-1. Formation of BTCI-Bk complexes is probably driven by hydrophobic forces, coupled with slight conformational changes in BTCI. In vitro assays using guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) ileum showed that Bk retains the ability to induce smooth muscle contraction in the presence of BTCI. Moreover, no alteration in the inhibitory activity of BTCI in complex with Bk and analogous was observed. When the BTCI and BTCI-Bk complexes were tested in vivo, a decrease of vascular resistance and consequent hypotension and potentiating renal and aortic vasodilatation induced by Bk and Bk2 infusions was observed. These results indicate that BTCI-Bk complexes may be a reliable strategy to act as a carrier and protective approach for Bk-related peptides against plasma serine proteases cleavage, leading to an increase in their half-life. These findings also indicate that BTCI could remain stable in some tissues to inhibit chymotrypsin or trypsin-like enzymes that cleave and inactivate bradykinin in situ.

  16. Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata seeds enhances the action of bradykinin-related peptides.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Morales Álvares, Alice; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Trindade, Neidiane Rosa; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Silva, Luciano Paulino; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The hydrolysis of bradykinin (Bk) by different classes of proteases in plasma and tissues leads to a decrease in its half-life. Here, Bk actions on smooth muscle and in vivo cardiovascular assays in association with a protease inhibitor, Black eyed-pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) and also under the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin were evaluated. Two synthetic Bk-related peptides, Bk1 and Bk2, were used to investigate the importance of additional C-terminal amino acid residues on serine protease activity. BTCI forms complexes with Bk and analogues at pH 5.0, 7.4 and 9.0, presenting binding constants ranging from 103 to 104 M-1. Formation of BTCI-Bk complexes is probably driven by hydrophobic forces, coupled with slight conformational changes in BTCI. In vitro assays using guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) ileum showed that Bk retains the ability to induce smooth muscle contraction in the presence of BTCI. Moreover, no alteration in the inhibitory activity of BTCI in complex with Bk and analogous was observed. When the BTCI and BTCI-Bk complexes were tested in vivo, a decrease of vascular resistance and consequent hypotension and potentiating renal and aortic vasodilatation induced by Bk and Bk2 infusions was observed. These results indicate that BTCI-Bk complexes may be a reliable strategy to act as a carrier and protective approach for Bk-related peptides against plasma serine proteases cleavage, leading to an increase in their half-life. These findings also indicate that BTCI could remain stable in some tissues to inhibit chymotrypsin or trypsin-like enzymes that cleave and inactivate bradykinin in situ. PMID:25361421

  17. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  18. The Diagnostic Potential of Salivary Protease Activities in Periodontal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomadaki, Konstantina; Bosch, Jos A.; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterised by proteolytic processes involving enzymes that are released by host immune cells and periodontal bacteria. These enzymes, when detectable in whole saliva, may serve as valuable diagnostic markers for disease states and progression. Because the substrate specificities of salivary proteases in periodontal health and disease are poorly characterised we probed these activities using several relevant substrates: 1) gelatin and collagen type IV; 2) the Arg/Lys–rich human salivary substrate histatin-5; and 3) a histatin-derived synthetic analog benzyloxycarbonyl-Arg-Gly-Tyr-Arg-methyl cumaryl amide (Z-RGYR-MCA). Substrate degradation was assessed in gel (zymography) and in solution. Whole saliva supernatant enzyme activities directed at gelatin, quantitated from the 42 kDa, 92 kDa and 130 kDa bands in the zymograms, were 1.3, 1.4 and 2.0 fold higher, respectively, in the periodontal patient group (p<0.01), consistent with enhanced activities observed towards collagen type IV. On the other hand, histatin 5 degraded equally fast in healthy and periodontal patients' whole saliva supernatant samples (p>0.10). Likewise, the hydrolysis rates of the Z-RGYR-MCA substrate were the same in the healthy and periodontal patient groups (p>0.10). In conclusion, gelatinolytic/collagenolytic activities but not trypsin-like activities in human saliva differentiate health from periodontal disease, and may thus provide an adjuvant to diagnosis for monitoring of disease activity. PMID:23379269

  19. Type I interferons induce lung protease responses following respiratory syncytial virus infection via RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Taggart, Clifford C.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Weldon, Sinéad; Cummins, Neville; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The role of proteases in viral infection of the lung is poorly understood. Thus, we examined MMP and cathepsin proteases in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infected mouse lungs. RSV induced gene expression for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, -12, -13, -14, -16, -17, -19, -20, -25, -27, -28 and cathepsins B, C, E, G, H, K, L1, S, W and Z in the airways of FVB/NJ mice. Increased proteases were present in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue during infection. Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (Mavs) and Trif deficient mice were exposed to RSV. Mavs deficient mice had significantly lower expression of airway MMP-2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, -12, -13 and -28 and cathepsins C, G, K, S, W and Z. In lung epithelial cells, retinoic acid–inducible gene-1 (RIG-I) was identified as the major RIG-I- like receptor (RLR) required for RSV induced protease expression via MAVS. Overexpression of RIG-I or treatment with IFN-β in these cells induced MMP and cathepsin gene and protein expression. The significance of RIG-1 protease induction was demonstrated by the fact that inhibiting proteases with batimastat, E64 or ribavirin prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and enhanced viral clearance in RSV infected mice. PMID:25005357

  20. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  1. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future.

  2. The Lon AAA+ protease.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    As the first ATP-dependent protease to be identified, Lon holds a special place in the history of cellular biology. In fact, the concept of ATP-dependent protein degradation was established through the findings that led to the discovery of Lon. Therefore, this chapter begins with a historical perspective, describing the milestones that led to the discovery of Lon and ATP-dependent proteolysis, starting from the early findings in the 1960s until the demonstration of Lon's ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in vitro, in 1981. Most of our knowledge on Lon derives from studies of the Escherichia coli Lon ortholog, and, therefore, most of this chapter relates to this particular enzyme. Nonetheless, Lon is not only found in most bacterial species, it is also found in Archaea and in the mitochondrion and chloroplast of eukaryotic cells. Therefore many of the conclusions gained from studies on the E. coli enzyme are relevant to Lon proteases in other organisms. Lon, more than any other bacterial or organellar protease, is associated with the degradation of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition, Lon also degrades many regulatory proteins that are natively folded, thus it also plays a prominent role in regulation of physiological processes. Throughout the years, many Lon substrates have been identified, confirming its role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including cell division, DNA replication, differentiation, and adaptation to stress conditions. Some examples of these functions are described and discussed here, as is the role of Lon in the degradation of misfolded proteins and in protein quality control. Finally, this chapter deals with the exquisite sensitivity of protein degradation inside a cell. How can a protease distinguish so many substrates from cellular proteins that should not be degraded? Can the specificity of a protease be regulated according to the physiological needs of a cell? This chapter thus broadly discusses the

  3. Indirect airway challenges.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; O'Connor, B; Anderson, S D; Chung, F; Cockcroft, D W; Dahlén, B; DiMaria, G; Foresi, A; Hargreave, F E; Holgate, S T; Inman, M; Lötvall, J; Magnussen, H; Polosa, R; Postma, D S; Riedler, J

    2003-06-01

    Indirect challenges act by causing the release of endogenous mediators that cause the airway smooth muscle to contract. This is in contrast to the direct challenges where agonists such as methacholine or histamine cause airflow limitation predominantly via a direct effect on airway smooth muscle. Direct airway challenges have been used widely and are well standardised. They are highly sensitive, but not specific to asthma and can be used to exclude current asthma in a clinic population. Indirect bronchial stimuli, in particular exercise, hyperventilation, hypertonic aerosols, as well as adenosine, may reflect more directly the ongoing airway inflammation and are therefore more specific to identify active asthma. They are increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and to assess specific problems in patients with known asthma, e.g. exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, evaluation before scuba diving. Direct bronchial responsiveness is only slowly and to a modest extent, influenced by repeated administration of inhaled steroids. Indirect challenges may reflect more closely acute changes in airway inflammation and a change in responsiveness to an indirect stimulus may be a clinically relevant marker to assess the clinical course of asthma. Moreover, some of the indirect challenges, e.g. hypertonic saline and mannitol, can be combined with the assessment of inflammatory cells by induction of sputum.

  4. Laundry performance of subtilisin proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A M; Showell, M S; Venegas, M G; Barnett, B L; Wertz, W C

    1996-01-01

    Effective laundry protease performance against susceptible stains depends upon both the enzyme itself and the environment in which it must work. In order to technically design superior laundry proteases, a model for protease's mechanism of action in detergents was developed which has been substantiated through-the-wash. While evaluation of this model and/or a given protease's effectiveness could be judged by a variety of methods, the utility of using visual wash performance comparisons, analytical, and stain characterization studies is described. Finally, data comparing the performance of wild type Subtilisin proteases with mutants designed via the projected model are given, demonstrating possible utility of the system.

  5. Glandular Proteome Identifies Antiprotease Cystatin C as a Critical Modulator of Airway Hydration and Clearance.

    PubMed

    Evans, T Idil Apak; Joo, Nam Soo; Keiser, Nicholas W; Yan, Ziying; Tyler, Scott R; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Yulong; Hsiao, Jordy J; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Wright, Michael E; Wine, Jeffrey J; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-04-01

    Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel lead to viscous secretions from submucosal glands that cannot be properly hydrated and cleared by beating cilia in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. The mechanisms by which CFTR, and the predominant epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), control the hydration and clearance of glandular secretions remain unclear. We used a proteomics approach to characterize the proteins contained in CF and non-CF submucosal gland fluid droplets and found that differentially regulated proteases (cathepsin S and H) and their antiprotease (cystatin C) influenced the equilibration of fluid on the airway surface and tracheal mucociliary clearance (MCC). Contrary to prevailing models of airway hydration and clearance, cystatin C, or raising the airway surface liquid (ASL) pH, inhibited cathepsin-dependent ENaC-mediated fluid absorption and raised the height of ASL, and yet decreased MCC velocity. Importantly, coupling of both CFTR and ENaC activities were required for effective MCC and for effective ASL height equilibration after volume challenge. Cystatin C-inhibitable cathepsins controlled initial phases of ENaC-mediated fluid absorption, whereas CFTR activity was required to prevent ASL dehydration. Interestingly, CF airway epithelia absorbed fluid more slowly owing to reduced cysteine protease activity in the ASL but became abnormally dehydrated with time. Our findings demonstrate that, after volume challenge, pH-dependent protease-mediated coupling of CFTR and ENaC activities are required for rapid fluid equilibration at the airway surface and for effective MCC. These findings provide new insights into how glandular fluid secretions may be equilibrated at the airway surface and how this process may be impaired in CF. PMID:26334941

  6. Airway statuses and nasopharyngeal airway use for airway obstruction in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Kouga, Takeshi; Tanoue, Koji; Matsui, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is associated with a high rate of respiratory difficulty, due mainly to midfacial hypoplasia. Nasopharyngeal airway establishment has been reported as the first-line approach to airway obstruction and may obviate the need for a highly invasive tracheotomy. No previous studies have compared airway obstruction status in syndromic craniosynostosis between cases requiring and not requiring airway managements. We focus on nasopharyngeal airway use and airway status outcomes to assess respiratory difficulty in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. A retrospective data analysis of 51 cases with syndromic craniosynostosis was carried out. We divided 30 of the 51 cases with lateral pharyngeal x-rays taken before operations affecting airway diameters into 2 groups, one with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and the other with one or both of these interventions, and the mean diameters for 8 indices related to the pharyngeal space were compared. Cases with respiratory difficulty due to nasopharyngeal stenosis and requiring airway managements comprised a significantly higher proportion of those with Pfeiffer syndrome than patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Comparative examination of lateral x-ray cephalometry between cases with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and cases with one or both revealed oropharyngeal diameters tended to be smaller in those with interventions. Cases requiring nasopharyngeal airway insertion were able to continue nasopharyngeal airway use for more than 1 year and a considerable number avoided tracheotomy. It may be worth considering an oropharyngeal-bypass nasopharyngeal airway before performing a tracheotomy. PMID:24820706

  7. Unleashing the therapeutic potential of human kallikrein-related serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Prassas, Ioannis; Eissa, Azza; Poda, Gennadiy; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-03-01

    Tissue kallikreins are a family of fifteen secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest protease gene cluster in the human genome. In the past decade, substantial progress has been made in characterizing the natural substrates, endogenous inhibitors and in vivo functions of kallikreins, and studies have delineated important pathophysiological roles for these proteases in a variety of tissues. Thus, kallikreins are now considered attractive targets for the development of novel therapeutics for airway, cardiovascular, tooth, brain, skin and neoplastic diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the physiological functions and pathological implications of kallikrein proteases, and highlight progress in the identification of kallikrein inhibitors, which together are bringing us closer to therapeutically targeting kallikreins in selected disease settings.

  8. The Role of Serine Proteases and Antiproteases in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Matthew S; Brockbank, Simon; Lowry, Philip; FitzGerald, S Peter; Taggart, Clifford; Weldon, Sinéad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is an inherited condition with an incidence rate of approximately 1 in 2500 new born babies. CF is characterized as chronic infection of the lung which leads to inflammation of the airway. Sputum from CF patients contains elevated levels of neutrophils and subsequently elevated levels of neutrophil serine proteases. In a healthy individual these proteases aid in the phagocytic process by degrading microbial peptides and are kept in homeostatic balance by cognate antiproteases. Due to the heavy neutrophil burden associated with CF the high concentration of neutrophil derived proteases overwhelms cognate antiproteases. The general effects of this protease/antiprotease imbalance are impaired mucus clearance, increased and self-perpetuating inflammation, and impaired immune responses and tissue. To restore this balance antiproteases have been suggested as potential therapeutics or therapeutic targets. As such a number of both endogenous and synthetic antiproteases have been trialed with mixed success as therapeutics for CF lung disease. PMID:26185359

  9. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  10. From proteases to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  11. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  12. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  13. Impact of oilseed rape expressing the insecticidal serine protease inhibitor, mustard trypsin inhibitor-2 on the beneficial predator Pterostichus madidus.

    PubMed

    Ferry, N; Jouanin, L; Ceci, L R; Mulligan, E A; Emami, K; Gatehouse, J A; Gatehouse, A M R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Insect-resistant transgenic plants have been suggested to have deleterious effects on beneficial predators feeding on crop pests, through transmission of the transgene product by the pest to the predator. To test this hypothesis, effects of oilseed rape expressing the serine protease inhibitor, mustard trypsin inhibitor -2 (MTI-2), on the predatory ground beetle Pterostichus madidus were investigated, using diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella as the intermediary pest species. As expected, oilseed rape expressing MTI-2 had a deleterious effect on the development and survival of the pest. However, incomplete pest mortality resulted in survivors being available to predators at the next trophic level, and inhibition studies confirmed the presence of biologically active transgene product in pest larvae. Characterization of proteolytic digestive enzymes of P. madidus demonstrated that adults utilize serine proteases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities; the former activity was completely inhibited by MTI-2 in vitro. When P. madidus consumed prey reared on MTI-2 expressing plants over the reproductive period in their life cycle, no significant effects upon survival were observed as a result of exposure to the inhibitor. However, there was a short-term significant inhibition of weight gain in female beetles fed unlimited prey containing MTI-2, with a concomitant reduction of prey consumption. Biochemical analyses showed that the inhibitory effects of MTI-2 delivered via prey on gut proteolysis in the carabid decreased with time of exposure, possibly resulting from up-regulation of inhibitor-insensitive proteases. Of ecological significance, consumption of MTI-2 dosed prey had no detrimental effects on reproductive fitness of adult P. madidus.

  14. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry.

  15. Protease signalling: the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Boris; Turk, Dus̆an; Turk, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Protease research has undergone a major expansion in the last decade, largely due to the extremely rapid development of new technologies, such as quantitative proteomics and in-vivo imaging, as well as an extensive use of in-vivo models. These have led to identification of physiological substrates and resulted in a paradigm shift from the concept of proteases as protein-degrading enzymes to proteases as key signalling molecules. However, we are still at the beginning of an understanding of protease signalling pathways. We have only identified a minor subset of true physiological substrates for a limited number of proteases, and their physiological regulation is still not well understood. Similarly, links with other signalling systems are not well established. Herein, we will highlight current challenges in protease research. PMID:22367392

  16. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Robert M Q; Stella, Nicholas A; Hunt, Kristin M; Brothers, Kimberly M; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2015-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens.

  17. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nicholas A.; Hunt, Kristin M.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens. PMID:25939509

  18. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Mediates Prolyl Endopeptidase Release from Airway Epithelia via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Szul, Tomasz; Bratcher, Preston E; Fraser, Kyle B; Kong, Michele; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Ingersoll, Sarah; Sztul, Elizabeth; Rangarajan, Sunil; Blalock, J Edwin; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are important regulators of pulmonary remodeling and airway inflammation. Recently, we have characterized the enzyme prolyl endopeptidase (PE), a serine peptidase, as a critical protease in the generation of the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) from collagen. However, PE has been characterized as a cytosolic enzyme, and the mechanism mediating PE release extracellularly remains unknown. We examined the role of exosomes derived from airway epithelia as a mechanism for PE release and the potential extracellular signals that regulate the release of these exosomes. We demonstrate a specific regulatory pathway of exosome release from airway epithelia and identify PE as novel exosome cargo. LPS stimulation of airway epithelial cells induces release of PE-containing exosomes, which is significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA depletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These differences were recapitulated upon intratracheal LPS administration in mice competent versus deficient for TLR4 signaling. Finally, sputum samples from subjects with cystic fibrosis colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate elevated exosome content and increased PE levels. This TLR4-based mechanism highlights the first report of nonstochastic release of exosomes in the lung and couples TLR4 activation with matrikine generation. The increased quantity of these proteolytic exosomes in the airways of subjects with chronic lung disease highlights a new mechanism of injury and inflammation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders.

  20. α-Ketobenzothiazole Serine Protease Inhibitors of Aberrant HGF/c-MET and MSP/RON Kinase Pathway Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenfu; Harris, Peter K W; Karmakar, Partha; Kim, Tommy; Owusu, Ben Y; Wildman, Scott A; Klampfer, Lidija; Janetka, James W

    2016-03-17

    Upregulation of the HGF and MSP growth-factor processing serine endopeptidases HGFA, matriptase and hepsin is correlated with increased metastasis in multiple tumor types driven by c-MET or RON kinase signaling. We rationally designed P1' α-ketobenzothiazole mechanism-based inhibitors of these proteases. Structure-activity studies are presented, which resulted in the identification of potent inhibitors with differential selectivity. The tetrapeptide inhibitors span the P1-P1' substrate cleavage site via a P1' amide linker off the benzothiazole, occupying the S3' pocket. Optimized inhibitors display sub-nanomolar enzyme inhibition against one, two, or all three of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin. Several compounds also have good selectivity against the related trypsin-like proteases, thrombin and Factor Xa. Finally, we show that inhibitors block the fibroblast (HGF)-mediated migration of invasive DU145 prostate cancer cells. In addition to prostate cancer, breast, colon, lung, pancreas, gliomas, and multiple myeloma tumors all depend on HGF and MSP for tumor survival and progression. Therefore, these unique inhibitors have potential as new therapeutics for a diverse set of tumor types. PMID:26889658

  1. Biochemical and molecular modeling analysis of the ability of two p-aminobenzamidine-based sorbents to selectively purify serine proteases (fibrinogenases) from snake venoms.

    PubMed

    De-Simone, S G; Correa-Netto, C; Antunes, O A C; De-Alencastro, R B; Silva, F P

    2005-08-01

    Snake venoms contain several trypsin-like enzymes with equivalent physicochemical characteristics and similar inhibition profiles. These are rather difficult to separate by classical purification procedures and therefore constitute a good model for affinity chromatography analysis. Some of these trypsin homologues present fibrinogenase activity, mimicking one or more features of the central mammalian coagulation enzyme, thrombin. It was previously demonstrated that a number of amidine derivatives are able to interact specifically with some of these serine proteases. To understand the enzyme-sorbent interactions we have investigated the ability of two commercially available benzamidine affinity matrices to purify thrombin-like serine proteases (TLSP) with similar biological properties from two snake venoms (Bothrops jararacussu and Lachesis muta rhombeata). Curiously, each sorbent retained a single but distinct TLSP from each venom with high yield. Molecular modeling analysis suggested that hydrophobic interactions within a specific region on the surface of these enzymes could be generated to explain this exquisite specificity. In addition, it was demonstrated that a specific tandem alignment of the two benzamidine sorbents enables the purification of three other enzymes from B. jararacussu venom. PMID:15994137

  2. Managing upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Innes, M H

    A complete respiratory obstruction can lead to death in 3 minutes. The first and constant duty of the nurse aider is to check that the person is breathing by looking, listening and feeling. Partial obstruction is no less serious than complete obstruction. The nurse aider, in any situation, should assess the problem and attempt to overcome the airway obstruction using the measures described. PMID:1490067

  3. Airway gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jane C; Alton, Eric W F W

    2005-01-01

    Given both the accessibility and the genetic basis of several pulmonary diseases, the lungs and airways initially seemed ideal candidates for gene therapy. Several routes of access are available, many of which have been refined and optimized for nongene drug delivery. Two respiratory diseases, cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency, are relatively common; the single gene responsible has been identified and current treatment strategies are not curative. This type of inherited disease was the obvious initial target for gene therapy, but it has become clear that nongenetic and acquired diseases, including cancer, may also be amenable to this approach. The majority of preclinical and clinical studies in the airway have involved viral vectors, although for diseases such as CF, likely to require repeated application, non-viral delivery systems have clear advantages. However, with both approaches a range of barriers to gene expression have been identified that are limiting success in the airway and alveolar region. This chapter reviews these issues, strategies aimed at overcoming them, and progress into clinical trials with non-viral vectors in a variety of pulmonary diseases.

  4. Causes of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway.

  5. Two variants of the major serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; González, Lidice; Mansur, Manuel; Machado, Yoan; Redecke, Lars; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-07-01

    The major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (ShPI-1) is a non-specific inhibitor that binds trypsin and other trypsin-like enzymes, as well as chymotrypsin, and human neutrophil elastase. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of ShPI-1 to produce two variants (rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S) that were expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and characterized. After a single purification step, 65 mg and 15 mg of protein per liter of culture supernatant were obtained for rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S, respectively. Functional studies demonstrated a 100-fold decreased trypsin inhibitory activity as result of the K13L substitution at the reactive (P1) site. This protein variant has a novel tight-binding inhibitor activity of pancreatic elastase and increased activity toward neutrophil elastase in comparison to rShPI-1A. In contrast, the substitution Y15S at P2' site did not affect the Ki value against trypsin, but did reduce activity 10-fold against chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase. Our results provide two new ShPI-1 variants with modified inhibitory activities, one of them with increased biomedical potential. This study also offers new insight into the functional impact of the P1 and P2' sites on ShPI-1 specificity. PMID:26993255

  6. Nafamostat mesilate, a broad spectrum protease inhibitor, modulates platelet, neutrophil and contact activation in simulated extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, S; Gikakis, N; Hack, C E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Koneti Rao, A; Sun, L; Cooper, S L; Colman, R W

    1996-01-01

    Activation of humoral and cellular participants in inflammation enhances the risk of postoperative bleeding and multiple organ damage in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We now compare the effects of heparin alone in combination with nafamostat mesilate (NM), a protease inhibitor with specificity of trypsin-like enzymes, in an extracorporeal circuit which simulates CPB. NM significantly inhibits the release of platelet beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) at 60 and 120 min. Platelet counts do not differ. ADP-induced aggregation decreases in circuits with NM, which is due to a direct effect of NM on platelet function. NM prevents any significant release of neutrophil elastase; at 120 min, plasma elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complex is 0.16 micrograms/ml in the NM group and 1.24 micrograms/ml in the control group. NM completely inhibits formation of complexes of C1 inhibitor with kallikrein and FXIIa. NM does not alter markers of complement activation (C1-C1-inhibitor complex and C5b-9), or indicators of thrombin formation (F1.2). However, at 120 min, thrombin activity as measured by release of fibrinopeptide A is significantly decreased. The data indicate that complement activation during CPB correlates poorly with neutrophil activation and that either kallikrein or FXIIa or both may be more important agonists. The ability of NM to inhibit two important contact system proteins and platelet and neutrophil release raises the possibility of suppressing the inflammatory response during clinical CPB.

  7. A sequence-specific protease cleaves a maternal, cortical protein during early embryogenesis in Sciara coprophila (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ruder, F J; Fischer, R; Büsen, W

    1990-08-01

    One of the first events of egg activation in Sciara coprophila (Diptera) is the disappearance of an abundant maternal 38-kDa protein (p38) and the simultaneous emergence of an abundant 35-kDa protein (p35). Western blotting experiments using monoclonal antibodies directed against p38 reveal that p38 and p35 are serologically related and indicate that maternal p38 is transformed into p35 during early development. This transition is possibly accompanied by a conformational change in the part of the protein that is common to both protein species. The processing of p38 to p35 can be mimicked by trypsin treatment in vitro, suggesting that a trypsin-like protease is responsible for this conversion in vivo. Immunostaining indicates that the p38 class of antigens is evenly distributed in the periplasm of early cleavage embryos. After the arrival of nuclei in the periplasm, the antigens become associated with the infolding cellular membranes. A similar membrane association of actin can be observed with anti-actin antibodies. Nevertheless, p38 and actin are clearly distinct from each other. We presume that p38 is a product of a maternal effect gene necessary for early dipteran development.

  8. Protease degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fiber populations support selective fiber degradation based on individual fiber degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications. PMID:25799370

  9. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease.

  10. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  11. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Heires, Art J.; Nordgren, Tara M.; Souder, Chelsea P.; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A.; Toews, Myron L.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  12. Alternaria-derived serine protease activity drives IL-33–mediated asthma exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Snelgrove, Robert J.; Gregory, Lisa G.; Peiró, Teresa; Akthar, Samia; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The fungal allergen Alternaria alternata is implicated in severe asthma and rapid onset life-threatening exacerbations of disease. However, the mechanisms that underlie this severe pathogenicity remain unclear. Objective We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby Alternaria was capable of initiating severe, rapid onset allergic inflammation. Methods IL-33 levels were quantified in wild-type and ST2−/− mice that lacked the IL-33 receptor given inhaled house dust mite, cat dander, or Alternaria, and the effect of inhibiting allergen-specific protease activities on IL-33 levels was assessed. An exacerbation model of allergic airway disease was established whereby mice were sensitized with house dust mite before subsequently being challenged with Alternaria (with or without serine protease activity), and inflammation, remodeling, and lung function assessed 24 hours later. Results Alternaria, but not other common aeroallergens, possessed intrinsic serine protease activity that elicited the rapid release of IL-33 into the airways of mice through a mechanism that was dependent upon the activation of protease activated receptor-2 and adenosine triphosphate signaling. The unique capacity of Alternaria to drive this early IL-33 release resulted in a greater pulmonary inflammation by 24 hours after challenge relative to the common aeroallergen house dust mite. Furthermore, this Alternaria serine protease–IL-33 axis triggered a rapid, augmented inflammation, mucus release, and loss of lung function in our exacerbation model. Conclusion Alternaria-specific serine protease activity causes rapid IL-33 release, which underlies the development of a robust TH2 inflammation and exacerbation of allergic airway disease. PMID:24636086

  13. Human prostate-specific antigen: structural and functional similarity with serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Watt, K W; Lee, P J; M'Timkulu, T; Chan, W P; Loor, R

    1986-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the prostate-specific antigen (PA) from human seminal plasma has been determined from analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, hydroxylamine, endoproteinases Arg-C and Lys-C. The single polypeptide chain of PA contains 240-amino acid residues and has a calculated Mr of 26,496. An N-linked carbohydrate side chain is predicted at asparagine-45, and O-linked carbohydrate side chains are possibly attached to serine-69, threonine-70, and serine-71. The primary structure of PA shows a high degree of sequence homology with other serine proteases of the kallikrein family. The active site residues of histidine, aspartic acid, and serine comprising the charge-relay system of typical serine proteases were found in similar positions in PA (histidine-41, aspartic acid-96, and serine-192). At pH 7.8, PA hydrolyzed insulin A and B chains, recombinant interleukin 2, and--to a lesser extent--gelatin, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and fibrinogen. The cleavage sites of these proteins by PA were chemically analyzed as the alpha-carboxyl side of some hydrophobic residues, tyrosine, leucine, valine, and phenylalanine, and of basic residues histidine, lysine, and arginine. The chymotrypsin-like activity of PA exhibited with the chromogenic substrate N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide yielded a specific activity of 9.21 microM per min per mg of PA and Km and kcat values of 15.3 mM and 0.075s-1, respectively. "Trypsin-like" activity of PA was also detected with N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide and gave a specific activity of 1.98 microM per min per mg of PA. Protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, aprotinin, leupeptin, soybean trypsin inhibitor as well as Zn2+ and spermidine were effective inhibitors of PA enzymatic activity.

  14. Subcutaneous Allergic Sensitization to Protease Allergen Is Dependent on Mast Cells but Not IL-33: Distinct Mechanisms between Subcutaneous and Intranasal Routes.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Shimura, Sakiko; Ochi, Hirono; Maruyama, Natsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Protease activity of papain, a plant-derived occupational allergen homologous to mite major allergens, is essential to IgE/IgG1 production and lung eosinophilia induced by intranasal papain administration in mice, and IL-33 contributes to these responses. In this work, we investigate skin and Ab responses induced by s.c. papain administration into ear lobes and responses induced by subsequent airway challenge with papain. Subcutaneous papain injection induced swelling associated with increased epidermal thickness, dermal inflammation, serum IgE/IgG1 responses, and Th2 cytokine production in draining lymph node cells restimulated in vitro. These responses were markedly less upon s.c. administration of protease inhibitor-treated papain. Results obtained by using mast cell-deficient mice and reconstitution of tissue mast cells suggested the contribution of mast cells to papain-specific IgE/IgG1 responses and eosinophil infiltration. The responses were equivalent between wild-type and IL-33(-/-) mice. After the subsequent airway challenge, the s.c. presensitized wild-type mice showed more severe lung eosinophilia than those without the presensitization. The presensitized IL-33(-/-) mice showed modest lung eosinophilia, which was absent without the presensitization, but its severity and IgE boost by the airway challenge were markedly less than the presensitized wild-type mice, in which protease activity of inhaled papain contributed to the responses. The results suggest that mechanisms for the protease-dependent sensitization differ between skin and airway and that cooperation of mast cell-dependent, IL-33-independent initial sensitization via skin and protease-induced, IL-33-mediated mechanism in re-exposure via airway to protease allergens maximizes the magnitude of the transition from skin inflammation to asthma in natural history of progression of allergic diseases. PMID:27001956

  15. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a clip-domain serine protease from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Jiang, Shigui; Ma, Jianjun; Jiang, Jingjing; Pan, Dequan; Xu, Xinping

    2009-04-01

    The clip-domain serine proteases (SPs) are the essential components of extracellular signaling cascade in various biological processes, especially in embryonic development and the innate immune responses of invertebrate. Herein, we described the isolation and characterization of pearl oyster Pinctada fucata clip-domain SP gene (designated as poSP). The poSP cDNA was 1080 bp long and consisted of a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 13 bp, a 3'-UTR of 68 bp with a polyadenylation signal (AATAAA) at 22 nucleotides upstream of the poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 999 bp encoding a polypeptide of 332 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 36.5 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 7.3. A clip-domain and a trypsin-like serine protease domain were identified in the poSP using SMART analysis. Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the poSP with other known SP sequences by MatGAT software revealed that the poSP shared 47.0-68.4% similarity to the other known SP sequences. The poSP mRNA was expressed in haemocytes, gonad, digestive gland and mantle, but not expressed in adductor muscle and gill. The poSP mRNA was up-regulated and increased nearly double-fold after LPS or Vibrio alginolyticus stimulation, respectively. These results suggested that the poSP was an inducible acute-phase protein that perhaps involved in the innate immune response of pearl oyster.

  16. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  17. The mechanics of airway closure.

    PubMed

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2008-11-30

    We describe how surface-tension-driven instabilities of the lung's liquid lining may lead to pulmonary airway closure via the formation of liquid bridges that occlude the airway lumen. Using simple theoretical models, we demonstrate that this process may occur via a purely fluid-mechanical "film collapse" or through a coupled, fluid-elastic "compliant collapse" mechanism. Both mechanisms can lead to airway closure in times comparable with the breathing cycle, suggesting that surface tension is the primary mechanical effect responsible for the closure observed in peripheral regions of the human lungs. We conclude by discussing the influence of additional effects not included in the simple models, such as gravity, the presence of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory flow and wall motion, the airways' geometry, and the mechanical structure of the airway walls. PMID:18595784

  18. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  19. Readily adaptable release kinetics of prodrugs using protease-dependent reversible PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Roland; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-05-28

    Protein and peptide therapeutics with good in vitro activities often fail due to poor bioavailability, circulation lifetime, and immunogenicity. PEGylation, i.e. conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), significantly improves serum stability and renal clearance besides reducing the immunogenicity and thus enhances pharmacokinetics and tolerance in vivo. Several PEGylated drugs are marketed including several top-selling blockbusters. However, PEGylation can mask the binding site, especially in peptides, and thereby reduce the activity drastically, which is only rarely compensated by the improved bioavailability. Prodrug strategies using temporary PEGylation, i.e. the authentic drug is released from a PEG-linked precursor by hydrolysis or enzymatic degradation, can overcome these weaknesses. Recently, we reported a strategy coupling PEG via a peptide linker cleaved C-terminally by trypsin-like proteases in blood to release the unmasked therapeutic peptide. Here, we designed twelve short peptide linkers (four or five residues) to tune the release-rates of oncocin Onc112, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide. In 25% aqueous mouse serum, Onc112 was released with half-life times from 0.5 to 12h. When elongated N-terminally with 5kDa ɑ-methoxy-ω-mercapto PEG as thioether, the half-life times of the prodrugs ranged from 7 to 42h in full mouse serum. Conjugation of a 20kDa instead of the 5kDa PEG increased the half-life times more than twofold, whereas longer peptide linkers up to twelve residues increased them only slightly. In all cases, Onc112 was released continuously providing stable peptide levels for at least 16h. The kinetics will allow the specific design of PEG-linker-drug-combinations for optimizing the pharmacokinetics of promising peptide therapeutics.

  20. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  1. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  2. Ambroxol suppresses influenza-virus proliferation in the mouse airway by increasing antiviral factor levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Yao, D F; Ohuchi, M; Ide, M; Yano, M; Okumura, Y; Kido, H

    2002-05-01

    The protective effect of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent which has antioxidant properties and stimulates the release of pulmonary surfactant, against influenza-virus proliferation in the airway was investigated in mice. Ambroxol or the vehicle was administered intraperitoneally twice a day for 5-7 days to mice shortly after intranasal infection with a lethal dose of influenza A/Aichi/68 (H3N2) virus, and the survival rate, virus titre and levels of factors regulating virus proliferation in the airway fluid were analysed. Ambroxol significantly suppressed virus multiplication and improved the survival rate of mice. The effect of ambroxol reached a peak at 10 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), higher doses being less effective. Ambroxol stimulated the release of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication, such as pulmonary surfactant, mucus protease inhibitor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-A and IgG, although it stimulated the release of a trypsin-type protease that potentiates virus proliferation. In addition, ambroxol transiently suppressed release of the cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-12, into airway fluid. Although ambroxol had several negative effects on the host defence system, overall it strikingly increased the concentrations of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication in the airway.

  3. Comparative genomics of mycobacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Guimarães, Michelle Lopes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2007-01-01

    Although proteases are recognized as important virulent factors in pathogenic microorganisms, little information is available so far regarding the potential role of these enzymes in diseases caused by mycobacteria. Here we use bioinformatic tools to compare the protease-coding genes present in the genome of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis. This analysis allowed a review of the nomenclature of the protease family present in mycobacteria. A special attention was devoted to the 'decaying genome' of M. leprae where a relatively high level of conservation of protease-coding genes was observed when compared to other genes families. A total of 39 genes out of the 49 found in M. bovis were identified in M. leprae. Of relevance, a core of well-conserved 38 protease genes shared by the four species was defined. This set of proteases is probably essential for survival in the host and disease outcome and may constitute novel targets for drug development leading to a more effective control of mycobacterial diseases.

  4. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  5. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  6. The Proteolytic Activation of (H3N2) Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Is Facilitated by Different Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Nora; Bergmann, Silke; Kösterke, Nadine; Lambertz, Ruth L. O.; Keppner, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Weiß, Siegfried; Hummler, Edith; Hatesuer, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleavage of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) by host cell proteases is necessary for viral activation and infectivity. In humans and mice, members of the type II transmembrane protease family (TTSP), e.g., TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and TMPRSS11d (HAT), have been shown to cleave influenza virus HA for viral activation and infectivity in vitro. Recently, we reported that inactivation of a single HA-activating protease gene, Tmprss2, in knockout mice inhibits the spread of H1N1 influenza viruses. However, after infection of Tmprss2 knockout mice with an H3N2 influenza virus, only a slight increase in survival was observed, and mice still lost body weight. In this study, we investigated an additional trypsin-like protease, TMPRSS4. Both TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 are expressed in the same cell types of the mouse lung. Deletion of Tmprss4 alone in knockout mice does not protect them from body weight loss and death upon infection with H3N2 influenza virus. In contrast, Tmprss2−/− Tmprss4−/− double-knockout mice showed a remarkably reduced virus spread and lung pathology, in addition to reduced body weight loss and mortality. Thus, our results identified TMPRSS4 as a second host cell protease that, in addition to TMPRSS2, is able to activate the HA of H3N2 influenza virus in vivo. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and recurring pandemics are responsible for significant global morbidity and mortality. Due to high variability of the virus genome, resistance to available antiviral drugs is frequently observed, and new targets for treatment of influenza are needed. Host cell factors essential for processing of the virus hemagglutinin represent very suitable drug targets because the virus is dependent on these host factors for replication. We reported previously that Tmprss2-deficient mice are protected against H1N1 virus infections, but only marginal protection against H3N2 virus infections was observed. Here we show that deletion of two host protease genes, Tmprss2 and

  7. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  8. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  9. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  10. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  11. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  12. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  13. Subfamily-Specific Fluorescent Probes for Cysteine Proteases Display Dynamic Protease Activities during Seed Germination1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haibin; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Wang, Zheming; Shindo, Takayuki; Bogyo, Matthew; Kaiser, Markus; van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are an important class of enzymes implicated in both developmental and defense-related programmed cell death and other biological processes in plants. Because there are dozens of cysteine proteases that are posttranslationally regulated by processing, environmental conditions, and inhibitors, new methodologies are required to study these pivotal enzymes individually. Here, we introduce fluorescence activity-based probes that specifically target three distinct cysteine protease subfamilies: aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes. We applied protease activity profiling with these new probes on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protease knockout lines and agroinfiltrated leaves to identify the probe targets and on other plant species to demonstrate their broad applicability. These probes revealed that most commercially available protease inhibitors target unexpected proteases in plants. When applied on germinating seeds, these probes reveal dynamic activities of aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes, coinciding with the remobilization of seed storage proteins. PMID:26048883

  14. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  15. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction.

  16. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  17. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  18. Colonization of CF patients' upper airways with S. aureus contributes more decisively to upper airway inflammation than P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Janhsen, Wibke Katharina; Arnold, Christin; Hentschel, Julia; Lehmann, Thomas; Pfister, Wolfgang; Baier, Michael; Böer, Klas; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Mainz, Jochen Georg

    2016-10-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients' airways, inflammatory processes decisively contribute to remodeling and pulmonary destruction. The aims of this study were to compare upper airway (UAW) inflammation in the context of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in a longitudinal setting, and to examine further factors influencing UAW inflammation. Therefore, we analyzed soluble inflammatory mediators in noninvasively obtained nasal lavage (NL) of CF patients together with microbiology, medication, and relevant clinical parameters. NL, applying 10 mL of isotonic saline per nostril, was serially performed in 74 CF patients (326 samples). Concentrations of the inflammatory mediators' interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and its anti-protease TIMP-1 were quantified by bead-based multiplexed assay, neutrophil elastase (NE) via ELISA. Culture-based microbiology of the upper and lower airways (LAW), as well as serological and clinical findings, were compiled. Our results indicate that UAW colonization with S. aureus significantly impacts the concentration of all measured inflammatory mediators in NL fluid except TIMP-1, whereas these effects were not significant for P. aeruginosa. Patients with S. aureus colonization of both the UAW and LAW showed significantly increased concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP-9, and slightly elevated concentrations of NE in NL fluid compared to non-colonized patients. This work elaborates a survey on S. aureus' virulence factors that may contribute to this underestimated pathology. Serial assessment of epithelial lining fluid by NL reveals that colonization of the UAW with S. aureus contributes more to CF airway inflammatory processes than hitherto expected. PMID:27377929

  19. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  20. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  1. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  2. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  3. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  4. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  5. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  6. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Pörn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  7. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes. PMID:24499119

  8. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor is a preferred in vitro substrate for human hepsin, a membrane-anchored serine protease implicated in prostate and ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Sylvia; Piper, Derek E.; Aaron, Wade; Gabriele, Timothy; Cutler, Gene; Cao, Ping; Bhatt, Ami S.; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles S.; Walker, Nigel; Meininger, David; Hoey, Timothy; Austin, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Hepsin is a membrane-anchored, trypsin-like serine protease with prominent expression in the human liver and tumours of the prostate and ovaries. To better understand the biological functions of hepsin, we identified macromolecular substrates employing a tetrapeptide PS-SCL (positional scanning-synthetic combinatorial library) screen that rapidly determines the P1–P4 substrate specificity. Hepsin exhibited strong preference at the P1 position for arginine over lysine, and favoured threonine, leucine or asparagine at the P2, glutamine or lysine at the P3, and proline or lysine at the P4 position. The relative activity of hepsin toward individual AMC (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin)-tetrapeptides was generally consistent with the overall peptide profiling results derived from the PC-SCL screen. The most active tetrapeptide substrate Ac (acetyl)-KQLR-AMC matched with the activation cleavage site of the hepatocyte growth factor precursor sc-HGF (single-chain HGF), KQLR↓VVNG (where ↓ denotes the cleavage site), as identified by a database analysis of trypsin-like precursors. X-ray crystallographic studies with KQLR chloromethylketone showed that the KQLR peptide fits well into the substrate-binding cleft of hepsin. This hepsin-processed HGF induced c-Met receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells, indicating that the hepsin-cleaved HGF is biologically active. Activation cleavage site mutants of sc-HGF with predicted non-preferred sequences, DPGR↓VVNG or KQLQ↓VVNG, were not processed, illustrating that the P4–P1 residues can be important determinants for substrate specificity. In addition to finding macromolecular hepsin substrates, the extracellular inhibitors of the HGF activator, HAI-1 and HAI-2, were potent inhibitors of hepsin activity (IC50 4±0.2 nM and 12±0.5 nM respectively). Together, our findings suggest that the HGF precursor is a potential in vivo substrate for hepsin in tumours, where hepsin expression is dysregulated and may

  10. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8 −/− versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and

  11. Postnatal Exposure History and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Miller, Lisa A.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O3) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O3 exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O3 biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5–8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O3, HDMA, and HDMA+O3) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O3. However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O3–exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O3 exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  12. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  13. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  14. Protease-activated receptor-2-mediated inhibition of ion transport in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Danahay, H; Withey, L; Poll, C T; van de Graaf, S F; Bridges, R J

    2001-06-01

    A cytoprotective role for protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) has been suggested in a number of systems including the airway, and to this end, we have studied the role that PARs play in the regulation of airway ion transport, using cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. PAR2 activators, added to the basolateral membrane, caused a transient, Ca2+-dependent increase in short-circuit current (I(sc)), followed by a sustained inhibition of amiloride-sensitive I(sc). These phases corresponded with a transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and then a transient increase, followed by decrease, in basolateral K+ permeability. After PAR2 activation and the addition of amiloride, the forskolin-stimulated increase in I(sc) was also attenuated. By contrast, PAR2 activators added to the apical surface of the epithelia or PAR1 activators added to both the apical and basolateral surfaces were without effect. PAR2 may, therefore, play a role in the airway, regulating Na+ absorption and anion secretion, processes that are central to the control of airway surface liquid volume and composition.

  15. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management.

  16. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact.

  19. Lung function and airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    Two studies report genome-wide association studies for lung function, using cross-sectional spirometric measurements in healthy individuals. They identify six genetic loci newly associated to natural variation in lung function, which may have implications for the related airway diseases of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:20037613

  20. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  1. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D E; Wiener-Kronish, J P

    1991-09-01

    For clinicians involved in airway management, a plan of action for dealing with the difficult airway or a failed intubation should be developed well in advance of encountering a patient in whom intubation is not routine. When difficulty is anticipated, the equipment necessary for performing a difficult intubation should be immediately available. It also is prudent to have a surgeon skilled in performing a tracheotomy and a criothyroidotomy stand by. The intubation should be attempted in the awake state, preferably using the fiberoptic bronchoscope. The more challenging situation is when the difficult airway is confronted unexpectedly. After the first failed attempt at laryngoscopy, head position should be checked and the patient ventilated with oxygen by mask. A smaller styletted tube and possibly a different laryngoscope blade should be selected for a second attempt at intubation. The fiberoptic bronchoscope and other equipment for difficult intubation should be obtained. A second attempt should then be made. If this is unsuccessful, the patient should be reoxygenated, and assistance including a skilled anesthesiologist and surgeon should be summoned. On a third attempt, traction to the tongue can be applied by an assistant, a tube changer could be used to enter the larynx, or one of the other special techniques previously described can be used. If this third attempt fails, it may be helpful to have a physician more experienced in airway management attempt intubation after oxygen has been administered to the patient. If all attempts are unsuccessful, then invasive techniques to secure the airway will have to be performed. PMID:1934950

  2. [Supraglottic airways in infants and children].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kai

    2013-04-01

    The development of the LMA-Classic™ revolutionized anaesthesia practice as its wide-spread use led to the establishment of a unique form of airway management, the "supraglottic airway management", besides the existing classical airway management with the face mask or endotracheal tube. Today, 25 years later, along with the original prototype of supraglottic airways quite a few numbers of different devices exist that can be used to secure the airway "above the glottis". After initially primarily marketing adult sizes many suppliers offer paediatric sizes nowadays. However, the scientific evidence in terms of superiority or at a least equality to the original LMA-Classic( of any of these airway devices must be considered insufficient except for the LMA-ProSeal™. Consequently, the routine use of these devices outside controlled clinical studies must be considered questionable. The following article aims at providing a critical appraisal of currently available supraglottic airway devices for neonates and infants. PMID:23633256

  3. Laryngeal mask airway: uses in anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Pinosky, M

    1996-06-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA), developed in 1983, is a new device to assist in the management of the pediatric and adult airway. In 1991, the Food and Drug Administration gave its approval for use of the LMA in the United States. The LMA is reusable and appears to provide cost-effective airway management in numerous situations. The LMA is simple to use, atraumatic to insert, and helpful in overcoming an obstructed airway. Its role in management of the difficult airway and the traumatic airway is still evolving. This review will introduce the LMA to the nonanesthesiologist and review for the anesthesiologist the origins of the LMA, its physical structure, the technical aspects of insertion, problems with aspiration, its role in the difficult airway, and experience with the pediatric population.

  4. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  5. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents.

  6. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  7. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  8. Crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Ramona E; Löwe, Jan

    2010-08-27

    Lon ATP-dependent proteases are key components of the protein quality control systems of bacterial cells and eukaryotic organelles. Eubacterial Lon proteases contain an N-terminal domain, an ATPase domain, and a protease domain, all in one polypeptide chain. The N-terminal domain is thought to be involved in substrate recognition, the ATPase domain in substrate unfolding and translocation into the protease chamber, and the protease domain in the hydrolysis of polypeptides into small peptide fragments. Like other AAA+ ATPases and self-compartmentalising proteases, Lon functions as an oligomeric complex, although the subunit stoichiometry is currently unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of truncated versions of Lon protease from Bacillus subtilis (BsLon), which reveal previously unknown architectural features of Lon complexes. Our analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy show different oligomerisation of Lon proteases from two different bacterial species, Aquifex aeolicus and B. subtilis. The structure of BsLon-AP shows a hexameric complex consisting of a small part of the N-terminal domain, the ATPase, and protease domains. The structure shows the approximate arrangement of the three functional domains of Lon. It also reveals a resemblance between the architecture of Lon proteases and the bacterial proteasome-like protease HslUV. Our second structure, BsLon-N, represents the first 209 amino acids of the N-terminal domain of BsLon and consists of a globular domain, similar in structure to the E. coli Lon N-terminal domain, and an additional four-helix bundle, which is part of a predicted coiled-coil region. An unexpected dimeric interaction between BsLon-N monomers reveals the possibility that Lon complexes may be stabilised by coiled-coil interactions between neighbouring N-terminal domains. Together, BsLon-N and BsLon-AP are 36 amino acids short of offering a complete picture of a full-length Lon protease.

  9. Biased Signaling of Protease-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Metcalf, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain, and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an emerging therapeutic target for major diseases. Most information about PAR activation and function derives from studies of a few proteases, for example thrombin in the case of PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4, and trypsin in the case of PAR2 and PAR4. These proteases cleave PARs at established sites with the extracellular N-terminal domains, and expose tethered ligands that stabilize conformations of the cleaved receptors that activate the canonical pathways of G protein- and/or β-arrestin-dependent signaling. However, a growing number of proteases have been identified that cleave PARs at divergent sites to activate distinct patterns of receptor signaling and trafficking. The capacity of these proteases to trigger distinct signaling pathways is referred to as biased signaling, and can lead to unique patho-physiological outcomes. Given that a different repertoire of proteases are activated in various patho-physiological conditions that may activate PARs by different mechanisms, signaling bias may account for the divergent actions of proteases and PARs. Moreover, therapies that target disease-relevant biased signaling pathways may be more effective and selective approaches for the treatment of protease- and PAR-driven diseases. Thus, rather than mediating the actions of a few proteases, PARs may integrate the biological actions of a wide spectrum of proteases in different patho-physiological conditions. PMID:24860547

  10. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  11. UPPER AIRWAY BLOCKS FOR AWAKE DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Pintaric, Tatjana Stopar

    2016-03-01

    Airway anesthesia is pivotal for successful awake intubation provided either topically or by blocks. Airway blocks are considered technically more difficult to perform and carry a higher risk of complications. However, in experienced hands, they can be useful as they provide excellent intubating conditions. For complete upper airway anesthesia, bilateral glossopharyngeal and superior laryngeal nerve blocks with translaryngeal injection are required. Superior laryngeal nerve block and translaryngeal injection can be performed easily, safely and with a high success rate in patients with normal anatomy. In those with difficult landmarks, ultrasound can be of assistance. For the superior laryngeal nerve block, other targets than the nerve itself must be established to make the technique consistently successful, easy to teach, learn and perform. The same applies to the translaryngeal injection, where the use of ultrasound is necessary for correct midline identification. Intraoral glossopharyngeal nerve block is also safe and easy to perform, but associated with long lasting discomfort. Bilateral extraoral peristyloid approach should be discouraged since inadvertent blocks of the closely adjacent vagus nerve cannot be prevented in this location. A safe and easy method of blocking the distal portions of the glossopharyngeal nerve for awake intubation is therefore required. PMID:27276778

  12. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  13. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  14. Obesity and upper airway control during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Susheel P.; Squier, Samuel; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P.; Smith, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms linking obesity with upper airway dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea are reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is due to alterations in upper airway anatomy and neuromuscular control. Upper airway structural alterations in obesity are related to adipose deposition around the pharynx, which can increase its collapsibility or critical pressure (Pcrit). In addition, obesity and, particularly, central adiposity lead to reductions in resting lung volume, resulting in loss of caudal traction on upper airway structures and parallel increases in pharyngeal collapsibility. Metabolic and humoral factors that promote central adiposity may contribute to these alterations in upper airway mechanical function and increase sleep apnea susceptibility. In contrast, neural responses to upper airway obstruction can mitigate these mechanical loads and restore pharyngeal patency during sleep. Current evidence suggests that these responses can improve with weight loss. Improvements in these neural responses with weight loss may be related to a decline in systemic and local pharyngeal concentrations of specific inflammatory mediators with somnogenic effects. PMID:19875707

  15. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  16. Airway obstruction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Alexandra K; Mosquera, Ricardo; Colasurdo, Giuseppe N; Jon, Cindy K; Clements, Roya M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is the failure of the autonomic system to control adequate ventilation while asleep with preserved ventilatory response while awake. We report a case of a patient with CCHS who presented with intrathoracic and extrathoracic airway obstruction after tracheostomy tube decannulation and phrenic nerve pacer placement. Nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) revealed hypoxia, hypercapnia and obstructive sleep apnoea, which required bilevel positive airway pressure titration. Airway endoscopy demonstrated tracheomalacia and paretic true vocal cords in the paramedian position during diaphragmatic pacing. Laryngeal electromyography demonstrated muscular electrical impulses that correlated with diaphragmatic pacer settings. Thus, we surmise that the patient's upper and lower airway obstruction was secondary to diaphragmatic pacer activity. Thorough airway evaluation, including NPSG and endoscopy, may help identify the side effects of diaphragmatic pacing, such as airway obstruction, in patients with CCHS.

  17. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  18. AIRWAY VISUALIZATION: EYES SEE WHAT MIND KNOWS.

    PubMed

    Sorbello, Massimiliano; Frova, Giulio; Zdravković, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Airway management is basic for anesthesia practice, and sometimes it can represent a really dramatic scenario for both the patient and the physicians. Laryngoscopy has been the gold standard of airway visualization for more than 60 years, showing its limitations and failure rates with time. New technology has made available an opportunity to move the physician's eye inside patient airways thanks to video laryngoscopy and video assisted airway management technique. Undoubtedly, we have entered a new era of high resolution airway visualization and different approach in airway instrumentation. Nevertheless, each new technology needs time to be tested and considered reliable, and pitfalls and limitations may come out with careful and long lasting analysis, so it is probably not the right time yet to promote video assisted approach as a new gold standard for airway visualization, despite the fact that it certainly offers some new prospects. In any case, whatever the visualization approach, no patient dies because of missed airway visualization or failed intubation, but due to failed ventilation, which remains without doubt the gold standard of any patient safety goal and airway management technique.

  19. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  20. Sequential Stenting for Extensive Malignant Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Tei, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant airway stenosis extending from the bronchial bifurcation to the lower lobar orifice was treated with airway stenting. We herein examine the effectiveness of airway stenting for extensive malignant airway stenosis. Methods: Twelve patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis underwent placement of a silicone Dumon Y stent (Novatech, La Ciotat, France) at the tracheal bifurcation and a metallic Spiral Z-stent (Medico’s Hirata, Osaka, Japan) at either distal side of the Y stent. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the sequential placement of these silicone and metallic stents in these 12 patients. Results: The primary disease was lung cancer in eight patients, breast cancer in two patients, tracheal cancer in one patient, and thyroid cancer in one patient. The median survival period after airway stent placement was 46 days. The Hugh–Jones classification and performance status improved in nine patients after airway stenting. One patient had prolonged hemoptysis and died of respiratory tract hemorrhage 15 days after the treatment. Conclusion: Because the initial disease was advanced and aggressive, the prognosis after sequential airway stent placement was significantly poor. However, because respiratory distress decreased after the treatment in most patients, this treatment may be acceptable for selected patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis. PMID:25273272

  1. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  2. Physical principle of airway design in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Son, Taeho; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    From an engineering perspective, lungs are natural microfluidic devices that extract oxygen from air. In the bronchial tree, airways branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. It is generally accepted that in conducting airways, which air passes on the way to the acinar airways from the atmosphere, the reduction ratio of diameter is closely related to the minimization of viscous dissipation. Such a principle is formulated as the Hess-Murray law. However, in acinar airways, where oxygen transfer to alveolae occurs, the diameter reduction with progressive generations is more moderate than in conducting airways. Noting that the dominant transfer mechanism in acinar airways is diffusion rather than advection, unlike conducting airways, we construct a mathematical model for oxygen transfer through a series of acinar airways. Our model allows us to predict the optimal airway reduction ratio that maximizes the oxygen transfer in a finite airway volume, thereby rationalizing the observed airway reduction ratio in acinar airways.

  3. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    PubMed

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  4. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  5. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to an extracellular Pseudomonas cepacia protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, C; Cox, A; Darling, P; Sokol, P A

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia produces at least two extracellular proteases with apparent molecular masses of 36,000 and 40,000 Da. The 36-kDa protease has high proteolytic activity and the 40-kDa protease has low proteolytic activity with hide powder azure as a substrate. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against the purified 36- and 40-kDa proteases. Several MAbs directed against the 36-kDa protease were found to recognize the 40-kDa protease by Western immunoblot analysis. Similarly, a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease recognized the 36-kDa protease, suggesting that these two proteases may be immunologically related. A MAb directed against the 36-kDa protease, designated 36-6-8, and a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease (MAb G-11) cross-reacted with other extracellular proteases, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease, Pseudomonas pseudomallei protease, and the Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin/protease. MAb 36-6-8 neutralized the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease, P. aeruginosa elastase, P. pseudomallei protease, and V. cholerae hemagglutinin/protease but did not affect P. aeruginosa alkaline protease activity. In contrast, MAb G-11 to the 40-kDa protease neutralized only the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease. This evidence suggests that the neutralizing MAb, 36-6-8, recognizes an epitope conserved among some metalloproteases. This epitope may lie at or near the active site of the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease and P. aeruginosa elastase. Images PMID:7516312

  6. Airway hyperresponsiveness in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Langdeau, J B; Turcotte, H; Bowie, D M; Jobin, J; Desgagné, P; Boulet, L P

    2000-05-01

    It has been suggested that high-level training could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), but the comparative effects of different sports on airway function remains to be determined. We evaluated 150 nonsmoking volunteers 18 to 55 yr of age; 100 athletes divided into four subgroups of 25 subjects each according to the predominant estimated hydrocaloric characteristic of ambient air inhaled during training: dry air (DA), cold air (CA), humid air (HA) and a mixture of dry and humid air (MA), and 50 sedentary subjects. Each subject had a respiratory questionnaire, a methacholine challenge, allergy skin-prick tests, and heart rate variability recording for evaluation of parasympathetic tone. The athletes had a 49% prevalence of AHR (PC(20) < 16 mg/ml), with a mean PC(20) of 16.9 mg/ml, compared with 28% (PC(20): 35.4) in sedentary subjects (p = 0.009). The prevalence (%) of AHR and mean PC(20) (mg/ml) varied as followed in the four subgroups of athletes: DA: 32% and 30.9; CA: 52% and 15.8; HA: 76% and 7.3; and MA: 32% and 21.5 (p = 0.002). The estimated parasympathetic tone was higher in athletes (p < 0.001), but this parameter showed only a weak correlation with PC(20) (r = -0.17, p = 0.04). This study has shown a significantly higher prevalence of AHR in athletes than in the control group because of the higher prevalence in the CA and HA groups. Parasympathetic activity may act as modulator of airway responsiveness, but the increased prevalence of AHR in our athlete population may be related to the type and possibly the content of inhaled air during training.

  7. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with Increased respiratory morbiditses and susceptibility to Infections Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet Its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known ‘the greater Mexico City area was the pri...

  8. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  9. Influenza virus pathogenicity regulated by host cellular proteases, cytokines and metabolites, and its therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes significant morbidity and mortality. The knowledge gained within the last decade on the pandemic IAV(H1N1)2009 improved our understanding not only of the viral pathogenicity but also the host cellular factors involved in the pathogenicity of multiorgan failure (MOF), such as cellular trypsin-type hemagglutinin (HA0) processing proteases for viral multiplication, cytokine storm, metabolic disorders and energy crisis. The HA processing proteases in the airway and organs for all IAV known to date have been identified. Recently, a new concept on the pathogenicity of MOF, the “influenza virus–cytokine–trypsin” cycle, has been proposed involving up-regulation of trypsin through pro-inflammatory cytokines, and potentiation of viral multiplication in various organs. Furthermore, the relationship between causative factors has been summarized as the “influenza virus–cytokine–trypsin” cycle interconnected with the “metabolic disorders–cytokine” cycle. These cycles provide new treatment concepts for ATP crisis and MOF. This review discusses IAV pathogenicity on cellular proteases, cytokines, metabolites and therapeutic options. PMID:26460316

  10. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  11. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  12. Extracellular proteases of Trichoderma species. A review.

    PubMed

    Kredics, L; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Szekeres, A; Hatvani, L; Manczinger, L; Vágvölgyi, Cs; Nagy, Erzsébet

    2005-01-01

    Cellulolytic, xylanolytic, chitinolytic and beta-1,3-glucanolytic enzyme systems of species belonging to the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma have been investigated in details and are well characterised. The ability of Trichoderma strains to produce extracellular proteases has also been known for a long time, however, the proteolytic enzyme system is relatively unknown in this genus. Fortunately, in the recent years more and more attention is focused on the research in this field. The role of Trichoderma proteases in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and nematodes has been demonstrated, and it is also suspected that they may be important for the competitive saprophytic ability of green mould isolates and may represent potential virulence factors of Trichoderma strains as emerging fungal pathogens of clinical importance. The aim of this review is to summarize the information available about the extracellular proteases of Trichoderma. Numerous studies are available about the extracellular proteolytic enzyme profiles of Trichoderma strains and about the effect of abiotic environmental factors on protease activities. A number of protease enzymes have been purified to homogeneity and some protease encoding genes have been cloned and characterized. These results will be reviewed and the role of Trichoderma proteases in biological control as well as their advantages and disadvantages in biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:16003937

  13. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  14. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  15. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD.

    PubMed

    Bidan, Cécile M; Veldsink, Annemiek C; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD.

  16. Athletic Trainers' Knowledge Regarding Airway Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor; Roman, Christopher; Mata, Heather Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research suggests that knowledge gaps regarding the appropriate use of airway adjuncts exist among various health care practitioners, and that knowledge is especially limited within athletic training. Objective: To determine the relationship between perceived knowledge (PK) and actual knowledge (AK) of airway adjunct use and the…

  17. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  18. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  19. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  1. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  2. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  4. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  7. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  8. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  9. The LasB Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acts in Concert with Alkaline Protease AprA To Prevent Flagellin-Mediated Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Casilag, Fiordiligie; Lorenz, Anne; Krueger, Jonas; Klawonn, Frank; Weiss, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing severe and persistent infections in various eukaryotic hosts. It encodes a wide array of virulence factors and employs several strategies to evade immune detection. In the present study, we screened the Harvard Medical School transposon mutant library of P. aeruginosa PA14 for bacterial factors that modulate interleukin-8 responses in A549 human airway epithelial cells. We found that in addition to the previously identified alkaline protease AprA, the elastase LasB is capable of degrading exogenous flagellin under calcium-replete conditions and prevents flagellin-mediated immune recognition. Our results indicate that the production of two proteases with anti-flagellin activity provides a failsafe mechanism for P. aeruginosa to ensure the maintenance of protease-dependent immune-modulating functions. PMID:26502908

  10. The LasB Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acts in Concert with Alkaline Protease AprA To Prevent Flagellin-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    Casilag, Fiordiligie; Lorenz, Anne; Krueger, Jonas; Klawonn, Frank; Weiss, Siegfried; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing severe and persistent infections in various eukaryotic hosts. It encodes a wide array of virulence factors and employs several strategies to evade immune detection. In the present study, we screened the Harvard Medical School transposon mutant library of P. aeruginosa PA14 for bacterial factors that modulate interleukin-8 responses in A549 human airway epithelial cells. We found that in addition to the previously identified alkaline protease AprA, the elastase LasB is capable of degrading exogenous flagellin under calcium-replete conditions and prevents flagellin-mediated immune recognition. Our results indicate that the production of two proteases with anti-flagellin activity provides a failsafe mechanism for P. aeruginosa to ensure the maintenance of protease-dependent immune-modulating functions. PMID:26502908

  11. The LasB Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acts in Concert with Alkaline Protease AprA To Prevent Flagellin-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    Casilag, Fiordiligie; Lorenz, Anne; Krueger, Jonas; Klawonn, Frank; Weiss, Siegfried; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing severe and persistent infections in various eukaryotic hosts. It encodes a wide array of virulence factors and employs several strategies to evade immune detection. In the present study, we screened the Harvard Medical School transposon mutant library of P. aeruginosa PA14 for bacterial factors that modulate interleukin-8 responses in A549 human airway epithelial cells. We found that in addition to the previously identified alkaline protease AprA, the elastase LasB is capable of degrading exogenous flagellin under calcium-replete conditions and prevents flagellin-mediated immune recognition. Our results indicate that the production of two proteases with anti-flagellin activity provides a failsafe mechanism for P. aeruginosa to ensure the maintenance of protease-dependent immune-modulating functions.

  12. Airway fires during surgery: Management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Navaid; Ansar, Farrukh; Baig, Mirza Shahzad; Abbas, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airway fires pose a serious risk to surgical patients. Fires during surgery have been reported for many years with flammable anesthetic agents being the main culprits in the past. Association of airway fires with laser surgery is well-recognized, but there are reports of endotracheal tube fires ignited by electrocautery during pharyngeal surgery or tracheostomy or both. This uncommon complication has potentially grave consequences. While airway fires are relatively uncommon occurrences, they are very serious and can often be fatal. Success in preventing such events requires a thorough understanding of the components leading to a fire (fuel, oxidizer, and ignition source), as well as good communication between all members present to appropriately manage the fire and ensure patient safety. We present a case of fire in the airway during routine adenotonsillectomy. We will review the causes, preventive measures, and brief management for airway fires. PMID:27006554

  13. Airway fires during surgery: Management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Navaid; Ansar, Farrukh; Baig, Mirza Shahzad; Abbas, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airway fires pose a serious risk to surgical patients. Fires during surgery have been reported for many years with flammable anesthetic agents being the main culprits in the past. Association of airway fires with laser surgery is well-recognized, but there are reports of endotracheal tube fires ignited by electrocautery during pharyngeal surgery or tracheostomy or both. This uncommon complication has potentially grave consequences. While airway fires are relatively uncommon occurrences, they are very serious and can often be fatal. Success in preventing such events requires a thorough understanding of the components leading to a fire (fuel, oxidizer, and ignition source), as well as good communication between all members present to appropriately manage the fire and ensure patient safety. We present a case of fire in the airway during routine adenotonsillectomy. We will review the causes, preventive measures, and brief management for airway fires. PMID:27006554

  14. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  15. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-01-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom’s 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists’ difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  16. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Calvo, Eric; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model about the contribution of cysteine peptidases to blood digestion, and how their concerted action with other tick midgut proteases leads to the absorbance of nutrients by the midgut epithelial cells. PMID:21660665

  17. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  18. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  19. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bandla, Preetam; Huang, Jingtao; Karamessinis, Laurie; Kelly, Andrea; Pepe, Michelle; Samuel, John; Brooks, Lee; Mason, Thornton. A.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading declines with age. The epidemiology of obstructive sleep apnea suggests that sex hormones play a role in modulating upper airway function. Sex hormones increase gradually during puberty, from minimally detectable to adult levels. We hypothesized that the upper airway response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with increasing pubertal Tanner stage in males but remained stable during puberty in females. Design: Upper airway dynamic function during sleep was measured over the course of puberty. Participants: Normal subjects of Tanner stages 1 to 5. Measurements: During sleep, maximal inspiratory airflow was measured while varying the level of nasal pressure. The slope of the upstream pressure-flow relationship (SPF) was measured. Results: The SPF correlated with age and Tanner stage. However, the relationship with Tanner stage became nonsignificant when the correlation due to the mutual association with age was removed. Females had a lower SPF than males. Conclusions: In both sexes, the upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with age rather than degree of pubertal development. Thus, changes in sex hormones are unlikely to be a primary modulator of upper airway function during the transition from childhood to adulthood. Although further studies of upper airway structural changes during puberty are needed, we speculate that the changes in upper airway function with age are due to the depressant effect of age on ventilatory drive, leading to a decrease in upper airway neuromotor tone. Citation: Bandla P; Huang J; Karamessinis L; Kelly A; Pepe M; Samuel J; Brooks L; Mason TA; Gallagher PR; Marcus CL. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep. SLEEP 2008;31(4):534-541. PMID:18457241

  20. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  1. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  2. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-09-08

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway.

  3. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease expressed in Escherichia coli behaves as a dimeric aspartic protease.

    PubMed Central

    Meek, T D; Dayton, B D; Metcalf, B W; Dreyer, G B; Strickler, J E; Gorniak, J G; Rosenberg, M; Moore, M L; Magaard, V W; Debouck, C

    1989-01-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) protease, purified from a bacterial expression system, processed a recombinant form of its natural substrate, Pr55gag, into protein fragments that possess molecular weights commensurate with those of the virion gag proteins. Molecular weights of the protease obtained under denaturing and nondenaturing conditions (11,000 and 22,000, respectively) and chemical crosslinking studies were consistent with a dimeric structure for the active enzyme. The protease appropriately cleaved the nonapeptide Ac-Arg-Ala-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2 between the tyrosine and proline residues. HIV-1 protease was sensitive to inactivators of the aspartic proteases. The aspartic protease inactivator 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)propane produced irreversible, time-dependent inactivation of the protease. The pH-dependent kinetics of this inactivator were consistent with the requirement of an unprotonated carboxyl group in the active site of the enzyme, suggesting that HIV-1 protease is also an aspartic protease. Images PMID:2648384

  5. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. PMID:27137097

  6. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  7. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  8. Bioinformatics of proteases in the MEROPS database.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Alan J

    2004-05-01

    Proteolytic enzymes represent approximately approximately 2% of the total number of proteins present in all types of organisms. Many of these enzymes are of medical importance, and those that are of potential interest as drug targets can be divided into the endogenous enzymes encoded in the human genome, and the exogenous proteases encoded in the genomes of disease-causing organisms. There are also naturally occurring inhibitors of proteases, some of which have pharmaceutical relevance. The MEROPS database provides a rich source of information on proteases and their inhibitors. Storage and retrieval of this information is facilitated by the use of a hierarchical classification system (which was pioneered by the compilers of the database) in which homologous proteases and their inhibitors are divided into clans and families. PMID:15216937

  9. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  10. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  11. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  12. Small particles disrupt postnatal airway development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongYoub; Wallis, Chris; Schelegle, Edward S.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Plopper, Charles G.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Kumfer, Ben; Kennedy, Ian M.; Chan, Jackie K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of epidemiologic studies associate air pollution exposure in children with decreased lung function development. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of exposure to combustion-generated fine [230 and 212 nm number mean aerodynamic particle diameter (NMAD)] to ultrafine (73 nm NMAD) particles differing in elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon content on postnatal airway development in rats. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed from postnatal day 7 through 25, and lung function and airway architecture were evaluated 81 days of age. In a separate group of rats, cell proliferation was examined after a single particle exposure at 7 days of age. Early life exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particles altered distal airway architecture and resulted in subtle changes in lung mechanics. Early life exposure to 212 nm high OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture but did alter lung mechanics in a manner suggestive of central airway changes. In contrast, early life exposure to 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture or mechanics. A single 6-h exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particle decreased airway cell proliferation, whereas 212 nm high OC/EC particles increased it and 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not. The early life exposure to ultrafine, high OC/EC particles results in persistent alterations in distal airway architecture that is characterized by an initial decrease in airway cell proliferation. PMID:20634362

  13. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  14. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  15. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis.

  16. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  17. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  18. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  19. Firefighting acutely increases airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherman, C B; Barnhart, S; Miller, M F; Segal, M R; Aitken, M; Schoene, R; Daniell, W; Rosenstock, L

    1989-07-01

    The acute effects of the products of combustion and pyrolysis on airway responsiveness among firefighters are poorly documented. To study this relationship, spirometry and methacholine challenge testing (MCT) were performed on 18 active Seattle firefighters before and 5 to 24 h after firefighting. Body plethysmography was used to measure changes in specific airway conductance (SGaw), and results of MCT were analyzed using PD35-SGaw, the cumulative dose causing a 35% decrease in SGaw. Subjects who did not react by the end of the protocol were assigned a value of 640 inhalational units, the largest cumulative dose. Fire exposure was defined as the total time (hours) spent without a self-contained breathing apparatus at the firesite and was categorized as mild (less than 1 h, n = 7), moderate (1 to 2 h, n = 5), or severe (greater than 2 h, n = 6). Mean age of the 18 firefighters was 36.7 +/- 6.7 yr (range, 25 to 51), with a mean of 9.1 +/- 7.9 active years in the trade (range, zero to 22). None was known to be asthmatic. After firefighting, FEV1 % predicted (%pred) and FEF25-75 %pred significantly decreased by means of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and 5.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively. The mean decline in PD35-SGaw after firefighting was 184.5 +/- 53.2 units (p = 0.003). This observed decline in PD35-SGaw could not be explained by decrements in prechallenge SGaw, FEV1, or FVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Osteopontin That Is Elevated in the Airways during COPD Impairs the Antibacterial Activity of Common Innate Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Michiko; Keenan, Paul; Mörgelin, Matthias; Erjefält, Jonas S.; Herwald, Heiko; Egesten, Arne; Kasetty, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the respiratory tract contribute to exacerbations and disease progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is also an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease in COPD. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood but include impaired mucociliary clearance and structural remodeling of the airways. In addition, antimicrobial proteins that are constitutively expressed or induced during inflammatory conditions are an important part of the airway innate host defense. In the present study, we show that osteopontin (OPN), a multifunctional glycoprotein that is highly upregulated in the airways of COPD patients co-localizes with several antimicrobial proteins expressed in the airways. In vitro, OPN bound lactoferrin, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), midkine, human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) but showed low or no affinity for lysozyme and LL-37. Binding of OPN impaired the antibacterial activity against the important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OPN reduced lysozyme-induced killing of S. pneumoniae, a finding that could be explained by binding of OPN to the bacterial surface, thereby shielding the bacteria. A fragment of OPN generated by elastase of P. aeruginosa retained some inhibitory effect. Some antimicrobial proteins have additional functions. However, the muramidase-activity of lysozyme and the protease inhibitory function of SLPI were not affected by OPN. Taken together, OPN can contribute to the impairment of innate host defense by interfering with the function of antimicrobial proteins, thus increasing the vulnerability to acquire infections during COPD. PMID:26731746

  1. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  2. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  3. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  4. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.H.; Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes (TH)casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and MgS . Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti.

  5. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  6. Extravascular fibrin, plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitors, and airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Scott S.; Norton, Ryan J.; Rinaldi, Lisa M.; Bates, Jason H.T.; Sobel, Burton E.; Irvin, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness are not yet fully elucidated. One of the manifestations of airway inflammation is leakage of diverse plasma proteins into the airway lumen. They include fibrinogen and thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to form fibrin, a major component of thrombi. Fibrin inactivates surfactant. Surfactant on the airway surface maintains airway patency by lowering surface tension. In this study, immunohistochemically detected fibrin was seen along the luminal surface of distal airways in a patient who died of status asthmaticus and in mice with induced allergic airway inflammation. In addition, we observed altered airway fibrinolytic system protein balance consistent with promotion of fibrin deposition in mice with allergic airway inflammation. The airways of mice were exposed to aerosolized fibrinogen, thrombin, or to fibrinogen followed by thrombin. Only fibrinogen followed by thrombin resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with controls. An aerosolized fibrinolytic agent, tissue-type plasminogen activator, significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic airway inflammation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of fibrinogen and thrombin and their accumulation on the airway surface can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15232617

  7. Airway Progenitor Clone Formation Is Enhanced by Y-27632-Dependent Changes in the Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Susan D; Rios, Cydney; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Zhuang, Yongbin; Pinter, Mary; Happoldt, Carrie; Hill, Cynthia L; Lallier, Scott W; Cosgrove, Gregory P; Solomon, George M; Nichols, David P; Seibold, Max A

    2016-09-01

    The application of conditional reprogramming culture (CRC) methods to nasal airway epithelial cells would allow more wide-spread incorporation of primary airway epithelial culture models into complex lung disease research. In this study, we adapted the CRC method to nasal airway epithelial cells, investigated the growth advantages afforded by this technique over standard culture methods, and determined the cellular and molecular basis of CRC cell culture effects. We found that the CRC method allowed the production of 7.1 × 10(10) cells after 4 passages, approximately 379 times more cells than were generated by the standard bronchial epithelial growth media (BEGM) method. These nasal airway epithelial cells expressed normal basal cell markers and could be induced to form a mucociliary epithelium. Progenitor cell frequency was significantly higher using the CRC method in comparison to the standard culture method, and progenitor cell maintenance was dependent on addition of the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis demonstrated widespread gene expression changes in Y-27632-treated basal cells. We found that Y-27632 treatment altered expression of genes fundamental to the formation of the basal cell cytoskeleton, cell-cell junctions, and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Importantly, we found that Y-27632 treatment up-regulated expression of unique basal cell intermediate filament and desmosomal genes. Conversely, Y-27632 down-regulated multiple families of protease/antiprotease genes involved in ECM remodeling. We conclude that Y-27632 fundamentally alters cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions, which preserves basal progenitor cells and allows greater cell amplification.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus triggers nitric oxide production in human upper airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Workman, Alan D.; Chen, Bei; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Lee, Robert J.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is an important antibacterial defense molecule produced by upper airway (sinonasal) epithelial cells. We previously showed that a bitter taste receptor expressed in airway epithelium detects quorum-sensing molecules secreted by Gram-negative bacteria and subsequently triggers bactericidal NO production. We hypothesized that the upper airway epithelium may also be able to detect the Gram-positive aerobe Staphylococcus aureus and mount an NO response. Methods Human sinonasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures were treated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)-conditioned medium (CM), and NO production was measured using fluorescence imaging. Inhibitors of bitter taste receptor signaling were used to pharmacologically determine if this pathway was involved in the production of NO. Results A low-molecular-weight, heat, and protease-stabile product found in MRSA CM induced differential, NO synthase (NOS)-mediated NO production. This response varied markedly between individual patients. The MRSA-stimulated NO production was not dependent on 2 important components of bitter taste signaling: phospholipase C isoform β-2 or the transient receptor potential melastatin isoform 5 (TRPM5) ion channel. Conclusion This study shows that a S. aureus product elicits an NO-mediated innate defense response in human upper airway epithelium. The active bacterial product is likely a small, nonpeptide molecule that triggers a pathway independent of bitter taste receptors. Patient variation in the NO response to MRSA product(s), potentially due to genetic differences, might play a role in pathophysiology of Gram-positive upper respiratory infections and/or pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:26097237

  9. Therapeutic bronchoscopic interventions for malignant airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dalar, Levent; Özdemir, Cengiz; Abul, Yasin; Karasulu, Levent; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Akbaş, Ayşegül; Altın, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no definitive consensus about the factors affecting the choice of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of malignant airway obstruction. The present study defines the choice of the interventional bronchoscopic modality and analyzes the factors influencing survival in patients with malignant central airway obstruction. Totally, over 7 years, 802 interventional rigid bronchoscopic procedures were applied in 547 patients having malignant airway obstruction. There was a significant association between the type of stent and the site of the lesion in the present study. Patients with tracheal involvement and/or involvement of the main bronchi had the worst prognosis. The sites of the lesion and endobronchial treatment modality were independent predictors of survival in the present study. The selection of different types of airway stents can be considered on the base of site of the lesion. Survival can be estimated based on the site of the lesion and endobronchial brochoscopic modality used. PMID:27281104

  10. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  13. Virtual Airway Skills Trainer (VAST) Simulator

    PubMed Central

    DEMIREL, Doga; YU, Alexander; HALIC, Tansel; SANKARANARAYANAN, Ganesh; RYASON, Adam; SPINDLER, David; BUTLER, Kathryn L.; CAO, Caroline; PETRUSA, Emil; MOLINA, Marcos; JONES, Dan; DE, Suvranu; DEMOYA, Marc; JONES, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of Virtual Airway Skill Trainer (VAST) tasks. The simulated tasks are a part of two main airway management techniques; Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) and Cricothyroidotomy (CCT). ETI is a simple nonsurgical airway management technique, while CCT is the extreme surgical alternative to secure the airway of a patient. We developed identification of Mallampati class, finding the optimal angle for positioning pharyngeal/mouth axes tasks for ETI and identification of anatomical landmarks and incision tasks for CCT. Both ETI and CCT simulators were used to get physicians’ feedback at Society for Education in Anesthesiology and Association for Surgical Education spring meetings. In this preliminary validation study, total 38 participants for ETI and 48 for CCT performed each simulation task and completed pre and post questionnaires. In this work, we present the details of the simulation for the tasks and also the analysis of the collected data from the validation study. PMID:27046559

  14. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  15. Diesel exhaust particles and airway inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose of review. Epidemiologic investigation has associated traffic-related air pollution with adverse human health outcomes. The capacity ofdiesel exhaust particles (DEP), a major emission source air pollution particle, to initiate an airway inflammation has subsequently been ...

  16. Airway clearance therapy: finding the evidence.

    PubMed

    Volsko, Teresa A

    2013-10-01

    Disease processes can impair ciliary function, alter secretion production and mucus rheology, and interfere with the cough reflex. Airway clearance therapy has been a cornerstone of therapy aimed at minimizing the devastating effects of airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation due to mucus stasis on the conducting airways and lung parenchyma. Although challenges to performing clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of airway clearance therapeutic modalities exist, resources are available in the literature. In addition to device evaluations and original clinical research, the expert opinion, systematic reviews, and evidence-based practice guidelines can be found. These tools can be used to develop protocols and pathways to guide our practice. Monitoring and reporting patient, process, and financial outcomes are essential steps germane to the implementation of evidence-based care.

  17. Airway obstruction secondary to rhinoscleroma during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, W B; Peskind, S P; Bressler, K L; Crockett, D M

    1995-11-01

    Dyspnea is a fairly common complaint during pregnancy. However, if one excludes allergic nasal congestion of pregnancy, upper airway obstruction is a distinctly uncommon cause of dyspnea in the pregnant patient. Three cases of laryngeal rhinoscleroma in pregnant women requiring tracheostomy for airway management are reported. All three delivered healthy infants vaginally. Postpartum, two of the three were successfully decannulated, while the third became pregnant again before decannulation was accomplished. Treatment options and a review of the literature are presented.

  18. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  19. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  20. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  1. Taste Receptors in Upper Airway Immunity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ryan M; Lee, Robert J; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors are well known for their role in communicating information from the tongue to the brain about nutritional value or potential toxicity of ingested substances. More recently, it has been shown that taste receptors are expressed in other locations throughout the body, including the airway, gastrointestinal tract, brain and pancreas. The roles of some 'extraoral' taste receptors are largely unknown, but emerging research suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are capable of sensing bacteria and modulating innate immunity. This chapter focuses on the role of bitter and sweet taste receptors in human airway innate immunity and their clinical relevance to rhinosinusitis. The bitter taste receptor T2R38 expressed in sinonasal cilia detects bitter bacterial quorum-sensing molecules and activates a nitric oxide-dependent innate immune response; moreover, there are polymorphisms in T2R38 that underlie susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Bitter and sweet receptors in sinonasal solitary chemosensory cells control secretion of antimicrobial peptides in the upper airway and may have a profound impact on airway infections in patients with CRS and diabetes. Future research on taste receptors in the airway has enormous potential to expand our understanding of host-pathogen immune interactions and provide novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27466851

  2. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  3. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  4. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19582234

  5. Full Airway Drainage by Fiber Bronchoscopy Through Artificial Airway in the Treatment of Occult Traumatic Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Zhong Yan; Zhang, Shao Yang; Yu, Wen Qiao; Huang, Fang-Fang

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of full airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway in the treatment of traumatic atelectasis with occult manifestations. From May 2006 to May 2011, 40 cases of occult traumatic atelectasis were enrolled into our prospective study. Group A (n = 18) received drainage by nasal bronchoscope; group B underwent airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway (n = 22). The effects of treatment were evaluated by the incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung abscess, and the average length of hospital stay. Compared with nasal fiber-optic treatment, airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway reduced the incidence of ARDS (p = 0.013) and lung abscess (p = 0.062) and shortened the mean length of stay (p = 0.018). Making the decision to create an artificial airway timely and carry out lung lavage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway played a significant role in the treatment of occult traumatic atelectasis. PMID:27011511

  6. Full Airway Drainage by Fiber Bronchoscopy Through Artificial Airway in the Treatment of Occult Traumatic Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Zhong Yan; Zhang, Shao Yang; Yu, Wen Qiao; Huang, Fang-Fang

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of full airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway in the treatment of traumatic atelectasis with occult manifestations. From May 2006 to May 2011, 40 cases of occult traumatic atelectasis were enrolled into our prospective study. Group A (n = 18) received drainage by nasal bronchoscope; group B underwent airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway (n = 22). The effects of treatment were evaluated by the incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung abscess, and the average length of hospital stay. Compared with nasal fiber-optic treatment, airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway reduced the incidence of ARDS (p = 0.013) and lung abscess (p = 0.062) and shortened the mean length of stay (p = 0.018). Making the decision to create an artificial airway timely and carry out lung lavage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway played a significant role in the treatment of occult traumatic atelectasis.

  7. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  8. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  9. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  10. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  11. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  12. Nidovirus papain-like proteases: multifunctional enzymes with protease, deubiquitinating and deISGylating activities

    PubMed Central

    Mielech, Anna M.; Chen, Yafang; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Baker, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses and arteriviruses, members of the order Nidovirales, are positive strand RNA viruses that encode large replicase polyproteins that are processed by viral proteases to generate the nonstructural proteins which mediate viral RNA synthesis. The viral papain-like proteases (PLPs) are critical for processing the amino-terminal end of the replicase and are attractive targets for antiviral therapies. With the analysis of the papain-like protease of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), came the realization of the multifunctional nature of these enzymes. Structural and enzymatic studies revealed that SARS-CoV PLpro can act as both a protease to cleave peptide bonds and also as a deubiquitinating (DUB) enzyme to cleave the isopeptide bonds found in polyubiquitin chains. Furthermore, viral DUBs can also remove the protective effect of conjugated ubiquitin-like molecules such as interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15). Extension of these studies to other coronaviruses and arteriviruses led to the realization that viral protease/DUB activity is conserved in many family members. Overexpression studies revealed that viral protease/DUB activity can modulate or block activation of the innate immune response pathway. Importantly, mutations that alter DUB activity but not viral protease activity have been identified and arteriviruses expressing DUB mutants stimulated higher levels of acute inflammatory cytokines after infection. Further understanding of the multifunctional nature of the Nidovirus PLP/DUBs may facilitate vaccine development. Here, we review studies describing the PLPs’ enzymatic activity and their role in virus pathogenesis. PMID:24512893

  13. Serine Protease(s) Secreted by the Nematode Trichuris muris Degrade the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Grencis, Richard K.; Thornton, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The polymeric mucin component of the intestinal mucus barrier changes during nematode infection to provide not only physical protection but also to directly affect pathogenic nematodes and aid expulsion. Despite this, the direct interaction of the nematodes with the mucins and the mucus barrier has not previously been addressed. We used the well-established Trichuris muris nematode model to investigate the effect on mucins of the complex mixture of immunogenic proteins secreted by the nematode called excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Different regimes of T. muris infection were used to simulate chronic (low dose) or acute (high dose) infection. Mucus/mucins isolated from mice and from the human intestinal cell line, LS174T, were treated with ESPs. We demonstrate that serine protease(s) secreted by the nematode have the ability to change the properties of the mucus barrier, making it more porous by degrading the mucin component of the mucus gel. Specifically, the serine protease(s) acted on the N-terminal polymerising domain of the major intestinal mucin Muc2, resulting in depolymerisation of Muc2 polymers. Importantly, the respiratory/gastric mucin Muc5ac, which is induced in the intestine and is critical for worm expulsion, was protected from the depolymerising effect exerted by ESPs. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitors (Serpins) which may protect the mucins, in particular Muc2, from depolymerisation, were highly expressed in mice resistant to chronic infection. Thus, we demonstrate that nematodes secrete serine protease(s) to degrade mucins within the mucus barrier, which may modify the niche of the parasite to prevent clearance from the host or facilitate efficient mating and egg laying from the posterior end of the parasite that is in intimate contact with the mucus barrier. However, during a TH2-mediated worm expulsion response, serpins, Muc5ac and increased levels of Muc2 protect the barrier from degradation by the nematode secreted protease(s). PMID

  14. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  15. Using specificity to strategically target proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark D.; Craik, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases are a family of naturally occurring enzymes in the body whose dysregulation has been implicated in numerous diseases and cancers. Their ability to selectively and catalytically turnover substrate adds both signal amplification and functionality as parameters for the detection of disease. This review will focus on the development of activity-based methodologies to characterize proteases, and in particular, the use of positional scanning, synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL’s), and substrate activity screening (SAS) assays. The use of these approaches to better understand a protease’s natural substrate will be discussed as well as the technologies that emerged. PMID:18434168

  16. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  17. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound.

  18. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  19. Measles: an epidemic of upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Manning, S C; Ridenour, B; Brown, O E; Squires, J

    1991-09-01

    Between October 1989 and August 1990, Dallas County experienced an 11-month epidemic of measles. Of 995 cases of pediatric measles diagnosed in the outpatient department of Children's Medical Center, 108 patients were admitted and 34 of these demonstrated significant upper airway obstruction at the time of admission. Airway problems ranged from mild inspiratory stridor with nasal flaring to frank obstruction and arrest in the emergency room, requiring intubation. Eight of the 34 airway patients were eventually diagnosed with bacterial tracheitis on the basis of endoscopic findings and culture results. The remaining patients had pictures more consistent with viral laryngotracheitis, but all patients were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent possible progression to bacterial tracheitis. A total of nine patients overall required intubation for airway obstruction and all were successfully extubated. Large outbreaks of measles are becoming common again in populations of urban poor--largely unvaccinated children. The disease in these populations tends to occur at a younger age and may be more aggressive with more associated complications. Physicians must keep in mind the possibility of upper airway obstruction in a significant proportion of these patients. Early diagnosis on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms, endoscopy, and radiographs is the key to timely appropriate management.

  20. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound. PMID:25567545

  1. Kinins, airway obstruction, and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a term that implies symptoms that are present in many organs, some of which are potentially fatal. The pathogenic process can either be IgE-dependent or non-IgE-dependent; the latter circumstance may be referred to as anaphylactoid. Bradykinin is frequently responsible for the manifestations of IgE-independent reactions. Blood levels may increase because of overproduction; diseases such as the various forms of C1 inhibitor deficiency (hereditary or acquired) or hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor are examples in this category. Blood levels may also increase because of an abnormality in bradykinin metabolism; the angioedema due to ACE inhibitors is a commonly encountered example. Angioedema due to bradykinin has the potential to cause airway obstruction and asphyxia as well as severe gastrointestinal symptoms simulating an acute abdomen. Formation of bradykinin in plasma is a result of a complex interaction among proteins such as factor XII, prekallikrein, and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) resulting in HK cleavage and liberation of bradykinin. These proteins also assemble along the surface of endothelial cells via zinc-dependent interactions with gC1qR, cytokeratin 1, and u-PAR. Endothelial cell expression (or secretion) of heat-shock protein 90 or prolylcarboxypeptidase can activate the prekallikrein-HK complex to generate bradykinin in the absence of factor XII, however factor XII is then secondarily activated by the kallikrein that results. Bradykinin is destroyed by carboxypeptidase N and angiotensin-converting enzyme. The hypotension associated with IgE-dependent anaphylaxis maybe mediated, in part, by massive proteolytic digestion of HK by kallikreins (tissue or plasma-derived) or other cell-derived kininogenases. PMID:20519882

  2. Central domain of IL-33 is cleaved by mast cell proteases for potent activation of group-2 innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Lefrançais, Emma; Duval, Anais; Mirey, Emilie; Roga, Stéphane; Espinosa, Eric; Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-10-28

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine from the IL-1 family. IL-33 activates many immune cell types expressing the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1) receptor ST2, including group-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s, natural helper cells, nuocytes), the major producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during type-2 innate immune responses and allergic airway inflammation. IL-33 is likely to play a critical role in asthma because the IL33 and ST2/IL1RL1 genes have been reproducibly identified as major susceptibility loci in large-scale genome-wide association studies. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating IL-33 activity is thus urgently needed. Here, we investigated the role of mast cells, critical effector cells in allergic disorders, known to interact with ILC2s in vivo. We found that serine proteases secreted by activated mast cells (chymase and tryptase) generate mature forms of IL-33 with potent activity on ILC2s. The major forms produced by mast cell proteases, IL-33(95-270), IL-33(107-270), and IL-33(109-270), were 30-fold more potent than full-length human IL-33(1-270) for activation of ILC2s ex vivo. They induced a strong expansion of ILC2s and eosinophils in vivo, associated with elevated concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13. Murine IL-33 is also cleaved by mast cell tryptase, and a tryptase inhibitor reduced IL-33-dependent allergic airway inflammation in vivo. Our study identifies the central cleavage/activation domain of IL-33 (amino acids 66-111) as an important functional domain of the protein and suggests that interference with IL-33 cleavage and activation by mast cell and other inflammatory proteases could be useful to reduce IL-33-mediated responses in allergic asthma and other inflammatory diseases.

  3. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  4. Proteases and Peptidases of Castor Bean Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Raymond E.; Beevers, Harry

    1978-01-01

    The endosperm of castor bean seeds (Ricinus communis L.) contains two —SH-dependent aminopeptidases, one hydrolyzing l-leucine-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.0, and the other hydrolyzing l-proline-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.5. After germination the endosperm contains in addition an —SH-dependent hemoglobin protease, a serine-dependent carboxypeptidase, and at least two —SH-dependent enzymes hydrolyzing the model substrate α-N-benzoyl-dl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (BANA). The carboxypeptidase is active on a variety of N-carbobenzoxy dipeptides, especially N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanine-l-alanine and N-carbobenzoxy-l-tyrosine-l-leucine. The pH optima for the protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase acivities are 3.5 to 4.0, 5.0 to 5.5, and 6 to 8, respectively. The two aminopeptidases increased about 4-fold in activity during the first 4 days of growth, concurrent with the period of rapid depletion of storage protein. Activities then declined as the endosperm senesced, but were still evident after 6 days. Senescence was complete by day 7 to 8. Hemoglobin protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase activities appeared in the endosperm at day 2 to 3, and reached peak activity at day 5 to 6. The data indicate that the aminopeptidases are involved in the early mobilization of endosperm storage protein, whereas protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase may take part in later turnover and/or senescence. PMID:16660598

  5. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  6. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  7. Airway Management in Croup and Epiglottitis

    PubMed Central

    Crumley, Roger L.

    1977-01-01

    Treatment techniques for airway obstruction in croup and epiglottitis are reviewed in the medical literature. Series totaling 295 nasotracheal intubations, and 591 tracheostomies were reviewed. There were two deaths attributable to airway complications in 126 patients in whom nasotracheal intubation was carried out. In three patients subglottic granulation tissue and subglottic stenoses developed from short-term nasotracheal intubation. There were no subglottic stenoses or tracheal stenoses reported in the 591 tracheostomies. From this review, it would seem feasible to use nasotracheal intubation for short-term airway treatment in croup and epiglottitis. The increasing occurrence of laryngeal and tracheal complications with long-term intubation suggests that tracheostomy be considered in such cases. PMID:349884

  8. MicroRNA in United Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin-Hao; Callejas-Díaz, Borja; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of united airway diseases (UAD) has received increasing attention in recent years. Sustained and increased inflammation is a common feature of UAD, which is inevitably accompanied with marked gene modification and tight gene regulation. However, gene regulation in the common inflammatory processes in UAD remains unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA), a novel regulator of gene expression, has been considered to be involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although there are an increasing number of studies of miRNAs in inflammatory upper and lower airway diseases, few miRNAs have been identified that directly link the upper and lower airways. In this article, therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies available in order to improve the understanding of the roles of miRNAs in the interaction and pathogenesis of UAD. PMID:27187364

  9. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  10. Protease IV, a quorum sensing-dependent protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; So, Yong-In; Park, Ha-Young; Li, Xi-Hui; Yeom, Doo Hwan; Lee, Mi-Nan; Lee, Bok-Luel; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2014-12-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) plays an essential role in pathogenesis and the QS response controls many virulence factors. Using a mealworm, Tenebrio molitor as a host model, we found that Protease IV, a QS-regulated exoprotease of P. aeruginosa functions as a key virulence effector causing the melanization and death of T. molitor larvae. Protease IV was able to degrade zymogens of spätzle processing enzyme (SPE) and SPE-activating enzyme (SAE) without the activation of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production. Since SPE and SAE function to activate spätzle, a ligand of Toll receptor in the innate immune system of T. molitor, we suggest that Protease IV may interfere with the activation of the Toll signaling. Independently of the Toll pathway, the melanization response, another innate immunity was still generated, since Protease IV directly converted Tenebrio prophenoloxidase into active phenoloxidase. Protease IV also worked as an important factor in the virulence to brine shrimp and nematode. These results suggest that Protease IV provides P. aeruginosa with a sophisticated way to escape the immune attack of host by interfering with the production of AMPs. PMID:25315216

  11. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  12. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  13. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  14. [Modern airway management--current concepts for more patient safety].

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Arnd

    2009-04-01

    Effective and safe airway management is one of the core skills among anaesthesiologists and all physicians involved in acute care medicine. However, failure in airway management is still the most frequent single incidence with the highest impact on patient's morbidity and mortality known from closed claims analyses. The anaesthesiologist has to manage the airway in elective patients providing a high level of safety with as little airway injury and interference with the cardio-vascular system as possible. Clinical competence also includes the management of the expected and unexpected difficult airway in different clinical environments. Therefore, it is the anaesthesiologist's responsibility not only to educate and train younger residents, but also all kinds of medical personnel involved in airway management, e.g. emergency physicians, intensive care therapists or paramedics. Modern airway devices, strategies and educational considerations must fulfill these sometimes diverse and large range requirements. Supraglottic airway devices will be used more often in the daily clinical routine. This is not only due the multiple advantages of these devices compared to the tracheal tube, but also because of the new features of some supraglottic airways, which separate the airway from the gastric track and give information of the pharyngeal position. For the event of a difficult airway, new airway devices and concepts should be trained and applied in daily practice.

  15. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  1. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  2. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  5. Proteases from the Regenerating Gut of the Holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix

    PubMed Central

    Lamash, Nina E.; Dolmatov, Igor Yu

    2013-01-01

    Four proteases with molecular masses of 132, 58, 53, and 47 kDa were detected in the digestive system of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix. These proteases displayed the gelatinase activity and characteristics of zinc metalloproteinases. The 58 kDa protease had similar protease inhibitor sensitivity to that of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases. Zymographic assay revealed different lytic activities of all four proteases during intestine regeneration in the holothurian. The 132 kDa protease showed the highest activity at the first stage. During morphogenesis (stages 2–4 of regeneration), the highest activity was measured for the 53 and 58 kDa proteases. Inhibition of protease activity exerts a marked effect on regeneration, which was dependent on the time when 1,10-phenanthroline injections commenced. When metalloproteinases were inhibited at the second stage of regeneration, the restoration rates were decreased. However, such an effect proved to be reversible, and when inhibition ceased, the previous rate of regeneration was recovered. When protease activity is inhibited at the first stage, regeneration is completely abolished, and the animals die, suggesting that early activation of the proteases is crucial for triggering the regenerative process in holothurians. The role of the detected proteases in the regeneration processes of holothurians is discussed. PMID:23505505

  6. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-01

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. PMID:26584340

  7. Allergic and nonallergic interactions between house dust mite allergens and airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Roche, N; Chinet, T C; Huchon, G J

    1997-03-01

    Asthma and allergy are extremely frequent diseases, affecting 5-10% and 30% of the population, respectively. The prevalence of asthma has increased in many developed countries, which may be due to several factors, including increased exposure to house dust mite (HDM) allergens. HDM to which humans are most frequently sensitized are Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and Euroglyphus maynei. These mites multiply in carpets, bedding and upholstered furniture in a hot and humid atmosphere. The allergens are digestive enzymes of the mites. Several epidemiological studies have shown that an increase in exposure to HDMs is associated with an increase in the prevalence of sensitization and asthma, whereas mite avoidance leads to a decrease in respiratory symptoms of sensitized asthmatic subjects. Sensitized subjects have specific immunoglobulin G and E (IgG and IgE) humoral responses, as well as proliferative T-cell responses to HDM allergens. Experimental exposure to HDM allergens induces bronchoalveolar inflammatory responses, that are characterized by the recruitment and activation of eosinophils, mastocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. The cysteine protease activity of Der p 1 (a major allergen of D. pteronyssinus) has been shown to increase airway mucosal permeability, and may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by nonimmunological mechanisms. These epidemiological and experimental data support the recommendations for mite avoidance, especially in persons at high risk of developing asthma.

  8. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Case reports of persistent airways hyperreactivity following high-level irritant exposures.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S M; Weiss, M A; Bernstein, I L

    1985-07-01

    Two individuals developed an asthma-like illness after a single exposure to high levels of an irritating aerosol, vapor, fume, or smoke. Symptoms developed within a few hours. A consistent physiologic accompaniment was airways hyperreactivity, with the two subjects showing positive methacholine challenge tests. No documented preexisting respiratory illness was identified, nor did subjects relate past respiratory complaints. Respiratory symptoms and airways hyperreactivity persisted for at least four years after the incident. The incriminated etiologic agents all shared a common characteristic of being irritant in nature. Bronchial biopsy specimens showed an airways inflammatory response. This report suggests that acute high-level irritant exposures may produce an asthma-like syndrome in some individuals, with long-term sequelae and chronic airways disease. Nonimmunologic mechanisms seems to be operative in the pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  9. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease is activated by low concentrations of protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Göran; Arenas, Omar Gutiérrez; Danielson, U Helena

    2009-12-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a bifunctional enzyme with a protease and a helicase functionality located in each of the two domains of the single peptide chain. There is little experimental evidence for a functional role of this unexpected arrangement since artificial single domain forms of both enzymes are catalytically competent. We have observed that low concentrations of certain protease inhibitors activate the protease of full-length NS3 from HCV genotype 1a with up to 100%, depending on the preincubation time and the inhibitor used. The activation was reduced, but not eliminated, by increased ionic strength, lowered glycerol concentration, or lowered pH. In all cases, it was at the expense of a significant loss of activity. Activation was not seen with the artificial protease domain of genotype 1b NS3 fused with a fragment of the NS4A cofactor. This truncated and covalently modified enzyme form was much less active and exhibited fundamentally different catalytic properties to the full-length NS3 protease without the fused cofactor. The most plausible explanation for the activation was found to involve a slow transition between two enzyme conformations, which differed in their catalytic ability and affinity for inhibitors. Equations derived based on this assumption resulted in better fits to the experimental data than the equation for simple competitive inhibition. The mechanism may involve an inhibitor-induced stabilization of the helicase domain in a conformation that enhances the protease activity, or an improved alignment of the catalytic triad in the protease. The proposed mnemonic mechanism and derived equations are viable for both these explanations and can serve as a basic framework for future studies of enzymes activated by inhibitors or other ligands.

  10. Three monoclonal antibodies against the serpin protease nexin-1 prevent protease translocation.

    PubMed

    Kousted, Tina M; Skjoedt, Karsten; Petersen, Steen V; Koch, Claus; Vitved, Lars; Sochalska, Maja; Lacroix, Céline; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A; Jensen, Jan K

    2014-01-01

    Protease nexin-1 (PN-1) belongs to the serpin family and is an inhibitor of thrombin, plasmin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, and matriptase. Recent studies have suggested PN-1 to play important roles in vascular-, neuro-, and tumour-biology. The serpin inhibitory mechanism consists of the serpin presenting its so-called reactive centre loop as a substrate to its target protease, resulting in a covalent complex with the inactivated enzyme. Previously, three mechanisms have been proposed for the inactivation of serpins by monoclonal antibodies: steric blockage of protease recognition, conversion to an inactive conformation or induction of serpin substrate behaviour. Until now, no inhibitory antibodies against PN-1 have been thoroughly characterised. Here we report the development of three monoclonal antibodies binding specifically and with high affinity to human PN-1. The antibodies all abolish the protease inhibitory activity of PN-1. In the presence of the antibodies, PN-1 does not form a complex with its target proteases, but is recovered in a reactive centre cleaved form. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mapped the three overlapping epitopes to an area spanning the gap between the loop connecting α-helix F with β-strand 3A and the loop connecting α-helix A with β-strand 1B. We conclude that antibody binding causes a direct blockage of the final critical step of protease translocation, resulting in abortive inhibition and premature release of reactive centre cleaved PN-1. These new antibodies will provide a powerful tool to study the in vivo role of PN-1's protease inhibitory activity.

  11. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Cameron D; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Wall, Daniel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  12. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  13. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed.

  14. Anaesthesia and airway management in mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Belani, Kumar G; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Bruce, Iain A; Hack, Henrik; Harmatz, Paul R; Jones, Simon; Rowe, Richard; Solanki, Guirish A; Valdemarsson, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    This paper provides a detailed overview and discussion of anaesthesia in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their anaesthetic management, including emergency airway issues. MPS represents a group of rare lysosomal storage disorders associated with an array of clinical manifestations. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. Typical anaesthetic problems include airway obstruction after induction or extubation, intubation difficulties or failure [can't intubate, can't ventilate (CICV)], possible emergency tracheostomy and cardiovascular and cervical spine issues. Because of the high anaesthetic risk, the benefits of a procedure in patients with MPS should always be balanced against the associated risks. Therefore, careful evaluation of anaesthetic risk factors should be made before the procedure, involving evaluation of airways and cardiorespiratory and cervical spine problems. In addition, information on the specific type of MPS, prior history of anaesthesia, presence of cervical instability and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint are important and may be pivotal to prevent complications during anaesthesia. Knowledge of these risk factors allows the anaesthetist to anticipate potential problems that may arise during or after the procedure. Anaesthesia in MPS patients should be preferably done by an experienced (paediatric) anaesthetist, supported by a multidisciplinary team (ear, nose, throat surgeon and intensive care team), with access to all necessary equipment and support.

  15. Nasal Airway Resistance: Its Measurement and Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lyle H.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of regulation of nasal airway resistance (Rn). Describes methods of calculating Rn by measuring pressure-flow relationship. Data are presented on improved methods for measuring Rn and effects for expiratory and inspiratory Rn after topical application of phenylephrine nasal decongestant spray. (Author/SA)

  16. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5810 Airway connector. (a) Identification. An... tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in § 868.9....

  17. Severe upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    PubMed

    Bonekat, H William; Hardin, Kimberly A

    2003-10-01

    Few disorders may manifest with predominantly sleep-related obstructive breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder, varies in severity and is associated with significant cardiovascular and neurocognitive morbidity. It is estimated that between 8 and 18 million people in the United States have at least mild OSA. Although the exact mechanism of OSA is not well-delineated, multiple factors contribute to the development of upper airway obstruction and include anatomic, mechanical, neurologic, and inflammatory changes in the pharynx. OSA may occur concomitantly with asthma. Approximately 74% of asthmatics experience nocturnal symptoms of airflow obstruction secondary to reactive airways disease. Similar cytokine, chemokine, and histologic changes are seen in both disorders. Sleep deprivation, chronic upper airway edema, and inflammation associated with OSA may further exacerbate nocturnal asthma symptoms. Allergic rhinitis may contribute to both OSA and asthma. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard treatment for OSA. Treatment with CPAP therapy has also been shown to improve both daytime and nighttime peak expiratory flow rates in patients with concomitant OSA and asthma. It is important for allergists to be aware of how OSA may complicate diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. A thorough sleep history and high clinical suspicion for OSA is indicated, particularly in asthma patients who are refractory to standard medication treatments.

  18. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin; Nielsen, Mads; Edula, Goutham; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2010-03-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 manually segmented images extracted from 15 different subjects and shown to give accurate results, with 37% less errors than the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) algorithm and 62% less than a similar graph cut method without coupled surfaces. Common measures of airway wall thickness such as the Interior Area (IA) and Wall Area percentage (WA%) was measured by the proposed method on a total of 723 CT scans from a lung cancer screening study. These measures were significantly different for participants with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) compared to asymptomatic participants. Furthermore, reproducibility was good as confirmed by repeat scans and the measures correlated well with the outcomes of pulmonary function tests, demonstrating the use of the algorithm as a COPD diagnostic tool. Additionally, a new measure of airway wall thickness is proposed, Normalized Wall Intensity Sum (NWIS). NWIS is shown to correlate better with lung function test values and to be more reproducible than previous measures IA, WA% and airway wall thickness at a lumen perimeter of 10 mm (PI10).

  19. Reproducibility of airway wall thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Owsijewitsch, Michael; de Hoop, Bartjan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2010-03-01

    Airway remodeling and accompanying changes in wall thickness are known to be a major symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), associated with reduced lung function in diseased individuals. Further investigation of this disease as well as monitoring of disease progression and treatment effect demand for accurate and reproducible assessment of airway wall thickness in CT datasets. With wall thicknesses in the sub-millimeter range, this task remains challenging even with today's high resolution CT datasets. To provide accurate measurements, taking partial volume effects into account is mandatory. The Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) method has been shown to be inappropriate for small airways1,2 and several improved algorithms for objective quantification of airway wall thickness have been proposed.1-8 In this paper, we describe an algorithm based on a closed form solution proposed by Weinheimer et al.7 We locally estimate the lung density parameter required for the closed form solution to account for possible variations of parenchyma density between different lung regions, inspiration states and contrast agent concentrations. The general accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated using basic tubular software and hardware phantoms. Furthermore, we present results on the reproducibility of the algorithm with respect to clinical CT scans, varying reconstruction kernels, and repeated acquisitions, which is crucial for longitudinal observations.

  20. COLCHICINE DECREASES AIRWAY HYPERACTIVITY AFTER PHOSGENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phosgene (COCl(2)) exposure affects an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung, which can be reduced in an animal model by pretreatment with colchicine. Inflammation in the respiratory tract can be associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity. We tested the hypotheses...

  1. Difficult airway in Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Packiasabapathy, Senthil; Chandiran, Ravindran; Batra, Ravinder K; Agarwala, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome involving multiple system abnormalities. The most consistently present components include facial deformity, mental retardation, and Hirschsprung disease. We report the anesthetic management of a case of Mowat-Wilson syndrome, with a difficult airway, who underwent Duhamel's procedure and colostomy closure. PMID:27687363

  2. Volatile Organic Compounds Contribute to Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Jang, An-Soo; Choi, Inseon-S; Koh, Young-Il

    2007-01-01

    Background Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in concentrations found in both the work and home environments may influence lung function. We investigated the prevalence of airway responsiveness in workers exposed to VOCs. Methods We used allergic skin tests, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness testing and questionnaires to study twenty exposed workers and twenty-seven control subjects. Atopy was defined as a reactor who showed >3+ response to one or more allergens on the skin prick tests. Airway hyperresponsiveness (BRindex) was defined as log [% fall of FEV1/ log (last concentration of methacholine) +10]. Results The VOC exposed workers, in comparison with the control subjects, tended to have a higher BRindex (1.19±0.07 vs. 1.15±0.08, respectively). Workers exposed to VOCs with atopy or smoker, as compared with the workers exposed to VOCs with non-atopy and who were non-smokers and the control subjects with non-atopy and who were non-smokers, had a significantly higher BRindex (1.20±0.05 vs. 1.14±0.06 vs. 1.10±0.03, respectively p<0.05). The BRindex was not correlated with atopy, the smoking status or the duration of VOC exposure. Conclusions These findings suggest that VOCs may act as a contributing factor of airway hyperresponsiveness in workers exposed to VOCs. PMID:17427638

  3. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  4. [Quality assurance in airway management: education and training for difficult airway management].

    PubMed

    Kaminoh, Yoshiroh

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory problem is one of the main causes of death or severe brain damage in perioperative period. Three major factors of respiratory problem are esophageal intubation, inadequate ventilation, and difficult airway. The wide spread of pulse oximeter and capnograph reduced the incidences of esophageal intubation and inadequate ventilation, but the difficult airway still occupies the large portion in the causes of adverse events during anesthesia. "Practice guideline for management of the difficult airway" was proposed by American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) in 1992 and 2002. Improvement of knowledge, technical skills, and cognitive skills are necessary for the education and training of the difficult airway management. "The practical seminar of difficult airway management (DAM practical seminar)" has been cosponsored by the Japanese Association of Medical Simulation (JAMS) in the 51 st and 52 nd annual meetings of Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists and the 24th annual meeting of Japanese Society for Clinical Anesthesia. The DAM practical seminar is composed of the lecture session for ASA difficult airway algorithm, the hands-on training session for technical skills, and the scenario-based training session for cognitive skills. Ninty six Japanese anesthesiologists have completed the DAM practical seminar in one year. "The DAM instructor course" should be immediately prepared to organize the seminar more frequently. PMID:16440705

  5. Estimation of airway obstruction using oximeter plethysmograph waveform data

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald H; Spiro, David M; Desmond, Renee' A; Hagood, James S

    2005-01-01

    Background Validated measures to assess the severity of airway obstruction in patients with obstructive airway disease are limited. Changes in the pulse oximeter plethysmograph waveform represent fluctuations in arterial flow. Analysis of these fluctuations might be useful clinically if they represent physiologic perturbations resulting from airway obstruction. We tested the hypothesis that the severity of airway obstruction could be estimated using plethysmograph waveform data. Methods Using a closed airway circuit with adjustable inspiratory and expiratory pressure relief valves, airway obstruction was induced in a prospective convenience sample of 31 healthy adult subjects. Maximal change in airway pressure at the mouthpiece was used as a surrogate measure of the degree of obstruction applied. Plethysmograph waveform data and mouthpiece airway pressure were acquired for 60 seconds at increasing levels of inspiratory and expiratory obstruction. At each level of applied obstruction, mean values for maximal change in waveform area under the curve and height as well as maximal change in mouth pressure were calculated for sequential 7.5 second intervals. Correlations of these waveform variables with mouth pressure values were then performed to determine if the magnitude of changes in these variables indicates the severity of airway obstruction. Results There were significant relationships between maximal change in area under the curve (P < .0001) or height (P < 0.0001) and mouth pressure. Conclusion The findings suggest that mathematic interpretation of plethysmograph waveform data may estimate the severity of airway obstruction and be of clinical utility in objective assessment of patients with obstructive airway diseases. PMID:15985171

  6. Postnatal growth of tracheobronchial airways of Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongYoub; Srirama, Praveen K; Wallis, Christopher; Wexler, Anthony S

    2011-01-01

    Rats are widely used for the studies of pulmonary toxicology in both juveniles and adults. To facilitate such studies, investigators have developed models of lung architecture based on manual or computerized airway measurements. However, postnatal growth of conducting airways of rat lungs has never been reported. In this paper, we present conducting airway architecture statistics for male Sprague–Dawley rat lungs at ages 15, 28, 40, and 81 days by analyzing CT images from airway silicon casts. Detailed branching characteristics and intersubject variance are presented. This study shows that (i) airway growth in diameter and length is not linear with age, (ii) growth of airway length is faster than that of diameter during the 15–81-day postnatal period, and (iii) asymmetry in airway diameter (ratio of major to minor daughter diameter) increases with age. PMID:21534951

  7. [Clinical basics of supraglottic airway management in paediatric anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kai

    2013-04-01

    The low invasiveness and simplicity of use of the LMA-Classic™ contributed substantially to the supraglottic airway management acquiring a special role in the anaesthesia care of neonates and children. Due to the introduction of new supraglottic airway devices and the expansion of indications, this form of airway management has a predominant role in paediatric anaesthesia in many institutions nowadays. As securing the airway "above the glottis" differs substantially in some aspects from securing the airway using the endotracheal tube it is mandatory to acknowledge special aspects in routine clinical practice in order to avoid complications. The following article describes basic aspects of supraglottic airway management in paediatric anaesthesia and illustrates, where possible, the available scientific evidence in the use of different supraglottic airway devices in this regard. PMID:23633257

  8. [Airway Management in a Patient with Forestier's Disease].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuriko; Echigo, Noriyuki; Akata, Mariko; Yokoyama, Kaori; Takasugi, Naoya; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-04-01

    Airway management in a patient with Forestier's disease can be challenging clinically because this disease may cause not only dysphagia but also airway obstruction due to the compression of the pharynx and esophagus caused by the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament. We report our anesthetic management in a patient with Forestier's disease. Meanwhile, we studied the causes of difficult airway and the most suitable airway device for a patient with this disease from a standpoint of anatomy of upper airway. Our study indicated the possibility that the most suitable airway device differed depending on the actual location of the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and that more prudent airway management would be required if its lesion location extended to upper cervical spine. PMID:27188118

  9. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  10. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  11. Mitochondrial Proteases as Emerging Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of mitochondrial function and integrity is critical for cell viability. Under stress conditions, unfolded, misfolded or damaged proteins accumulate in a certain compartment of the organelle, interfering with oxidative phosphorylation and normal mitochondrial functions. In stress conditions, several mechanisms, including mitochondrial unfolded protease response (UPRmt), fusion and fission, and mitophagy are engaged to restore normal proteostasis of the organelle. Mitochondrial proteases are a family of more than 20 enzymes that not only are involved in the UPRmt, but actively participate at multiple levels in the stress-response system. Alterations in their expression levels, or mutations that determine loss or gain of function of these proteases deeply impair mitochondrial functionality and can be associated with the onset of inherited diseases, with the development of neurodegenerative disorders and with the process of carcinogenesis. In this review, we focus our attention on six of them, namely CLPP, HTRA2 and LONP1, by analysing the current knowledge about their functions, their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases, and the compounds currently available for inhibiting their functions. PMID:26831646

  12. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development. PMID:25261311

  13. Oligomeric state study of prokaryotic rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Padmapriya; Mak, Michelle W; Fischer-Witholt, Sarah J; Guigard, Emmanuel; Kay, Cyril M; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2012-12-01

    Rhomboid peptidases (proteases) play key roles in signaling events at the membrane bilayer. Understanding the regulation of rhomboid function is crucial for insight into its mechanism of action. Here we examine the oligomeric state of three different rhomboid proteases. We subjected Haemophilus influenzae, (hiGlpG), Escherichia coli GlpG (ecGlpG) and Bacillus subtilis (YqgP) to sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent-solubilized dodecylmaltoside (DDM) solution. For hiGlpG and ecGlpG, rhomboids consisting of the core 6 transmembrane domains without and with soluble domains respectively, and YqgP, predicted to have 7 transmembrane domains with larger soluble domains at the termini, the predominant species was dimeric with low amounts of monomer and tetramers observed. To examine the effect of the membrane domain alone on oligomeric state of rhomboid, hiGlpG, the simplest form from the rhomboid class of intramembrane proteases representing the canonical rhomboid core of six transmembrane domains, was studied further. Using gel filtration and crosslinking we demonstrate that hiGlpG is dimeric and functional in DDM detergent solution. More importantly co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that the dimer is present in the lipid bilayer suggesting a physiological dimer. Overall these results indicate that rhomboids form oligomers which are facilitated by the membrane domain. For hiGlpG we have shown that these oligomers exist in the lipid bilayer. This is the first detailed oligomeric state characterization of the rhomboid family of peptidases. PMID:22921757

  14. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development.

  15. Corruption of innate immunity by bacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host's innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections.

  16. Four Amino Acid Changes in HIV-2 Protease Confer Class-Wide Sensitivity to Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert A.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protease is essential for retroviral replication, and protease inhibitors (PI) are important for treating HIV infection. HIV-2 exhibits intrinsic resistance to most FDA-approved HIV-1 PI, retaining clinically useful susceptibility only to lopinavir, darunavir, and saquinavir. The mechanisms for this resistance are unclear; although HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share just 38 to 49% sequence identity, all critical structural features of proteases are conserved. Structural studies have implicated four amino acids in the ligand-binding pocket (positions 32, 47, 76, and 82). We constructed HIV-2ROD9 molecular clones encoding the corresponding wild-type HIV-1 amino acids (I32V, V47I, M76L, and I82V) either individually or together (clone PRΔ4) and compared the phenotypic sensitivities (50% effective concentration [EC50]) of mutant and wild-type viruses to nine FDA-approved PI. Single amino acid replacements I32V, V47I, and M76L increased the susceptibility of HIV-2 to multiple PI, but no single change conferred class-wide sensitivity. In contrast, clone PRΔ4 showed PI susceptibility equivalent to or greater than that of HIV-1 for all PI. We also compared crystallographic structures of wild-type HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases complexed with amprenavir and darunavir to models of the PRΔ4 enzyme. These models suggest that the amprenavir sensitivity of PRΔ4 is attributable to stabilizing enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the P2 and P2′ pockets of the protease dimer. Together, our results show that the combination of four amino acid changes in HIV-2 protease confer a pattern of PI susceptibility comparable to that of HIV-1, providing a structural rationale for intrinsic HIV-2 PI resistance and resolving long-standing questions regarding the determinants of differential PI susceptibility in HIV-1 and HIV-2. IMPORTANCE Proteases are essential for retroviral replication, and HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share a great deal of structural similarity. However, only three of nine

  17. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  18. Diversity of Both the Cultivable Protease-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial Extracellular Proteases in the Coastal Sediments of King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Wang, Guang-Long; Li, Dan; Zhao, Dian-Li; Qin, Qi-Long; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Protease-producing bacteria play a vital role in degrading sedimentary organic nitrogen. However, the diversity of these bacteria and their extracellular proteases in most regions remain unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and of bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica was investigated. The cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 105 cells/g in all 8 sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria were mainly affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, and the predominant genera were Bacillus (22.9%), Flavobacterium (21.0%) and Lacinutrix (16.2%). Among these strains, Pseudoalteromonas and Flavobacteria showed relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria were serine proteases or metalloproteases. These results begin to address the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of the Antarctic Sea. PMID:24223990

  19. Pim1 kinase protects airway epithelial cells from cigarette smoke-induced damage and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M; Heijink, I H; Gras, R; den Boef, L E; Reinders-Luinge, M; Pouwels, S D; Hylkema, M N; van der Toorn, M; Brouwer, U; van Oosterhout, A J M; Nawijn, M C

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is the main risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and can induce airway epithelial cell damage, innate immune responses, and airway inflammation. We hypothesized that cell survival factors might decrease the sensitivity of airway epithelial cells to CS-induced damage, thereby protecting the airways against inflammation upon CS exposure. Here, we tested whether Pim survival kinases could protect from CS-induced inflammation. We determined expression of Pim kinases in lung tissue, airway inflammation, and levels of keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and several damage-associated molecular patterns in bronchoalveolar lavage in mice exposed to CS or air. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were treated with CS extract (CSE) in the presence or absence of Pim1 inhibitor and assessed for loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, induction of cell death, and release of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). We observed increased expression of Pim1, but not of Pim2 and Pim3, in lung tissue after exposure to CS. Pim1-deficient mice displayed a strongly enhanced neutrophilic airway inflammation upon CS exposure compared with wild-type controls. Inhibition of Pim1 activity in BEAS-2B cells increased the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced cell viability upon CSE treatment, whereas release of HSP70 was enhanced. Interestingly, we observed release of S100A8 but not of double-strand DNA or HSP70 in Pim1-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls upon CS exposure. In conclusion, we show that expression of Pim1 protects against CS-induced cell death in vitro and neutrophilic airway inflammation in vivo. Our data suggest that the underlying mechanism involves CS-induced release of S100A8 and KC. PMID:24816488

  20. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  1. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  2. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  3. [The detection of biphasic reactivity of the airway by astograph].

    PubMed

    Ohe, Masashi; Kishi, Fujiya; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    Dose-related curves of the airway responses to Methacholine by Astograph are frequently biphasic. That is, respiratory resistance (Rrs) increases slowly at first and rapidly after that. We proposed (-dGrs/dt)/Grs obtained by using Astograph as an index of dynamic property of the airway, which we suggested was related to a coefficient of the contraction or dilatation of the airway. Grs represents respiratory conductance. By calculating (-dGrs/dt)/Grs, we found that biphasic dose-related curves were composed of the slow and subsequently rapid contraction of the airways. And by mathematical analysis, we found that all segments of the airway contracted simultaneously at a uniform velocity. The combination of slow and rapid contraction explains three types of the airway responses, that is, the monophasic reactivity of the airway with slow contraction, the monophasic reactivity of the airway with rapid contraction and the biphasic reactivity of the airway with slow and subsequently rapid contraction. We found that the frequency of the monophasic reactivity of the airway with slow contraction was significantly higher in patients with COPD than in healthy subjects or in patients with mild asthma. But there was no significant difference in (-dGrs/dt)/Grs values among healthy subjects, patients with mild asthma and patients with COPD.

  4. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  5. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  6. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  7. Small airways function of silica-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Chia, K S; Ng, T P; Jeyaratnam, J

    1992-01-01

    Small airways obstruction may be present for many years before chronic airway obstruction becomes evident. Several spirometric indices, especially flow rates at low lung volumes, may reflect the status of small airways. Time domain indices, by using moments analysis of the volume time spirogram, have also been shown to be sensitive indicators of small airways obstruction. In this study, we have applied the various spirometric indices as well as time domain indices to a group of granite quarry workers without radiographic evidence of silicosis or physiological evidence of obstruction to the larger airways. The aim was to evaluate small airways function in relation to dust exposure in subjects with normal ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second to the forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and normal FVC. The volume-time spirograms of 140 quarry workers were digitized using an electronic digitizer connected to a microcomputer where flow and time domain indices were computed. The workers were divided into three exposure groups based on their occupational history. With adjustment for age, height, and smoking status, all the time domain indices showed significant small airways obstruction with increasing dust exposure. Smokers had greater degree of airways obstruction than the non-smokers, with a similar trend of increase in small airways obstruction in relation to higher exposure. Our present study suggests that small airways obstruction is present among silica exposed workers in the absence of radiological evidence of silicosis and large airways obstruction. There was also evidence of increasing small airways obstruction in higher dust exposure group. Our study also suggests that time domain indices are more sensitive to small airways obstruction.

  8. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637

  9. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  10. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  11. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  12. Detergent alkaline proteases: enzymatic properties, genes, and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Tohru; Ito, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases from bacilli have been used in various industrial fields worldwide, particularly in the production of laundry and automatic dishwashing detergents. They belong to family A of the subtilase superfamily, which is composed of three clans, namely, true subtilisins, high-alkaline proteases, and intracellular proteases. We succeeded in the large-scale production of a high-alkaline protease (M-protease) from alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16, and the enzyme has been introduced into compact heavy-duty laundry detergents. We have also succeeded in the industrial-scale production of a new alkaline protease, KP-43, which was originally resistant to chemical oxidants and to surfactants, produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-KP43 and have incorporated it into laundry detergents. KP-43 and related proteases form a new clan, oxidatively stable proteases, in subtilase family A. In this review, we describe the enzymatic properties, gene sequences, and crystal structures of M-protease, KP-43, and related enzymes. PMID:17630120

  13. Elimination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia from the airways of mice with allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus conidia can exacerbate asthma symptoms. Phagocytosis of conidia is a principal component of the host antifungal defense. We investigated whether allergic airway inflammation (AAI) affects the ability of phagocytic cells in the airways to internalize the resting fungal spores. Methods Using BALB/c mice with experimentally induced AAI, we tested the ability of neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells to internalize A. fumigatus conidia at various anatomical locations. We used light microscopy and differential cell and conidium counts to determine the ingestion potential of neutrophils and macrophages present in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). To identify phagocyte-conidia interactions in conducting airways, conidia labeled with tetramethylrhodamine-(5-(and-6))-isothiocyanate were administered to the oropharyngeal cavity of mice. Confocal microscopy was used to quantify the ingestion potential of Ly-6G+ neutrophils and MHC II+ antigen-presenting cells located in the intraepithelial and subepithelial areas of conducting airways. Results Allergen challenge induced transient neutrophil recruitment to the airways. Application of A. fumigatus conidia at the acute phase of AAI provoked recurrent neutrophil infiltration, and consequently increased the number and the ingestion potential of the airway neutrophils. In the absence of recurrent allergen or conidia provocation, both the ingestion potential and the number of BAL neutrophils decreased. As a result, conidia were primarily internalized by alveolar macrophages in both AAI and control mice at 24 hours post-inhalation. Transient influx of neutrophils to conducting airways shortly after conidial application was observed in mice with AAI. In addition, the ingestion potential of conducting airway neutrophils in mice with induced asthma exceeded that of control mice. Although the number of neutrophils subsequently decreased, the ingestion capacity remained elevated in AAI mice, even at 24

  14. Intracellular alkaline proteases produced by thermoacidophiles: detection of protease heterogeneity by gelatin zymography and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Kocabiyik, Semra; Erdem, Bilge

    2002-08-01

    In this study 24 thermoacidophilic archeal and bacterial strains isolated from hot-springs and hot-soils were screened for their ability to produce intracellular alkaline proteases. The protease activities of the strains, based on azocasein hydrolysis, showed a variation from 0.6 to 5.1 U. The cell extracts of three most potent producers were further examined and it was found that their proteases exhibited maximum activity at 60-70 degrees C and showed a pH optimum over a range of pH 7.0-8.5. Gelatin zymography revealed that two of the selected archeal strains produced multiple active SDS-resistant proteases. On the other hand, PCR amplification of alkaline serine protease gene sequences of total DNA from all isolates yielded four distinct amplification fragments of 650, 450, 400 and 300 bp, which might have been derived from different serine protease genes.

  15. Do Airway Epithelium Air–Liquid Cultures Represent the In Vivo Airway Epithelium Transcriptome?

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Anna; Tilley, Ann E.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells cultured in vitro at the air–liquid interface (ALI) form a pseudostratified epithelium that forms tight junctions and cilia, and produces mucin. These cells are widely used in models of differentiation, injury, and repair. To assess how closely the transcriptome of ALI epithelium matches that of in vivo airway epithelial cells, we used microarrays to compare the transcriptome of human large airway epithelial cells cultured at the ALI with the transcriptome of large airway epithelium obtained via bronchoscopy and brushing. Gene expression profiling showed that global gene expression correlated well between ALI cells and brushed cells, but with some differences. Gene expression patterns mirrored differences in proportions of cell types (ALIs have higher percentages of basal cells, whereas brushed cells have higher percentages of ciliated cells), that is, ALI cells expressed higher levels of basal cell–related genes, and brushed cells expressed higher levels of cilia-related genes. Pathway analysis showed that ALI cells had increased expression of cell cycle and proliferation genes, whereas brushed cells had increased expression of cytoskeletal organization and humoral immune response genes. Overall, ALI cells provide a good representation of the in vivo airway epithelial transcriptome, but for some biologic questions, the differences between in vitro and in vivo environments need to be considered. PMID:20525805

  16. Are new supraglottic airway devices, tracheal tubes and airway viewing devices cost-effective?

    PubMed

    Slinn, Simon J; Froom, Stephen R; Stacey, Mark R W; Gildersleve, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a plethora of new airway devices has become available to the pediatric anesthetist. While all have the laudable intention of improving patient care and some have proven clinical benefits, these devices are often costly and at times claims of an advantage over current equipment and techniques are marginal. Supraglottic airway devices are used in the majority of pediatric anesthetics delivered in the U.K., and airway-viewing devices provide an alternative for routine intubation as well as an option in the management of the difficult airway. Yet hidden beneath the convenience of the former and the technology of the latter, the impact on basic airway skills with a facemask and the lack of opportunities to fine-tune the core skill of intubation represent an unrecognised and unquantifiable cost. A judgement on this value must be factored into the absolute purchase cost and any potential benefits to the quality of patient care, thus blurring any judgement on cost-effectiveness that we might have. An overall value on cost-effectiveness though not in strict monetary terms can then be ascribed. In this review, we evaluate the role of these devices in the care of the pediatric patient and attempt to balance the advantages they offer against the cost they incur, both financial and environmental, and in any quality improvement they might offer in clinical care. PMID:25370686

  17. Silencing Nociceptor Neurons Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Burkett, Patrick R; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J F; Pascal, Maud A; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L; Tran, Johnathan V; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Bean, Bruce P; Levy, Bruce D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-07-15

    Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation, we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8(+) sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large-pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin- or house-dust-mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4(+) and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  18. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  19. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  20. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with {sup 3}H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers.

  1. Advances in upper airway cough syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Xu, Xianghuai; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-05-01

    Upper airway cough syndrome (UACS), previously referred to as postnasal drip syndrome, is one of the most common causes of chronic cough. However, the pathogenesis of UACS/postnasal drip syndrome remains unclear, and physicians in countries throughout the world have different definitions and ways of treating this disease. The various proposed pathogeneses of UACS include the early postnasal drip theory, subsequent chronic airway inflammation theory, and a recent sensory neural hypersensitivity theory. Additionally, some researchers suggest that UACS is a clinical phenotype of cough hypersensitivity syndrome. While the general principles involved in treating UACS are similar throughout the world, the specific details of treatment differ. This review summarizes the various definitions, pathogenic mechanisms, treatments, and other aspects of UACS, to aid clinicians in expanding their knowledge of how to diagnose and treat this syndrome.

  2. Pleomorphic adenoma causing acute airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, D; Papakostas, K; Karkanevatos, A; Coast, G J; Jackson, S R

    2000-08-01

    A case is reported of a pleomorphic adenoma of the minor salivary glands of the oral cavity presenting with acute airway obstruction. This is the first reported case to our knowledge of a mixed salivary tumour of the upper respiratory tract causing upper airway obstruction and acute respiratory failure. The patient had to be intubated and transferred to the intensive care unit. After an elective tracheostomy was performed, the adenoma was excised from its fibrous capsule. It was found to originate from the soft palate and occupied the parapharyngeal space. A high index of suspicion should be kept in order to diagnose tumours of the parapharyngeal space with unusual presentation. These tumours which are usually benign should be considered in the differential diagnosis from more common infectious or traumatic conditions and surgical morbidity should be minimal.

  3. Airway hyperreactivity elicited by toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-albumin conjugate is not accompanied by airway eosinophilic infiltration in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Millecchia, L L; Frazer, D G; Fedan, J S

    1998-02-01

    Nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness is present in many patients with toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma; however, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of this hyperresponsiveness remain controversial. In the present study, we used a guinea pig model to investigate the association of TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness with eosinophilic airway infiltration, which is widely considered to play a key role in the development of allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness. Guinea pigs were sensitized by i.d. injections of 10 microl TDI on day 1 and day 6. Control animals received saline injections. Two weeks after the second injection, airway reactivity to inhaled methacholine and specific airway resistance (sRaw) was measured before and at several times after inhalation challenge with TDI-GSA (guinea pig serum albumin) conjugates. Eosinophils in the airways were detected using enzyme histochemistry and quantified using computer-assisted image analysis. TDI-specific IgG1 antibodies were found in the blood of TDI-sensitized animals. An immediate increase in sRaw was induced in these animals by TDI-GSA challenge; airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine was observed at 6 h and 18 h after TDI-GSA challenge. However, TDI-GSA challenge did not result in an elevation of eosinophils in the airways, compared with control animals. The results suggest that the development of TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is not dependent upon eosinophil infiltration in airways. PMID:9520137

  4. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  5. Voxel classification based airway tree segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Pechin; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a voxel classification based method for segmenting the human airway tree in volumetric computed tomography (CT) images. In contrast to standard methods that use only voxel intensities, our method uses a more complex appearance model based on a set of local image appearance features and Kth nearest neighbor (KNN) classification. The optimal set of features for classification is selected automatically from a large set of features describing the local image structure at several scales. The use of multiple features enables the appearance model to differentiate between airway tree voxels and other voxels of similar intensities in the lung, thus making the segmentation robust to pathologies such as emphysema. The classifier is trained on imperfect segmentations that can easily be obtained using region growing with a manual threshold selection. Experiments show that the proposed method results in a more robust segmentation that can grow into the smaller airway branches without leaking into emphysematous areas, and is able to segment many branches that are not present in the training set.

  6. Spontaneous intrathyroidal hematoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A.E.; Dhaliwal, Sandeep; Tam, Samantha; Low, T. Hubert; Hughes, Brian; Fung, Kevin; MacNeil, S. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage is a rare occurrence that results in pain, discomfort, and occasionally compressive symptoms. Infrequently, extensive thyroid hemorrhage can result in a rapidly expanding hematoma resulting in airway compromise. This is a case of an otherwise healthy young woman, 3 months postpartum, with a slowly expanding spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage that measured at 7 × 5.5 × 5 cm by computed tomography. She ultimately required intubation to manage respiratory distress and subsequently a hemithyroidectomy for definitive treatment. The case presentation is followed by a literature review where known etiologies of thyroid hematoma including traumatic and nontraumatic causes, precipitating anticoagulation, and spontaneous rupture of branches of the external carotid artery are outlined. The potential links to pregnancy are explored. The roles of bedside thyroid ultrasound in the emergency department and lateral neck roentgenogram in diagnosis are explored. The importance of airway management and indications for conservative versus surgical treatments are discussed. Conclusions: This is a case of a spontaneous intrathyroidal hemorrhage, which progressed over days to ultimately cause airway compromise. It is imperative that physicians are educated on the appropriate detection and management of the potentially life-threatening spontaneous thyroid hematoma. PMID:27583841

  7. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  8. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  9. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    PubMed

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained. PMID:22558834

  10. Surgery of the airway: historic notes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joel D

    2016-03-01

    Prior to the 20(th) century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20(th) century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection.

  11. Surgery of the airway: historic notes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the 20th century, the need for surgical procedures on the airway was infrequent and consisted mainly of tracheostomy to relieve airway obstruction or repair of tracheal injuries such as lacerations. Even the ability of tracheal suture lines to heal primarily was viewed with concern due to the rigidity of the tracheal wall, its precarious blood supply and uncertainty as to whether the cartilage components could heal without complications. In the 20th century the evolution of tracheal procedures on major airways evolved to meet the challenges provided by the expanding fields of thoracic surgery and advent of mechanical respiratory support with its associated complications. In the first half of the century lobar and lung resections done for tuberculosis and lung cancer required methods for safe closure of the resulting bronchial stumps and end-to-end bronchial anastomosis in the case of sleeve resections of the lung. Beginning in mid-century the advent of respiratory care units for the treatment of polio and for the expanding fields of thoracic and cardiac surgery resulted in a significant number of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requiring resection and primary repair. In the last 20 years of the century the development of lung transplantation with its requirement for successful bronchial anastomoses between the donor and recipient bronchi, created unique challenges including ischemia of the donor bronchus the adverse effects of immunosuppression, donor lung preservation and diagnosis and management of post-transplant infection and rejection. PMID:26981261

  12. Lentiviral Vector Gene Transfer to Porcine Airways

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L; Cooney, Ashley L; Oakland, Mayumi; Dylla, Douglas E; Wallen, Tanner J; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Chang, Eugene H; McCray, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated lentiviral vector development and transduction efficiencies in well-differentiated primary cultures of pig airway epithelia (PAE) and wild-type pigs in vivo. We noted gene transfer efficiencies similar to that observed for human airway epithelia (HAE). Interestingly, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based vectors transduced immortalized pig cells as well as pig primary cells more efficiently than HIV-1–based vectors. PAE express TRIM5α, a well-characterized species-specific lentiviral restriction factor. We contrasted the restrictive properties of porcine TRIM5α against FIV- and HIV-based vectors using gain and loss of function approaches. We observed no effect on HIV-1 or FIV conferred transgene expression in response to porcine TRIM5α overexpression or knockdown. To evaluate the ability of GP64-FIV to transduce porcine airways in vivo, we delivered vector expressing mCherry to the tracheal lobe of the lung and the ethmoid sinus of 4-week-old pigs. One week later, epithelial cells expressing mCherry were readily detected. Our findings indicate that pseudotyped FIV vectors confer similar tropisms in porcine epithelia as observed in human HAE and provide further support for the selection of GP64 as an appropriate envelope pseudotype for future preclinical gene therapy studies in the porcine model of cystic fibrosis (CF). PMID:23187455

  13. Origin and Diversification of Meprin Proteases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Meprins are astacin metalloproteases with a characteristic, easily recognizable structure, given that they are the only proteases with both MAM and MATH domains plus a transmembrane region. So far assumed to be vertebrate-specific, it is shown here, using a combination of evolutionary and genomic analyses, that meprins originated before the urochordates/vertebrates split. In particular, three genes encoding structurally typical meprin proteins are arranged in tandem in the genome of the urochordate Ciona intestinalis. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the protease and MATH domains present in the meprin-like proteins encoded by the Ciona genes are very similar in sequence to the domains found in vertebrate meprins, which supports them having a common origin. While many vertebrates have the two canonical meprin-encoding genes orthologous to human MEP1A and MEP1B (which respectively encode for the proteins known as meprin α and meprin β), a single gene has been found so far in the genome of the chondrichthyan fish Callorhinchus milii, and additional meprin-encoding genes are present in some species. Particularly, a group of bony fish species have genes encoding highly divergent meprins, here named meprin-F. Genes encoding meprin-F proteins, derived from MEP1B genes, are abundant in some species, as the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, which has 7 of them. Finally, it is confirmed that the MATH domains of meprins are very similar to the ones in TRAF ubiquitin ligases, which suggests that meprins originated when protease and TRAF E3-encoding sequences were combined. PMID:26288188

  14. Purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases and microscopic characterization of pseudomonal protease-induced rabbit corneal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, A S; Gray, L D

    1978-01-01

    Extracellular proteases of three cornea-virulent strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, Ultrogel AcA 54 gel filtration, and flat-bed isoelectric focusing. The purity of the preparations was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis , thin-layer isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoretic procedures, and tests for the presence of other known pseudomonal products. Light and electron microscopic examination of rabbit corneal lesions observed 4 to 6 h after the intracorneal injection of submicrogram amounts of the proteases revealed: (i) degeneration and necrosis of epithelium, endothelium, and keratocytes, (ii) infiltration, degeneration, and necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, (iii) loss of the characteristic weblike pattern, colloidal iron staining, and ruthenium red staining of the stromal proteoglycan ground substance, (iv) dispersal of strucutrally normal appearing collagen fibrils, ground substance, (iv) dispersal of structurally normal appearing collagen fibrils, and (v) accumulation of plasma proteins and fibrin in the necrotic corneas. These structural alterations are very similar to those observed previously during experimental P. aeruginosa keratitis, and this similarity supports the idea that pseudomonal proteases are responsible, at least in part, for the rapid and extensive liquefaction necrosis characteristic of pseudomonal-induced keratitis. In addition, the results support the idea that pseudomonal proteases elicit severe corneal damage by causing the loss of the corneal proteoglycan ground substance, thus resulting in dispersal of undamaged collagen fibrils, weakening of the corneal stroma, and subsequent descemetocele formation and corneal perforation by the anterior chamber pressure. Images PMID:415981

  15. A bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) venom serine protease inhibitor that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hu; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Lee, Kyung Yong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors from bumblebee venom have been shown to block plasmin activity. In this study, we identified the protein BiVSPI from the venom of Bombus ignitus to be a serine protease inhibitor and an antimicrobial factor. BiVSPI is a 55-amino acid mature peptide with ten conserved cysteine residues and a P1 methionine residue. BiVSPI is expressed in the venom gland and also found in the venom as an 8-kDa peptide. Recombinant BiVSPI that was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells exhibited inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin but not trypsin. BiVSPI also inhibited microbial serine proteases, such as subtilisin A (Ki=6.57nM) and proteinase K (Ki=7.11nM). In addition, BiVSPI was shown to bind directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Beauveria bassiana but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these results, BiVSPI exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. These findings provide evidence for a novel serine protease inhibitor in bumblebee venom that has antimicrobial functions.

  16. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  17. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heal, J. W.; Wells, S. A.; Jimenez-Roldan, E.; Freedman, R. F.; Römer, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the β-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  18. Endogenous Protease Activation of ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Adebamiro, Adedotun; Cheng, Yi; Johnson, John P.; Bridges, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous serine proteases have been reported to control the reabsorption of Na+ by kidney- and lung-derived epithelial cells via stimulation of electrogenic Na+ transport mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). In this study we investigated the effects of aprotinin on ENaC single channel properties using transepithelial fluctuation analysis in the amphibian kidney epithelium, A6. Aprotinin caused a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition (84 ± 10.5%) in the amiloride-sensitive sodium transport (INa) with a time constant of 18 min and half maximal inhibition constant of 1 μM. Analysis of amiloride analogue blocker–induced fluctuations in INa showed linear rate–concentration plots with identical blocker on and off rates in control and aprotinin-inhibited conditions. Verification of open-block kinetics allowed for the use of a pulse protocol method (Helman, S.I., X. Liu, K. Baldwin, B.L. Blazer-Yost, and W.J. Els. 1998. Am. J. Physiol. 274:C947–C957) to study the same cells under different conditions as well as the reversibility of the aprotinin effect on single channel properties. Aprotinin caused reversible changes in all three single channel properties but only the change in the number of open channels was consistent with the inhibition of INa. A 50% decrease in INa was accompanied by 50% increases in the single channel current and open probability but an 80% decrease in the number of open channels. Washout of aprotinin led to a time-dependent restoration of INa as well as the single channel properties to the control, pre-aprotinin, values. We conclude that protease regulation of INa is mediated by changes in the number of open channels in the apical membrane. The increase in the single channel current caused by protease inhibition can be explained by a hyperpolarization of the apical membrane potential as active Na+ channels are retrieved. The paradoxical increase in channel open probability caused by protease inhibition will require further

  19. Airway management of a difficult airway due to prolonged enlarged goiter using loco-sedative technique

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Divya; Dhiraaj, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate airway management is an essential part of anesthesiologist's role. Huge goiters can lead to distorted airway and difficulty in endotracheal intubation. In this report, we present a case of a 67-year-old woman with a huge toxic multinodular thyroid swelling, gradually increasing in size for last 20 years, where trachea was successfully intubated. She had a history of deferred surgery in June 2007 due to inability to intubate, despite 5-6 attempts using different laryngoscopes, bougie, and stylet. Patient was re-admitted in December 2011 for the surgery and was successfully intubated this time with help of fiberoptic intubation using loco-sedative technique. Patient was electively kept intubated postoperatively in view of chances of tracheomalacia due to prolonged large goiter. She was extubated successfully on post-op day 2 after demonstration of leak around trachea following tracheal tube cuff deflation. The different techniques of managing the difficult airway in these patients are discussed. PMID:23717240

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Thoracic External Beam Radiotherapy After Airway Stenting in Malignant Airway Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rochet, Nathalie; Hauswald, Henrik; Schmaus, Martina; Hensley, Frank; Huber, Peter; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix J.; Debus, Juergen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the outcome and toxicity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after airway stents were placed in patients treated for malignant airway obstruction. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2009, we performed airway stenting followed by EBRT in 43 patients for symptomatic primary lung cancer (n = 31) or other thoracic malignancies (n = 12). The median time interval between stent placement and first irradiation was 14 days. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had reduced performance status (Karnofsky performance score, {<=}70). Results: EBRT had to be stopped prematurely in 16 patients (37%), at a median total dose of 17 Gy, for various reasons. In this group of patients, the survival was poor, with a median overall survival (OS) of only 21 days. Twenty-seven patients (63%) completed radiotherapy as planned, with a median OS of 8.4 months. Fourteen of 43 patients (33%) developed at least one Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event of grade 3 to 5. The most common event was a malignant restenosis of the stent leading to asphyxia (n = 7), followed by fistula formation (n = 4), necrosis (n = 3), mediastinitis with abscess (n = 1), secondary nonmalignant airway stenosis (n = 1), and hemoptysis (n = 1). With the exception of one event, all events were associated with a local progression of the tumor. Conclusions: Although the long-term prognosis for patients with malignant airway obstruction is poor, airway stenting combined with EBRT offers a possible therapeutic option, achieving fast relief of acute respiratory distress with an associated antitumor effect, resulting in a potential survival benefit. However, due to local advanced tumor growth, increased rates of adverse events are to be expected, necessitating careful monitoring.

  1. Influence of sleep on response to negative airway pressure of tensor palatini muscle and retropalatal airway.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; White, D P

    1993-11-01

    Increased retropalatal airway resistance may be caused by a sleep-induced loss of palatal muscle activity and a diminished ability of these muscles to respond to the increasing intrapharyngeal negative pressure that develops during sleep. To investigate these possibilities, in six normal subjects, we determined the effect of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep on 1) the tensor palatini (TP) electromyogram (EMG) response to rapid-onset negative-pressure generations (NPG) in the upper airway and 2) the collapsibility of the retropalatal airway during these NPGs. During wakefulness, the change in TP EMG from basal to peak levels (during NPG) was 19.8 +/- 3.2 arbitrary units (P < 0.005). This was markedly reduced during sleep (3.6 +/- 1.5 arbitrary units; P < 0.001). The latency of the TP EMG response was 48.5 +/- 5.6 ms during wakefulness but was prolonged during sleep (105.0 +/- 12.2 ms; P < 0.02). The peak transpalatal pressure during NPG (a measure of airway collapse) was 2.1 +/- 0.7 cmH2O during wakefulness and increased to 5.3 +/- 0.8 cmH2O during sleep (P < 0.05). We conclude that the brisk reflex response of the TP muscle to negative pressure during wakefulness is markedly reduced during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, in association with a more collapsible retropalatal airway. We speculate that the reduction in this TP reflex response contributes to retropalatal airway narrowing during sleep in normal subjects.

  2. Motorcycle exhaust particles induce airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in BALB/C mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2004-06-01

    A number of large studies have reported that environmental pollutants from fossil fuel combustion can cause deleterious effects to the immune system, resulting in an allergic reaction leading to respiratory tract damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP), a major pollutant in the Taiwan urban area, on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in laboratory animals. BALB/c mice were instilled intratracheally (i.t.) with 1.2 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg of MEP, which was collected from two-stroke motorcycle engines. The mice were exposed 3 times i.t. with MEP, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness were sequentially analyzed. We found that MEP would induce airway and pulmonary inflammation characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung. In addition, MEP treatment enhanced BALF interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine levels and serum IgE production. Bronchial response measured by unrestrained plethysmography with methacholine challenge showed that MEP treatment induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in BALB/c mice. The chemical components in MEP were further fractionated with organic solvents, and we found that the benzene-extracted fraction exerts a similar biological effect as seen with MEP, including airway inflammation, increased BALF IL-4, serum IgE production, and induction of AHR. In conclusion, we present evidence showing that the filter-trapped particles emitted from the unleaded-gasoline-fueled two-stroke motorcycle engine may induce proinflammatory and proallergic response profiles in the absence of exposure to allergen.

  3. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    PubMed Central

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  4. Difficult Airway Management in Field Conditions: Somalia Experience.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Nasır, Serdar Nazif

    2015-10-01

    Difficult airway is defined as having the patient's mask ventilation or difficult tracheal intubation of an experienced anaesthesiologist. A number of reasons, such as congenital or acquired anatomical anomalies, can cause difficult intubation and difficult ventilation. Keeping all equipment ready for airway management of patients will reduce mortality and complications. In this case, it is intended that the submission of difficult airway management who encountered in mandibular reconstruction for mandible bone defect repairing with reconstruction plates before at the field conditions in Somalia.

  5. Improving the safety of remote site emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wijesuriya, Julian; Brand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Airway management, particularly in non-theatre settings, is an area of anaesthesia and critical care associated with significant risk of morbidity & mortality, as highlighted during the 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists (NAP4). A survey of junior anaesthetists at our hospital highlighted a lack of confidence and perceived lack of safety in emergency airway management, especially in non-theatre settings. We developed and implemented a multifaceted airway package designed to improve the safety of remote site airway management. A Rapid Sequence Induction (RSI) checklist was developed; this was combined with new advanced airway equipment and drugs bags. Additionally, new carbon dioxide detector filters were procured in order to comply with NAP4 monitoring recommendations. The RSI checklists were placed in key locations throughout the hospital and the drugs and advanced airway equipment bags were centralised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It was agreed with the senior nursing staff that an appropriately trained ICU nurse would attend all emergency situations with new airway resources upon request. Departmental guidelines were updated to include details of the new resources and the on-call anaesthetist's responsibilities regarding checks and maintenance. Following our intervention trainees reported higher confidence levels regarding remote site emergency airway management. Nine trusts within the Northern Region were surveyed and we found large variations in the provision of remote site airway management resources. Complications in remote site airway management due lack of available appropriate drugs, equipment or trained staff are potentially life threatening and completely avoidable. Utilising the intervention package an anaesthetist would be able to safely plan and prepare for airway management in any setting. They would subsequently have the drugs, equipment, and trained assistance required to manage any difficulties or complications

  6. Airway-parenchymal interdependence after airway contraction in rat lung explants.

    PubMed

    Adler, A; Cowley, E A; Bates, J H; Eidelman, D H

    1998-07-01

    The constriction of pulmonary airways is limited by the tethering effect exerted by parenchymal attachments. To characterize this tethering effect at the scale of intraparenchymal airways, we studied the pattern of parenchymal distortion due to bronchoconstriction in a rat lung explant system. First, we measured the elastic modulus under tension for 2% (wt/vol) agarose alone (37.6 +/- 1.5 kPa) and for agarose-filled lung (5.7 +/- 1.3 kPa). The latter is similar to the elastic modulus of air-filled lung at total lung capacity (4.5-6 kPa) (S. J. Lai-Fook, T. A. Wilson, R. E. Hyatt, and J. R. Rodarte. J. Appl. Physiol. 40: 508-513, 1976), suggesting that explants can be used as a model of lung tissue distortion. Subsequently, confocal microscopic images of fluorescently labeled 0.5-mm-thick explants prepared from agarose-filled rat lungs inflated to total lung capacity (48 ml/kg) were acquired. Images were taken before and after airway constriction was induced by direct application of 10 mM methacholine, and the pattern of parenchymal distortion was measured from the displacement of tissue landmarks identified in each image for 14 explants. The magnitude of the radial component of tissue displacement was calculated as a function of distance from the airway wall and characterized by a parameter, b, describing the rate at which tissue movement decreased with radial distance. The parameter b was 0.994 +/- 0.19 (SE), which is close to the prediction of b = 1 of micromechanical modeling (T. A. Wilson. J. Appl. Physiol. 33: 472-478, 1972). There was significant variability in b, however, which was correlated with the fractional reduction in airway diameter (r = 0.496). Additionally, parenchymal distortion showed significant torsion with respect to the radial direction. This torsion was similar in concentric zones around the airway, suggesting that it originates from inhomogeneity in the parenchyma rather than inhomogeneous airway constriction. Our results demonstrate the

  7. Practical advance in obtaining an emergency airway via cricothyroidotomy.

    PubMed

    Huber, William G; Dahman, Marc H; Thomas, Deanna; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2007-05-01

    By the time a cricothyroidotomy is deemed necessary, the patient is in critical need of an emergency airway before anoxic damage ensues. Two things are necessary for the delivery of the requisite oxygen. First, an airway must be rapidly established. Second, the airway must be large enough to facilitate ventilation. Present methods for emergency cricothyroidotomy include needle cricothyroidotomy, which suffers from difficulties in both establishment and ventilation. We describe here a practical and widely available method for establishing a timely effective airway that has been used successfully for five patients since 1992.

  8. Airway management in patients with burn contractures of the neck.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Smita; Mullick, Parul

    2015-12-01

    Airway management of patients with burn contracture of the neck (PBC neck) is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Patient evaluation includes history, physical and airway examination. A safe approach in the airway management of a patient with moderate to severe PBC neck is to secure the airway with the patient awake. The anesthesiologist should have a pre-planned strategy for intubation of the difficult airway. The choices advocated for airway management of such patients include awake fiberoptic-guided intubation, use of intubating laryngeal mask airway, intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents, intubation with neuromuscular blocking agents after testing the ability to ventilate by mask, pre-induction neck scar release under local anesthesia and ketamine or sedation followed by direct laryngoscopy and intubation and video-laryngoscope guided intubation, amongst others. Preparation of the patient includes an explanation of the proposed procedure, sedation, administration of antisialogogues and regional anesthesia of the airway. The various options for intubation of patients with PBC neck, intraoperative concerns and safe extubation are described. Back-up plans, airway rescue strategies and a review of literature on this subject are presented.

  9. Mechanisms of Acid and Base Secretion by the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the main functions of the airway epithelium is to inactivate and remove infectious particles from inhaled air and thereby prevent infection of the distal lung. This function is achieved by mucociliary and cough clearance and by antimicrobial factors present in the airway surface liquid (ASL). There are indications that airway defenses are affected by the pH of the ASL and historically, acidification of the airway surfaces has been suggested as a measure of airway disease. However, even in health, the ASL is slightly acidic, and this acidity might be part of normal airway defense. Only recently research has focused on the mechanisms responsible for acid and base secretion into the ASL. Advances resulted from research into the airway disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) after it was found that the CFTR C1- channel conducts HCO3- and, therefore, may contribute to ASL pH. However, the acidity of the ASL indicated parallel mechanisms for H+ secretion. Recent investigations identified several H+ transporters in the apical membrane of the airway epithelium. These include H+ channels and ATP-driven H+ pumps, including a non-gastric isoform of the H+-K+ ATPase and a vacuolar-type H+ ATPase. Current knowledge of acid and base transporters and their potential roles in airway mucosal pH regulation is reviewed here. PMID:17091214

  10. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Airway, Ventilation, and Sedation.

    PubMed

    Seder, David B; Jagoda, Andy; Riggs, Becky

    2015-12-01

    Airway management and ventilation are central to the resuscitation of the neurologically ill. These patients often have evolving processes that threaten the airway and adequate ventilation. Furthermore, intubation, ventilation, and sedative choices directly affect brain perfusion. Therefore, airway, ventilation, and sedation was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Topics include airway management, when and how to intubate with special attention to hemodynamics and preservation of cerebral blood flow, mechanical ventilation settings, and the use of sedative agents based on the patient's neurological status. PMID:26438457

  11. Cardiovascular Causes of Pediatric Airway Compression: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Manphool; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Rana Sandip; Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Airways compression by vascular structures is one of the important comorbidities of congenital heart disease with incidence of approximately 1%-2% in children. Airways compression is a consequence of abnormal configuration of the great vessels producing a vascular ring with enlargement of normal structures (pulmonary arteries or cardiac chambers) or because of surgery. A high index of suspicion for vascular airway compression is important in children with recurrent respiratory complaints. Early diagnosis and management are essential, as chronic airway compression causes significant morbidity. As the underlying anatomical patterns tend to be highly complex, presurgical imaging assessment is essential.

  12. Strategies and algorithms for management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Thomas; Gerig, Hans J; Henderson, John J

    2005-12-01

    Management of the difficult airway is the most important patient safety issue in the practice of anaesthesia. Many national societies have developed algorithms and guidelines for management of the difficult airway. The key issues of this chapter are definition of terms, the advantages and disadvantages of the use of guidelines, and a comparison of different algorithms and guidelines for management of the most important clinical airway scenarios. Although there is no strong evidence of benefit for any specific strategy or algorithm for management of the difficult airway, there is strong agreement that a pre-planned strategy may lead to improved outcome.

  13. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Y.S.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known roles in the nervous system, there is increasing recognition that neurotrophins such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as their receptors are expressed in peripheral tissues including the lung, and can thus potentially contribute to both normal physiology and pathophysiology of several diseases. The relevance of this family of growth factors lies in emerging clinical data indicating altered neurotrophin levels and function in a range of diseases including neonatal and adult asthma, sinusitis, influenza, and lung cancer. The current review focuses on 1) the importance of BDNF expression and signaling mechanisms in early airway and lung development, critical to both normal neonatal lung function and also its disruption in prematurity and insults such as inflammation and infection; 2) how BDNF, potentially derived from airway nerves modulate neurogenic control of airway tone, a key aspect of airway reflexes as well as dysfunctional responses to allergic inflammation; 3) the emerging idea that local BDNF production by resident airway cells such as epithelium and airway smooth muscle can contribute to normal airway structure and function, and to airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in diseases such as asthma. Furthermore, given its pleiotropic effects in the airway, BDNF may be a novel and appealing therapeutic target. PMID:24560686

  14. Upper airway function during maximal exercise in horses with obstructive upper airway lesions. Effect of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Williams, J W; Meagher, D M; Pascoe, J R; Hornof, W J

    1990-01-01

    Upper airway pressure was measured during maximal exercise in 10 Thoroughbred racehorses with naturally occurring upper airway obstruction. Left laryngeal hemiplegia and arytenoid chondropathy resulted in substantial increases (30-40 cm H2O) in inspiratory upper airway pressure (Pl), whereas complicated aryepiglottic entrapment and subepiglottic cysts produced only modest increases (15 cm H2O) in Pl. Uncomplicated aryepiglottic entrapment and grade IV pharyngeal lymphoid hyperplasia produced only slight increases (3-5 cm H2O). In general, surgical procedures restored airway pressures to within normal limits. Subtotal arytenoidectomy improved but did not normalize airway pressures in horses with arytenoid chondropathy. Pharyngeal lymphoid hyperplasia appeared to have little effect on upper airway function.

  15. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  16. AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE FOLLOWING ANTIGEN AND PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE IS VAGALLY MEDIATED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensory nerves within the airways can initiate a variety of protective reflexes. We hypothesized that insults such as exposure to antigen and particulate matter (PM) might dysregulate airway sensory nerve function, thereby contributing to enhanced airway inflammation and hyperre...

  17. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  18. Broad-Spectrum Allosteric Inhibition of Herpesvirus Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses rely on a homodimeric protease for viral capsid maturation. A small molecule, DD2, previously shown to disrupt dimerization of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) by trapping an inactive monomeric conformation and two analogues generated through carboxylate bioisosteric replacement (compounds 2 and 3) were shown to inhibit the associated proteases of all three human herpesvirus (HHV) subfamilies (α, β, and γ). Inhibition data reveal that compound 2 has potency comparable to or better than that of DD2 against the tested proteases. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a new application of the kinetic analysis developed by Zhang and Poorman [Zhang, Z. Y., Poorman, R. A., et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15591–15594] show DD2, compound 2, and compound 3 inhibit HHV proteases by dimer disruption. All three compounds bind the dimer interface of other HHV proteases in a manner analogous to binding of DD2 to KSHV protease. The determination and analysis of cocrystal structures of both analogues with the KSHV Pr monomer verify and elaborate on the mode of binding for this chemical scaffold, explaining a newly observed critical structure–activity relationship. These results reveal a prototypical chemical scaffold for broad-spectrum allosteric inhibition of human herpesvirus proteases and an approach for the identification of small molecules that allosterically regulate protein activity by targeting protein–protein interactions. PMID:24977643

  19. Effect of proteases on the. beta. -thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Donlon, M.A.

    1985-02-11

    Rat peritoneal mast cells and mast cell granules were evaluated by radioimmunoassay for the presence of ..beta..-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4. The initial assays indicated that a ..beta..-thromboglobulin cross reacting material was released from mast cells by compound 48/80 in a similar dose-dependent manner as histamine release. The material was also found to be associated with purified granules. However, the use of protease inhibitors in the buffers completely abolished the positive assays. Further evaluation of the effects of various proteases on the ..beta..-thromboglobulin assay indicated that elastase would also generate a false positive assay which could then be neutralized by the use of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin as a protease inhibitor. There was no protease effect on the platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay which always showed no detectable amounts with mast cells, granules or proteases. These results clearly indicate the artifactual positive assays which can arise when using certain radioimmunoassay tests in the presence of cell proteases. The use of protease inhibitors is a necessary control when applying a radioimmunoassay to a system with potentially active proteases. 24 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  1. Submental intubation with intubating laryngeal mask airway as conduit: An airway option for oral submucous fibrosis release

    PubMed Central

    Mohambourame, Aruloli; Sameer, Mohamed; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Ramamirtham, Muthukumaran

    2015-01-01

    The main anesthetic concern with oral submucous fibrosis is progressive restriction of mouth opening due to fibrosis producing difficult airway. Securing airway by nasotracheal intubation and tracheostomy are associated with potential complications. Flexible fiberoscope is not available in all the institutes. Submental intubation using intubating laryngeal mask airway is an acceptable alternative technique in such situations. It also provides an unobstructed surgical field. PMID:25886429

  2. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  3. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  4. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  5. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  6. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  7. Airway management using laryngeal mask airway in insertion of the Montgomery tracheal tube for subglottic stenosis -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sun; Kwon, Young-Suk; Lee, Sangseock; Yon, Jun Heum; Kim, Dong Won

    2010-12-01

    The Montgomery tracheal tube (T-tube) is a device used as a combined tracheal stent and airway after laryngotracheoplasty for patients with tracheal stenosis. This device can present various challenges to anesthesiologists during its placement, including the potential for acute loss of the airway, inadequate administration of inhalation agents, and inadequacy of controlled mechanical ventilation. The present case of successful airway management used a laryngeal mask airway under total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil in the insertion of a Montgomery T-tube in a tracheal resection and thyrotracheal anastomosis because of severe subglottic stenosis.

  8. Positive selection of digestive Cys proteases in herbivorous Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Juan; Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Cloutier, Conrad; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Positive selection is thought to contribute to the functional diversification of insect-inducible protease inhibitors in plants in response to selective pressures exerted by the digestive proteases of their herbivorous enemies. Here we assessed whether a reciprocal evolutionary process takes place on the insect side, and whether ingestion of a positively selected plant inhibitor may translate into a measurable rebalancing of midgut proteases in vivo. Midgut Cys proteases of herbivorous Coleoptera, including the major pest Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), were first compared using a codon-based evolutionary model to look for the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites among the tested sequences. Hypervariable sites were found, distributed within -or close to- amino acid regions interacting with Cys-type inhibitors of the plant cystatin protein family. A close examination of L. decemlineata sequences indicated a link between their assignment to protease functional families and amino acid identity at positively selected sites. A function-diversifying role for positive selection was further suggested empirically by in vitro protease assays and a shotgun proteomic analysis of L. decemlineata Cys proteases showing a differential rebalancing of protease functional family complements in larvae fed single variants of a model cystatin mutated at positively selected amino acid sites. These data confirm overall the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites in herbivorous Coleoptera digestive Cys proteases. They also support the idea of an adaptive role for positive selection, useful to generate functionally diverse proteases in insect herbivores ingesting functionally diverse, rapidly evolving dietary cystatins. PMID:26264818

  9. Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Richard B; Cohen, Mitchell; Gordon, Terry; Nadziejko, Christine; Zelikoff, Judith T; Sisco, Maureen; Regal, Jean F; Ménache, Margaret G

    2002-06-01

    Although acute exposure to ozone (03*) has been shown to influence the severity and prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, information has been lacking on effects due to long-term exposure at relatively low exposure concentrations. The goals of this study were to determine whether long-term repeated ozone exposures could induce nonspecific hyperresponsiveness in normal, nonatopic (nonsensitized) animals, whether such exposure could exacerbate the preexisting hyperresponsive state in atopic (sensitized) animals, or both. The study was also designed to determine whether gender modulated airway responsiveness related to ozone exposure. Airway responsiveness was measured during and after exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 ppm ozone for 4 hours/day, 4 days/week for 24 weeks in normal, nonsensitized guinea pigs, in guinea pigs sensitized to an allergen (ovalbumin) prior to initiation of ozone exposures, and in animals sensitized concurrently with ozone exposures. Both male and female animals were studied. Ozone exposure did not produce airway hyperresponsiveness in nonsensitized animals. Ozone exposure did exacerbate airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific bronchoprovocation in both groups of sensitized animals, and this effect persisted at least 4 weeks after the end of the exposures. Although the overall degree of airway responsiveness did differ between genders (males had more responsive airways than did females), the airway response to ozone exposure did not differ between the two groups. Ozone-induced effects upon airway responsiveness were not associated with the number of pulmonary eosinophils or with any chronic pulmonary inflammatory response. Levels of antigen-specific antibodies increased in sensitized animals, and a significant correlation was observed between airway responsiveness and antibody levels. The results of this study provide support for a role of ambient ozone exposure in exacerbation of airway dysfunction in persons with atopy.

  10. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced.

  11. Restoring airway epithelial barrier dysfunction: a new therapeutic challenge in allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Steelant, B; Seys, S F; Boeckxstaens, G; Akdis, C A; Ceuppens, J L; Hellings, P W

    2016-09-01

    An intact functional mucosal barrier is considered to be crucial for the maintenance of airway homeostasis as it protects the host immune system from exposure to allergens and noxious environmental triggers. Recent data provided evidence for the contribution of barrier dysfunction to the development of inflammatory diseases in the airways, skin and gut. A defective barrier has been documented in chronic rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it remains to be elucidated to what extent primary (genetic) versus secondary (inflammatory) mechanisms drive barrier dysfunction. The precise pathogenesis of barrier dysfunction in patients with chronic mucosal inflammation and its implications on tissue inflammation and systemic absorption of exogenous particles are only partly understood. Since epithelial barrier defects are linked with chronicity and severity of airway inflammation, restoring the barrier integrity may become a useful approach in the treatment of allergic diseases. We here provide a state-of-the-art review on epithelial barrier dysfunction in upper and lower airways as well as in the intestine and the skin and on how barrier dysfunction can be restored from a therapeutic perspective.

  12. A Treatment with a Protease Inhibitor Recombinant from the Cattle Tick (Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus) Ameliorates Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Juliana D.; Neves, Luana P.; Olivo, Clarice R.; Duran, Adriana; Almeida, Francine M.; Arantes, Petra M. M.; Prado, Carla M.; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Tanaka, Aparecida S.; Martins, Mílton A.; Sasaki, Sergio D.; Lopes, Fernanda D. T. Q. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine whether a serine protease inhibitor treatment can prevent or minimize emphysema in mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were subjected to porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) nasal instillation to induce emphysema and were treated with a serine protease inhibitor (rBmTI-A) before (Protocol 1) and after (Protocol 2) emphysema development. In both protocols, we evaluated lung function to evaluate the airway resistance (Raw), tissue damping (Gtis) and tissue elastance (Htis). The inflammatory profile was analyzed in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) and through the use of morphometry; we measured the mean linear intercept (Lm) (to verify alveolar enlargement), the volume proportion of collagen and elastic fibers, and the numbers of macrophages and metalloprotease 12 (MMP-12) positive cells in the parenchyma. We showed that at both time points, even after the emphysema was established, the rBmTI-A treatment was sufficient to reverse the loss of elastic recoil measured by Htis, the alveolar enlargement and the increase in the total number of cells in the BALF, with a primary decrease in the number of macrophages. Although, the treatment did not control the increase in macrophages in the lung parenchyma, it was sufficient to decrease the number of positive cells for MMP-12 and reduce the volume of collagen fibers, which was increased in PPE groups. These findings attest to the importance of MMP-12 in PPE-induced emphysema and suggest that this metalloprotease could be an effective therapeutic target. PMID:24886716

  13. Protease activity of Per a 10 potentiates Th2 polarization by increasing IL-23 and OX40L.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Komal; Kale, Sagar L; Arora, Naveen

    2015-12-01

    Proteases are implicated in exacerbation of allergic diseases. In this study, the role of proteolytic activity of Per a 10 was evaluated on Th2 polarization. Intranasal administration of Per a 10 in mice led to allergic airway inflammation as seen by higher IgE levels, cellular infiltration, IL-17A, and Th2 cytokines, whereas, inactive (Δ)Per a 10 showed attenuated response. There was an increased OX40L expression on lung and lymph node dendritic cells in Per a 10 immunized group and on Per a 10 stimulated BMDCs. Reduction in CD40 expression without any change at transcript level in lungs of Per a 10 immunized mice suggested CD40 cleavage. BMDCs pulsed with Per a 10 showed reduced CD40 expression with lower IL-12p70 secretion as compared to heat inactivated Per a 10. IL-23, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in Per a 10 stimulated BMDCs supernatant. In DC-T cell coculture studies, Per a 10 pulsed BMDCs showed higher levels of IL-4 and IL-13 that were reduced on blocking of either IL-23 or OX40L. In conclusion, the data suggests a critical role of protease activity of Per a 10 in promoting Th2 polarization by increasing IL-23 secretion and OX40L expression on dendritic cells. PMID:26417883

  14. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  15. New insights into upper airway innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Protecting the upper airway from microbial infection is an important function of the immune system. Proper detection of these pathogens is paramount for sinonasal epithelial cells to be able to prepare a defensive response. Toll-like receptors and, more recently, bitter taste receptors and sweet taste receptors have been implicated as sensors able to detect the presence of these pathogens and certain compounds that they secrete. Activation of these receptors also triggers innate immune responses to prevent or counteract infection, including mucociliary clearance and the production and secretion of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., defensins). Objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the upper airway, the mechanisms by which it is carried out, and its clinical relevance. Methods: A literature review of the existing knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the human sinonasal cavity was performed. Results: Clinical and basic science studies have shown that the physical epithelial cell barrier, mucociliary clearance, and antimicrobial compound secretion play pivotal innate immune roles in defending the sinonasal cavity from infection. Clinical findings have also linked dysfunction of these defense mechanisms with diseases, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. Recent discoveries have elucidated the significance of bitter and sweet taste receptors in modulating immune responses in the upper airway. Conclusion: Numerous innate immune mechanisms seem to work in a concerted fashion to keep the sinonasal cavity free of infection. Understanding sinonasal innate immune function and dysfunction in health and disease has important implications for patients with respiratory ailments, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis.

  16. New insights into upper airway innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Protecting the upper airway from microbial infection is an important function of the immune system. Proper detection of these pathogens is paramount for sinonasal epithelial cells to be able to prepare a defensive response. Toll-like receptors and, more recently, bitter taste receptors and sweet taste receptors have been implicated as sensors able to detect the presence of these pathogens and certain compounds that they secrete. Activation of these receptors also triggers innate immune responses to prevent or counteract infection, including mucociliary clearance and the production and secretion of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., defensins). Objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the upper airway, the mechanisms by which it is carried out, and its clinical relevance. Methods: A literature review of the existing knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the human sinonasal cavity was performed. Results: Clinical and basic science studies have shown that the physical epithelial cell barrier, mucociliary clearance, and antimicrobial compound secretion play pivotal innate immune roles in defending the sinonasal cavity from infection. Clinical findings have also linked dysfunction of these defense mechanisms with diseases, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. Recent discoveries have elucidated the significance of bitter and sweet taste receptors in modulating immune responses in the upper airway. Conclusion: Numerous innate immune mechanisms seem to work in a concerted fashion to keep the sinonasal cavity free of infection. Understanding sinonasal innate immune function and dysfunction in health and disease has important implications for patients with respiratory ailments, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27657896

  17. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  18. Positive airway pressure therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takao; Suda, Shoko; Kasai, Takatoshi

    2014-11-26

    Heart failure (HF) is a life-threatening disease and is a growing public health concern. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management for HF, the morbidity and mortality from HF remain high. Therefore, non-pharmacological approaches for HF are being developed. However, most non-pharmacological approaches are invasive, have limited indication and are considered only for advanced HF. Accordingly, the development of less invasive, non-pharmacological approaches that improve outcomes for patients with HF is important. One such approach may include positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. In this review, the role of PAP therapy applied through mask interfaces in the wide spectrum of HF care is discussed. PMID:25429330

  19. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  20. MOEBIUS SYNDROME: CHALLENGES OF AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Budić, Ivana; Šurdilović, Dušan; Slavković, Anđelka; Marjanović, Vesna; Stević, Marija; Simić, Dušica

    2016-03-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes. PMID:27276780

  1. Airway protease/antiprotease imbalance in atopic asthmatics contributes to increased influenza A virus cleavage and replication

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthmatics are more susceptible to influenza infections, yet mechanisms mediating this enhanced susceptibility are unknown. Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein binds to sialic add residues on the host cells. HA requires cleavage to allow fusion of the viral HA with host ce...

  2. Contribution of airway closure to chronic postbronchiolitis airway dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, Ronald L; Tuffaha, Amjad

    2004-03-01

    Genetically susceptible Brown Norway rats develop a chronic asthmalike syndrome after recovering from viral bronchiolitis at an early age. We hypothesized that airway closure is an important mechanism of airflow obstruction in postbronchiolitis rats. Rats were studied 8-12 wk after inoculation with Sendai virus or sterile vehicle at 3-4 wk of age. Under light pentobarbital anesthesia, rats were instrumented with an orotracheal catheter and an esophageal pressure monitor and placed in a total body plethysmograph. Lung volumes and forced-expiratory maneuvers were measured using the Boyle's law method and software-controlled valving of positive and negative pressures to elicit lung inflations and rapid deflations; pulmonary resistance was measured during spontaneous tidal breathing; and quasi-static pressure-volume curves were obtained with passive inflations and deflations in fully anesthetized, paralyzed rats. Compared with controls, the postbronchiolitis rats had elevated pulmonary resistance and reduced forced-expiratory volume in 0.2 s. Most of the reduced forced-expiratory volume in 0.2 s was associated with reduced forced vital capacity, indicating premature airway closure as a prominent mechanism. The reduced airflow in postbronchiolitis rats was highly dependent on lung volume, being nearly normal at 70% lung capacity, but sevenfold less than normal at 30% lung capacity. Increased respiratory system hysteresis between functional reserve capacity and total lung capacity was evidence for increased airway closure at normal end-expiratory lung volumes in postbronchiolitis rats. We conclude that airway instability and closure is a prominent mechanism of the chronic airway dysfunction in rats that have recovered from viral bronchiolitis at an early age. PMID:14594863

  3. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor: INHIBITION OF CYSTEINE PROTEASES BUT NOT SERINE PROTEASES.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G; Jewhurst, Heather L; Drysdale, Orla C; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P

    2016-09-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu(15) within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu(15)/Arg(15)) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu(15) in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host.

  4. Preventing Cleavage of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attachment Protein in Vero Cells Rescues the Infectivity of Progeny Virus for Primary Human Airway Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Corry, Jacqueline; Johnson, Sara M.; Cornwell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT All live attenuated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines that have advanced to clinical trials have been produced in Vero cells. The attachment (G) glycoprotein in virions produced in these cells is smaller than that produced in other immortalized cells due to cleavage. These virions are 5-fold less infectious for primary well-differentiated human airway epithelial (HAE) cell cultures. Because HAE cells are isolated directly from human airways, Vero cell-grown vaccine virus would very likely be similarly inefficient at initiating infection of the nasal epithelium following vaccination, and therefore, a larger inoculum would be required for effective vaccination. We hypothesized that Vero cell-derived virus containing an intact G protein would be more infectious for HAE cell cultures. Using protease inhibitors with increasing specificity, we identified cathepsin L to be the protease responsible for cleavage. Our evidence suggests that cleavage occurs in the late endosome or lysosome during endocytic recycling. Cathepsin L activity was 100-fold greater in Vero cells than in HeLa cells. In addition, cathepsin L was able to cleave the G protein in Vero cell-grown virions but not in HeLa cell-grown virions, suggesting a difference in G-protein posttranslational modification in the two cell lines. We identified by mutagenesis amino acids important for cleavage, and these amino acids included a likely cathepsin L cleavage site. Virus containing a modified, noncleavable G protein produced in Vero cells was 5-fold more infectious for HAE cells in culture, confirming our hypothesis and indicating the value of including such a mutation in future live attenuated RSV vaccines. IMPORTANCE Worldwide, RSV is the second leading infectious cause of infant death, but no vaccine is available. Experimental live attenuated RSV vaccines are grown in Vero cells, but during production the virion attachment (G) glycoprotein is cleaved. Virions containing a cleaved G protein

  5. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP10 regulates the endocytic recycling of CFTR in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel that plays an important role in regulating the volume of the lung airway surface liquid, and thereby mucociliary clearance and elimination of pathogens from the lung. In epithelial cells, cell surface CFTR abundance is determined in part by regulating both CFTR endocytosis from the apical plasma membrane and recycling back to the plasma membrane. We recently reported, using an activity-based chemical screen to identify active deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) in human airway epithelial cells, that Ubiquitin Specific Protease-10 (USP10) is located and active in the early endosomal compartment and regulates the deubiquitination of CFTR and thereby promotes its endocytic recycling. siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP10 increased the multi-ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of CFTR and decreased the endocytic recycling and the half-life of CFTR in the apical membrane, as well as CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Overexpression of wild-type USP10 reduced CFTR multi-ubiquitination and degradation, while overexpression of a dominant-negative USP10 promoted increased multi-ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of CFTR. In the current study, we show localization and activity of USP10 in the early endosomal compartment of primary bronchial epithelial cells, as well as an interaction between CFTR and USP10 in this compartment. These studies demonstrate a novel function for USP10 in facilitating the deubiquitination of CFTR in early endosomes, thereby enhancing the endocytic recycling and cell surface expression of CFTR.

  6. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. PMID:27354786

  7. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface.

  8. Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Airway Responsiveness in Individuals with Asthma

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effect of inhaled NO2 on the inherent responsiveness of the airways to challenge by bronchoconstricting agents have had mixed results. In general, existing meta-analyses show statistically significant effects of NO2 on the airway r...

  9. Inertial and interceptional deposition of fibers in a bifurcating airway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Asgharian, B; Anjilvel, S

    1996-01-01

    A computer model of a three-dimensional bifurcating airway was constructed in which the parent and daughter airways had different lengths but equal diameters. A diameter of 0.6 cm was chosen for the airways based on the third generation of Weibel's symmetric lung model. Different bifurcation angles of 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees were studied. Airflow fields in the airway were obtained by a finite-element method (FIDAP, Fluid Dynamics International, Evanston, IL) for Reynolds numbers of 500 and 1000, assuming uniform parent inlet velocities. The equations of motion for fiber transport in the airways were obtained, and deposition by the combined mechanisms of impaction and interception was incorporated. A computer code was developed that utilized the flow field data and calculated fiber transport in the airways using the equations of motion for fibers. Deposition efficiency was obtained by simulating a large number of fibers of various sizes. Fiber entering the daughter airways tended to orient themselves parallel to the flow. A site of enhanced deposition (or hot spot) was observed at the carina. The dominant parameter for the deposition was the fiber Stokes number. Flow Reynolds number and airway bifurcation angle were also found to affect the deposition.

  10. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  11. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  12. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  13. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  14. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  16. Dietary sodium intake, airway responsiveness, and cellular sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Tribe, R M; Barton, J R; Poston, L; Burney, P G

    1994-06-01

    Both epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggest that a high dietary sodium intake may increase airway responsiveness, but no adequate explanation exists of how changes in sodium intake might lead to increased responsiveness. This investigation was carried out to study dietary sodium intake and airway response to methacholine in relation to cellular sodium transport in 52 young men. Airway response to methacholine was associated with urinary sodium excretion when subjects were on normal sodium intake. Airway responsiveness in patients with mild asthma correlated with the furosemide-insensitive influx of sodium into peripheral leukocytes stimulated by autologous serum, but there was no relation between this influx and 24-h urinary sodium excretion. In a separate investigation, serum from subjects with increased airway responsiveness caused an increase in the sodium influx and sodium content of leukocytes from nonatopic subjects. The magnitude of the furosemide-insensitive, serum stimulated influx was related to the degree of airway responsiveness of the serum donor, as was the increase in intracellular sodium content. Neither was related to the 24-h urinary sodium excretion of the donor. Patients with airway hyperresponsiveness have an increased sodium influx into cells stimulated by a serum-borne factor. This is independent of the effect of added dietary sodium on airway responsiveness.

  17. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  18. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis.

  19. Airway obstruction among Latino poultry processing workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Chatterjee, Arjun B; Mora, Dana C; Arcury, Thomas A; Blocker, Jill N; Chen, Haiying; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Marín, Antonio J; Schulz, Mark R; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of airway obstruction among Latino poultry processing workers. Data were collected from 279 poultry processing workers and 222 other manual laborers via spirometry and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Participants employed in poultry processing reported the activities they perform at work. Participants with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) or FEV1/forced expiratory volume (FVC) below the lower limits of normal were categorized as having airway obstruction. Airway obstruction was identified in 13% of poultry processing workers and 12% of the comparison population. Among poultry processing workers, the highest prevalence of airway obstruction (21%) occurred among workers deboning chickens (prevalence ratio: 1.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 3.15). These findings identify variations in the prevalence of airway obstruction across categories of work activities.

  20. Airway obstruction among Latino poultry processing workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Chatterjee, Arjun B; Mora, Dana C; Arcury, Thomas A; Blocker, Jill N; Chen, Haiying; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Marín, Antonio J; Schulz, Mark R; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of airway obstruction among Latino poultry processing workers. Data were collected from 279 poultry processing workers and 222 other manual laborers via spirometry and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Participants employed in poultry processing reported the activities they perform at work. Participants with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) or FEV1/forced expiratory volume (FVC) below the lower limits of normal were categorized as having airway obstruction. Airway obstruction was identified in 13% of poultry processing workers and 12% of the comparison population. Among poultry processing workers, the highest prevalence of airway obstruction (21%) occurred among workers deboning chickens (prevalence ratio: 1.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 3.15). These findings identify variations in the prevalence of airway obstruction across categories of work activities. PMID:24965321

  1. Design of translactam HCMV protease inhibitors as potent antivirals.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Alan D

    2005-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important pathogen for which there is a significant unmet medical need. New HCMV antivirals, active against novel molecular targets, are undoubtedly needed as the currently available drugs ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet, which are all viral DNA inhibitors, suffer from limited effectiveness, mainly due to the development of drug resistance, poor bioavailability, and toxicity. One of the newer molecular targets that has been exploited in the search for better drug candidates is HCMV protease. Our deltaAla HCMV protease (wild type variant with the internal cleavage site deleted) was cloned and expressed in E. coli. This viral enzyme was used to develop HCMV protease assays to evaluate potential inhibitors. The chirally pure (SRS)-alpha-methyl pyrrolidine-5,5-trans-lactam template was synthesized, which together with the natural substrate requirements of HCMV protease and detailed SAR, was used to design potent and selective mechanism based inhibitors of HCMV protease. The mechanism of action of these inhibitors of HCMV protease was investigated by ESI/MS, and the X-ray crystal structure of the HCMV protease was used to refine our selective viral enzyme inhibitors to obtain plasma stable antivirals. A novel ELISA antiviral assay was developed which, together with a cytotoxicity assay, enabled us to discover anti-HCMV drug candidates equivalent in potency to ganciclovir that had good pharmacokinetics in the dog and good brain and ocular penetration in the guinea pig.

  2. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  3. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C.

  4. Pioneer oral streptococci produce immunoglobulin A1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M F; Evans, M; Fitzsimmons, S; Johnson, J; Pearce, C; Sheridan, M J; Wientzen, R; Bowden, G

    1994-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study of the relationship between bacterial colonization and the secretory immune response, 367 isolates of pioneer viridans streptococci collected from 40 breast- and bottle-fed neonates within the first month postpartum were tested for the production of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease and glycosidases. Fifty percent of the streptococci isolated produced IgA1 protease, including all isolates of Streptococcus oralis and S. sanguis, 60.7% of S. mitis biovar 1 isolates, and some isolates that could not be identified. Three cleavage patterns of alpha 1 heavy chains were observed. Six isolates of S. mitis biovar 1 that did not produce IgA1 protease attacked the alpha 1 chain. Incubation of IgA1 protease-negative S. mitis biovar 1 isolates with IgA1, either prior to or together with S. sanguis, rendered the IgA1 paraprotein resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 protease of S. sanguis. The ability of some pioneer streptococci in the human oral cavity to produce IgA1 protease and of others to modify the susceptibility of IgA1 to cleavage by IgA1 protease perhaps enhances their ability to survive in this habitat. Images PMID:8188337

  5. Salt stress represses production of extracellular proteases in Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Huang, C L; Feng, H

    2015-05-11

    Bacillus pumilus is able to secrete subtilisin-like prote-ases, one of which has been purified and characterized biochemically, demonstrating great potential for use in industrial applications. In the current study, the biosynthesis and transcription of extracellular pro-teases in B. pumilus (BA06) under salt stress were investigated using various methods, including a proteolytic assay, zymogram analysis, and real-time PCR. Our results showed that total extracellular proteolytic activity, both in fermentation broth and on milk-containing agar plates, was considerably repressed by salt in a dosage-dependent manner. As Bacillus species usually secret multiple extracellular proteases, a vari-ety of individual extracellular protease encoding genes were selected for real-time PCR analysis. It was shown that proteases encoded by the aprE and aprX genes were the major proteases in the fermentation broth in terms of their transcripts in B. pumilus. Further, transcription of aprE, aprX, and epr genes was indeed repressed by salt stress. In con-trast, transcription of other genes (e.g., vpr and wprA) was not repressed or significantly affected by the salt. Conclusively, salt stress represses total extracellular proteolytic activity in B. pumilus, which can largely be ascribed to suppression of the major protease-encoding genes (aprE, aprX) at the transcriptional level. In contrast, transcription of other pro-tease-encoding genes (e.g., vpr, wprA) was not repressed by salt stress.

  6. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:25135820

  7. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  8. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  9. Staphylococcal proteases aid in evasion of the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Bielecka, Ewa; Miller, Halie K; Kalinska, Magdalena; Dubin, Grzegorz; Garred, Peter; Shaw, Lindsey N; Blom, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component by aureolysin (Aur). We demonstrate here that four major extracellular proteases of S. aureus are potent complement inhibitors. Incubation of human serum with the cysteine proteases staphopain A and staphopain B, the serine protease V8 and the metalloproteinase Aur resulted in a drastic decrease in the hemolytic activity of serum, whereas two staphylococcal serine proteases D and E, had no effect. These four proteases were found to inhibit all pathways of complement due to the efficient degradation of several crucial components. Furthermore, S. aureus mutants lacking proteolytic enzymes were found to be more efficiently killed in human blood. Taken together, the major proteases of S. aureus appear to be important for pathogen-mediated evasion of the human complement system.

  10. Extracellular proteases modify cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, L K; Doyle, R J; Streips, U N

    1980-01-01

    The rate of turnover of peptidoglycan in exponentially growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis was observed to be sensitive to extracellular protease. In protease-deficient mutants the rates of cell wall turnover were greater than that of wild-type strain 168, whereas hyperprotease-producing strains exhibited decreased rates of peptidoglycan turnover. The rate of peptidogylcan turnover in a protease-deficient strain was decreased when the mutant was grown in the presence of a hyperprotease-producing strain. The addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, to cultures of hyperprotease-producing strains increased their rates of cell wall turnover. Isolated cell walls of all protease mutants contained autolysin levels equal to or greater than that of wild-type strain 168. The presence of filaments, or cells with incomplete septa, was observed in hyperprotease-producing strains or when a protease-deficient strain was grown in the presence of subtilisin. The results suggest that the turnover of cell walls in B. subtilis may be regulated by extracellular proteases. Images PMID:6102558

  11. Membrane Proteases and Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Resistance ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Aaron; Lee, Samuel; Jacoby, Kyle; Manoil, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We present genetic studies that help define the functional network underlying intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our analysis shows that proteolysis, particularly that controlled by the membrane protease FtsH, is a major determinant of resistance. First, we examined the consequences of inactivating genes controlled by AmgRS, a two-component regulator required for intrinsic tobramycin resistance. Three of the gene products account for resistance: a modulator of FtsH protease (YccA), a membrane protease (HtpX), and a membrane protein of unknown function (PA5528). Second, we screened mutations inactivating 66 predicted proteases and related functions. Insertions inactivating two FtsH protease accessory factors (HflK and HflC) and a cytoplasmic protease (HslUV) increased tobramycin sensitivity. Finally, we generated an ftsH deletion mutation. The mutation dramatically increased aminoglycoside sensitivity. Many of the functions whose inactivation increased sensitivity appeared to act independently, since multiple mutations led to additive or synergistic effects. Up to 500-fold increases in tobramycin sensitivity were observed. Most of the mutations also were highly pleiotropic, increasing sensitivity to a membrane protein hybrid, several classes of antibiotics, alkaline pH, NaCl, and other compounds. We propose that the network of proteases provides robust protection from aminoglycosides and other substances through the elimination of membrane-disruptive mistranslation products. PMID:21764915

  12. Fluorometric CCHFV OTU protease assay with potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Fatih; Aslan, Galip S

    2015-10-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a deadly virus that has been listed in the Category C as a potential bioterror agent. There are no specific therapies against CCHFV, which urges identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of CCHFV therapies. CCHFV OTU protease takes an important role in viral invasion through antagonizing NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of CCHFV OTU protease by small molecules warrants an exciting potential as antiviral therapeutics. Here we report the expression and purification of a C-His-tagged recombinant CCHFV OTU protease in E. coli BL21 (DE3) host strain. Activity of the refolded purified recombinant viral OTU protease has been validated with a UB-AMC fluorescent assay. In addition, we show a dose-dependent inhibition of the viral OTU protease by two small molecules. This study provides a reliable approach for recombinant expression and purification of CCHFV OTU protease, and demonstrates validation of OTU protease activity and its inhibition based on a UB-AMC florescent assay.

  13. Changes in airway permeability and responsiveness after exposure to ozone. [Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Delehunt, J.C.; Yerger, L.; Marchette, B.; Oliver, W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between airway responsiveness and the permeability of histamine through the airways in conscious sheep after exposure to ozone (O/sub 3/ was examined). Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring the change from baseline in mean pulmonary flow resistance following a controlled 2-min inhalation challenge with 1% histamine, containing 200 ..mu..Ci/ml of (/sup 3/H)histamine. The rate of appearance of the (/sup 3/H)histamine in the plasma during inhalation challenge was used to estimate airway permeability. To perturb the airways, conscious sheep were exposed to either 0.5 or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2 hr via an endotracheal tube. Airway responsiveness and airway permeability were measured prior to and 1 day after exposure. In six sheep exposed to 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/, increased airway responsiveness and airway permeability were obseved 1 day after exposure. Four of seven sheep exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ had enhanced airway responsiveness and airway permeability, while the remaining three sheep showed corresponding decreases in airway responsiveness and airway permeability. Since the O/sub 3/-induced directional changes in airway responsiveness paralleled the directional changes in airway permeability in both the positive and negative directions, it was concluded that changes in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine following exposure to O/sub 3/ may be related to concomitant changes in airway permeability to this agent.

  14. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  15. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1990-11-01

    During the current reporting period experimental studies of aerosol deposition in replicate NOPL airways have carried out. A replicate model of a 4 week old infant nasal passage was constructed from MR scans. The model completes the age range from newborn'' to 4 years, there now being one child model for 4 different ages. Deposition studies have been performed with unattached radon progeny aerosols in collaboration with ITRI, Albuquerque, NM and NRPB, Chilton, UK. Overall measurements have been performed in adult and child nasal airways indicating that the child nasal passage was slightly more efficient than the adult in removing 1 nm particles at corresponding flow rates. A similar weak dependence on flow rate was observed. Local deposition studies in an adult nasal model indicated predominant deposition in the anterior region during inspiratory flow, but measurable deposition was found throughout the model. The deposition pattern during expiration was reverse, greater deposition being observed in the posterior region. Local deposition studies of attached progeny aerosol size (100--200 nm) were performed in adult and child nasal models using technigas'' and a gamma scintillation camera. Similar to the unattached size, deposition occurred throughout the models, but was greater in the anterior region.

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    PubMed

    Garvey, John F; McNicholas, Walter T

    2010-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management. PMID:20308751

  17. [Anaesthesia for patients with obstructive airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Groeben, H; Keller, V; Silvanus, M T

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive lung diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive lung diseases have a high prevalence and are one of the four most frequent causes of death. Obstructive lung diseases can be significantly influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques and anesthetic agents. Basically, the severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity will determine the perioperative anesthetic risk. This risk has to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation and will give the rationale on which to decide for the adequate anaesthetic technique. In particular, airway instrumentation can cause severe reflex bronchoconstriction. The use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia can help to avoid airway irritation and leads to reduced postoperative complications. Prophylactic antiobstructive treatment, volatile anesthetics, propofol, opioids, and an adequate choice of muscle relaxants minimize the anesthetic risk, when general anesthesia is required In case, despite all precautions intra-operative bronchospasm occurs, deepening of anaesthesia, repeated administration of beta2-adrenergic agents and parasympatholytics, and a single systemic dose of corticosteroids represent the main treatment options. PMID:24749300

  18. [Validity of airway predictors in outpatient medicine].

    PubMed

    Mateos Rodríguez, A A; Navalpotro Pascual, J M; Pardillos Ferrer, L; Fernández Domínguez, J J; Barragán Chávez, J; Martínez González, E P

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of the airway sometimes determines the survival or death of the patient. To anticipate the presence of a difficult airway (DA) there are a number of indicators that are validated for hospitals: Mallampati, sternum and thyromental distance, interdental distance and Cormack grade. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of these indicators in the ambulatory setting and to know the incidence of DA. This data was collected from 324 intubations. Most patients were males (65.2%). The average age of the population was 63 years and no significant difference in age between DA and DA was found. A DA presence of 20.7% was objectified and an alternative device utilization of 21.4%. The thyromental distance was abnormal in 59% of patients and sternomentonal distance in 56.4% but neither showed an association with the presence of DA (p = 0.681 and p = 0.415 respectively). Interdental distance was less than 3 cm if presence is associated with DA (p = 0.005). The sensitivity and specificity of all measures are low. According to our series the sternum and thyromental distance are not useful in the ambulatory setting, but interdental distance is useful for predicting a DA.

  19. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes. PMID:27730195

  20. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  1. Mechanical properties of different airway stents.

    PubMed

    Ratnovsky, Anat; Regev, Noa; Wald, Shaily; Kramer, Mordechai; Naftali, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Airway stents improve pulmonary function and quality of life in patients suffering from airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare main types of stents (silicone, balloon-dilated metal, self-expanding metal, and covered self-expanding metal) in terms of their mechanical properties and the radial forces they exert on the trachea. Mechanical measurements were carried out using a force gauge and specially designed adaptors fabricated in our lab. Numerical simulations were performed for eight different stent geometries, inserted into trachea models. The results show a clear correlation between stent diameter (oversizing) and the levels of stress it exerts on the trachea. Compared with uncovered metal stents, metal stents that are covered with less stiff material exert significantly less stress on the trachea while still maintaining strong contact with it. The use of such stents may reduce formation of mucosa necrosis and fistulas while still preventing stent migration. Silicone stents produce the lowest levels of stress, which may be due to weak contact between the stent and the trachea and can explain their propensity for migration. Unexpectedly, stents made of the same materials exerted different stresses due to differences in their structure. Stenosis significantly increases stress levels in all stents.

  2. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  3. Fourteen cases of imposed upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, M P; McClaughlin, W; Jacobson, R R; Poets, C F; Southall, D P

    1992-01-01

    Imposed upper airway obstruction was diagnosed as the cause of recurrent and severe cyanotic episodes in 14 patients. Episodes started between 0.8 and 33 months of age (median 1.4) and occurred over a period of 0.8 to 20 months (median 3.5). Diagnosis was made by covert video surveillance, instituted after either (a) the observation that episodes began only in the presence of one person, or (b) characteristic findings on physiological recordings, lasting between 12 hours and three weeks, performed in hospital or at home. Surveillance was undertaken for between 15 minutes and 12 days (median 24 hours) and resulted in safety for the patient and psychiatric assessment of the parent: mother (n = 12), father (n = 1), and grandmother (n = 1). These revealed histories of sexual, physical, or emotional abuse (n = 11), self harm (n = 9), factitious illness (n = 7), eating disorder (n = 10), and previous involvement with a psychiatrist (n = 7). Management of the abusing parents is complex, but recognition of their psychosocial characteristics may allow earlier diagnosis. Imposed upper airway obstruction should be considered and excluded by physiological recordings in any infant or young child with recurrent cyanotic episodes. If physiological recordings fail to substantiate a natural cause for episodes, covert video surveillance may be essential to protect the child from further injury or death. PMID:1543373

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SMALL AIRWAYS AND ALVEOLI FROM CHILDHOOD TO ADULT LUNG MEASURED BY AEROSOL-DERIVED AIRWAY MORPHOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the human development of pulmonary airspaces is important for calculating the dose from exposure to inhaled materials as a function of age. We have measured, in vivo, the airspace caliber of the small airways and alveoli by aerosol-derived airway morphometry (ADAM) ...

  5. Early life exposure to bisphenol A investigated in mouse models of airway allergy, food allergy and oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Vinje, Nina Eriksen; Samuelsen, Mari; Andreassen, Monica; Groeng, Else-Carin; Bølling, Anette Kocbach; Becher, Rune; Lovik, Martinus; Bodin, Johanna

    2015-09-01

    The impact of early life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) through drinking water was investigated in mouse models of respiratory allergy, food allergy and oral tolerance. Balb/c mice were exposed to BPA (0, 10 or 100 μg/ml), and the offspring were intranasally exposed to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA). C3H/HeJ offspring were sensitized with the food allergen lupin by intragastric gavage, after exposure to BPA (0, 1, 10 or 100 μg/ml). In separate offspring, oral tolerance was induced by gavage of 5 mg lupin one week before entering the protocol for the food allergy induction. In the airway allergy model, BPA (100 μg/ml) caused increased eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and a trend of increased OVA-specific IgE levels. In the food allergy and tolerance models, BPA did not alter the clinical anaphylaxis or antibody responses, but induced alterations in splenocyte cytokines and decreased mouse mast cell protease (MMCP)-1 serum levels. In conclusion, early life exposure to BPA through drinking water modestly augmented allergic responses in a mouse model of airway allergy only at high doses, and not in mouse models for food allergy and tolerance. Thus, our data do not support that BPA promotes allergy development at exposure levels relevant for humans.

  6. Protease inhibition as new therapeutic strategy for GI diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The GI tract is the most exposed organ to proteases, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. For digestive purposes, the lumen of the upper GI tract contains large amounts of pancreatic proteases, but studies have also demonstrated increased proteolytic activity into mucosal tissues (both in the upper and lower GI tract), associated with pathological conditions. This review aims at outlining the evidences for dysregulated proteolytic homeostasis in GI diseases and the pathogenic mechanisms of increased proteolytic activity. The therapeutic potential of protease inhibition in GI diseases is discussed, with a particular focus on IBDs, functional GI disorders and colorectal cancer. PMID:27196587

  7. In vitro digestion with proteases producing MHC class II ligands.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Maschalidi, Sophia; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Proteases generate peptides that bind to MHC class II molecules to interact with a wide diversity of CD4(+) T cells. They are expressed in dedicated organelles: endosomes and lysosomes of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPCs) such as B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The identification of endosomal proteases which produce antigenic peptides is important, for example, for better vaccination and to prevent autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a panel of technics (in vitro digestion assays of protein with recombinant proteases or purified endosomes/lysosomes, T cell stimulation) to monitor the production of MHC class II ligands. PMID:23329510

  8. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1027 Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes carbohydrase and protease...

  9. Detection of Legume Protease Inhibitors by the Gel-X-ray Film Contact Print Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, Veerappa H.; Sudheendra, Kulkarni; Giri, Ashok P.

    2002-01-01

    Redgram (Cajanus cajan L.) extracts have been analyzed for the protease inhibitors using a new, sensitive, simple, and rapid method for detection of electrophoretically separated protease inhibitors. The detection involves equilibrating the gel successively in the protease assay buffer and protease solution, rinsing the gel in assay buffer, and…

  10. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts.

  11. The Tulip GT® airway versus the facemask and Guedel airway: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers in anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A; Robinson, P N; Hasan, M

    2016-03-01

    We performed a randomised, controlled, cross-over study of lung ventilation by Basic Life Support-trained providers using either the Tulip GT® airway or a facemask with a Guedel airway in 60 anaesthetised patients. Successful ventilation was achieved if the provider produced an end-tidal CO2 > 3.5 kPa and a tidal volume > 250 ml in two of the first three breaths, within 60 sec and within two attempts. Fifty-seven (95%) providers achieved successful ventilation using the Tulip GT compared with 35 (58%) using the facemask (p < 0.0001). Comparing the Tulip GT and facemask, the mean (SD) end-tidal CO2 was 5.0 (0.7) kPa vs 2.5 (1.5) kPa, tidal volume was 494 (175) ml vs 286 (186) ml and peak inspiratory pressure was 18.3 (3.4) cmH2 O vs 13.6 (7) cmH2 O respectively (all p < 0.0001). Forty-seven (78%) users favoured the Tulip GT airway. These results are similar to a previous manikin study using the same protocol, suggesting a close correlation between human and manikin studies for this airway device. We conclude that the Tulip GT should be considered as an adjunct to airway management both within and outside hospitals when ventilation is being undertaken by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers. PMID:26684684

  12. The Tulip GT® airway versus the facemask and Guedel airway: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers in anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A; Robinson, P N; Hasan, M

    2016-03-01

    We performed a randomised, controlled, cross-over study of lung ventilation by Basic Life Support-trained providers using either the Tulip GT® airway or a facemask with a Guedel airway in 60 anaesthetised patients. Successful ventilation was achieved if the provider produced an end-tidal CO2 > 3.5 kPa and a tidal volume > 250 ml in two of the first three breaths, within 60 sec and within two attempts. Fifty-seven (95%) providers achieved successful ventilation using the Tulip GT compared with 35 (58%) using the facemask (p < 0.0001). Comparing the Tulip GT and facemask, the mean (SD) end-tidal CO2 was 5.0 (0.7) kPa vs 2.5 (1.5) kPa, tidal volume was 494 (175) ml vs 286 (186) ml and peak inspiratory pressure was 18.3 (3.4) cmH2 O vs 13.6 (7) cmH2 O respectively (all p < 0.0001). Forty-seven (78%) users favoured the Tulip GT airway. These results are similar to a previous manikin study using the same protocol, suggesting a close correlation between human and manikin studies for this airway device. We conclude that the Tulip GT should be considered as an adjunct to airway management both within and outside hospitals when ventilation is being undertaken by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers.

  13. Heat resistant proteases produced in milk by psychrotrophic bacteria of dairy origin.

    PubMed

    Adams, D M; Barach, J T; Speck, M L

    1975-06-01

    Production of heat resistant proteases by psychrotrophs growing in milk, resistance of such proteases to ultrahigh temperature treatments and action of these enzymes on milk were studied. All of the psychrotrophs obtained from raw milk produced proteases that survived 149 C for 10s. Seventy to ninety percent of the raw milk samples contained psychrotrophs capable of producing heat resistant proteases. The protease chosen as a model was resistant to heat treatments at 110 to 150 C, and the inactivation parameters suggested that thermal destruction of heat resistant proteases would damage the milk severely. The casein content and pH of normal milk were suitable for protease action, and the protease was quite active at normal and elevated room temperatures. The protease rapidly spoiled sterile milk with the development of bitter flavor, clearing, or coagulation; and the susceptibility of sterile milk to protease increased during storage of the milk.

  14. Increased airways responsiveness in swine farmers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C; Hurst, T S; Cockcroft, D W; Dosman, J A

    1991-04-01

    A respiratory questionnaire, pulmonary function tests, and an examination of airways responsiveness were conducted on 20 swine farmers and 20 control subjects. The swine farmers represented almost the complete work force from 13 Hutterite colonies and had worked in confinement buildings with more than 2,000 swine (3,270 +/- 1,221 swine) for at least four hours (6.6 +/- 1.8 hours) per day for more than two years (10.5 +/- 7.5 years). The control subjects were randomly selected from outdoor city workers from the city of Saskatoon and were matched for gender, age (+/- 2 years), and smoking status. Eleven swine farmers (55 percent) had chronic cough, compared with three (15 percent) of the control subjects (p less than 0.01). Eight (40 percent) of the swine farmers had symptoms of wheezing, compared with three (15 percent) of the control subjects (p less than 0.05). The FEV1 was significantly lower in swine farmers (97.2 +/- 11.5 percent predicted) than in control subjects (106.0 +/- 12.0 percent of predicted) (p less than 0.05). Airways responsiveness was measured by methacholine challenge with doubling concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 256 mg/ml. The provocation concentrations resulting in a reduction of 10 percent (PC10) and 20 percent (PC20) in FEV1 were lower in swine farmers than in control subjects (PC10, 77.2 +/- 78.8 mg/ml vs 180.8 +/- 96.5 mg/ml; p less than 0.01; and PC20, 154.5 +/- 99.9 mg/ml vs 229.6 +/- 66.8 mg/ml; p less than 0.05). Twelve swine farmers (60 percent) had PC20 of less than 256 mg/ml, compared with three (15 percent) of the control workers (p less than 0.01). Fewer swine farmers demonstrated atopy as measured by skin prick tests than did control workers (21 percent vs 56 percent; p less than 0.05). These findings suggested that occupational exposure in swine confinement buildings is associated with mild increases of nonspecific, nonatopic airways responsiveness in swine farmers. PMID:2009799

  15. Expression and secretion of heterologous proteases by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed Central

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Wang, L; Kortt, A; Stewart, D; Radford, A

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding the basic protease of Dichelobacter nodosus (bprV) and the subtilisin of Bacillus subtilis (aprE) were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In each case, enzymatically active protein was detected in the supernatants of liquid cultures. While the secretion of subtilisin was directed by its own signal peptide, the natural signal peptide of the bprV basic protease did not facilitate secretion. A hybrid aprE-bprV gene in which the promoter and signal peptide coding sequences of subtilisin replaced those of bprV could be expressed, and basic protease was secreted by C. glutamicum. Expression of these proteases in C. glutamicum provides an opportunity to compare protein secretion from this gram-positive host with that from other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7747974

  16. Genotype dependent QSAR for HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Boutton, Carlo W; De Bondt, Hendrik L; De Jonge, Marc R

    2005-03-24

    The development of drug-resistant viruses limits the therapeutic success of anti-HIV therapies. Some of these genetic HIV-variants display complex mutational patterns in their pol gene that codes for protease and reverse transcriptase, the most investigated molecular targets for antiretroviral therapy. In this paper, we present a computational structure-based approach to predict the resistance of a HIV-1 protease strain to amprenavir by calculating the interaction energy of the drug with HIV-1 protease. By considering the interaction energy per residue, we can identify what residue mutations contribute to drug-resistance. This approach is presented here as a structure-based tool for the prediction of resistance of HIV-1 protease toward amprenavir, with a view to use the drug-protein interaction-energy pattern in a lead-optimization procedure for the discovery of new anti-HIV drugs. PMID:15771454

  17. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  18. Toxoplasma gondii aspartic protease 1 is not essential in tachyzoites.

    PubMed

    Polonais, Valerie; Shea, Michael; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Aspartic proteases are important virulence factors for pathogens and are recognized as attractive drug targets. Seven aspartic proteases (ASPs) have been identified in Toxoplasma gondii genome. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analyses regroup them into five monophyletic groups. Among them, TgASP1, a coccidian specific aspartic protease related to the food vacuole plasmepsins, is associated with the secretory pathway in non-dividing cells and relocalizes in close proximity to the nascent inner membrane complex (IMC) of daughter cells during replication. Despite a potential role for TgASP1 in IMC formation, the generation of a conventional knockout of the TgASP1 gene revealed that this protease is not required for T. gondii tachyzoite survival or for proper IMC biogenesis.

  19. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  20. Early airway infection, inflammation, and lung function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Carlin, J; Olinsky, A; Robertson, C; Grimwood, K

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the relation between lower airway infection and inflammation, respiratory symptoms, and lung function in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective study of children with CF aged younger than 3 years, diagnosed by a newborn screening programme. All were clinically stable and had testing as outpatients. Subjects underwent bronchial lavage (BL) and lung function testing by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique under general anaesthesia. BL fluid was cultured and analysed for neutrophil count, interleukin 8, and neutrophil elastase. Lung function was assessed by forced expiratory volume in 0.5, 0.75, and 1 second. Results: Thirty six children with CF were tested on 54 occasions. Lower airway infection shown by BL was associated with a 10% reduction in FEV0.5 compared with subjects without infection. No relation was identified between airway inflammation and lung function. Daily moist cough within the week before testing was reported on 20/54 occasions, but in only seven (35%) was infection detected. Independent of either infection status or airway inflammation, those with daily cough had lower lung function than those without respiratory symptoms at the time of BL (mean adjusted FEV0.5 195 ml and 236 ml respectively). Conclusions: In young children with CF, both respiratory symptoms and airway infection have independent, additive effects on lung function, unrelated to airway inflammation. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of airway obstruction in these young patients. PMID:12244003